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January 14, 2015

03:25
SMBE SYMPOSIUM ON MICRO-EVO-DEVO – VIENNA JULY 12-16TH 2015. Title: ‘Micro-evo-devo: using natural variation to explain the how and why of phenotypic evolution’ Invited Speaker: Marie Anne-Felix (Institute of Biology of the Ecole Normale SupĂ©rieure, Paris) Dear colleagues, we would like to welcome you to submit your abstract to our symposium on Micro- Evo- Devo. Micro-evo-devo synthesises population genetics and evolutionary developmental biology to take advantage of natural variation to explain the genetic and developmental bases, and fitness consequence of phenotypic change, as well as the evolutionary forces that have shaped it. Therefore, this symposium will highlight how the integrative framework of micro-evo-devo has great potential to explain how and why phenotypic diversity among populations has evolved. This symposium will provide a platform for the most recent advances using established models and attract researchers using recent advances in sequencing and genome editing technologies to investigate phenotypic evolution in emerging models. We expect that our proposed symposium will serve to consolidate this growing community and help the field to realise its full potential to enhance our understanding of the evolution of biological diversity. Registration and abstract submission deadline is Feb 8, 2015 (http://bit.ly/1FUHrVk). Please feel free to contact us directly in case you have any question. Looking forward to seeing you in Vienna! Luisa Pallares (pallares@evolbio.mpg.de) Daniela Nunes (msantos-nunes@brookes.ac.uk) Alistair McGregor (amcgregor@brookes.ac.uk) Daniela Santos Nunes via Gmail
03:05

—Boundary_(ID_N9myiXleYvkwr809UZflcA) Content-type: text/plain; charset=Windows-1252 Content-transfer-encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE Field Assistants Required-North American red squirrels Kluane, Yukon, Canada We are looking for 3 volunteers to assist with fieldwork for the period of February 20 to the end of May, 2015, and a further 5 volunteers from May through August (please note: there is the exciting possibility of linking this position with a sister study’ on Columbian ground squirrels in Alberta. See below). The positions are part of a long-term study of red squirrel population dynamics. As a member of the study, assistants will be involved with monitoring the reproduction and survival of individuals. Fieldwork will involve live-trapping and handling of animals, radio-telemetry, behavioural observation, and climbing trees to find young in nests. This is an excellent opportunity to gain experience working with a collaborative research team on a long-term study of a wild mammal. All fieldwork is carried out in the beautiful backdrop of southwestern Yukon, Canada. We will be staying at a rustic field station two hours from Whitehorse. Food and accommodation are provided. Volunteers are required to provide for their own travel to Edmonton, Alberta; however, travel from Edmonton to the field station (and back again!) is provided. Training will be provided and no experience is necessary, but candidates should have an interest in a number of the following: ecology, evolutionary biology, wildlife, field biology, and animal behaviour. The field camp is remote and low tech (no showers, cell phone service, or internet), so successful applicants must enjoy the outdoors and be able to remain a positive and responsible team member under relatively isolated and demanding conditions. Candidates must be in good physical condition, be willing to climb trees, and have an enthusiasm for learning. We work on squirrel time’, which often involves long work days; as such, applicants must have a strong work ethic. That said, the atmosphere at squirrel camp is friendly and inclusive, and this area is one of the most beautiful in Canada. Columbian ground squirrel study: We are also involved with a similar long-term study on Columbian ground squirrels in Kananaskis, Alberta. We are thus able to provide the opportunity for interested applicants to be involved with both programs. Volunteers would begin work on red squirrels in February and switch to ground squirrels for May to August 31. Both projects use a similar approach (lifetime monitoring using live-trapping and observation), but are conducted in two different landscapes and on species differing in natural history (e.g., winter-active vs. hibernating). If you are interested in this joint opportunity, please see our advertisement on this webpage and mention it in your application. If you wish to apply for one of these posts then please send a CV with a cover letter and contact details for three references (with e-mail addresses), by email to Ainsley Sykes (contact info below), by January 30, 2015. Contact: Ainsley Sykes via email: asykes@ualberta.ca Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta Twitter: @KluaneSquirrels —Boundary_(ID_N9myiXleYvkwr809UZflcA) Content-type: text/html; charset=Windows-1252 Content-transfer-encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE

02:46

Research Associate Position in Single Cell Phylogenomics University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada The Department of Botany seeks a well-trained highly motivated and enthusiastic individual interested in exploring the evolutionary biology of complex microbial life and their organelles using single cell genomics methods coupled with phylogenomic analyses as a Research Associate. The applicant must have a PhD or equivalent and at least three additional years of research experience. Expertise in eukaryotic biodiversity and evolutionary history, and the application of single cell genomics methods (genomic and transcriptomic datasets) and phylogenic analyses are essential. The applicant must have excellent written and oral communication skills and be highly organised. Basic molecular biology and analyses techniques are also highly desirable. The candidate must have a proven record of publication in significant journals in the field.The position is available starting May 15 2015 for an initial period of one year with a possibility for extension subject to a satisfactory performance and funding. To apply, please send a cover letter outlining research experience and interest, a curriculum vitae and the names and contact information for 3 referees to Patrick Keeling, Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, 3529-6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, B. C. V6T 1Z4, Canada. Email pkeeling@mail.ubc.ca. Fax (604) 822-6089. Closing date is Feb. 16, 2015. UBC hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community. We especially welcome applications from visible minority group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others with the skills and knowledge to productively engage with diverse communities. Canadians and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. via Gmail

02:07

SMBE SYMPOSIUM ON DETECTING SELECTION USING ANCIENT GENOMES - VIENNA JULY 12-16TH 2015. We are pleased to invite you to participate in the symposium “Ancient genomes: A time machine for investigating natural selection”, which will take place at the annual meeting of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution (Vienna, July 12-16th 2015). Symposium abstract: ‘Detecting natural selection and processes underlying genetic adaptations are core objectives of evolutionary biology and ecology. A number of statistical approaches have been developed in recent years to detect signatures of natural selection in modern genetic data. However, they all have poor temporal resolution, most are confounded by past demographic processes, and many are insensitive to selection acting on standing variation. Ancient genomics has gained considerable momentum in recent years but its application to selection studies is still in its infancy. Sequencing ancient genomes from fossil material provides a unique snapshot of past genetic variation, thus providing a powerful tool for investigating adaptation hypotheses directly, and the only means of assessing temporal heterogeneity in natural selection. In this Symposium we will explore new methods and the potentials of using heterochronic data to study natural selection, whether comparing ancient genomes to modern variation and/or ancient genomes from different time periods. We will discuss the principles, examples and potential limitations of detecting selection in any organism for which ancient genomes are available, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and humans.’ Confirmed keynote speakers: Johannes Krause (http://bit.ly/1yaI7lQ) and Ludovic Orlando (http://bit.ly/1qXj1Qw). Submit your abstracts for oral presentations (ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 8TH OF FEBRUARY 2015 – Check submission details on SMBE’s annual meeting webpage http://smbe2015.at/). Other important dates: Abstract submission for poster presentations, March 29, 2015 - Early bird registration, March 1, 2015. See you in Vienna! Zuzana Faltyskova, Yoan Diekmann, David DĂ­ez-del-Molino, Pascale Gerbault and Mark Thomas. Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, UK. via Gmail

01:47

—Boundary_(ID_hCtak77prCoV3ghvM4XS0g) Content-type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE Field Assistants Required - Black-tailed prairie dogs Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada I am looking for 3 volunteers to assist with fieldwork beginning March 10 and continuing until July 10 (with a possibility of extension to Oct 10 for at least 1 of the positions). The project investigates the ecology of Black-tailed prairie dogs and will involve live-trapping, handling and monitoring of individuals. Prairie dog towns are home to (among others): burrowing owls, swift fox and, the recently reintroduced, black-footed ferret. Assistants will have the opportunity of seeing all of these iconic grassland species, plus the many more resident in the Park. This is an excellent opportunity to gain experience working with a population of wild mammals in a spectacular setting and in collaboration with university, park and zoo researchers. All fieldwork is carried out in Grasslands National Park, southern Saskatchewan, one of the largest remaining tracts of native prairie in Canada. We will be staying in Parks Canada housing in the heart of the park. Food and accommodation are provided. Volunteers are required to provide for their own travel to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Travel between the field station and Saskatoon is provided. Training will be provided and no experience is necessary, but candidates should have an interest in the following (the more the better!): ecology, evolutionary biology, wildlife, field biology, and conservation biology. The field house and study population is isolated (the nearest town is approx. 45 min away) and, as such, successful applicants need to be able to cope under these conditions, enjoy the outdoors, be up-beat, positive, responsible and work well as a member of a team. If you wish to apply for one of these posts then please send a CV with a cover letter and contact details for three references (with e-mail addresses), by email to Jeff Lane (contact info below) by January 31, 2015. Contact: Dr. Jeff Lane Department of Biology University of Saskatchewan jeffrey.lane@usask.ca www.lanelab.ca —Boundary_(ID_hCtak77prCoV3ghvM4XS0g) Content-type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-transfer-encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE

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01:26
A two-year postdoc position in ancient DNA is currently available at Stockholm University and the Science for Life Laboratory. The successful candidate will join the collaborative research project “Testing the utility of massively parallel sequencing on ancient sediments”. This project is aimed at retrieving and analyzing metagenomic data sets from environmental DNA from 11,000-16,000-year old lake sediments. The postdoctoral position is shared between the groups of Barbara Wohlfarth (Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University), Tanja Slotte (Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, and Science for Life Laboratory) and Laura Parducci (Department of Plant Ecology and Evolution, Uppsala University). The postdoctoral fellow will be employed by the Department of Geological Sciences, but will have his/her main working place at the Science for Life Laboratory in Stockholm. Link to the full ad on Stockholm University’s website: http://bit.ly/1yifWOP Project Ancient lake sediments store a wealth of biological, chemical and physical information that allow reconstructing past climatic and environmental conditions in great detail. Although a wealth of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental information has been obtained, it is clear that the analysed microscopic and macroscopic fossil assemblages only represent a tiny fraction of the organisms that had existed at a certain time in the past and that each of the analytical methods employed has its specific limitation. Recent advances in environmental DNA analyses that make use of new large-scale sequencing technologies now offer the unprecedented opportunity to unravel a complementary spectrum of ancient faunal and floral remains than those identified by micro- or macrofossil analyses. As such, aDNA analysis can provide a completely new understanding of how ecosystems responded to dramatic climatic changes. The postdoctoral fellow will work in close collaboration with molecular ecologists, paleoecologists, paleoclimatologists and bioinformaticians and will utilize state-of-the-art approaches to retrieve and analyze the metagenomic data sets and to lead hypothesis-driven genomic analyses in an evolutionary context. He/she will also be involved in fieldwork (coring lake sediments), lab-work to sub-sample the sediment cores and DNA extraction in facilities specifically dedicated to ancient DNA extraction. Bioinformatics work will be done in collaboration with the Bioinformatic Service (https://www.bils.se) available at the Science for Life Laboratory in Stockholm. Terms of employment This is a full-time position for two years, financed by the Faculty of Science at Stockholm University. Salaries at Stockholm University are set on an individual basis. The preferred starting date is May 2015. Qualification requirements The applicant must hold a doctoral degree from an accredited college/university in a subject area relevant to the project. The ideal candidate must have very good experience in molecular biology, genetics, and bioinformatic analyses or equivalent. Candidates with a strong record in genetics/genomics, and previous experience in the field of ancient DNA will be preferred. Experience beyond the doctoral degree is not required. However the successful candidate must be highly motivated, creatively thinking and have a record of high quality scientific publications. He/she must demonstrate independency in working and be able to collaborate with scientists from different disciplines (biology, paleoscience, bioinformatics). Excellent English language skills, both written and spoken, are required. Selection criteria The successful applicant will be selected based on the qualifications specified above. References and interviews will be used during the selection process to assess the qualifications of the applicants. Infrastructure and environment Stockholm University is a leading European university offering a multicultural environment in one of the world’s most dynamic capital cities. With more than 60,000 students and 5,000 staff, the University facilitates individual and societal development by providing top quality education that is tightly linked to its internationally recognized research programs. The Department of Geological Sciences (http://bit.ly/1zaiAJD) is located in the Frescati Campus of Stockholm University. Our research combines classical geology with geochemistry, marine geology and paleoclimate and is strongly integrated with the interests of the Bolin Centre for Climate Research (http://bit.ly/1zaiAJF). Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab, http://bit.ly/17a7QLt) is a collaboration between Stockholm University, the Karolinska Institute, the Royal Institute of Technology, and Uppsala University, is a national centre for large-scale biosciences with a focus on health and environmental research. The centre combines advanced technical know-how and state-of-the-art equipment with a broad knowledge in translational medicine and molecular biosciences. The postdoctoral researcher will be employed by the Department of Geological Sciences and will be integrated into SciLifeLab in Stockholm. He/she will frequently visit the Department of Plant Ecology and Evolution, Uppsala University to perform laboratory work. The environment is international with English as the working language. More information Further information about the position can be requested from Barbara Wohlfarth (barbara.wohlfarth@geo.su.se), tel. +46(0)8-16 48 83; Tanja Slotte (tanja.slotte@su.se); and Laura Parducci (laura.parducci@ebc.uu.se), tel. +46(0)18-471 64 14. Trade union representatives Anqi Lindblom-Ahlm (SACO-S), Lisbeth HĂ€ggberg (Fackförbundet ST), tel. 08-16 20 00 (switchboard), and Gunnar Stenberg (SEKO), tel. +46 70 316 43 41. Application Applications marked with reference number SU FV-0064-15 should be submitted electronically as a single PDF file. Applications should comprise the following: 1. CV, including full contact information, date of birth and date of PhD degree 2. Personal statement describing research interests (1-2 paragraphs), research experience (1-2 paragraphs) and career goals (1-2 paragraphs). 3. List of publications. 4. List of 2-3 references; please include name, e-mail address and telephone number. 5. Relevant documents: the applicants are encouraged to provide copies of documents that substantiate their qualifications Welcome with your complete application, labeled with reference number SU FV-0064-15 no later than March 15, 2015 to: registrator@su.se. Stockholm University strives to be a workplace, which is free from discrimination and offers equal opportunities to everyone. Tanja Slotte via Gmail
00:30
*Biodiversity and Metagenomics of the Herbivore Microbiome* The Dearing lab at the University of Utah invites applications for a postdoctoral fellow to participate in a collaborative study to understand the gut microbiome of mammalian herbivores with respect to detoxification of plant defensive compounds. Our investigations suggest 1) the microbiome in the foregut of woodrats is critical for the ingestion of dietary toxins, 2) microbial biodiversity is important in this process and 3) previous exposure to toxins shapes the microbiome. For more information on previous research, see: http://bit.ly/1BnDPqK This postdoctoral position will focus on the influences of host evolutionary history and diet in sculpting the diversity and function of the mammalian microbiome. One component of this will be a broad survey of microbiomes and phylogeny across the woodrat genus (*Neotoma). *The ideal candidate will have a strong interest and experience in microbial ecology and metagenomics, with experience in gut systems preferably of vertebrates. Basic bioinformatic and molecular skills are required. Fieldwork for small mammal collection will be necessary; prior experience preferred but not required. The candidate should have a demonstrated record of publication with at least one first authored publication in press, and will be expected to work well in a collaborative environment. The Dearing lab provides a strong training and career development environment for candidates interested in academic positions. *Applications will be reviewed as they are received through January 30, 2015*. The preferred start date is March 15, 2015. Please send a C.V., statement of research experience and interests that includes career goals (1-2 pgs), pdfs of papers, and contact information (emails, phone numbers and professional relationship) for at least 3 professional references to Dr. Denise Dearing, care of Dr. Jael Malenke ; please put $B!H(BMicrobiome Postdoctoral Applicant$B!I(B in the Subject Line. jaelmalenke@gmail.com via Gmail
00:30
Responses to sexual environments modelled as neural networks. Norwich Research Park Doctoral Training Partnership PI: T Chapman (http://bit.ly/1BnDPaq) Co-Is: Tamas Dalmay, Irina Mohorianu. The ability to respond appropriately to the environment (e.g. temperature, day length, presence of females or same-sex rivals) is crucially important. Therefore the detection of environmental cues, and integration of information from them, are vital. Recently, there has been much interest in modelling the underlying biological mechanisms responsible, using ‘neural networks’. Our recent work suggests that the response of male fruitflies to conspecific mating rivals can be modelled via this type of network. The aim is to test this idea and identify the alternative pathways involved. This will be done via the analysis of RNA sequencing data of the transcriptomes of males with manipulated sensory systems. http://bit.ly/1AOJ0hT Contact for more information: tracey.chapman@uea.ac.uk Application Deadline: 06/03/2015 “Tracey Chapman (BIO)” via Gmail

January 13, 2015

23:32

[corrected version] Dear colleagues, it is our pleasure to invite you to submit abstracts to our symposium on the **Origins and Evolution of Molecular Innovation** ! Our guest invited speaker is Prof. M. Mar AlbĂ  from the UPF in Barcelona. This symposium will be a part of the 2015 Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution Meeting (http://smbe2015.at/). The meeting will be held in the Hofburg Palace in Vienna, Austria, from July 12 to 16. Further about the destination can be found here: http://bit.ly/1BORVzD The deadline for registration is Feb. 8, 2015. You may find registration information and a link to the registration portal here: http://bit.ly/1Hs3vnD Symposium description: Generally, the field of molecular evolution is dominated by studies of descent with accumulation of slight modifications. However, larger changes are also possible, in which entirely new molecular features originate for the first time. We will consider rapid or spontaneous molecular innovations of diverse kinds (structures, functions, interactions, networks), with a preference for the most dramatic leaps between the absence and the presence of the molecular traits or features in question. Timely examples of great interest in the community include (i) de novo emergence of new genes, protein domains, regulatory regions and (ii) neo-functionalization, e.g. via the acquisition of new and adaptive binding activities. The symposium will not only address well-documented examples of spontaneous emergence of novel molecular traits, but also cover findings relevant to the processes of innovation and its aftermath. These include (but are not limited to) the roles of promiscuity (e.g. in the emergence of novel enzymatic functions) and stochasticity across different organization levels. We look forward to seeing you in Vienna! Joanna Masel (masel@u.arizona.edu) Rafik Neme (rneme@evolbio.mpg.de) Erich Bornberg-Bauer (ebb@wwu.de) via Gmail

05:05
—_000_D0D99B072787Emaslotmanagtamuedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable A post-doctoral position is available in the Slotman laboratory in the Department of Entomology at Texas A&M University (http://bit.ly/1q2xluC). Our lab focuses on the evolutionary and behavioral genetics/genomics of disease transmitting mosquitoes. The post-doc will conduct NIH-funded research into the genomic basis of outdoor feeding preference of the African malaria mosquito An. gambiae. This mosquito generally prefers feeding indoors, but after years of indoor-based vector control on Bioko Island has shifted its behavior towards a preference for outdoor feeding. We are taking a whole genome Pool-seq approach to map genetic differences between indoor and outdoor host-seeking An. gambiae mosquitoes on Bioko. In addition, the successful candidate will be expected to contribute to ongoing research into the genetic basis of attraction of An. gambiae to human hosts. The ideal candidate will have a background in population genetics, experience with analyzing next-generation sequencing data, and familiarity with R and Python (or Perl). The Texas A&M System is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Veterans/Disability Employer committed to diversity. The position is available for two years available immediately, but start date is open to negotiation. If you are interested in applying for this position please send a cover letter, CV, PDFs of representative publications, and contact information for three references to maslotman@tamu.edu. —_000_D0D99B072787Emaslotmanagtamuedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
04:22
Dear Colleagues, Abstracts for oral presentations are being sought for a phylogenetics symposium titled “Untangling information, noise, and phylogenetic reconstruction in genome scale data”, a part of SMBE 2015 (July 12-16) in Vienna, Austria. Abstracts are due Feb 8, 2015 at the SMBE 2015 submission website (http://bit.ly/1xIlYts) Invited Speakers: Tandy Warnow (University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana) Olivier Gascuel, Le Laboratoire dInformatique, de Robotique et de Microlectronique de Montpellier, France Organizers: Khidir Hilu, Virginia Tech (hilukw@vt.edu) Jeffery Townsend, Yale University (jeffrey.townsend@yale.edu) Arindam RoyChoudhury, Columbia University (ar2946@cumc.columbia.edu) A brief summary of the symposium theme: Phylogenetic information and noise are central components in successful tree reconstruction as they can invariably impact tree resolution, support, and accuracy. As we attempt to resolve deeper, shorter internodes and estimate short branch lengths in the tree of life with genome-scale data sets, the magnitude of impact of these two components is accentuated considerably, as is the prevalence of conflicts among gene trees. These phylogenetic issues are greatly entangled with intrinsic gene features, e.g. gene mode and tempo of evolution, and are exacerbated by historic depth. A high rate of nucleotide substitution can obscure phylogenetic information, and sometimes yields noise at deep historic times. However, fast rates and genome-scale datasets also potentially yield much more information if modeled accurately, taxa are sufficiently sampled, and substitution rate is not so fast. Thus, our symposium will be relevant to molecular evolution, phylogenetics and genomics. Recruited speakers will address theoretical and empirical studies relating to: 1) assessment of suitability of genomic regions across a spectrum of nucleotide substitution rates and selection pressure to resolve phylogenetic trees; 2) comparison between whole genome vs. optimal genes approaches; 3) evaluation of the effectiveness of current approaches/algorithms used in discerning sources of signal, noise and conflicts among phylogenetic trees; 4) fast methods and algorithms for dating and phylogenetic reconstruction of large genomic data. Best regards, Arindam RoyChoudhury “RoyChoudhury, Arindam” via Gmail
04:22

—_000_8CF4BD0AE46C7142B6EFA932141BB91ECB2C32BAuwmbx06uwluse_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The link to the previously (Jan 4) advertised postdoc to study sexual selection and hybridisation in lizards is now unfortunately broken. To access information about this position (Official Records Number: NPA 2014/747) and two other postdoc opportunities in my group at Lund University, please see information posted on Jan 5 on the following link (which allows you to continue to the list of vacancies and the application system): http://bit.ly/1C235kd Apologies for any confusion caused. Dr Tobias Uller Wallenberg Academy Fellow Department of Biology Lund University —_000_8CF4BD0AE46C7142B6EFA932141BB91ECB2C32BAuwmbx06uwluse_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

The link to the previously (Jan 4) advertised postdoc to study sexual selection and hybridisation in lizards is now unfortunately broken. To access information about this position (Official Records Number: NPA 2014/747) and two other postdoc opportunities in my group at Lund University, please see information posted on Jan 5 on the following link (which allows you to continue to the list of vacancies and the application system): http://bit.ly/1C235kd Apologies for any confusion caused. Dr Tobias Uller Wallenberg Academy Fellow Department of Biology Lund University —_000_8CF4BD0AE46C7142B6EFA932141BB91ECB2C32BAuwmbx06uwluse via Gmail
03:23
Nutritional stress and thermal adaptation Applications are invited for a PhD fellowship/scholarship at Graduate School of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark, within the Bioscience programme. The position is available from 1 May 2015 or later. Title: Nutritional stress and thermal adaptation Research area and project description: Evolutionary genetics, ecophysiology and molecular biology. The PhD student should study effects of variable nutritional regimes and interactions between nutrition, temperature and genotype on stress resistance and life history traits using Drosophila as a model organism. It is intended to use rearing and test conditions that are ecological relevant making the studies of strong interest from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Relevant molecular work should complement organismal phenotypic analyses, possibly followed up by the application of relevant “omics” techniques. The work will be done under the supervision of Prof. Volker Loeschcke (AU) in collaboration with Prof. MSO Torsten N. Kristensen from Aalborg University and in interaction with PhD students/post-docs Mads F. Schou and Tommaso Manenti and supported by grants from the Danish Natural Research Council (the project will be funded by grants of Natural Science Research Council to Volker Loeschcke (2/3) and Torsten Nygaard Kristensen (1/3). Qualifications and specific competences: A Master’s degree in Bioscience, Biotechnology or similar or a bachelor’s degree in a relevant subject are possible backgrounds. A strong interest in experimental as well as analytical work is required, and experience with the model organism Drosophila is an advantage. Place of Employment and Place of Work: The place of employment is Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Denmark, and the place of work is the section for Genetics, Ecology and Evolution, Ny Munkegade 114-116, 8000 Aarhus C, or for part of the time at Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Section of Biology and Environmental Science, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7H, DK-9220 Aalborg East, Denmark Contacts: Applicants seeking further information are invited to visit http://bit.ly/1Bhqf8p or contact: Volker Loeschcke, phone: +45 2899 2368, e-mail: volker@bios.au.dk, or Torsten Nygaard Kristensen, phone: +45 61463375, email: tnk@bio.aau.dk, for further information about the position. Torsten Nygrd Kristensen via Gmail
03:23

Two field assistant positions to study oxidative stress in relation to social status in house sparrows in Switzerland. We are seeking for two (2) research assistants for the upcoming breeding season to join a project investigating the impact of oxidative stress and social status on the development of reproductive strategies in house sparrow. The research will be conducted in Bern, Switzerland. The work will start on 1st of April and will continue through early/mid July. Our project investigates how males with different positions in a dominance hierarchy allocate their antioxidant resources to the protection of their sperm vs. the protection of their somatic functions, and how such allocation strategies affect the quality of the sperm they produce. The project is based at the University of Neuchatel, Switzerland (PI Prof. Fabrice Helfenstein, PhD student Alfonso Rojas), but will be conducted at Hasli, Bern, Switzerland. The work of the volunteers will consist in carrying out an experiment in aviaries with house sparrows. This includes assisting the PhD student with catching and banding birds, behavioural observations, sample collection, data management and data analysis. During the conduct of the experiment we work 7 days a week and 10-12 hours a day. Qualifications: (1) BSc or higher in Biology or similar qualification (2) Ability to work and live in small groups and sociable personality (3) Fluent in English (French and/or German are a plus, but not essential) (4) Ability to endure long working days (5) Knowledge in observing & handling birds is a plus (6) Driving license. This is a volunteer field assistant position, thus the applicant should cover his/her travel expenses and food. Accommodation expenses will be covered (up to 500.-CHF/month). Applications - including a CV and a letter of motivation (1 pg.) - should be send to both: Fabrice Helfenstein: fabrice.helfenstein@unine.ch and Alfonso Rojas: alf.roja@gmail.com Please use “Volunteer Assistant in Switzerland” as the subject and note your availability during this time period in the body of the e-mail. Applications received until 15th of February 2014 will be given full consideration. Do not hesitate to contact us for further information. via Gmail

02:44

Dear colleagues, it is our pleasure to invite you to submit abstracts to our symposium about **Origins and Evolution of Molecular Innovation** ! Our guest invited speaker is Prof. M. Mar AlbĂ  from the UPF in Barcelona. This symposium will be a part of the 2015 Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution Meeting (http://smbe2015.at/). The meeting will be held in the Hofburg Palace in Vienna, Austria. More details about the destination can be found here: http://bit.ly/1BORVzD The deadline for registration is Feb. 8, 2015. You may find registration information and a link to the registration portal here: http://bit.ly/1Hs3vnD Symposium description: Generally, the field of molecular evolution is dominated by studies of descent with accumulation of slight modifications. However, larger changes are also possible, in which entirely new molecular features originate for the first time. We will consider rapid or spontaneous molecular innovations of diverse kinds (structures, functions, interactions, networks), with a preference for the most dramatic leaps between the absence and the presence of the molecular traits or features in question. Timely examples of great interest in the community include (i) de novo emergence of new genes, protein domains, regulatory regions and (ii) neo-functionalization, e.g. via the acquisition of new and adaptive binding activities. The symposium will not only address well-documented examples of spontaneous emergence of novel molecular traits, but also cover findings relevant to the processes of innovation and its aftermath. These include (but are not limited to) the roles of promiscuity (e.g. in the emergence of novel enzymatic functions) and stochasticity across different organization levels. We look forward to seeing you in Vienna! Joanna Masel (masel@u.arizona.edu) Rafik Neme (rneme@evolbio.mpg.de) Erich Bornberg-Bauer (ebb@wwu.de) via Gmail

02:25

Post-Doctoral Fellow (PDF) in Functional Conservation Genomics A collaborative research program on caribou conservation is seeking a conservation geneticist, molecular ecologist, molecular biologist or bioinformatician with strong quantitative skills for ecotype characterization of Canadian caribou. The relationship among sub-species and ecotypes will be examined in assessing the reconstruction of population histories across Canada. This project is a partnership between academic and provincial government agencies with significant engagement with industrial partners. The PDF will use a large DNA dataset to expand into functional gene characterization and mitogenomics of caribou representative of nation-wide sampling efforts. The PDF will be expected to take a leadership role in coordinating a team of graduate and undergraduate students and liaise with project partners. The salary is $40,000/year and the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found. Applicants should submit a CV, a statement of research interests, and the names and contact information for three references. Please submit applications to: Dr. Paul J. Wilson Canada Research Chair in DNA Profiling, Forensics & Functional Genomics Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, K9J7B8 Phone 705.748.1011 ext. 7259; Fax 705.748.1003 Website: http://bit.ly/1IpeRtb pawilson@trentu.ca or Dr. Micheline Manseau Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba 70 Dysart Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 Phone 204.474.9889; Fax 204.261.0038 Website: www.lecol-ck.ca Micheline.Manseau@pc.gc.ca Post-Doctoral Fellow (PDF) in Landscape Genomics A collaborative research program on caribou conservation is seeking a researcher with strong quantitative skills to complement a research team examining the spatial genetic/genomic dynamics of Canadian boreal caribou. This project is a partnership between academic, federal and provincial government agencies and the private sector and builds on a multi-year dataset. The PDF will use project data to characterize the spatial genetic structure and landscape/environmental variables influencing caribou herds, ecotypes and associated subspecies based on genetic structure using mitogenomics, SNP analyses and functional gene profiles. The research will assess the potential impacts of anthropogenic activities, e.g. mining and protected areas, on caribou genetic structure by developing predictive genetic structure models within defined conservation units or targeted areas-of-interest for development or protection. The PDF will be expected to take a leadership role in coordinating a team of graduate and undergraduate students and liaise with project partners. The salary is $40,000/year + benefits and the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found. Applicants should submit a CV, a statement of research interests, and the names and contact information for three references. Please submit applications to: Dr. Paul J. Wilson Canada Research Chair in DNA Profiling, Forensics & Functional Genomics Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, K9J7B8 Phone 705.748.1011 ext. 7259; Fax 705.748.1003 Website: http://bit.ly/1IpeRtbwww.lecol-ck.ca Micheline.Manseau@pc.gc.ca Post-Doctoral Fellow (PDF) in Landscape Genomics A collaborative research program on caribou conservation is seeking a researcher with strong quantitative skills to complement a research team examining the spatial genetic/genomic dynamics of Canadian boreal caribou. This project is a partnership between academic, federal and provincial government agencies and the private sector and builds on a multi-year dataset. The PDF will use project data to characterize the spatial genetic structure and landscape/environmental variables influencing caribou herds, ecotypes and associated subspecies based on genetic structure using mitogenomics, SNP analyses and functional gene profiles. The research will assess the potential impacts of anthropogenic activities, e.g. mining and protected areas, on caribou genetic structure by developing predictive genetic structure models within defined conservation units or targeted areas-of-interest for development or protection. The PDF will be expected to take a leadership role in coordinating a team of graduate and undergraduate students and liaise with project partners. The salary is $40,000/year + benefits and the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found. Applicants should submit a CV, a statement of research interests, and the names and contact information for three references. Please submit applications to: Dr. Paul J. Wilson Canada Research Chair in DNA Profiling, Forensics & Functional Genomics Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, K9J7B8 Phone 705.748.1011 ext. 7259; Fax 705.748.1003 Website: http://bit.ly/1IpeRtb pawilson@trentu.ca or Dr. Micheline Manseau Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba 70 Dysart Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 Phone 204.474.9889; Fax 204.261.0038 Website: www.lecol-ck.ca Micheline.Manseau@pc.gc.ca Jill Lalor Research Technician Trent University Genomics Lab A112 and Wilson Lab C254 2140 East Bank Drive Peterborough, ON K9J 7B8 705-748-1011 ext 6657 via Gmail

02:06
Dear colleagues and friends, This is to announce the meeting that Jonathan Wendel, Scot Jackson, Olivier Panaud, Michael Purugganan and myself are organizing in Barcelona very soon, in March (17-18), on plant genome evolution. The meeting is entitled “Evolution of plant phenotypes, from genomes to traits” and will be divided in three scientific sessions: 1. Mechanisms generating genome variability, with special emphasis on polyploidy and TEs; 2. Evolution of plant phenotypes: wild and domesticated species; 3. Domestication and plant improvement: Putting science into practice in the aid of the human condition. We have a group of excellent speaker from the US, the EU, Israel and Japan that will ensure a fantastic discussion on these exciting and timely scientific questions. The registration will be available very soon at the price of only 100 euro (which includes the lunch onsite for the two days of the conference). Please visit the webpage of the meeting (http://bit.ly/1u23Fdi) for more information on the meeting. Hope to see you in Barcelona! Best wishes, Josep Olivier Panaud via Gmail
02:06

Dear Colleagues, Don’t forget the application deadline for the course “Systematics and Biology of Hydrozoa” is this week. The 2-week workshop held in Panama is aimed for at a graduate student level, but is open to any researcher wishing to learn more about hydrozoa, including collection managers, people involved in bioinventories and surveys and advanced undergraduates with appropriate preparation. Find out more at: http://bit.ly/1u23EWT logy_Tropical_Hydrozoa.html Or Contact one of us Dr. Rachel Collin CollinR@si.edu Dr. MariaPia Miglietta miglietm@tamug.edu via Gmail

01:23
PhD studentship: Next-generation sequencing approaches to short-tandem repeat sequence variation: mutation processes, haplotype evolution and forensic application A fully funded four-year BBSRC CASE PhD Studentship is available with Prof Mark Jobling and Dr Jon Wetton to use next-generation sequencing (NGS) to study the internal structure of human short-tandem repeats. These markers are universally used in forensic analysis, but genotyping considers only allele length, and not allele sequence. The next decade promises to bring the power of NGS to bear on forensic identification, yet little is known about what new opportunities and problems sequence data will bring. The project will address the following questions: i) What is the internal sequence variability of autosomal and Y-STRs in human populations? ii) How are sequence variants (e.g. variant repeats, microdeletions) related to linked SNP variation? iii) What does the information from (i) and (ii) add to our understanding of microgeographic variation? iv) What can we learn about STR mutation processes from an appreciation of sequence variability? v) How can information from (iii) and (iv) be used in a forensic context? Close collaboration with Key Forensic Services Ltd. (http://bit.ly/1y88Aip) is an essential part of the project, and the student will spend 3-6 months in their laboratories on the University of Warwick campus. For further details and how to apply, see: http://bit.ly/14u9fhK Prof Mark A. Jobling Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow in Basic Biomedical Science Department of Genetics Room G5, Adrian Building University of Leicester University Road Leicester LE1 7RH UK tel.: +44 (0)116 252 3427 mob.: +44 (0)7955 882334 fax: +44 (0)116 252 3378 email: maj4@le.ac.uk web: http://bit.ly/1y88B5S Mark Jobling via Gmail