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June 4, 2014

01:05

The United Kingdom is home to exceptional evolutionarybiologists. However, compared to the number of evolutionaryzoologists, the number of their botanical counterparts is few. In many cases, U.K. plant evolutionary biologists are in small numbers at any one institution, and such isolation hinders progress. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh will host a conference on 8, 9 September, 2014 to help address this situation. The conference will showcase evolutionary research on plants by UK researchers to foster new collaborations. The conference will also hold a workshop, where discussion will identify challenges faced and suggest strategies to overcome them. We see this as a first step towards developing a longer-terms strategy for strengthening the UK community of plant evolutionary biologists. The conference will include a poster and networking session, open speaking slots (both standard and “lightning” talks), as well as an exciting lineup of invited speakers. For more information and to register, please visit the website at: http://bit.ly/1h7xbNN Invited speakers: Mating system: Dr. Mario Vallejo-Marin Speciation: Dr. Richard Buggs Ecological Speciation: Dr. Patrik Nosil Evo-Devo: Dr. Beverley Glover Phylogeny: Dr. Toby Pennington Polyploidy: Dr. Barbara Mable Biogeography: Dr. Bill Baker Population Genetics ? (Molecular ecology): Dr. Simon Hiscock Population Genetics (Genomics): Dr. Rob Ness International Speaker: Dr. Spencer Barrett (University of Toronto) via Gmail

01:05

THE EVOLUTION OF INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOURAL VARIATION A great deal of research in recent years has revealed that animals from a wide range of species display consistent individual behaviours (known as animal personality, behavioural types, temperament), and that this individual variation can have powerful ecological consequences. In this project the student will focus upon unravelling some of the ecological factors important in the evolution of animal personality, using the three-spined stickleback as a model system. Sticklebacks occupy a range of habitats which vary naturally in their parasite abundance and diversity, predation regime, and resource availability. The project will involve experimental lab-work, characterising individual fish for personality traits and parasite fauna, infection experiments, and also fieldwork to explore natural behavioural variation among and within populations in the adaptive radiation of sticklebacks on the island of North Uist in the Scottish Outer Hebrides, from which longitudinal data is available on parasite abundance and diversity, predation risk, and resource availability. Key questions include: how do parasites, predation and resource availability interact to produce patterns of individual behavioural variation in natural populations? Do fish with different personality types vary in their parasite load, and if so what is the mechanism driving this? What are the fitness outcomes of personality types under divergent ecological conditions? How does do cumented life-history variation, within- and between-populations relate to behavioural variation? Applicants should have a good degree in a relevant subject, and a strong interest and enthusiasm for evolutionary biology/ecology/animal behaviour. Previous fieldwork or experience working with animal behaviour and/or fish parasites, and a full driving licence would be beneficial but are not essential. The project will be co-supervised by Assoc. Prof. Andrew Maccoll. Informal enquiries can be made to Ben Chapman: ben.chapman@nottingham.ac.uk. Applications, with a detailed CV and the names and addresses of 2 referees, should be sent to Dr Ben Chapman, School of Life Sciences, Room B108, Life Sciences Building, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH. Interviews for this studentship are expected to be held mid-July, but the vacancy is open until filled. Funding Notes: This studentship is available for a period of at least 3 years starting on 1st October 2014 and provides a stipend of 13,863 per annum, and is fully funded for all EU citizens. ****************************** Ben Chapman Senior Research Fellow Ecology & Evolution Group Nottingham UniversityThis message and any attachment are intended solely for the addressee and may contain confidential information. If you have received this message in error, please send it back to me, and immediately delete it. Please do not use, copy or disclose the information contained in this message or in any attachment. Any views or opinions expressed by the author of this email do not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Nottingham. This message has been checked for viruses but the contents of an attachment may still contain software viruses which could damage your computer system, you are advised to perform your own checks. Email communications with the University of Nottingham may be monitored as permitted by UK legislation. via Gmail

01:05
REMINDER: The deadline for submission of symposium proposals for ESEB 2015 (June 30) is fast approaching! The original call for symposia is repeated below with the relevant information. ESEB 2015 Lausanne CALL FOR SUBMISSION OF SYMPOSIUM PROPOSALS The 15th Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology will take place in Lausanne (Switzerland), August 10-15, 2015. Submissions for symposium proposals are now invited. These will be processed through our website, currently at: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbW Information about the symposia can be found at: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbY For symposium submission, please go to : http://bit.ly/1rIZm7V You will be asked to provide: 1. The names and e-mail addresses of one organizer (for all communication) and one co-organizer (as a replacement). Both must be committed to attend the whole meeting. 2. The proposed symposium title. 3. A summary of max 200 words explaining why you think this makes a good subject for the ESEB Congress. 4. The names of one or two invited speakers (please check beforehand whether these people are available). Organizers cannot invite themselves to their own symposium. The deadline for submission is June 30, 2014. Proposals will be evaluated by the Scientific Committee, and the selected list communicated in September 2014. Symposia proposals on overlapping subjects may be requested to fuse. A call for talk and poster submissions will be sent out in November 2014, with a deadline of January 15, 2015. At this time, symposium organizers must be prepared to screen submissions for their symposium (for which an on-line evaluation system will be available). Symposia typically start with one or two invited speakers (40 min each, including discussion) and are followed by submitted talks (15 min plus 5 for discussion). The time window allotted to each symposium will be decided by the Scientific Committee, depending on the number and quality of submissions. Some symposia might be cancelled at this stage if they do not arouse sufficient interest. We do not provide financial support for organizing a symposium, but ESEB will pay the registration fee for invited speakers. Check our webpage for updates: www.unil.ch/eseb2015; or http://bit.ly/1rIZnbY. We look forward to your contributions The ESEB2015 organizing committee John Pannell Department of Ecology and Evolution Biophore Building University of Lausanne CH-1015 Lausanne Switzerland Phone: + 41 (0) 21 692 4170 Fax: + 41 (0) 21 692 4265 web: http://bit.ly/1dxNIF1www.unil.ch/eseb2015; or http://bit.ly/1rIZnbY. We look forward to your contributions The ESEB2015 organizing committee John Pannell Department of Ecology and Evolution Biophore Building University of Lausanne CH-1015 Lausanne Switzerland Phone: + 41 (0) 21 692 4170 Fax: + 41 (0) 21 692 4265 web: http://bit.ly/1dxNIF1 John Pannell via Gmail
00:28

Kamila Naxerova Massachusetts General Hospital Phylogenetic analysis of metastatic colon cancer in humans Thursday, June 5, 2014 10:00 AM PDT Metastasis is the main cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite its clinical significance, several fundamental questions about the metastatic process in humans remain unsolved. Does metastasis occur early or late in cancer progression? Do metastases emanate directly from the primary tumor or give rise to each other? How does heterogeneity in the primary tumor relate to the genetic composition of secondary lesions? Addressing these questions ” ideally by examining the genetic makeup of tumor cells in distinct anatomic locations and reconstructing their evolutionary relationships ” is crucial to improving our understanding of metastasis. I will give an overview of a simple PCR-based assay that enables the tracing of tumor lineage in patient tissue specimens. The methodology relies on somatic variation in highly mutable polyguanine (poly-G) repeats located in non-coding genomic regions. Poly-G mutations are present in a variety of human cancers. In colon carcinoma, an association exists between patient age at diagnosis and tumor mutational burden, suggesting that poly-G variants accumulate during normal division in colonic stem cells. Poorly differentiated colon carcinomas (which have a worse prognosis) have fewer mutations than well-differentiated tumors, possibly indicating a shorter mitotic history of the founder cell in these cancers. By presenting several patient case studies, I will describe how poly-G fingerprints can be used to construct phylogenetic trees that reflect the evolution of metastatic colon cancer, with an emphasis on how biological considerations inform analysis strategies. For more details, please see http://bit.ly/16UKCta. Frederick “Erick” Matsen, Assistant Member Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center http://bit.ly/18kRSvK ematsen@gmail.com via Gmail

June 3, 2014

23:44

Post-doc position available immediately ” DNA-based diagnostics for spruce budworm, its parasitoids, and other conifer-feeding species ” A postdoctoral position is immediately available in the Smith lab at the University of Guelph (Ontario) in the application of DNA-based diagnostics in the early detection of species involved in predating upon the spruce budworm (SBW). In particular, experience in the design and implementation of microarrays is necessary. Applicants should have a Ph.D. and extensive training and experience in one or more of the following areas: DNA extraction, PCR, qPCR and microarray development. The ideal candidate will also have broad training in evolutionary biology, strong writing skills, and prior management experience. The successful applicant will play a key role in a recently funded project to develop and apply new methods involving DNA-based diagnostics for the rapid identification natural enemies of the spruce budworm in New Brunswick. The spruce budworm (SBW - Choristoneura fumiferana) is the major coniferous forest pest in eastern North America. The goal of this project is to design a DNA-based diagnostic for these critical, but difficult to quantify and identify the complement of natural enemies (insect parasitoids and pathogens) that act as natural control agents. To do so, we will adapt, and augment, the existing library of DNA barcodes (small, standardised gene sequences) into a DNA microarray chip enabling us to rapidly identify and quantify the many organisms that interact directly (> 100 species of natural enemies) and indirectly (other conifer-feeding species that serve as alternate/alternative hosts of SBW parasitoids) with the spruce budworm and form the so-called “spruce budworm food web”. Interested applicants should submit a CV, a letter describing their research interests and career goals, and contact information for two references to Dr. Alex Smith (salex@uoguelph.ca). Further information on my research interests and publications can be found at: http://bit.ly/1lm7HIt and on Google Scholar http://bit.ly/1kBISME. Applications will be considered for an immediate start date. Alex Smith email: salex@uoguelph.ca web site: http://bit.ly/1lm7GnF Twitter: @Alex_Smith_Ants via Gmail

00:35

—Apple-Mail=_6667C4C8-FC76-4E8B-8BF6-08D848629D1C Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii U of Minnesota.Evolutionary Genetics A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Peter Morrell (z.umn.edu/morrell) to study barley evolutionary genetics. The primary research involves the examination of genome-level variation in barley, with a particular emphasis on the role of deleterious mutations. The position will provide the opportunity to work with Illumina resequencing data from large panels of wild, landrace, and cultivated barley and to work with experimental populations designed to test genomic prediction models. The position will also provide opportunities to interact with collaborators, including the barley breeding group of Dr. Kevin Smith and with the evolutionary genetics group of Dr. Justin Fay at Washington University in St. Louis. The appointment is for one year with the possibility of renewal based on satisfactory performance. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience, and benefits are included. The University of Minnesota has strong programs in plant and evolutionary biology. Genetics and genomics research at the university has been expanding in part because of number of new faculty who were part of a Genome Variation cluster hire. Preference is for candidates with a strong background in evolutionary biology, proficiency in UNIX computing, and experience with computational analysis of population genetic data. For more information or to apply, please send a cover letter and a CV with a list of references to pmorrell@umn.edu. —Apple-Mail=_6667C4C8-FC76-4E8B-8BF6-08D848629D1C Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

U of Minnesota.Evolutionary GeneticsA postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Peter Morrell (z.umn.edu/morrell) to study barley evolutionary genetics. The primary research involves the examination of genome-level variation in barley, with a particular emphasis on the role of deleterious mutations. The position will provide the opportunity to work with Illumina resequencing data from large panels of wild, landrace, and cultivated barley and to work with experimental populations designed to test genomic prediction models. The position will also provide opportunities to interact with collaborators, including the barley breeding group of Dr. Kevin Smith and with the evolutionary genetics group of Dr. Justin Fay at Washington University in St. Louis.The appointment is for one year with the possibility of renewal based on satisfactory performance. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience, and benefits are included.The University of Minnesota has strong programs in plant and evolutionary biology. Genetics and genomics research at the university has been expanding in part because of number of new faculty who were part of a Genome Variation cluster hire. Preference is fo r candidates with a strong background in evolutionary biology, proficiency in UNIX computing, and experience with computational analysis of population genetic data. For more information or to apply, please send a cover letter and a CV with a list of references to pmorrell@umn.edu. —Apple-Mail=_6667C4C8-FC76-4E8B-8BF6-08D848629D1 via Gmail

June 2, 2014

23:42
Post Doc in “Evolutionary Genomics of insect vectors of apple disease” (151_CRI_IVAD) - deadline June 22, 2014 A postdoc position is available in the Chemical Ecology unit, Sustainable Agro-Ecosystems and Bioresources department of the Research and Innovation Centre (CRI). The position is related to the project “Scopazzi” funded by the Autonomous Province of Trento (Accordo di Programma) and the Association of Fruit and Vegetable Producers in Trentino (APOT) and aimed at providing new insights into the biology and ecology of the insects vectors of apple proliferation for the development of sustainable control strategies. The successful candidate will work on genomics and evolution of two insects (hemipterans C. melanoneura and C. picta) which are the main vectors of the “apple proliferation”, phytoplasma causing illness in the apple trees. Successful candidate will apply bioinformatics tools to get new insights in the evolution, biology and ecology of these insect vectors. Please read the position details to understand if you are eligible for the position. In order to apply send your cv and fill the application form. Application and profile are also available at the bottom of the page. Deadline for application: June 22, 2014. More info and the full call at: http://bit.ly/1h2gkfc Omar Rota-Stabelli PhD Marie Curie - PAT postdoctoral fellow Department of Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources, IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all’Adige, (TN), Italy. Phone:+39 0461 615393 Mobile:+39 389 8375091 Fax:+39 0461 615500 Councillor of the Italian Society for Evolutionary Biology Research Associate of the School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution www.smbe.org Italian Society for Evolutionary Biology www.sibe-iseb.it The Systematics Association http://bit.ly/1hE0Ate The Willi Hennig Society http://bit.ly/1kG09jn Unione Zoologica Italiana www.uzionlus.it Omar’s scholar http://bit.ly/1fOzFAdwww.smbe.org Italian Society for Evolutionary Biology www.sibe-iseb.it The Systematics Association http://bit.ly/1hE0Ate The Willi Hennig Society http://bit.ly/1kG09jn Unione Zoologica Italiana www.uzionlus.it Omar’s scholar http://bit.ly/1fOzFAd Omar Rota-Stabelli via Gmail
00:25
Volunteer opportunity as field assistants for the project: Evolution and Socio-Ecology of small Mammals in the Succulent Karoo of South Africa Opportunity: This is a great opportunity for anybody who wants to get more experience in field work relating to eco-physiology, animal behavior, evolution, and ecology before starting an MSc or PhD project. Project: We study the evolutionary and ecological reasons as well as physiological mechanisms of group living, paternal care, communal nesting and social flexibility in the striped mouse. One focus is on the adaptation to droughts, combining physiological, behavioral, ecological and evolutionary research. As this species is diurnal and the habitat is open, direct behavioral observations in the field are possible. What kind of people are needed? Biology/zoology/veterinary students are preferred as candidates. Applicants must have an interest in working in the field and with animals. Hard working conditions will await applicants, as the study species gets up with sunrise (between 5 and 6 o` clock), and stops its activity with dusk (19 o` clock). Work during nights might also be necessary. Work in the field will be done for 5 days a week. Applicants must be able to manage extreme temperatures (below 0 at night in winter, sometimes over 40 C during summer days). Applicants must both be prepared to live for long periods in the loneliness of the field and to be part of a small social group. Work of volunteer field assistants: Trapping, marking and radio-tracking of striped mice; direct behavioral observations in the field. Volunteers will also see how blood samples are collected for physiological measurements. Volunteers are expected to help with maintenance of the research station (water pump, solar power, etc.). Confirmation letter: Students get a letter of confirmation about their work and can prepare a report of their own small project to get credit points from their university for their bachelor or masters studies. Costs: Students have to arrange their transport to the field site themselves. Per month, an amount of Rand 1300 (around 180 US$, 110 Euro) must be paid for accommodation at the research station. Students must buy their own food etc in Springbok (costs of about R 3000, approx. 360 US$ or 250 Euro/month). Including extras (going out for dinner; shopping), you should expect costs of about 600 US$ / 450 Euros per month. Students get an invitation letter which they can use to apply for funding in their home country. Place: The field site is in the Goegap Nature Reserve near Springbok in the North-West of South Africa. The vegetation consists of Succulent Karoo, which has been recognized as one of 25 hotspots of biodiversity. It is a desert to semi-desert with rain mainly in winter (June to September). When and how long: At the moment we are looking for one or two volunteers starting in July / August 2014 and for two volunteers starting in December 2014/ January 2015. Volunteers are expected to stay at least three months, but longer periods of up to 6months are preferred. How to apply? Send a short motivation letter stating why and for which period you are interested and your CV via email to succulent.karooo.research.station@kabelbw.de. More information under http://bit.ly/157Nija http://bit.ly/155vMBn ex=1 Contact via e-mail: succulent.karoo.research.station@kabelbw.de Succulent Karoo Research Station a registered South African non-profit organization Dr. Carsten Schradin (Director) South Africa WORKING AS A FIELD ASSISTANT IN GOEGAP NATURE RESERVE A report by Romy Höppli, student at the University of Zurich, who staid in Goegap June to August 2008 Blue skies without a single cloud for six weeks rocky mountains with little vegetation yellow, orange and pink fields of flowers in whatever direction you look small mammals, lizards and birds in our front yard and Mountain Zebras, Springbok and Ostrich right next door… This was my time at the Succulent Karoo Research Station in Goegap Nature Reserve in South Africa! During six weeks from the beginning of July until the middle of August I’ve been living here, studying mice, experiencing nature like never before and being part of a small community where there was always something to laugh and joke about! After arriving in Goegap, right the next morning my scientific adventure in South Africa began: Setting and checking traps, nest observations and radio-tracking were our daily routine. While I got bitten by the mice quite often in the beginning and my right middle finger was scarred all over, I improved quickly shaking the mice out of the traps, weighing them and checking the number of the ear tag. Other duties like cleaning the cages of the mice in the captive colony, washing the dirt from probably several months out of the traps, painting the new Wendy House and putting in a floor and curtains quickly added to our daily field work activities. It was never boring in Goegap! There was always something to do: studying the striped mouse, listening to the interesting and funny stories every member could tell or just enjoying the time while reading a book or writing e-mails to friends to tell them about this unique experience. Here, the weekly trip back to ‘civilization’ in Springbok for shopping, sending e-mails and having lunch at “Nando’s” - the best (Portuguese) fast food I ever tasted - was always a highlight and the occasional trip to “Beaver’s”, the towns funniest pub, where all the locals went to, was a good opportunity to dance, make party and enjoy the relaxed South African way of life! My six weeks down here were full of great experiences and I enjoyed every single day! Hopefully, I will be able to come back to Goegap Nature Reserve one day! _____ Dr. Carsten Schradin Director of the Succulent Karoo Research Station (South African non-profit organization), Goegap Nature Reserve, PO Box 1010, 8240 Springbok, South Africa http://bit.ly/157Nizq Director Succulent Karoo Research Station via Gmail

June 1, 2014

23:46

A 4-year PhD position at University of Helsinki in resurrection ecology: Reconstructing past responses of Eubosmina maritima to anthropogenic environmental changes using the historical archives of the Baltic Sea sediment A powerful way to reconstruct past responses of populations to human-induced environmental changes is to use the information hidden in the sediment in the form of dormant eggs and subfossils. We investigate how and why the cladoceran zooplankton community has changed in response to human-induced environmental change during the last century, using resurrection ecology, paleolimnology and paleogenomics. The PhD project will involve reconstructing past responses of Eubosmina maritima to human-induced changes of the Baltic Sea, particularly to eutrophication and changes in the fish fauna. Recorded phenotypic changes will be related to environmental changes to determine whether the population has been able to track changes in the environment. Reaction norm experiments will be performed to investigate the degree of plasticity and the limits of responses. The work will be complemented with genomic work carried out within the research group. This will allow us to determine the genetic underpinning of the phenotypic changes. A detailed research plans will be developed and tailored to match your individual interests and strengths. The work is done in collaboration with the research groups of prof. Dieter Ebert at University of Basel and Dr Luisa Orsini at University of Birmingham. English is the working language. *Your role: Your work will include the retrieval and hatching of dormant eggs of E. maritima from dated sediments of the Baltic Sea, the cultivation of clonal lineages from these resurrected eggs, and the performance of reaction norm experiments using the clonal lineages, to determine their responses to blooms of toxic cyanobacteria. In addition, microfossils will be measured to record phenotypic changes across time. Depending on your interests and strengths, you can contribute to the genomic work. You will work in close collaboration with two post-docs within the group, and participate in the supervision of undergraduate students and assistants. *Qualifications: You will have a Masters or equivalent degree in ecology or evolutionary biology (or related fields), and a strong interest in the research questions and a high motivation to pursue a PhD. Excellent written and oral communication skills in English are required, as are the ability to work efficiently, independently as well as in collaboration. *We offer: The salary will follow the demands level chart for teaching and research personnel in the salary system of Finnish universities, with a salary component based on personal performance. All standard pension benefits and occupational health care are provided for university employees. For information on the University of Helsinki, please visit: http://bit.ly/19RKh8I *Starting date: 1st of September 2014 or as agreed on. *To apply: Consideration of applications will begin on 15th of June 2014, and will remain open until filled. Please send your application with (1) a statement of research interests and why you have applied for this position, (2) your CV, (3) an authorized copy of your MSc degree (if available at time of application, and (4) contact details of two references to Dr Ulrika Candolin at ulrika.candolin@helsinki.fi Feel free to address informal inquiries to: Ulrika Candolin Phone: +358-(0)2941-57800 Email: ulrika.candolin@helsinki.fi http://bit.ly/1oMk5Iq via Gmail

May 31, 2014

23:41

The monthly review of the EvolDir is available from the EvolDir website - http://bit.ly/17VdShI. For more information or for help send mail to Golding@McMaster.CA. Please see the above website for instructions for the EvolDir. This includes ways to limit/reduce the messages you receive from the EvolDir. A reminder: The userid for the web site user list is `evoldir’ and the password is `2EvolBulletins’. [ This was done to limit the access of spammers (e.g. SpeakOut.Com and others). ] Brian Golding via Gmail

02:07

A 4 year PhD position is available at the Natural history Museum (NHM), University of Oslo (http://bit.ly/16YyGW2). The subject of the PhD project is “Evolution of sperm form and function in passerine birds”. Passerine birds, and especially the oscine passerines or songbirds, are highly diversified in sexual traits, including their sperm cells. Recent research has documented that post-copulatory sexual selection, mediated by female promiscuity (extrapair copulations), shape sperm phenotypes and lead to longer and/or faster-swimming sperm over evolutionary time scales. The project will examine in more detail how particular sperm structures, especially the size and shape of the sperm head, which contains the acrosome and the nucleus, vary in response to sexual selection across the passerine phylogeny. The project will also study how variation in sperm phenotypes among males in a population is influenced by current selection pressures. NHM holds a large collection of passerine sperm samples, which will be the main source material for analysis, using high-resolution light and electron microsco py. There will also be some field work in Norway and abroad for collecting additional sperm samples. We seek a person with strong motivation and ability to define his/her own research questions. The candidate must have wide interests in evolution and ecology, and should have good knowledge in avian systematics and practical experience with ornithological field work. Candidates with experience in microscopy techniques of biological material and relevant tools in molecular phylogenetics and comparative methods will be preferred. Applicants must hold a Master’s degree or equivalent in evolutionary biology. The position is affiliated with the Sex and Evolution Research Group (SERG) at NHM (http://bit.ly/1rsiGZp). The research team will also include scientists from Finland and Czech Republic. For further information and instructions on how to apply, see: http://bit.ly/1oU15oX. Application deadline: 22 June 2014 Professor Jan T. Lifjeld Natural History Museum University of Oslo P.O. Box 1172 Blindern NO-0318 Oslo Phone +47-22851726 j.t.lifjeld@nhm.uio.no via Gmail

01:36
Molecular Biology Technician, Tung Lab at Duke University An Associate in Research/Laboratory Research Analyst position available, starting immediately, in the Tung lab at Duke University. The Tung lab studies the relationship between behavior, the social environment, and genetics and genomics, with a focus on nonhuman primate populations. We combine detailed phenotypic and demographic information with modern genomic data sets on gene regulation and epigenetics. Current projects focus on the gene regulatory mechanisms linking social adversity and health in rhesus macaques, the epigenetic signature of early life ecological and social adversity, and the genomic and phenotypic consequences of hybridization in wild baboons. Duties will include performance of basic molecular biology laboratory techniques, including DNA and RNA sample extraction and sample preparation for high-throughput sequencing, and responsibility for day-to-day logistics, including purchasing, shipping and receiving, and working with trainees in the lab. Important skills/traits include: aseptic technique, molecular techniques, attention to detail, ability to work independently, careful record keeping. Requirements: bachelor’s degree, 1 V 2 years experience in a research laboratory (not just a lab class), familiarity with fundamentals of molecular biology. Position is for 40 hrs/week, and will last 12 months, with the possibility of renewal contingent on performance and availability of funding. For more information about the lab and our work, see http://bit.ly/1kaLfH0 If interested, email resume, including contact information for two references, to Shauna Morrow, smorrow@duke.edu Duke University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/ADA Employer. Jenny Tung Assistant Professor Department of Evolutionary Anthropology and Duke Population Research Institute jt5@duke.edu 919-668-4912 Jenny Tung via Gmail
01:22

A 4 year PhD position is available at the Natural history Museum (NHM), University of Oslo (http://bit.ly/16YyGW2). The subject of the PhD project is “Functional genomics of sperm phenotypes and cryptic female choice in passerine birds”. In many passerine bird species, females copulate frequently with extra-pair mates, which implies that sperm from different males compete for the same set of ova and that there might be sperm-female interactions affecting the outcome of sperm competition. This project takes a molecular approach to deepen our understanding of the possible mechanisms involved in this form of sexual selection at the gamete level. The project has two main goals, a) finding molecular markers or genes associated with sperm performance traits, b) test if females obtain good or compatible genes through extrapair mating, in particular immune genes at the Major Histocompatibility Complex. The project will adopt next-generation sequencing approaches for several analyses, and utilize a large sample of already-collected DNA from families of a few intensively studied species (e.g. willo w warblers, bluethroats and barn swallows). There will be little or no field work but extensive analysis of molecular data for this project. We seek a person with strong motivation and ability to define his/her own research questions. The candidate must have wide interests in molecular ecology/genetics and evolutionary biology, and good practical, hands-on experience with relevant DNA methods. Good computing skills and background in bioinformatics will be of advantage, in particular when handling and analyzing large data sets emerging from next-generation sequencing approaches. Applicants must hold a Master’s degree or equivalent in biology. The position is affiliated with the Sex and Evolution Research Group (SERG) at NHM (http://bit.ly/1rsiGZp). The research team will also include scientists from Finland, Czech Republic and USA. For further information and instructions on how to apply, see: http://bit.ly/1lZVkSJ Application deadline: 22 June 2014 Professor Jan T. Lifjeld Natural History Museum University of Oslo P.O. Box 1172 Blindern NO-0318 Oslo Phone: +47-22851726 j.t.lifjeld@nhm.uio.no via Gmail

01:06
*Master in Biological Sciences (MBS) at the University of Vigo, Spain* http://bit.ly/1nNPZCg We are pleased to announce the *Master in Biological Sciences (MBS) of the University of Vigo (Spain)* for the *academic year 2014-2015*. The MBS aims to provide future professionals in biology with the knowledge, skills and insights they will need to take on top science-based positions around the world. The* official language of the MBS is English*. Non-English speaking students must demonstrate that they have the minimum language skills to study the Master. Personal interviews with members of the Academic Commission might be required before admission. The MBS teaching staff covers a wide range of areas, and includes renowned researchers, specialists in developing professional skills and practitioners from industry, with long-term teaching experience. For students interested in doing a PhD, there are two PhD programmes linked to the MBS and rated as excellent by the Spanish Ministry of Education. *Master outline* The MSc programme comprises *120 ECTS distributed between 2 academic years *(60 ECTS each). During the 1st year, students will complete a *Basic Module (12 ECTS)* on experimental design and statistical analysis, followed by an *Elective Component (42 ECTS) *where students will choose among four specific tracks: 1. Molecular Biology for Health and Life Sciences 2. Environmental Sciences 3. Bioinformatics and Computational Biology 4. Green-Industries Management The 2nd year includes a *Mandatory Major Project (48 ECTS)* and a *Master’s thesis (12 ECTS)*, to be carried out under the guidance of one of the MBS professors. *ONLINE APPLICATION for academic year 2014-15 (no payment required)* First pre-registration period (2014): *June 27 July 3* Second pre-registration period (2014): *August 27 September 3* *DOCUMENTS that must accompany the application form:* DNI, NIE or Passport Bachelors degree diploma Brief CV *PRICE FOR THE TWO-YEAR MASTER* 3,763 *COORDINATOR* María Jesús Iglesias Briones *MBS ADDRESS * Master in Biological Sciences Facultad de Biología Campus Lagoas-Marcosende Universidad de Vigo 36310 Vigo Spain *INFORMATION: *biologicalsciences@uvigo.es Armando Caballero via Gmail
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BlackHillsStateU_Spearfish_Integrative_Genomics The Masters in Science in Integrative Genomics program at Black Hills State University (Spearfish, South Dakota) currently has openings for the Fall 2014 semester. This program exposes students to modern techniques and instrumentation in the laboratory and field and prepares students for success in both academic and other biotechnology-related pursuits. Graduate Research Assistantships (RAs) are awarded to students and provide a competitive stipend ($16,640/yr) plus funding for research. All RAs receive a reduced tuition rate (1/3 of in-state rate) and assist with instruction of undergraduate-level science labs. Black Hills State University, located in the heart of the northern Black Hills V Spearfish, SD, offers 75 academic programs at the associate, bachelor, and master degree levels. BHSU, which has over 4,000 students, has earned a reputation for transforming lives through innovative, high-quality academic programs and a dynamic learning community. Our location provides a natural laboratory for Integrative Genomics. We are also close to the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at Homestake Mine, allowing for collaboration with other major universities (to study, for example, the meta-genomics of the unique microbial communities found in extreme environments). Learn more about the community here: http://bit.ly/1tZfNwZ http://bit.ly/1tZfMsX http://bit.ly/1nNPYhN Information about M.S. Integrative Genomics program requirements and application process can be found here: http://bit.ly/1tZfNx3 For further information email: Raeann.Mettler@bhsu.edu Raeann Mettler via Gmail
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Postdoctoral position: Mathematical modelling of drug-resistance in microorganisms and cancers, University of Exeter We are recruiting a Research Fellow to participate in an exciting interdisciplinary collaboration between a mathematical modelling groups of Dr Ivana Gudelj and Prof Robert Beardmore, University of Exeter, UK and Computational Biology and Oncology Departments at AstraZeneca, Cambridge. This position is available from 1st July 2014 for the period of 2 years. The successful applicant will contribute towards research that uses concepts from ecology and Darwinian evolution applied to micro-organisms, to understand the strength of natural selection in cancer cells. The successful applicant will be working on the development and analysis of mathematica models in Dr Gudelj and Prof Beardmore’s labs at the University of Exeter in close collaborations with colleagues at AstraZeneca, Cambridge. Applicants will posses a PhD in a quantitative discipline (mathematics, physics, engineering or computer science) and be familiar with ordinary differential equations, their use in modelling, analysis (Dynamical Systems techniques) and simulation. The successful candidate should be able to communicate effectively with individuals from a wide range of disciplines. More information about the project and how to apply can be found at: http://bit.ly/1rsbKvx “Gudelj, Ivana” via Gmail
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Postdoctoral position: Mathematical modelling of drug-resistance in microorganisms and cancers, University of Exeter We are recruiting a Research Fellow to participate in an exciting interdisciplinary collaboration between a mathematical modelling groups of Dr Ivana Gudelj and Prof Robert Beardmore, University of Exeter, UK and Computational Biology and Oncology Departments at AstraZeneca, Cambridge. This position is available from 1st July 2014 for the period of 2 years. The successful applicant will contribute towards research that uses concepts from ecology and Darwinian evolution applied to micro-organisms, to understand the strength of natural selection in cancer cells. The successful applicant will be working on the development and analysis of mathematica models in Dr Gudelj and Prof Beardmore’s labs at the University of Exeter in close collaborations with colleagues at AstraZeneca, Cambridge. Applicants will posses a PhD in a quantitative discipline (mathematics, physics, engineering or computer science) and be familiar with ordinary differential equations, their use in modelling, analysis (Dynamical Systems techniques) and simulation. The successful candidate should be able to communicate effectively with individuals from a wide range of disciplines. More information about the project and how to apply can be found at: http://bit.ly/1rsbKvx “Gudelj, Ivana” via Gmail

May 30, 2014

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The School of Environment & Life Sciences at Salford University, Manchester, is investing in its expanding profile of research and training in the areas of human health and environment. We are now offering new academic positions, some of which are highly relevant to modern evolutionary biology, such as: Lecturer in Bioinformatics/Genomics - Salary range: 37,756 - 45,053, see REF: 1410411 Lecturer in Spatial Epidemiology - Salary range: 37,756 - 45,053, see REF: 1409681 Chair in Science Communication & Digital Media - Salary range: Professorial scale, see REF: 1415337 To apply, visit: http://bit.ly/1wE42hI Closing date: 8 June 2014 Interviews will take place in the week commencing 23 June 2014. To discuss these posts informally, please contact Professor Judith Smith, Head of School j.e.smith@salford.ac.uk via Gmail

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Hello colleagues, We would like to let you know that due to several cancelations a few spots have opened up in our Methods in Ecological Genomics Workshops this summer in the Florida Keys. The two courses offered this year are: Whole-genome genotyping with 2bRAD June 20 - June 27 Global gene expression profiling with tag-based RNA-Seq June 27 - July 5 http://bit.ly/1mC1V87 Each course is $2000.00, which includes accomodation at MOTE. To express interest please send an email with $B!H(BMEGA 2014$B!I(B in the subject line to all the instructors (Mikhail Matz , Sarah Davies , Rachel Wright ). Hope to see you in Florida! Misha, Rachel and Sarah via Gmail
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2014 American Genetic Association Presidential Symposium - Evolution and Plasticity: Adaptive responses by species to human-mediated changes to their ecosystems The AGA symposium is less than a month away — register now! Includes a great lineup of speakers, lots of posters, 2 generously hosted receptions, and free AGA membership. AGA meetings are small and friendly, offering students a great opportunity to interact with top international researchers. 27-29 June 2014 University of Washington, Seattle Schedule: Friday 27 June 6 - 9 PM Hosted reception and poster session Saturday 28 June 8 AM - 5 PM Symposium, Day 1 Key Lecture by David Reznick, UC Riverside, “Hard and soft selection revisited:How evolution by natural selection works in the real world” Saturday 28 June 6 - 9 PM Hosted reception and poster session Sunday 29 June 8 AM - 5 PM Symposium, Day 2 Noon brown-bag discussion, “What should conservation biologists and evolutionary biologists know about epigenetics?” moderated by Katie Peichel, AGA president-elect. This will follow a special presentation by Michael Skinner, WSU, “Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of phenotypic variation in evolution: Lessons from Darwin’s finches” Visit the AGA website to register and book housing: http://bit.ly/1eZIdSq Robin Waples, AGA President agajoh@oregonstate.edu via Gmail