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June 6, 2014

01:15
*Master Thesis Projects in Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology - Research Group Insect Symbiosis * A position is available from July 2014 in Jena, Germany, to carry out either of the projects outlined below. Beetles in the subfamily Lagriinae live in association to bacteria of the genus /Burkholderia/, a group exhibiting extraordinary ecological and metabolic versatility. The transmission of the symbiotic bacteria from mother to offspring is facilitated by structures, particularly in the larval stage, that are considered unique in terms of location and development. *Project 1: Horizontal transmission of bacterial symbionts in lagriid beetles* Despite a described vertical transmission route, the possibility remains that lagriid beetles occasionally acquire /Burkholderia/ from the environment or from related host species (horizontal transmission), having important implications for the ecology and evolutionary trajectory of the association. The main purpose of the project is to test whether horizontal transmission of bacterial symbionts can occur across two different lagriid species and to describe potential exchange routes, as well as the possibility of infection by multiple bacterial strains. In order to address these questions, the student will work on manipulative experiments involving bacterial culture, insect collection and lab rearing, DNA extraction, PCR, phylogenetic analyses and Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We are looking for a highly motivated candidate with a strong background in the areas of ecology, evolutionary biology, entomology or microbiology, to carry out her/his M.Sc. thesis project or an internship for a period of 4-6 months. *Project 2: Genomics of /Burkholderia/ symbionts of lagriid beetles * The symbiotic bacteria in the two lagriid hosts investigated until now belong to the species /Burkholderia gladioli/, which is known to be pathogenic on certain plants and fungi, as well as an opportunistic human pathogen. The lagriid-associated strains possess a genome of comparable size lacking evident signs of gene erosion, contrary to other vertically transmitted bacterial symbionts. A M.Sc. thesis project is available to carry out a comparative genomic analysis of the symbiotic strains and closest relatives with a different life style in order to identify genomic traits and/or specific genes that are potentially relevant for the symbiosis. The M.Sc. student should have experience and/or a solid theoretical knowledge in bioinformatics, genome analysis and biochemistry, as well as a strong interest in evolutionary biology and the ecology of symbiotic interactions. Background in transcriptome analyses is also advantageous. Please send your applications (including previous research experience and CV) to: Laura Flrez/Dr. Martin Kaltenpoth Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Research Group Insect Symbiosis Hans-Knll-Strae 8, 07745 Jena - Germany E-mail: lflorez [at] ice.mpg.de or mkaltenpoth [at] ice.mpg.de Laura Flrez Insect Symbiosis Research Group Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Hans Knoell Str. 8 07745 Jena, Germany Tel: +49 (0)3641 57 1804 Fax: +49 (0)3641 57 1810 Laura Florez via Gmail
00:29

I would like to bring to your attention to a PhD position in evolutionary biology available at the Department of Biology at the University of Hamburg. ***** Universitt Hamburg invites applications for a Research Associate commencing on August 1st 2014 (earliest starting date). The position is part time (19.5 hours per week) and is remunerated at the 13 TV-L salary level. The short-term, three-year contract terminates on July 31st 2017 or at a later date, depending on the starting date.* The short-term nature of this contract is based upon 2 of the Academic Short-term Contract Act (WissZeitVG). The University aims to increase the number of women in research and teaching and explicitly encourages women to apply. Equally qualified female applicants will receive preference in accordance with Hamburg’s Higher Education Act (HmbHG). Tasks: Duties primarily include research and a moderate amount of teaching. The successful candidate will also have the opportunity to pursue further academic qualifications, in particular a doctoral dissertation, in accordance with 28 (1) sentence 3 of Hamburg’s Higher Education Act (HmbHG). Area(s) of responsibility: The group focus on global biodiversity and evolutionary genomics of freshwater zooplankton (Daphnia), using next-generation sequencing data. Bioinformatics tools are used to detect local adaptation patterns in natural populations and experimental cultures will allow assessing the phenotype/genotype correlation. The candidate will be analysing RNAseq data and plan/conduct follow-up studies on candidate genes, in collaboration with another graduate student (focusing on the experimental part). The Next Gen data analysis includes (but is not limited to) differential expression analysis, SNP calling and eQTL analysis. Furthermore, a comparative approach will be used, since the genomes and transcriptomes of other Daphnia species are available. The candidate is encouraged to develop specific projects of her or his own choice as long as they include mining this data and are conducted in collaboration with other members of the group. Requirements: A university degree in a relevant field: Biology, Bioinformatics The candidate should: - be familiar with bioinformatics methods, through experience gained while doing the master project, for example. - have a strong background in evolutionary biology / molecular ecology. In addition, knowledge of population genetics will be advantageous. - be familiar with at least one of these scripting languages: python, perl, C++, R - be creative, critical and have conceptual thinking skills. - have good communication and writing abilities in English. - be able to work both independently and as part of a multidisciplinary team. The working language of the group is English, willingness to learn German is necessary to allow a better integration/communication in the institute and in daily life. Severely disabled applicants will receive preference over equally qualified non-disabled applicants. Applications should include a letter of application, a detailed curriculum vitae, an abstract of your master thesis, and copies of degree certificate(s), as well as the names of two scientific referees. These documents should be submitted as a single pdf-file in the given order. The deadline for applications is June 30th 2014. Please send applications to: Mathilde Cordellier via the ‘Apply’ button. For further information, please contact Mathilde Cordellier on 040-428 38 3933 or mathilde.cordellier@uni-hamburg.de. Alternatively, please consult our website http://bit.ly/1xg1jeS. * In accordance with 27, 28 of Hamburg’s Higher Education Act (HmbHG). cordellier@biologie.uni-muenchen.de via Gmail

June 5, 2014

23:44
CALL for NEW RESEARCH GROUP LEADERS, LYON, FRANCE Deadline Friday 4th of July 2014 The Institut de Gnomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon (IGFL) currently hosts 13 research groups (approx. 110 personnel). The Institute has recently moved to a newly commissioned building, within the multidisciplinary campus of Lyon-Gerland, and, in line with its expansion, is hiring additional groups. Research at the IGFL focuses on the role of the genome in animal physiology, developmental biology and evolution. In addition, the IGFL is actively seeking to strengthen its research in bioinformatics and modelling at the genomic scale. IGFL groups have full access to state-of-the-art core services, including high throughput sequencing technologies, X-Ray microtomography, 2D and 3D imaging and morphometrics, transgenic animal facilities (mouse, fish, drosophila, etc), bioinformatics, mass spectrometry, proteomics, FACS sorting, histology and electron microscopy. The IGFL is searching for outstanding young scientists wishing to start their own team as well as established group leaders interested in joining the IGFL. Group leaders with a strong interest in animal-based research falling within the scientific mission of the Institute - namely physiology and physiopathology, developmental biology and evolutionary sciences - may apply to this call. Applications (in English) should include curriculum vitae, a short description of achievements and records of self-financing, a proposed research program of 5 to 10(max) pages and contact details for 3 professional references. The deadline for applications is July 4th 2014. Please send as a single PDF named LASTNAME_IGFL_2014.pdf to direction.igfl@ens-lyon.fr. Enquiries should also be directed to this address. Interviews of shortlisted candidates will be held in Lyon, France in mid October. http://bit.ly/1kEWlCW The IGFL is run by the Ecole normale suprieure de Lyon, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universit Lyon 1 and the Institut National de Recherche Agronomique. fred via Gmail
02:29

—_000_8C60CFA2CFEB404696A3B8A4C0EDBDCFillinoisedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Post-doctoral Position in physiological genomics and high-altitude adaptation A postdoctoral position is available in the Cheviron Lab at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (http://bit.ly/1f5N7Zb) as part of an NSF-funded, international collaboration to study the mechanistic underpinnings of hypoxia adaptation and thermogenic performance in high-altitude deer mice [1,2,3,4]. The ideal candidate will have a strong background in evolutionary physiology or evolutionary genetics, experience with bioinformatic and functional genomic analysis, and experience with computational analysis of RNA-seq and/or metabolomic data. Programming proficiency in perl, python or other scripting languages and/or regulatory network analysis will be considered a plus. The position will involve close collaboration with Graham Scott and Grant McClelland at McMaster University, Amina Qutub at Rice University, and Jay Storz at the University of Nebraska. It will also provide opportunities for fieldwork in some beautiful places, like the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and White Mountains of eastern California. The start date is flexible, but preferably before January 2015, and the position is full-time for two years subject to satisfactory performance in the first year. Further extension may be available subject to funding availability and performance. Salary will be commensurate with experience and skills, and a generous benefits package will be offered. Interested applicants should send a CV, a brief description of research interests and experience, and contact information for three references to Zac Cheviron (cheviron@illinois.edu). To receive full consideration, please send all application materials before June 30, 2014. I will also be attending the Evolution meeting in Raleigh NC this month, and would happy to meet with potential candidates there. 1. Cheviron et al. (2012) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109:8635-8640; 2. Cheviron et al. (2013) J Exp. Biol. 216:1160-1166; 3. Cheviron et al. (2014) Evolution. 68:48-62; 4. Storz et al. (2010) J Exp Biol. 213:4125-4136. —_000_8C60CFA2CFEB404696A3B8A4C0EDBDCFillinoisedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Post-doctoral Position in physiological genomics and high-altitude adaptation

A postdoctoral position is available in the Cheviron Lab at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (http://bit.ly/1f5N7Zb) as part of an NSF-funded, international collaboration to study the mechanistic underpinnings of hypoxia adaptation and thermogenic performance in high-altitude deer mice [1,2,3,4]. The ideal candidate will have a strong background in evolutionary physiology or evolutionary genetics, experience with bioinformatic and functional genomic analysis, and experience with computational analysis of RNA-seq and/or metabolomic data. Programming proficiency in perl, python or other scripting languages and/or regulatory network analysis will be considered a plus. The position will involve close collaboration with Graham Scott and Grant McClelland at McMaster University, Amina Qutub at Rice University, and Jay Storz at the University of Nebraska. It will also provide opportunities for fieldwork in some beautiful places, like the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and White Mountains of eastern California.

The start date is flexible, but preferably before January 2015, and the position is full-time for two years subject to satisfactory performance in the first year. Further extension may be available subject to funding availability and performance. Salary will be commensurate with experience and skills, and a generous benefits package will be offered. Interested applicants should send a CV, a brief description of research interests and experience, and contact information for three references to Zac Cheviron (cheviron@illinois.edu).

To receive full consideration, please send all application materials before June 30, 2014. I will also be attending the Evolution meeting in Raleigh NC this month, and would happy to meet with potential candidates there.   

1. Cheviron et al. (2012) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109:8635-8640; 2. Cheviron et al. (2013) J Exp. Biol. 216:1160-1166; 3. Cheviron et al. (2014) Evolution. 68:48-62; 4. Storz et al. (2010) J Exp Biol. 213:4125-4136.

—_000_8C60CFA2CFEB404696A3B8A4C0EDBDCFillinoisedu via Gmail
01:54
—_000_D99C4CD08C1D435CBF7160F8805C0661ugaedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Job Description can be found here: http://bit.ly/1oYcSF3 POSITION: This is a 12-month tenure track faculty position with a 80% research and 20% teaching appointment in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, The University of Georgia. The position is home based at the University of Georgia Athens campus. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: The person that fills this position will be responsible for developing an internationally recognized program in one or more of the following: genetics based on high-dimensional data analysis, statistical genomics, genome-wide analysis, gene-environment interactions, and/or epigenetics of crop plants. Development of an independent research program that focuses on the application of quantitative/statistical genomics to crop plants is expected. UGA offers a vibrant research environment with potential collaborations with faculty in crop genetics (http://bit.ly/1oYcSF7), plant sciences (http://bit.ly/1i4yOH2) and bioinformatics (http://iob.uga.edu). The successful candidate is expected to conduct research that will result in securing extramural funding and publication of manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals. Teaching responsibilities will include instructio n of graduate and/or undergraduate courses and training of graduate students in the areas of quantitative genomics, statistical genetics or plant breeding, as determined by the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences and the Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics and assigned by the Department Head. BASIC QUALIFICATIONS: A Ph.D. in plant breeding, genetics, quantitative genetics or genomics, or a closely related field is required. Candidates should have demonstrated skills in verbal and written communication, interpersonal relationships, statistical computational systems, and an ability to workwell with students and colleagues. Application: Electronically send application package to: Scott Jackson atsjackson@uga.edu>. Applicants must submit the following documentation: a letter of application, curriculum vita, and names and addresses of four professional references, and any other information that reflects on professional qualifications. To assure full consideration, applications must be received by 31 August 2014. Anticipated start date is Spring 2015. The University of Georgia is anAffirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applicants regardless of gender or ethnic background. Effective January 1, 2008, the Board of Regents has enacted a “background check” policy for new hires in thesystem as a condition of employment. This policy can be found at: http://bit.ly/1i4yQ1K. Upon offer of employment, candidate must complete the “Consent for a Background Investigation” form. —_000_D99C4CD08C1D435CBF7160F8805C0661ugaedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Job Description can be found here: http://bit.ly/1oYcQNG
2/assistant-professor-in-quantitative-genomics/


POSITION: This is a 12-month tenure track faculty position with a 80% resea=
rch and 20% teaching appointment in the Department of Crop and Soil Science=
s, The University of Georgia. The position is home based at the University =
of Georgia Athens campus.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: The person that fills this position will be re=
sponsible for developing an internationally recognized program in one or mo=
re of the following: genetics based on high-dimensional data analysis, stat=
istical genomics, genome-wide analysis, gene-environment interactions, and/=
or epigenetics of crop plants. Development of an independent research progr=
am that focuses on the application of quantitative/statistical genomics to =
crop plants is expected. UGA offers a vibrant research environment with po=
tential collaborations with faculty in crop genetics (http://www.plantbreed=3D
ing.uga.edu), plant sciences (http://pla=
ntcenter.uga.edu) and bioinformatics (http://iob.uga.edu). The successful c=
andidate is expected to conduct research that will result in securing extra=
mural funding and publication of manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals. Te=
aching responsibilities will include instruction of graduate and/or undergr=
aduate courses and training of graduate students in the areas of quantitati=
ve genomics, statistical genetics or plant breeding, as determined by the D=
epartment of Crop and Soil Sciences and the Institute for Plant Breeding, G=
enetics and Genomics and assigned by the Department Head.

BASIC QUALIFICATIONS: A Ph.D. in plant breeding, genetics, quantitative gen=
etics or genomics, or a closely related field is required. Candidates shoul=
d have demonstrated skills in verbal and written communication, interperson=
al relationships, statistical computational systems, and an ability to work=
well with students and colleagues.

Application: Electronically send application package to: Scott Jackson atsj=
ackson@uga.edu. Applicants must submit the followi=
ng documentation: a letter of application, curriculum vita, and names and a=
ddresses of four professional references, and any other information that re=
flects on professional qualifications.

To assure full consideration, applications must be received by 31 August 20=
14. Anticipated start date is Spring 2015. The University of Georgia is an=
Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applicants r=
egardless of gender or ethnic background. Effective January 1, 2008, the Bo=
ard of Regents has enacted a “background check” policy for new hires in the=
system as a condition of employment. This policy can be found at: http://=
http://bit.ly/1i4yQ1K. Upon offer =
of employment, candidate must complete the “Consent for a Background Invest=
igation” form.
—_000_D99C4CD08C1D435CBF7160F8805C0661ugaedu via Gmail
01:54

WORKSHOP SOCIAL EVOLUTION: MERITS AND LIMITATIONS OF INCLUSIVE FITNESS THEORY WHEN: 13-15 July 2014 WHERE: Arolla (Swiss Alps) DESCRIPTION: Inclusive fitness theory is generally assumed to sufficiently explain the evolution of social behaviour. However, empirical evidence is accumulating that other evolutionary concepts need to be involved to explain cooperation and social structure in a wide range of taxa. This includes the archetypical examples of altruism, like the reproductive division of labour in eusocial hymenoptera and the cooperative breeding groups observed in many vertebrates. Recent evidence from insects and vertebrates reveals that high levels of relatedness can even reduce rather than further cooperation and altruism. The aim of this workshop is to combine pertinent evolutionary theoreticians and empiricists to discuss complementary evolutionary mechanisms to inclusive fitness theory. This is a topic of great interest to students and biologists in general, because there is a growing awareness that explanations based on inclusive fitness, which have dominated the theoretical and empirical literature for the past half century, cannot account for many examples of apparently altruistic behaviour observed in nature. INFO & REGISTARTION: http://bit.ly/1oYcSoN SPEAKERS: Prof. Rufus Johnstone, University of Cambridge (UK) Prof. Laurent Lehmann, University of Lausanne (CH) Dr Christina Riehl, Harvard University (US) Prof. Hanna Kokko, Australian National University (AU) Dr Erol Akcay, University of Pennsylvania (US) Dr Elli Leadbeater, University of London (UK) via Gmail

01:06
The Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research seeks a path-breaking recent Ph.D. eager to develop a highly innovative Max Planck Research Group at a frontier of mathematical, biological, historical, social, economic or qualitative demography. The successful candidate will be given ample resources to establish and direct an independent research program. For this purpose, he or she will be guaranteed funding to recruit and lead a team of researchers, for operating expenses, scientific collaborators, and technical and secretarial support. The successful candidate will start a five-year contract (with the possibility of a prolongation after positive evaluation) between October and December 2014. The payment corresponds to the W2 level on the German university scale, equivalent to an Assistant or Associate Professor. Applicants should have completed a doctoral degree in the past decade. They should have an outstanding record - or show exceptional promise - as demographic scholars. The Max Planck Society is committed to employing more handicapped individuals and to increasing the share of women in areas where they are under-represented, and therefore expressly encourages applications from such qualified individuals. The applicant should submit a three to five page description of a research program, along with a work plan, a complete CV, and three personal references. Please send applications by July 25, 2014 to appl-mprg@demogr.mpg.de Thank you very much. Best regards, Antje Antje Gosselck Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Konrad-Zuse-Str. 1 D-18057 Rostock Germany http://bit.ly/1nXvr8p mailto:gosselck@demogr.mpg.de Tel. +49 (0) 381 / 2081 108 Fax +49 (0) 381 / 2081 408 “Gosselck, Antje” via Gmail
00:44
LAST WEEK TO REGISTER! The Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate is now accepting applications for our annual PHD course entitled “Modelling species distributions under climate change”, to be held at the University of Copenhagen August 25-29. Read more about it here, including information on how to apply: http://bit.ly/1iqvQvz Please note that this course is available to PhD students ONLY, and applications received outside of the application period will not be considered; this year’s deadline is June 6. Applications and other inquiries should be directed to David Nogus-Bravo: dnogues@snm.ku.dk. Katharine Ann Marske, PhD Assistant Professor Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate Natural History Museum of Denmark University of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 15 DK-2100 Copenhagen Denmark kamarske@snm.ku.dk via Gmail
00:44

NIH-funded Postdoctoral Opportunity in Genomics A highly motivated Research Associate is sought for multiple genomic research projects in honey bees. The primary responsibility will lie in the analysis of RNA-Seq and Methyl-Seq data sets. In addition, the candidate may take the lead on a comparative genomic project within the genus Apis and realize related research ideas. Therefore, programming and related bioinformatic skills, analytical thinking, team work, and communication skills are essential. An interest in social insect biology and evolution is preferred. Salary will be commensurate with experience. PhD desirable, but not required. The position will be in the Department of Biology at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro and is initially funded for one year. Review of applications will begin immediately until position is filled. To apply for this position, please visit UNCG’s JobSearch website http://bit.ly/1p8Hd1x to complete the application process for position #999620 ” Research Associate. A CV and a personal statement, including contact information for two professional references, are required. Please contact Dr. Olav Rueppell for additional details. EEO/AA via Gmail

00:09
Dear colleague, Science and conservation at Kew Gardens (http://www.kew.org/) is under threat due to government cuts - £5M deficit will lead to a loss of over 120 posts (see http://bbc.in/1tKiMr9 )! Please help to prevent this, please sign this e-petition: http://bit.ly/save_kew , and please, please forward this message to your colleagues and friends. Every single signature is VERY important!” Dr Gerhard PRENNER Senior Researcher in Morphology/Anatomy Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Jodrell Laboratory Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3DS UK * ++44(0)20 8332 5316 * g.prenner at kew.org http://bit.ly/1l7APXi Gerhard Prenner via Gmail

June 4, 2014

23:17

This is a MIME message. If you are reading this text, you may want to consider changing to a mail reader or gateway that understands how to properly handle MIME multipart messages. —=__PartEEDC3F51.0__Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary=”=__PartEEDC3F51.1__=” —=__PartEEDC3F51.1__Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Graduate Position at Laurentian University (ON) and Keyano College (AB) Evolutionary Ecology of Amphibian Emerging Infectious Diseases We are seeking one MSc/PhD student to join our lab at Laurentian University http://bit.ly/1kvMzEl and the Centre for Evolutionary Ecology and Ethical Conservation (http://bit.ly/T1ghWz) in the area of Emergent Infectious Diseases in Amphibians (Ranavirus & Chytrid fungus). These two diseases are causing mass die-offs in amphibian populations but the evolution, ecology, dynamics and effects of the pathogens are still largely unknown. In particular, 2 questions are of interest: -what are the temporal patterns associated with this host-pathogen(s) system? -what role does a community of host species play in the maintenance of the pathogen(s)? The student will work in this context by combining fieldwork and experiments depending on his/her interests. Good aptitude for fieldwork, molecular ecology skills and some herpetological knowledge are expected as well as good communication skills. Starting date: Candidates are expected to commence their studies in January 2015. Funding: Full funding of approximately $17,000/year is guaranteed for 2 years through a combination of TAships and RAships. Additional scholarships will be available by competition. How to apply: Interested students should contact us via email, including a cover letter describing background and interests (including specific interests in our lab), cv, transcripts (unofficial is fine). Dr. David Lesbarrères (dlesbarreres@laurentian.ca) Dr. Danna Schock (danna.schock@keyano.ca) “It takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place.” Dr. David Lesbarrères, Associate Professor Director, School of Graduate Studies Genetic & Ecology of Amphibians Research Group (GEARG) Department of Biology - Laurentian University, http://bit.ly/1kvMzEl Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada phone: (705)675-1151 ext. 3232/2275 - Fax: (705)671-3840 —=__PartEEDC3F51.1__Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Description: HTML

Graduate Position at Laurentian University (ON) and Keyano College (AB) Evolutionary Ecology of Amphibian Emerging Infectious DiseasesWe are seeking one MSc/PhD student to join our lab at Laurentian University http://bit.ly/1kvMzEl and the Centre for Evolutionary Ecology and Ethical Conservation (http://bit.ly/T1ghWz) in the area of Emergent Infectious Diseases in Amphibians (Ranavirus & Chytrid fungus). These two diseases are causing mass die-offs in amphibian populations but the evolution, ecology, dynamics and effects of the pathogens are still largely unknown. In par ticular, 2 questions are of interest:-what are the temporal patterns associated with this host-pathogen(s) system?-what role does a community of host species play in the maintenance of the pathogen(s)?The student will work in this context by combining fieldwork and experiments depending on his/her interests. Good aptitude for fieldwork, molecular ecology skills and some herpetological knowledge are expected as well as good communication skills.Starting date:Candidates are expected to commence their studies in January 2015.Funding:Full funding of approximately $17,000/year is guaranteed for 2 years through a combination of TAships and RAships. Additional scholarships will be available by competition. How to apply:Interested students should contact us via email, including a cover letter describing background and interests (including specific interests in our lab), cv, transcripts (unofficial is fine).Dr. David Lesbarrères (dlesbarreres@laurentian.ca)Dr. Danna Schock (danna.schock@keyano.ca)"It takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place." Dr. David Lesbarrères, Associate Pr ofessor Director, School of Graduate StudiesGenetic & Ecology of Amphibians Research Group (GEARG)Department of Biology - Laurentian University, http://bit.ly/1kvMzElRamsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canadaphone: (705)675-1151 ext. 3232/2275 - Fax: (705)671-3840 —=__PartEEDC3F51.1__ via Gmail
02:12
—e89a8ff1ccae076cbb04faf6db10 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”UTF-8” The Blois Paleoecology Lab at UC Merced is recruiting a postdoc to help develop ancient DNA and phylogenetics projects focusing on understanding the dynamic population genetic changes that happened within mammals (particularly small mammals) through the late Quaternary. The postdoc will be responsible for developing original research projects related to the interests and focus of the lab, in addition to contributing to the development and maintenance of the molecular lab. Ongoing projects in the lab use species distribution modeling, community modeling, and paleoecological tools to understand the ecological and evolutionary forces shaping populations, species, and communities across time and space, particularly focusing on fossil small mammal and pollen communities during the late Quaternary. Applications will be reviewed starting June 30th, but the position is open until filled. Please contact Dr. Jessica Blois (*jblois@ucmerced.edu *) for additional information. For more information about the lab, full position information and to apply to the position, please visit the lab website (*www.jessicablois.com *). Best, Jessica via Gmail
01:42
POST-DOCTORAL POSITION in Molecular Evolution University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE A post-doctoral position is available in the Storz lab at the University of Nebraska. This is one of two possible positions associated with an NIH-funded project that is designed to address questions about the roles of mutational pleiotropy and epistasis in shaping trajectories of protein evolution. The project involves the use of a protein-engineering approach to explore the mutational landscape of hemoglobin function in experimentally defined regions of protein sequence space. The work integrates evolutionary analyses of sequence variation with functional analyses of native and recombinant hemoglobins from a diverse range of animal taxa. The post-doc’s work would involve ancestral sequence reconstructions, phylogenetic analyses, and comparative genomics, and there is also the opportunity to get involved in experimental aspects of the project involving protein biochemistry. The ideal candidate would have expertise in molecular evolution, bioinformatics, and genomics and an enthusiasm for integrative evolutionary biology. For more information about research in the lab, see: http://bit.ly/1aSXB05 If interested, please send a CV and contact information for a few references. The position could start as early as summer 2014, but the start-date is flexible. Funding is potentially available for 3+ years. Salary will be determined by the NIH pay scale and will include full benefits. Please feel free to contact me (jstorz2@unl.edu) with any questions. Lincoln is a great midwestern college town with high quality of life and miles of bike trails. The School of Biological Sciences at the University of Nebraska has a great core group of evolutionary biologists. I will be attending the SMBE meeting in Puerto Rico (8-12 June) and the Society for Experimental Biology meeting in Manchester, UK (1-5 July), and I would be happy to meet with prospective candidates in person. Jay Storz Jay F. Storz Susan J. Rosowski Associate Professor of Biology School of Biological Sciences University of Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68588 Phone: 402/472-1114 E-mail: jstorz2@unl.edu http://bit.ly/1aSXB05 Jay Storz via Gmail
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LECTURER IN ENTOMOLOGY/PHYLOGENETIC METHODS Academic Year Appointment (9 month) September 1, 2014 - May 2016 Department of Entomology College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) Cornell University For more than 125 years, our faculty members, staff and students have been working to advance the field of insect biology and apply that knowledge to solve problems and improve lives. As one of the top-ranked entomology programs in the country, our work spans the globe and impacts human lives on many levels, influencing a broad range of disciplines including human and veterinary medicine, farming, biodiversity and genomics. The Department of Entomology’s mission is threefold: To pursue studies to understand basic and applied aspects of insect biology; to provide a robust and modern curriculum as part of preeminent undergraduate and graduate programs; and to inform and educate the public about the issues related to insects and other arthropods. The Department is currently searching for a Lecturer to develop a new course in “Model-based phylogenetic methods and hypothesis testing” to be offered in Spring semester 2015 and 2016. Course description: Model-based Phylogenetic Methods and and Hypothesis Testing (4000 level; Spring semester; 4 credits) - This course would provide an advanced undergraduate/graduate level introduction to the diverse methods of model-based phylogenetic analysis including maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. The course would focus heavily on DNA sequence data and issues associated with reconstructing phylogenetic trees from multiple gene loci. In addition, the course would cover how phylogenies can be used in the context of evolutionary hypothesis testing (including fossil-calibrated phylogenies, character mapping, ancestral state reconstruction, community ecology, and historical biogeography) using rigorous statistical methods. The course will include a computer laboratory for performing analyses using real data sets. Beginning skills in R and/or Perl programming would be introduced. The course would be targeted at students from Entomology, E&EB, NB&B, MB&G, Plant Biology, Microbiology, and associated fields. Required Qualifications: A PhD in evolutionary biology, systematics, entomology or related fields is essential. We seek a candidate with substantial experience with molecular systematics, molecular evolution, and model-based phylogenetics. A strong commitment to expanding and fostering diversity is required. Preferred Qualifications: Previous teaching experience at the university level is desirable. Salary: $37,500 for a 9-month appointment. Benefits: This is a fully benefits eligible 9 month position which is for a limited term with possible continuation dependent on funding. Application: Interested candidates should send a letter of interest, resume/vitae; copies of transcripts; and the names (complete with address, telephone number, email address) of at least three recent job-related references in a single pdf file to Bryan Danforth (bnd1@cornell.edu). The deadline for applications will be June 15, 2014 or until a qualified applicant is identified. Posting on Cornell website: http://bit.ly/1oUTI35 Bryan N. Danforth, Professor Department of Entomology 3124 Comstock Hall Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853-0901 phone: 607-255-3563/FAX: 607-255-0939 email: bnd1@cornell.edu Lab website: http://bit.ly/1hYTHDz CU Insect Collection website: http://bit.ly/1oUTGIt Northeast Pollinator Partnership: http://bit.ly/1hYTJeI Bryan Nicholas Danforth via Gmail
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The United Kingdom is home to exceptional evolutionarybiologists. However, compared to the number of evolutionaryzoologists, the number of their botanical counterparts is few. In many cases, U.K. plant evolutionary biologists are in small numbers at any one institution, and such isolation hinders progress. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh will host a conference on 8, 9 September, 2014 to help address this situation. The conference will showcase evolutionary research on plants by UK researchers to foster new collaborations. The conference will also hold a workshop, where discussion will identify challenges faced and suggest strategies to overcome them. We see this as a first step towards developing a longer-terms strategy for strengthening the UK community of plant evolutionary biologists. The conference will include a poster and networking session, open speaking slots (both standard and “lightning” talks), as well as an exciting lineup of invited speakers. For more information and to register, please visit the website at: http://bit.ly/1h7xbNN Invited speakers: Mating system: Dr. Mario Vallejo-Marin Speciation: Dr. Richard Buggs Ecological Speciation: Dr. Patrik Nosil Evo-Devo: Dr. Beverley Glover Phylogeny: Dr. Toby Pennington Polyploidy: Dr. Barbara Mable Biogeography: Dr. Bill Baker Population Genetics ? (Molecular ecology): Dr. Simon Hiscock Population Genetics (Genomics): Dr. Rob Ness International Speaker: Dr. Spencer Barrett (University of Toronto) via Gmail

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THE EVOLUTION OF INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOURAL VARIATION A great deal of research in recent years has revealed that animals from a wide range of species display consistent individual behaviours (known as animal personality, behavioural types, temperament), and that this individual variation can have powerful ecological consequences. In this project the student will focus upon unravelling some of the ecological factors important in the evolution of animal personality, using the three-spined stickleback as a model system. Sticklebacks occupy a range of habitats which vary naturally in their parasite abundance and diversity, predation regime, and resource availability. The project will involve experimental lab-work, characterising individual fish for personality traits and parasite fauna, infection experiments, and also fieldwork to explore natural behavioural variation among and within populations in the adaptive radiation of sticklebacks on the island of North Uist in the Scottish Outer Hebrides, from which longitudinal data is available on parasite abundance and diversity, predation risk, and resource availability. Key questions include: how do parasites, predation and resource availability interact to produce patterns of individual behavioural variation in natural populations? Do fish with different personality types vary in their parasite load, and if so what is the mechanism driving this? What are the fitness outcomes of personality types under divergent ecological conditions? How does do cumented life-history variation, within- and between-populations relate to behavioural variation? Applicants should have a good degree in a relevant subject, and a strong interest and enthusiasm for evolutionary biology/ecology/animal behaviour. Previous fieldwork or experience working with animal behaviour and/or fish parasites, and a full driving licence would be beneficial but are not essential. The project will be co-supervised by Assoc. Prof. Andrew Maccoll. Informal enquiries can be made to Ben Chapman: ben.chapman@nottingham.ac.uk. Applications, with a detailed CV and the names and addresses of 2 referees, should be sent to Dr Ben Chapman, School of Life Sciences, Room B108, Life Sciences Building, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH. Interviews for this studentship are expected to be held mid-July, but the vacancy is open until filled. Funding Notes: This studentship is available for a period of at least 3 years starting on 1st October 2014 and provides a stipend of 13,863 per annum, and is fully funded for all EU citizens. ****************************** Ben Chapman Senior Research Fellow Ecology & Evolution Group Nottingham UniversityThis message and any attachment are intended solely for the addressee and may contain confidential information. If you have received this message in error, please send it back to me, and immediately delete it. Please do not use, copy or disclose the information contained in this message or in any attachment. Any views or opinions expressed by the author of this email do not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Nottingham. This message has been checked for viruses but the contents of an attachment may still contain software viruses which could damage your computer system, you are advised to perform your own checks. Email communications with the University of Nottingham may be monitored as permitted by UK legislation. via Gmail

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REMINDER: The deadline for submission of symposium proposals for ESEB 2015 (June 30) is fast approaching! The original call for symposia is repeated below with the relevant information. ESEB 2015 Lausanne CALL FOR SUBMISSION OF SYMPOSIUM PROPOSALS The 15th Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology will take place in Lausanne (Switzerland), August 10-15, 2015. Submissions for symposium proposals are now invited. These will be processed through our website, currently at: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbW Information about the symposia can be found at: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbY For symposium submission, please go to : http://bit.ly/1rIZm7V You will be asked to provide: 1. The names and e-mail addresses of one organizer (for all communication) and one co-organizer (as a replacement). Both must be committed to attend the whole meeting. 2. The proposed symposium title. 3. A summary of max 200 words explaining why you think this makes a good subject for the ESEB Congress. 4. The names of one or two invited speakers (please check beforehand whether these people are available). Organizers cannot invite themselves to their own symposium. The deadline for submission is June 30, 2014. Proposals will be evaluated by the Scientific Committee, and the selected list communicated in September 2014. Symposia proposals on overlapping subjects may be requested to fuse. A call for talk and poster submissions will be sent out in November 2014, with a deadline of January 15, 2015. At this time, symposium organizers must be prepared to screen submissions for their symposium (for which an on-line evaluation system will be available). Symposia typically start with one or two invited speakers (40 min each, including discussion) and are followed by submitted talks (15 min plus 5 for discussion). The time window allotted to each symposium will be decided by the Scientific Committee, depending on the number and quality of submissions. Some symposia might be cancelled at this stage if they do not arouse sufficient interest. We do not provide financial support for organizing a symposium, but ESEB will pay the registration fee for invited speakers. Check our webpage for updates: www.unil.ch/eseb2015; or http://bit.ly/1rIZnbY. We look forward to your contributions The ESEB2015 organizing committee John Pannell Department of Ecology and Evolution Biophore Building University of Lausanne CH-1015 Lausanne Switzerland Phone: + 41 (0) 21 692 4170 Fax: + 41 (0) 21 692 4265 web: http://bit.ly/1dxNIF1www.unil.ch/eseb2015; or http://bit.ly/1rIZnbY. We look forward to your contributions The ESEB2015 organizing committee John Pannell Department of Ecology and Evolution Biophore Building University of Lausanne CH-1015 Lausanne Switzerland Phone: + 41 (0) 21 692 4170 Fax: + 41 (0) 21 692 4265 web: http://bit.ly/1dxNIF1 John Pannell via Gmail
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Kamila Naxerova Massachusetts General Hospital Phylogenetic analysis of metastatic colon cancer in humans Thursday, June 5, 2014 10:00 AM PDT Metastasis is the main cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite its clinical significance, several fundamental questions about the metastatic process in humans remain unsolved. Does metastasis occur early or late in cancer progression? Do metastases emanate directly from the primary tumor or give rise to each other? How does heterogeneity in the primary tumor relate to the genetic composition of secondary lesions? Addressing these questions ” ideally by examining the genetic makeup of tumor cells in distinct anatomic locations and reconstructing their evolutionary relationships ” is crucial to improving our understanding of metastasis. I will give an overview of a simple PCR-based assay that enables the tracing of tumor lineage in patient tissue specimens. The methodology relies on somatic variation in highly mutable polyguanine (poly-G) repeats located in non-coding genomic regions. Poly-G mutations are present in a variety of human cancers. In colon carcinoma, an association exists between patient age at diagnosis and tumor mutational burden, suggesting that poly-G variants accumulate during normal division in colonic stem cells. Poorly differentiated colon carcinomas (which have a worse prognosis) have fewer mutations than well-differentiated tumors, possibly indicating a shorter mitotic history of the founder cell in these cancers. By presenting several patient case studies, I will describe how poly-G fingerprints can be used to construct phylogenetic trees that reflect the evolution of metastatic colon cancer, with an emphasis on how biological considerations inform analysis strategies. For more details, please see http://bit.ly/16UKCta. Frederick “Erick” Matsen, Assistant Member Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center http://bit.ly/18kRSvK ematsen@gmail.com via Gmail

June 3, 2014

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Post-doc position available immediately ” DNA-based diagnostics for spruce budworm, its parasitoids, and other conifer-feeding species ” A postdoctoral position is immediately available in the Smith lab at the University of Guelph (Ontario) in the application of DNA-based diagnostics in the early detection of species involved in predating upon the spruce budworm (SBW). In particular, experience in the design and implementation of microarrays is necessary. Applicants should have a Ph.D. and extensive training and experience in one or more of the following areas: DNA extraction, PCR, qPCR and microarray development. The ideal candidate will also have broad training in evolutionary biology, strong writing skills, and prior management experience. The successful applicant will play a key role in a recently funded project to develop and apply new methods involving DNA-based diagnostics for the rapid identification natural enemies of the spruce budworm in New Brunswick. The spruce budworm (SBW - Choristoneura fumiferana) is the major coniferous forest pest in eastern North America. The goal of this project is to design a DNA-based diagnostic for these critical, but difficult to quantify and identify the complement of natural enemies (insect parasitoids and pathogens) that act as natural control agents. To do so, we will adapt, and augment, the existing library of DNA barcodes (small, standardised gene sequences) into a DNA microarray chip enabling us to rapidly identify and quantify the many organisms that interact directly (> 100 species of natural enemies) and indirectly (other conifer-feeding species that serve as alternate/alternative hosts of SBW parasitoids) with the spruce budworm and form the so-called “spruce budworm food web”. Interested applicants should submit a CV, a letter describing their research interests and career goals, and contact information for two references to Dr. Alex Smith (salex@uoguelph.ca). Further information on my research interests and publications can be found at: http://bit.ly/1lm7HIt and on Google Scholar http://bit.ly/1kBISME. Applications will be considered for an immediate start date. Alex Smith email: salex@uoguelph.ca web site: http://bit.ly/1lm7GnF Twitter: @Alex_Smith_Ants via Gmail

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—Apple-Mail=_6667C4C8-FC76-4E8B-8BF6-08D848629D1C Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii U of Minnesota.Evolutionary Genetics A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Peter Morrell (z.umn.edu/morrell) to study barley evolutionary genetics. The primary research involves the examination of genome-level variation in barley, with a particular emphasis on the role of deleterious mutations. The position will provide the opportunity to work with Illumina resequencing data from large panels of wild, landrace, and cultivated barley and to work with experimental populations designed to test genomic prediction models. The position will also provide opportunities to interact with collaborators, including the barley breeding group of Dr. Kevin Smith and with the evolutionary genetics group of Dr. Justin Fay at Washington University in St. Louis. The appointment is for one year with the possibility of renewal based on satisfactory performance. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience, and benefits are included. The University of Minnesota has strong programs in plant and evolutionary biology. Genetics and genomics research at the university has been expanding in part because of number of new faculty who were part of a Genome Variation cluster hire. Preference is for candidates with a strong background in evolutionary biology, proficiency in UNIX computing, and experience with computational analysis of population genetic data. For more information or to apply, please send a cover letter and a CV with a list of references to pmorrell@umn.edu. —Apple-Mail=_6667C4C8-FC76-4E8B-8BF6-08D848629D1C Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

U of Minnesota.Evolutionary GeneticsA postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Peter Morrell (z.umn.edu/morrell) to study barley evolutionary genetics. The primary research involves the examination of genome-level variation in barley, with a particular emphasis on the role of deleterious mutations. The position will provide the opportunity to work with Illumina resequencing data from large panels of wild, landrace, and cultivated barley and to work with experimental populations designed to test genomic prediction models. The position will also provide opportunities to interact with collaborators, including the barley breeding group of Dr. Kevin Smith and with the evolutionary genetics group of Dr. Justin Fay at Washington University in St. Louis.The appointment is for one year with the possibility of renewal based on satisfactory performance. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience, and benefits are included.The University of Minnesota has strong programs in plant and evolutionary biology. Genetics and genomics research at the university has been expanding in part because of number of new faculty who were part of a Genome Variation cluster hire. Preference is fo r candidates with a strong background in evolutionary biology, proficiency in UNIX computing, and experience with computational analysis of population genetic data. For more information or to apply, please send a cover letter and a CV with a list of references to pmorrell@umn.edu. —Apple-Mail=_6667C4C8-FC76-4E8B-8BF6-08D848629D1 via Gmail