Research Malacologist - The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) Foundation has an immediate opening, the Twila Bratcher Endowed Chair in Malacological Research, for an accomplished malacologist to conduct collection-based research on the Museum’s extensive collections of mollusks. The Museum has world-class malacological holdings and a rich history of collections-based research on marine invertebrates. Neontological holdings have a special emphasis on shelled mollusks of the eastern Pacific. The Museum also holds extensive collections of fossil mollusks, especially Cretaceous and Cenozoic gastropods and bivalves.

Postdoctoral fellow in biosystematics - phylogenetic diversity of bark and ambrosia beetles

At the Museum of Natural History, University Museum of Bergen, a position as postdoctoral research fellow is available for 2 years in the NFR funded project "A phylogenomic approach to understand the diversification of bark beetles and associated microbes" http://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/99273/postdoctoral-fellow-in-biosystematics-phylogenetic-diversity-of-bark-and-ambrosia-beetles. The fellow will be associated with the research group Phylogenetic Systematics and Evolution at the museum (http://www.uib.no/rg/pse).

NSF Program Announcement: GoLife solicitation goes live

A new NSF Division of Environmental Biology Program Solicitation titled, Genealogy of Life (GoLife), has been posted http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5129 with a deadline for proposals of March 26, 2014.

GoLife has two primary research objectives, resolving life’s phylogenetic history and integrating the genealogy of life with additional organismal biodiversity datasets. This solicitation builds upon the former Assembling the Tree of Life program, with new emphases on a complete and universal genealogy of all life’s lineages, broad training in phylogenetic comparative biology, and community development of open and expandable frameworks for data sharing.

Distributed European School of Taxonomy (DEST) courses

The Distributed European School of Taxonomy (DEST) provides two types of training courses at various European research facilities and universities. The training curriculum targets both modern disciplines such as molecular systematics and biodiversity informatics, as well as the more ‘traditional’ approaches such as morphology and descriptive taxonomy. Courses are open to participants from Europe and from outside of Europe.

The Modern Taxonomy programme 2013-2014 offers intensive theoretical courses in subjects as varied as nomenclature and DNA-barcoding.

phyloseminar #33: Daniel Ksepka, NESCent

Daniel Ksepka, NESCent
"Including Fossil Taxa in Phylogenies: Advances and Issues"
December 3, 2013

Program Officer for Advances in Digitization of Biological Collections (ADBC)

The Directorate for Biological Sciences at the National Science Foundation is advertising for a program officer position to manage the program “Advances in Digitization of Biological Collections (ADBC)”. For information about the scope of the program, visit the program web site.

The ADBC program began in 2010 as a result of the community strategic plan for a National Integrated Biocollections Alliance (NIBA). The program supports some of the NIBA goals, specifically increasing access to the wealth of information contained in vouchered biological specimens and associated metadata through digitization and providing a central resource for access to the data (iDigBio). For information about the NIBA strategic plan and implementation plan, see here where the links to community efforts are provided. For information about the goals and activities of iDigBio, see www.iDigBio.org.

Insect evolutionary genomics position at University of California, Riverside


The Department of Entomology invites applications for an Assistant Professor/Assistant Entomologist in the area of Insect Evolutionary Genomics at the University of California, Riverside. Position available July 1, 2014, tenure-track position, 9-month appointment, 25% IR/75% OR. Appointment level and salary commensurate with experience. Ph.D. degree in Entomology, Genetics, Genomics, Bioinformatics, Evolution, Ecology, or a related discipline required; postdoctoral research experience is preferred. The emphasis of research will be on the analysis of genome-scale data to reveal insect evolutionary relationships and identify specific pathways, genes, and mutations driving insect diversification and ecological adaptation. Candidates with experience using population genomic, systems biology, and/or phylogenomic approaches in non-model insects are strongly encouraged to apply. Discovery and development of novel genetic targets for pestiferous insect control in support of the mission of the Agricultural Experiment Station (http://cnas.ucr.edu/about/anr/) are encouraged. Teaching responsibilities include mentoring of graduate students, participation in undergraduate instruction, as well as a graduate course taught in an area of interest. Interactions with the other research groups in interdepartmental programs are encouraged. Applicants should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of research interests, teaching interests and philosophy, up to three select reprints of publications or manuscripts in press, and arrange for four confidential letters of recommendation to be sent to: https://aprecruit.ucr.edu/apply/JPF00058.

Questions regarding this position should be directed to Professor J. Daniel Hare, Chair of the Insect Evolutionary Genomics Search Committee at daniel.hare@ucr.edu. Review of applications will begin January 3, 2014, but this position will remain open until filled. Information about the Entomology Department and an expanded description can be found on the website: http://www.entomology.ucr.edu.

Mathematical and Computational Evolutionary Biology 2014

The 2014 meeting will take place at Hameau de l'Etoile, in the Montpellier region (France), June 15-19. This year a special focus will be given to the applications of mathematical and computational evolutionary biology to the study of biodiversity in all its aspects: from its conservation to its ecology and evolution, from the diversity within a genome, to that between individuals within a species and that between species in an ecosystem. The number of attendees will be limited (~60), so as to favor small group interaction. See http://www.lirmm.fr/mceb2014/ for full details.

How can SSB better serve the systematics community?

Hello SSB members,
At the 2013 SSB council meeting, we had a lengthy discussion about how well the society and the journal are serving our members. This included topics such as increasing open access publication, better supporting empirical studies and initiating more activities beyond publishing a journal.

We would like to hear your opinions on these issues. Please take 10-15 minutes to complete the following survey about the role of the Systematic Biology journal and the Society of Systematic Biologists:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1xHtdp0Ay_XL9-nLRWpxnszLuFQUyPyfUcq8Jb1m4QSU/viewform

Paleovirology: Insights from the genomic fossil record

Royal Society Publishing has just published Paleovirology: Insights from the genomic fossil record, compiled and edited by Aris Katzourakis.
This content can be accessed at http://bit.ly/ZOA8Ib A print version is also available at the special price of £35.00. You can order online via the above web page (enter special code TB 1626 when prompted) or, alternatively, you can contact debbie.vaughan@royalsociety.org