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November 22, 2014

02:43
CUNY.NewYork.ComparativePopulationGenetics The Hickerson lab at the City University of New York has an opening for a PhD student who is interested in community-level population genetics and comparative phylogeography. The group is focusing on developing and implementing population genetic methods for understanding the evolutionary and demographic histories of species assemblages. The ideal candidate will have a strong interest or aptitude in quantitative biology, modeling, and programming as well as an interest in evolutionary genetics and biogeography. The lab welcomes qualified applicants with diverse backgrounds, including biology, anthropology, mathematics, physics, computer science, and related fields. This opening offers an opportunity for independent research in joint quantitative and empirical labs that now have 2 postdoctoral researchers, 3 PhD students and access to a wide array of population genomic datasets. We are in active collaboration with the lab of Ana Carnaval (CCNY) on an NSF-funded Dimensions of Biodiversity project (www.afbiota.org) focusing on the Atlantic Forest ecosystem of Brazil. There is a tight collaboration with the Kyle McDonalds group at City College of New York as well as with the research groups of Michelangeli and Thomas at the New York Botanical Garden. Through our 5 year NSF CAREER grant (http://1.usa.gov/1uM3lCZ), our group is also in close collaboration with the research groups led by Konrad Lohse (http://bit.ly/151xXaq) and Graham Stone at the University of Edinburgh (http://bit.ly/1AedKuC), as well as with Elizabeth Derryberry (Tulane; http://bit.ly/1EWRzHp) and curator Brian Smith from the nearby American museum of Natural History (http://bit.ly/1xkZwWq). The lab benefits from a thriving academic environment in New York City and has close ties with other biogeographically focused labs at CUNY and the American Museum of Natural History, as well as being part of the CUNY subprogram in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (http://bit.ly/1F0kpZc). We anticipate that the position would start in the Fall of 2015. If interested please contact Mike Hickerson (mhickersion at ccny.cuny.edu). Note that applications for Fall 2015 to the CUNY EEB subprogram must be received before January 1rst. For more information visit: http://bit.ly/1a2oJFKwww.afbiota.org) focusing on the Atlantic Forest ecosystem of Brazil. There is a tight collaboration with the Kyle McDonalds group at City College of New York as well as with the research groups of Michelangeli and Thomas at the New York Botanical Garden. Through our 5 year NSF CAREER grant (http://1.usa.gov/1uM3lCZ), our group is also in close collaboration with the research groups led by Konrad Lohse (http://bit.ly/151xXaq) and Graham Stone at the University of Edinburgh (http://bit.ly/1AedKuC), as well as with Elizabeth Derryberry (Tulane; http://bit.ly/1EWRzHp) and curator Brian Smith from the nearby American museum of Natural History (http://bit.ly/1xkZwWq). The lab benefits from a thriving academic environment in New York City and has close ties with other biogeographically focused labs at CUNY and the American Museum of Natural History, as well as being part of the CUNY subprogram in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (http://bit.ly/1F0kpZc). We anticipate that the position would start in the Fall of 2015. If interested please contact Mike Hickerson (mhickersion at ccny.cuny.edu). Note that applications for Fall 2015 to the CUNY EEB subprogram must be received before January 1rst. For more information visit: http://bit.ly/1a2oJFK Mike Hickerson Associate Professor City College of New York - Biology Department; City University of New York Ecology, Evolution and Behavior Sub-Program 160 Convent Ave New York, NY 10031 phone 212-650-8530 lab 212-650-3457 Research Associate - Division of Invertebrate Zoology American Museum of Natural Historyhttp://hickerlab.wordpress.com/ mhickerson@ccny.cuny.edu Mike Hickerson via Gmail
02:26
Dear Colleagues, I am seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral researcher with an exceptional background in bioinformatics, functional genomics, or evolutionary genomics. Experience analyzing Illumina sequence data, computer programming proficiency, and training in ecological or evolutionary genetics are highly desirable. We recently received generous funding for yeast evolutionary genomics research from the National Science Foundations Dimensions of Biodiversity Program (http://1.usa.gov/1vnuUlV) and the Pew Charitable Trusts (http://bit.ly/1ruTJKa). With Antonis Rokas (Vanderbilt) and Cletus P. Kurtzman (USDA), the Y1000+ Project (http://1.usa.gov/1vnuUlW) seeks to sequence and analyze the to complete genomes of all ~1,000 known species of Saccharomycotina yeasts and determine the genetic basis of their metabolic, ecological, and functional diversification. Yeasts are genetically more diverse than vertebrates and have remarkable metabolic dexterity, but most remain minimally characterized. They compete vigorously for nutrients in every continent and biome and can produce everything from beer to oil. The history of yeasts is recorded in their genome sequences. Now is the time to read it and tell their story! The Hittinger Lab has diverse funding for other basic and applied research from NSF, DOE, and USDA, but we are specifically expanding our basic research in ecological and evolutionary genomics. The complete advertisement and application instructions can be found here: http://bit.ly/1ruTKhh. The precise start date is flexible, but candidates should apply by November 30th to receive full consideration. Sincerely, Chris Todd Hittinger, Assistant Professor of Genetics Genome Center of Wisconsin J. F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution University of Wisconsin-Madison 425-G Henry Mall, 2434 Genetics/Biotechnology Center Madison, WI 53706-1580 cthittinger@wisc.edu, (608) 890-2586 http://bit.ly/1vnuUm0 Chris Hittinger via Gmail
01:59
Postdoctoral Position Genomics of Migration My group combines several biological disciplines including behavioural observation, evolutionary genomics, molecular ecology, and bioinformatics, and utilises emergent technologies to identify the genetic basis of migratory traits. Here we focus on identifying the genes and signaling pathways behind the components shaping the migratory phenotype in the blackcap, a well characterised migratory songbird species. We will complement the sequencing approach with gene expression profiling and characterisation of chromatin modification to investigate the extent of phenotypic variation manifested by expression differences, either through slight genetic differences or epigenetic processes. The key focus of this project is to understand: Which genes harbour coding variation with relevant consequences for migratory traits, and which signalling cascades are involved in shaping the migratory phenotype? Within this project that is funded through a Max Planck Research Group Grant, I am offering a 2 year postdoctoral position with the possibility for extension. The postdoc will assume a central position within this project that is funded through an independent Max Planck Research Group Grant. Project start is January 2015 and the ideal starting date for the postdoc is April 2015. The ideal candidate has a biological training, background in bioinformatics with skills in programming (scripts and analysis pipelines), next generation sequence analysis, genome assembly and annotation. The successful candidate will be involved in fundamental research questions on migratory genomics, and I highly appreciate a creative postdoc who is motivated to contribute to and extends our research agenda to understand the genetic architecture of migratory traits. The core dataset that will be generated includes Illumina sequencing of the blackcap genome from populations with varying migratory phenotypes, some of which will be used for de novo genome assembly. The expected output of the postdoc is to contribute to the genome assembly and to compare the genomic makeup and underlying signaling pathways of different populations with various migratory phenotypes. We offer an English speaking and ambitious working environment at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Pln, Germany. Cutting edge infrastructure is available at all levels, including high-performance computer clusters and next-generation sequencing core facility. The Institutes main fields of work include evolutionary ecology (Prof. Dr. M. Milinski), evolutionary genetics (Prof. Dr. D. Tautz) and evolutionary theory (Prof. Dr. A. Traulsen) and hosts a number of research groups providing ample opportunities for collaborations and interactions. The MPI in Pln further collaborates with the nearby Christian Albrechts University of Kiel in a joint International Max Planck Research School that attracts PhD students from abroad which contributes to a multicultural working atmosphere. The Max Planck Society is committed to also employing handicapped individuals and especially encourages them to apply. The Max Planck Society seeks to increase the number of women in those areas where they are underrepresented and therefore explicitly encourages women to apply. Applications should include 1) a cover letter outlining your motivation to work on this project as well as relevant experience, 2) a detailed curriculum vitae and copies of certificates, and 3) the contact details of three academic referees. Please send the above as a single .pdf file to liedvogel@evolbio.mpg.de. Review of applications will start on January 1st 2015, but candidates will be considered until the position is filled. For more information, feel free to contact me! Miriam Liedvogel liedvogel@evolbio.mpg.de Max Planck Research Group Behavioural Genomics Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Biology August-Thienemann-Strae 2 24306 Pln, Germany http://bit.ly/1uOKA0F Miriam Liedvogel via Gmail
01:59
Marine Invertebrate Biologist The Department of Marine Biology and Ecology (MBE) formerly known as the Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries (MBF) at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, RSMAS , invites applications for a tenure-track position in Marine Invertebrate Biology as part of a broad strategic plan involving 16 faculty hires over the coming few years. This will be a 9-month guaranteed salary position and is intended to be at the rank of Assistant Professor but exceptional applicants at other ranks will be considered. The anticipated start date is August 2015. We are searching for an outstanding candidate working on any marine invertebrate group and questions. Potential research areas include, but are not restricted to: comparative or developmental physiology, organism-environment interactions, toxicology, climate change impacts, ecological and/or evolutionary genomics, or ecology. Preference will be given to applicants applying a broad range of techniques and approaches with strong potential for within and among department collaborations, as well as interactions with our Coral Gables and Medical campuses . Research interests of the faculty in MBE span, in no particular order, fisheries/population level biology; coastal and coral reef biology, ecology and conservation; organismal biology; marine health and biomedicine, and biological oceanography. The successful applicant will be housed in the recently inaugurated 85,000 sf Marine Technology and Life Sciences Seawater Complex that hosts state-of-the-science biological and chemical labs for seawater research and hands-on teaching. In addition, the hire would have access to marine invertebrate culture facilities associated with our NIH-supported National Resource for Aplysia, as well as the extensive collections of our Marine Invertebrate Museum . The hire will also have access to on-campus research vessels, including the F.G. Walton Smith (a 96-foot research catamaran), multiple smaller boats, Broad Key (a 63-acre island recently acquired as a field station for marine research and education, as well as a pool currently under construction for the training of scientific divers. The successful candidate will contribute to teaching and mentoring students at the undergraduate and graduate level, and is expected to teach Invertebrate Zoology in our top-ranked Marine Sciences undergraduate (B.S.) program, and related courses in our graduate programs (Ph. D., M. S. and Professional Masters). The RSMAS campus is located on Virginia Key, a unique community of marine research and educational institutions 15 minutes from downtown Miami, Florida. Approximately $250M per year is invested in marine science and education on Virginia Key, including RSMAS, the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, the NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center, the Miami Seaquarium, and the Maritime and Science Technology Academy (MAST). Applicants must have a Ph. D. in a relevant field, appropriate postdoctoral training, and the ability to establish and maintain a vigorous, extramurally-funded research program. A complete application includes a cover letter, curriculum vitae, separate statements of research and teaching interests, and the names and contact information of at least three references. The position will remain opened until filled, but to receive full consideration, applications should be received by January 15, 2014. We anticipate conducting interviews for the positions in February 2015. Inquiries should be directed to MBEsearch@rsmas.miami.edu The University of Miami is an Equal Opportunity Employer, and we encourage qualified individuals to apply regardless of race, gender, disability, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or gender expression. Andrew C. Baker, Ph.D. Associate Professor, University of Miami Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation Visit the lab on Facebook by clicking here Department of Marine Biology and Ecology Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science University of Miami 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy. Miami, FL 33149, USA Office: +1 (305) 421-4642 Lab: +1 (305) 421-4226 Fax: +1 (305) 421-4600 Email: abaker@rsmas.miami.edu Associate Conservation Scientist Wildlife Conservation Society www.wcs.org/marine Andrew Baker via Gmail
01:48
Hi, We have been having serious problems with the PC supplied with our ABI 3130 sequencer. It is now looking very likely that the PC will have to be replaced. I have therefore been wondering if it is possible to successfully run a 3130 sequencer using a different PC to that with which it is supplied. I would be interested to know how well the Genemapper software runs on different PCs. Thank you, Robert Donnelly robert.donnelly@plymouth.ac.uk Robert Donnelly via Gmail
01:28
Conference: Lausanne.ESEB2015_ExperimentalEvolutionOfEcosystems.Aug10-14 Dear evoldir members, We would like to announce the symposium Experimental evolution and ecology of (microbial and other) ecosystems at the ESEB 2015 conference and would like to invite abstract submissions. This symposium aims at showcasing recent studies and bringing together ecological and (experimental) evolutionary approaches to study the evolution of ecosystems. In natural systems, organisms and species evolve not in isolation but embedded into ecosystems. Several models describe such relationships, for example the Red Queen and niche construction theories as well as metabolism-based models. Such models have shown that evolutionary processes on the ecosystem level can be highly complex. To investigate this phenomenon experimentally, laboratory approaches have simplified the situation by studying evolutionary dynamics using a (very) limited number of strains at a time under controlled laboratory conditions in the powerful approach of experimental evolution. Others studies have utilized a more ecological approach by observing and describing complex systems and how organisms and species can V or cannot V co-exist over time. Increasingly, research has been initiated that combines these two approaches by tracking evolutionary changes of complex ecosystems in laboratory and natural conditions. Examples include studies of the dynamics of species composition in (microbial) ecosystems over space and time and in response to various stresses, the evolution of social interaction between microbes, and long-term co-evolutionary studies between different (sets of) species or genotypes. For this symposium, we invite submissions of experimental and theoretical studies in this area. * Invited speakers: Susi Remold (University of Louisville) http://bit.ly/11NqzhB Tom Bell (Imperial College London) http://bit.ly/1uOKxSl * Organisers: Sijmen Schoustra (Wageningen University and University of Zambia) and Susanne Kraemer (University of Edinburgh). * Deadline for submission for abstracts for contributed talks and posters is 10th January 2015. More information can be found at http://bit.ly/11NqzxR submission/ . We look forward to receiving your submissions and to seeing you at the conference and our symposium. Dr Sijmen E Schoustra Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University, the Netherlands & Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Zambia Phone: +31 317 483142 and +260 974 572686 http://bit.ly/1veNTR5 “Schoustra, Sijmen” via Gmail
01:28
Opening for a PhD student Genomics of Migration My group combines several biological disciplines including behavioural observation, evolutionary genomics, molecular ecology, and bioinformatics, and utilises emergent technologies to identify the genetic basis of migratory traits. Here we focus on identifying the genes and signalling pathways behind the components shaping the migratory phenotype in the blackcap, a well characterized migratory songbird species. We will complement the sequencing approach with gene expression profiling and characterisation of chromatin modification to investigate the extent of phenotypic variation manifested by expression differences, either through slight genetic differences or epigenetic processes. Within this project that is funded through a Max Planck Research Group Grant, I am offering a PhD position. Project start is January 2015 and the ideal starting date for the PhD is April 2015. The ideal candidate for this position has a biological training, a background in using next-generation sequencing data to answer evolutionary questions, and is eager to learn and master new skills and tools to understand the genetic architecture of behavioural traits. Experience in genome assembly or annotation, and skills in programming are a bonus. The core project focuses on various levels of genomic analysis, but the focus of the PhD project is flexible and can be tailored to both skills and interest of the successful candidate, and could cover genome assembly and annotation, or comparison of the genomic makeup and underlying signaling pathways of different populations with various migratory phenotypes, and may also involve behavioural experiments and field work. PhD candidates at the institute have the opportunity to become member of the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Evolutionary Biology in collaboration with the nearby Christian Albrechts University of Kiel (for more information see: http://bit.ly/11NqzxT) We offer an English speaking and ambitious working environment at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Pln, Germany. Cutting edge infrastructure is available at all levels, including high-performance computer clusters and next-generation sequencing core facility. The Institutes main fields of work include evolutionary ecology (Prof. Dr. M. Milinski), evolutionary genetics (Prof. Dr. D. Tautz) and evolutionary theory (Prof. Dr. A. Traulsen) and hosts a number of research groups providing ample opportunities for collaborations and interactions. The Max Planck Society is committed to also employing handicapped individuals and especially encourages them to apply. The Max Planck Society seeks to increase the number of women in those areas where they are underrepresented and therefore explicitly encourages women to apply. Applications should include 1) a cover letter outlining your motivation to work on this project as well as relevant experience, 2) a detailed curriculum vitae and copies of certificates, and 3) the contact details of three academic referees. Please send the above as a single .pdf file to liedvogel@evolbio.mpg.de. Review of applications will start on January 1st 2015, but candidates will be considered until the position is filled. For more information, feel free to contact me! Dr. Miriam Liedvogel liedvogel@evolbio.mpg.de Max Planck Research Group Behavioural Genomics Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Biology August-Thienemann-Strae 2 24306 Pln, Germany http://bit.ly/1uOKA0F Miriam Liedvogel via Gmail
01:12
WHAT: Postdoctoral position in Ecological-Epidemiological Modelling WHERE: at IZW in Berlin, Germany, for 2 years, with regular visits to CEFE/CNRS in Montpellier, France. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 04.01.2015 For WHOM: Ecological-epidemiological modeller; computational biologist SUBJECT: evolutionary ecology, ecology of infectious diseases, epidemiology TO DO: Developing process-based dynamical models to understand complex disease dynamics in the light of heterogeneity of host behaviour and contact rates due to social processes. Research will focus on a highly social carnivore, the spotted hyena, and long-term data on demography, social processes and viral genotypes determined by the IZW’s long-term spotted hyena project in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Dr. Stephanie Kramer-Schadt Senior Scientist Department Evolutionary Ecology Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) in the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. Alfred-Kowalke-Straße 17 10315 Berlin GERMANY P.O.Box 70 04 30, 10324 Berlin Fon. + 49 - 30 - 51 68 -714 Fax + 49 - 30 - 51 26 - 104 http://bit.ly/1xBHEqw :: Evolutionary wildlife research for conservation :: “Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie” via Gmail
00:09
Post-doctoral position in viral bioinformatics : Lyon, France We are welcoming applications from enthusiastic and independent post-doctoral candidates to participate in our ECOFECT LabEx grant-funded project. We will develop a new bioinformatic approach to identify the sites of the Dengue virus genome that interact with the mosquito cell machinery. Background To control the Dengue virus epidemics, the most promising strategies target the mosquito host to stop viral transmission to humans. However, it is very hard to optimise these strategies and predict whether they could be successful because little is known about how the virus interacts with its mosquito host. Project We will implement a new approach that combines viral evolution experiments in mosquito cells with deep sequencing runs (collaboration with Marlne Dreuxs team). The postdoctoral project aims at developing bioinformatic and statistical methods to infer a map of interactions between the mosquito cell machinery and the viral genome. Doing so requires addressing two important problems in viral bioinformatics, i/ the assembly of viral haplotypes from short reads and ii/ fitness prediction for assembled haplotypes. Environment The host laboratory (LBBE) is a stimulating and pleasant place to work, where one can meet biologists, physicians, computer scientists, mathematicians and statisticians working on problems that range from ecology to medicine, through genomics and evolution. In addition, the post-doctoral researcher will enjoy close interactions with virologists in the team of Marlne Dreux (CIRI, ENSLyon). Lyon is the second largest city in France, is famous for its food, is a UNESCO World Heritage site and enjoys a very convenient central location in Europe. Candidates The applicants are expected to have a strong background in bioinformatics or phylogenetics or population genetics or computer science or statistics. The ideal candidate should be highly motivated, curious and enthusiastic to work in a collaborative team. Proven ability to identify research objectives and meet agreed deadlines, self-motivation and flexibility are essential. Excellent written and oral skills in English are required. Applicants: Please send one PDF file to Bastien Boussau, boussau@gmail.com, with the following: - cover letter - concise summary of previous research activities - curriculum vitae including publication list and contact details for 2-3 referees Ad: http://bit.ly/1xYq2Ed Bastien Boussau UMR CNRS 5558 Biometry and Evolutionary Biology Laboratory Lyon, France http://bit.ly/1xYq2Ef Collaboration with Marlne Dreux CIRI - Inserm U1111 - CNRS UMR5308 ENS Lyon, France http://bit.ly/1xYpZYX Bastien Boussau via Gmail

November 21, 2014

23:53
—=_alternative 0045F999C1257D97_Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable PhD. position in Plant Systematics & Evolution, Univ Zurich Project description: The selected student will work with Dr. Colin Hughes http://bit.ly/1p7NvCg on a research project entitled “Global Legume diversity patterns: macroevolutionary and ecological processes shaping biodiversity”, funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation in the Institute of Systematic Botany at the University of Zürich. http://bit.ly/1jNq6NX We are interested in how diversity evolves and understanding the processes and factors that determine the spatial distribution of life on Earth. Using comparative approaches and one of the most evolutionary successful families of flowering plants, the legumes (Leguminosae = Fabaceae), as a study system, we are addressing a set of inter-related questions about global plant diversity patterns. We are making use of recent developments in comparative phylogenomics and global-scale species distribution modelling to quantify phylogenetic turnover and the ecological factors underlying patterns of diversity across large-scale ecological gradients. The PhD project will focus on the legume subfamily Mimosoideae, a pantropical clade spanning all lowland tropical biomes and will involve fieldwork, laboratory work to generate DNA sequence data using NGS, herbarium specimen database work, and phylogenetic and macroevolutionary analysis. This will build on foundations already established in Zurich in terms of genomic data, development of suitable NGS approaches, taxonomic knowledge and research material for the mimosoid legumes. Position characteristics: The Institute of Systematic Botany in Zurich offers excellent research facilities and a stimulating working environment for graduate students in plant systematics and evolution. The project will also involve collaboration with legume researchers in Brasil, the Netherlands, U.K., U.S.A. and Canada. Salary is according to the Swiss National Science Foundation guidelines. Funding, including for laboratory and field costs, is available for 3 years. Requirements: Applicants should hold a Masters degree in systematics, biodiversity or evolutionary biology. Experience in molecular laboratory techniques, working with NGS data, phylogenetic analysis, macroevolutionary analysis, fieldwork and GIS are all potentially relevant. Excellent knowledge of English, written and oral, is essential. How to apply: Send the following documents by email AS A SINGLE PDF FILE to Dr. Colin Hughes, colin.hughes@systbot.uzh.ch:  i) a two-page application letter describing your research interests, clearly stating why are you interested in a Ph.D. position in systematic botany and your career goals; ii) your CV, including a list of publications (if applicable); iii) a copy of your undergraduate and graduate academic record; iv) names and contact details of at least two referees selected from your academic advisors. Deadline: Applications will be screened from January 1st 2015 onwards until the position is filled. Starting date: early 2015. —=_alternative 0045F999C1257D97_Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

PhD. position in Plant Systematics & Evolution, Univ Zurich

Project description: The selected student will work with Dr. Colin Hughes http://bit.ly/1p7NvCi  on a research project entitled “Global Legume diversity patterns: macroevolutionary and ecological processes shaping biodiversity”, funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation in the Institute of Systematic Botany at the University of Zürich. http://bit.ly/1p7Nw94

We are interested in how diversity evolves and under standing the processes and factors that determine the spatial distribution of life on Earth. Using comparative approaches and one of the most evolutionary successful families of flowering plants, the legumes (Leguminosae = Fabaceae), as a study system, we are addressing a set of inter-related questions about global plant diversity patterns. We are making use of recent developments in comparative phylogenomics and global-scale species distribution modelling to quantify phylogenetic turnover and the ecological factors underlying patterns of diversity across large-scale ecological gradients.

The PhD project will focus on the legume subfamily Mimosoideae, a pantropical clade spanning all lowland tropical biomes and will involve fieldwork, laboratory work to generate DNA sequence data using NGS, herbarium specimen database work, and phylogenetic and macroevolutionary analysis. T his will build on foundations already established in Zurich in terms of genomic data, development of suitable NGS approaches, taxonomic knowledge and research material for the mimosoid legumes.

Position characteristics: The Institute of Systematic Botany in Zurich offers excellent research facilities and a stimulating working environment for graduate students in plant systematics and evolution. The project will also involve collaboration with legume researchers in Brasil, the Netherlands, U.K., U.S.A. and Canada. Salary is according to the Swiss National Science Foundation guidelines. Funding, including for laboratory and field costs, is available for 3 years.

Requirements: Applicants should hold a Masters degree in systematics, biodiversity or evolutionary biology. Experience in molecular laboratory techniques, working with NGS data, phylogenetic analysis, macroevolutionary analysis, fieldwork and GIS are all potentially relevant. Excellent knowledge of English, written and oral, is essential.

How to apply: Send the following documents by email AS A SINGLE PDF FILE to Dr. Colin Hughes, colin.hughes@systbot.uzh.ch:  i) a two-page application letter describing your research interests, clearly stating why are you interested in a Ph.D. position in systematic botany and your career goals; ii) your CV, including a list of publications (if applicable); iii) a copy of your undergraduate and graduate academic record; iv) names and contact details of at least two referees selected from your academic advisors.

Deadline: Applications will be screened from January 1st 2015 onwards until the position is filled.

Starting date: early 2015.

—=_alternative 0045F999C1257D97_ via Gmail
23:37
Dear colleagues, We are very happy to invite your to attend and contribute to the symposium “Evolutionary ecology of cooperation: theory and experiment” which will be held at the 15th European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) Meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland, 10th - 14th August 2015. We are excited about the opportunity to bring together scientist who use either theoretical or experimental approaches (or ideally both!) to study the ecology and evolution of cooperation. We hope this will allow us to to mak connections between our lines of research and start a productive dialog on research questions of common interest. You can see the full symposium description below. We have two excellent invited speakers confirmed: Ashleigh Griffin, University of Oxford http://bit.ly/1Aw7heM Jeff Gore, MIT http://bit.ly/1Aw7heQ Ours is the symposium 9 in this list: http://bit.ly/1AEbj5O The call for abstract and registration are officially open, and the deadline for submission is 10th January 2015. http://bit.ly/1Aw7heR Please be sure to state your preference for a talk or a poster when submitting your abstract. Do not hesitate to contact either one of us with any further questions. Sorry i you are receiving this email multiple times and feel free to forward it to any colleagues who may be interested. Looking forward to seeing many of you in Lausanne! Your symposium organizers, Dusan Misevic & Sam Brown Symposium description: Understanding the ecology and evolution of cooperation remains one of the great challenges in biology. Why do individuals help others at a personal cost? How do patterns of social interaction emerge from behavioral, evolutionary, and ecological processes? What are the selective forces that maintain multi-species cooperative interactions within communities? Theory has been a vital driver in answering these and other questions, especially when engaged with data. Making the data-theory connections is often complex, as cooperation is studied in the lab, the field and the clinic, at all levels of biological complexity, in natural systems that range from cancerous cells and pathogenic microbes to birds, bees and humans. Robotic and other in silico computational systems have a potential to act as an intermediary between the different approaches to cooperation research. During the symposium we aim to move beyond ineffective debates over kin versus group selection, and focus instead on theory as a problem-solving tool, both fully driven by data and directly informing future experiments. Testable theoretical predictions and theoretical frameworks based on real-world data are essential for moving the field forward. More than just an overview of theory, simulations, and experiments about cooperation, at this symposium we wish to bring together researchers who aim to make connections between these approaches, refocus our joint efforts, and move the field forward. dule@alife.org via Gmail
03:54
Lecturer or Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Genetics-1401520 DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS To build on the University of Otagos internationally recognised strengths across Mathematics, Statistics and Genetics, and to develop quantitative genetics capability in support of New Zealands primary industries, we are offering opportunities for permanent academic appointments that would suit motivated people who wish to live in the vibrant southern city of Dunedin , gateway to the beautiful Otago Region of New Zealand . The position is supported by Beef + Lamb New Zealand Genetics (B+LNZG). The successful applicant will be expected to engage in research and teaching that will promote the development of the next generation of researchers and industry experts using statistical genetics to promote New Zealands primary industries. The position is ideal for an active researcher who wants to further his or her career in an academic environment, with a focus on quantitative genetics and who is interested in applications in plant and animal science. The University of Otago is one of New Zealand’s most research-intensive University, and members of the Department collaborate frequently with researchers in other University departments, including researchers in Genetics Otago. The AgResearch Invermay campus is also nearby. Research interests of staff in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics include environmental and ecological statistics, Bayesian inference, time-series analysis, phylogenetics, biostatistics and bioinformatics. We welcome applications from candidates wishing to extend their research in any area of statistics, applied mathematics or animal genetic evaluation. The successful applicant will teach papers in Mathematics, Statistics or Genetics at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and supervise postgraduate research students. The research/teaching nexus is emphasised at Otago, and we structure teaching loads to facilitate personal scholarship of our academics, as well as to expose our students to research-informed teaching. Genetics at Otago involves a broad collaboration that strongly supports research informed teaching in statistical genetics, and provides a broad range of potential collaborators. A feature of this position is that it is supported by a grant from Beef and Lamb NZ Genetics that aims to develop capability in the area of quantitative genetics that can be applied in the primary industries. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to create and lead a new centre of expertise that is fully supported by the University. Candidates will preferably have a PhD in animal/plant breeding and genetics, quantitative genetics, statistical/computational genetics and genomics, or related fields. The successful appointee will have shown a commitment to ongoing research in quantitative genetics with applications in the primary industires, and an aptitude for teaching. Therefore a background in genetic or genomic statistical methodologies and computational skills is a strong requirement. We welcome international candidates, and can provide financial assistance for relocation and visa applications . There is a wealth of practical information available for migrants considering a move to New Zealand and Dunedin . We encourage academics to maintain international research connections, and support this with generous research and study leave provisions. The Department is committed to diversity in staffing, and we encourage applications from women and other groups who are under-represented in the Mathematical and Statistical Sciences. The University has generous parental leave provisions and operates childcare centres covering the period birth to eight years. The position is full-time and permanent, subject to the satisfactory completion of the Confirmation Path objectives for new appointees. Please note that the U.S.-equivalent levels of appointment are Assistant Professor (Lecturer) and Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer). Also, confirmation path is equivalent to tenure-track. Specific enquiries about this position may be directed to Professor Richard Barker, contact details below. Further details about the Department, its staff, courses, and research interests can be obtained here . To ensure that appropriate credit can be given by the search committee to a variety of areas of activity, not only academic achievements, we encourage you to supply a broad-based curriculum vitae describing your productivity and creativity in all areas you wish to have considered. There is no formal closing date and applications will be considered individually on receipt. The University reserves the right to close this vacancy at any time. Additional Information Contact: Professor Richard Barker Tel: +64 3 479 7756 Position details: Information Statement Guidelines for Academic Positions: Guidelines Further Information: Department Website Create or send a link to this vacancy: Copy this link Location: About Dunedin Relocation: Support Immigration: Immigration and Visas Neil Gemmell via Gmail
03:54

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03:38
Assessing non-target risks of candidates for the biological control of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in Europe The North American plant Ambrosia artemisiifolia, common ragweed, has become one of the flagship invasive alien species in Europe, causing severe health issues (allergies) and yield reductions in agriculture. While herbicides and mechanical control are well suited as local and short-term measures to control A. artemisiifolia, sustainable control strategies to reduce its abundance and spread as well as its pollen production in badly infested areas are lacking in Europe. One of the main objectives of the recently launched European COST action SMARTER (‘Sustainable management of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in Europe’; ragweed.eu) is to develop sustainable control strategies such as biological control (BC), an approach which has been successfully implemented against A. artemisiifolia in other continents. Within this project, an exciting PhD position funded by the Swiss State Secretariat for Education and Research (SER) is available at CABI in Switzerland (http://bit.ly/1v1pE81), with the coordinator of the Working Group 1 (Biological Control) in SMARTER. The PhD aims to conduct biosafety studies with exotic insect species that are considered for BC of A. artemisiifolia in Europe. The goal is to combine standard biosafety tests (assessment of fundamental host-range) with new, innovative approaches that will strengthen the scientific quality of non-target risk assessment, specifically with regard to i) host-range testing under open-field conditions, and ii) prediction of the population dynamics of BC candidates prior to their release into a new environment, and iii) their impact on the population dynamics and spread of common ragweed. The student will be based at the CABI Centre in Delmont, Switzerland, and registered at the University of Fribourg (www.unifr.ch). He/she will be closely collaborating with the research group of Prof. Heinz Mller-Schrer (University of Fribourg; http://bit.ly/1z1LTcY, Action chair of SMARTER) and conduct field work in North America and Israel. Required competences: * Master in natural science or related fields, preferably with a background in insect-plant interactions or biological invasions * Good skills in statistical analysis * Experiences with population modelling are an asset * High social competences in interacting with other research colleagues and stakeholders * Excellent skills in oral and written communications (English) * Highly dedicated and motivated student What the research project offers: * Work in a strong international and interdisciplinary team * PhD salary according to Swiss National Science Foundation standards during 3 years * Field expenses, travel allowances * Close collaboration with research partners and stakeholders of the European COST action SMARTER (presently 180 participants from 33 countries, cf. ragweed.eu). Application: Please send a CV, academic transcript, contact details for at least two academic references, and a brief outline of research interests to: Dr Urs Schaffner (u.schaffner@cabi.org), by 31 December 2014. Informal inquiries are welcome. Review of applications will begin immediately, and short-listed candidates will be interviewed. The envisaged start date for the project is 1 February 2015. Please let me know in case I should post this information on EvolDir myself. With best regards, Urs Schaffner Urs Schaffner Head Ecosystems Management CABI Rue des Grillons 1 CH-2800 Delmont Switzerland Telephone: +41 (0)32 421 4877 Fax: +41 (0)32 421 4871 Email: u.schaffner@cabi.org Visit us at www.cabi.org Our centre annual report 2012 is available at http://bit.ly/1v1pGwswww.unifr.ch). He/she will be closely collaborating with the research group of Prof. Heinz Mller-Schrer (University of Fribourg; http://bit.ly/1z1LTcY, Action chair of SMARTER) and conduct field work in North America and Israel. Required competences: * Master in natural science or related fields, preferably with a background in insect-plant interactions or biological invasions * Good skills in statistical analysis * Experiences with population modelling are an asset * High social competences in interacting with other research colleagues and stakeholders * Excellent skills in oral and written communications (English) * Highly dedicated and motivated student What the research project offers: * Work in a strong international and interdisciplinary team * PhD salary according to Swiss National Science Foundation standards during 3 years * Field expenses, travel allowances * Close collaboration with research partners and stakeholders of the European COST action SMARTER (presently 180 participants from 33 countries, cf. ragweed.eu). Application: Please send a CV, academic transcript, contact details for at least two academic references, and a brief outline of research interests to: Dr Urs Schaffner (u.schaffner@cabi.org), by 31 December 2014. Informal inquiries are welcome. Review of applications will begin immediately, and short-listed candidates will be interviewed. The envisaged start date for the project is 1 February 2015. Please let me know in case I should post this information on EvolDir myself. With best regards, Urs Schaffner Urs Schaffner Head Ecosystems Management CABI Rue des Grillons 1 CH-2800 Delmont Switzerland Telephone: +41 (0)32 421 4877 Fax: +41 (0)32 421 4871 Email: u.schaffner@cabi.org Visit us at www.cabi.org Our centre annual report 2012 is available at http://bit.ly/1v1pGws CABI improves people’s lives worldwide by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment Urs Schaffner via Gmail
03:38
Graduate student positions are available in Dr. Megan Porters Molecular Evolution Lab in the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa (http://bit.ly/1v1pDRo) starting in Fall 2015. I am looking for enthusiastic, dynamic, and independent students broadly interested in studying the interface between visual ecology, physiology, and molecular evolution. Students would ideally have a B.S. degree in Biology or related discipline and must be proficient in English. Candidates with additional knowledge of computer science and/or bioinformatics are encouraged to apply. My research focuses on non-model invertebrate study organisms, including mantis shrimp crustaceans. My current projects combine elements of molecular biology, biochemistry, next generation sequencing, bioinformatics, physiology, and molecular evolution to address questions related to the evolution of visual system form and function. This research requires good communication skills, and the ability to work collaboratively as part of a team. More information on my research is available at my website (http://bit.ly/1z1LSG9) or from my publication list (http://bit.ly/1z1LSGb). Interested students will be required to apply to the Graduate Program in the Department of Biology at UHM. To learn more about the application process, please go to the Department of Biology homepage (http://bit.ly/1v1pDRo) and look at the graduate admissions pages (http://bit.ly/1v1pDRu). The application deadline for the 2015-2016 academic year is January 15, 2015. For more information on current research projects in the lab, applicants should contact Megan Porter directly at Megan.Porter@usd.edu (before Jan. 1, 2015) or mlporter@hawaii.edu (after Jan. 1, 2015) well before the January deadline. Please provide a brief description of your background, your research interests, and your reasons for considering the Porter lab for graduate training. Megan Porter, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Biology University of Hawaii at Manoa Honolulu, HI Until Jan. 1 2015 email: Megan.Porter@usd.edu phone: 605-677-6176 After Jan. 1 2015 email: mlporter@hawaii.edu “Porter, Megan L” via Gmail
03:07

University of Zrich — Switzerland — URPP “Evolution in Action” Academic Fellow Position (4 years) About the URPP Evolution in Action The University Research Priority Program (URPP) “Evolution in Action: From Genomes to Ecosystems” invites applications for an Academic Fellow position. Evolutionary biology is a core area of biology and understanding the underlying mechanisms is of crucial importance for both basic and applied aspects of biology and medicine. Beyond the biological and medical fields, evolutionary concepts are an important theme in the social and economic sciences. The URPP Evolution in Action is set in this wide area of research (see http://bit.ly/1jwjsKQ). It brings together multiple research groups of the Faculty of Science, the Faculty of Medicine, and the Faculty of Arts, and plays an important integrative role for diverse disciplines at the UZH. Tasks This is an opportunity for young scientists to pursue a period of independent research before taking a faculty position. The successful candidate will direct his/her own research under the mentorship of a senior faculty member. A central aspect of the URPP Evolution in Action is the use of next generation sequencing data to address important evolutionary questions. The research topic of the Academic Fellow must be linked to the research theme of the URPP Evolution in Action, and preferably include an integrative/interdisciplinary approach. The position in the midst of the diverse groups of the URPP Evolution in Action offers the unique opportunity to network and collaborate with both senior and junior scientists in a diverse range of disciplines. Requirements We are seeking outstanding young scientists who have recently received their Ph.D. degree or have completed a first postdoctoral position (application is possible up to 4 years after obtaining the Ph.D. degree). Applicants should have a strong and demonstrated background in the research area they propose to pursue as Academic Fellow. This position requires strong communication skills and the ability to interact with the diverse areas of expertise within the URPP Evolution in Action. The working language of the URPP Evolution in Action is English; German skills are helpful, but not essential. Offers We offer a friendly, international, dynamic and team-oriented scientific environment at the UZH. The UZH is the largest University of Switzerland with internationally leading institutes in the Life Sciences. The Academic Fellow position is available earliest in January 2015 and runs on a fixed-term contract of four years. The salary is competitive and the Academic Fellow position also includes a generous budget for running costs and support personnel. The UZH is an equal opportunity employer. Part-time work is possible. Zurich is an attractive city in beautiful surroundings, a multinational population, and many educational and recreational opportunities. Contact For questions relating to the position, kindly contact the Program Coordinator of the URPP Evolution in Action, Dr. Annegret Lesslauer. E-Mail annegret.lesslauer@uzh.ch Application Please send your application as single PDF-File by e-mail to Dr. Annegret Lesslauer, annegret.lesslauer@uzh.ch. Applications should include: full CV and publication list, a statement of research interests not exceeding three pages, and three academic references. Please use the keyword “Application Academic Fellow 2015” in the subject line. Application deadline is December 21, 2014. via Gmail

02:06
Two PhD scholarships in host-pathogen interactions and insect immunocompetence Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science at the University of Copenhagen (UCPH) is offering two PhD scholarships in host-pathogen interactions, one commencing on the 1st of April, and the other on the 1st of May 2015. The application deadline for both positions is the 1st of January 2015. Project description Organisms in most ecosystems are exposed to parasites and pathogens, increasingly in combination with chronic exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of pesticides. Recent studies indicate that combined exposure to pathogenic and chemical stress may lead to more profound disease manifestation. An interdisciplinary research project at UCPH headed by Associate Professor Brian Lund Fredensborg is developing a conceptual insect-pathogen model to explore the impact of chemical stress on host and pathogen parameters. The successful applicants will join a dynamic team working on unraveling the mechanisms behind the combined effects of low doses of pesticides (pyrethroids and azoles) and two different pathogens, a fungus and a tapeworm, on the beetle Tenebrio molitor. The project provides an excellent opportunity to gain a broad set of state-of-the-art laboratory skills, and for interdisciplinary collaborations. PhD student 1: Host-Pathogen interactions Starting date: 1st of April 2015 The main task is to experimentally quantify host and pathogen fitness parameters in relation to chemical stress from pesticides. The successful applicant preferably has a background in host-parasite or host-pathogen interactions using an experimental and ecological approach. Information on applying for this position may be found on: http://bit.ly/1qEWPyk PhD student 2: Insect immunocompetence Starting date: 1st of May 2015 The main task is to identify and quantify host immune response parameters to pathogen infection in relation to chemical stress from pesticides. The successful applicant preferably has a background in host-pathogen interactions. Knowledge on the use of immunological and molecular methods is advantageous. Experience with invertebrate immune response to infection using an experimental approach is particularly relevant. Information on applying for this position may be found on: http://bit.ly/1r3B1as Only electronic applications will be accepted. Inquiries are welcome and may be sent to Associate Professor Brian Lund Fredensborg, e-mail: blf@plen.ku.dk Brian Lund Fredensborg, Ph.D. Associate Professor Head of Studies (MSc. Parasitology) Department of Plant & Environmental Sciences University of Copenhagen MOB +45 31323860 blf@plen.ku.dk Brian Lund Fredensborg via Gmail
02:06
ANR-FCT supported Postdoctoral position We have a 2 years postdoc position in landscape genetics and dispersal ecology funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR) and the Portuguese National Agency (FCT) to work on a recently granted project “ExpandTree: Spatio-temporal colonization patterns in expanding tree populations: an integrated genetic and genomic approach”. The work is based in INRA-Avignon (France) for up to 1 year and in CIBIO/InBio (Portugal) up to another year starting early 2015. Shorts stays at the hosting-collaboration Integrative Ecology Group (IEG, Estación Biológica de Doñana, CSIC, Spain) are also contemplated supervised by Prof. Pedro Jordano. Project overview and description of the position Understanding the spatio-temporal dynamics of expanding populations is central to predict the responses of fragmented forest populations to drivers of global change. The main tasks of the postdoctoral researcher consist in implementing recent statistical methods and, ideally, developing new evolutionary models, that use georeferenced genotypic and phenotypic data to understand demographic dynamics and gene flow patterns in the colonisation front of expanding populations of trees inhabiting heterogeneous environments. Two Mediterranean tree species currently undergoing demographic expansions will be studied: (i) Juniperus phoenicea subsp. turbinata in Reserva Biológica de Doñana (Huelva, Spain) in collaboration with Pedro Jordano’s team (CSIC, Spain) and (ii) Cedrus atlantica on Mont-Ventoux (Avignon, France, in collaboration with Sylvie Oddo-Muratorio-François Lefèvre’s team). Microsatellites are the primary genotypic markers but the development and analysis of SNPs potentially under selection are also planned in the ExpandTree project. Specific goals within the framework of the project entailing genetic, spatial, demographic, and ecological data can be accommodated to the skills and interests of the successful candidate. Skills required: an excellent quantitative and computational background in spatial population genetics modelling applied to ecological issues. Interest in movement ecology, eco-evolutionary dynamics and statistical methodology of molecular data for ecology. Experience in analysing SNPs and phenotypic data based on association models would be appreciated. Proficiency in written and spoken English is mandatory. Host teams: . Plant Biology group (PLANTBIO), CIBIO-InBio, University of Porto, Portugal (www.cibio.pt) . Biostatistics and Spatial Processes (BioSP), INRA Avignon, France (http://bit.ly/1r3B1ad) . Ecology of Mediterranean forests (URFM), INRA Avignon http://bit.ly/LLCowL . Collaboration team: Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC, Spain) http://bit.ly/1r3AYLD. Recent publications relevant to the ExpandTree project: . Roques, L., Garnier, J., Hamel, F. & Klein, E.K. (2012) Allee effect promotes diversity in traveling waves of colonization. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 109: 8828-8833. . García, C., Moracho, E., Diaz-Delgado, R. & Jordano, P. (2014) Long- term expansion of juniper populations in managed landscapes: patterns in space and time. Journal of Ecology 102, 1562-1571. For informal inquiries of the position, please contact the PI’s of the project Cristina Garcia (CIBIO), cristinagarcia@cibio.up.pt Etienne Klein (BioSP-URFM), etienne.klein@avignon.inra.fr How to apply To apply, please e-mail Etienne Klein (etienne.klein@avignon.inra.www.cibio.pt) . Biostatistics and Spatial Processes (BioSP), INRA Avignon, France (http://bit.ly/1r3B1ad) . Ecology of Mediterranean forests (URFM), INRA Avignon http://bit.ly/LLCowL . Collaboration team: Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC, Spain) http://bit.ly/1r3AYLD. Recent publications relevant to the ExpandTree project: . Roques, L., Garnier, J., Hamel, F. & Klein, E.K. (2012) Allee effect promotes diversity in traveling waves of colonization. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 109: 8828-8833. . García, C., Moracho, E., Diaz-Delgado, R. & Jordano, P. (2014) Long- term expansion of juniper populations in managed landscapes: patterns in space and time. Journal of Ecology 102, 1562-1571. For informal inquiries of the position, please contact the PI’s of the project Cristina Garcia (CIBIO), cristinagarcia@cibio.up.pt Etienne Klein (BioSP-URFM), etienne.klein@avignon.inra.fr How to apply To apply, please e-mail Etienne Klein (etienne.klein@avignon.inra.fr) or Cristina García (cristinagarcia@cibio.up.pt) with a motivation letter explaining why you are interested in the position, a PDF of your CV where you should include the name and contact details for two referees. Deadline for application is 15 January 2015. CRISTINA GARCIA via Gmail
01:44

ESEB 2015 Symposium on Sexually Antagonistic Selection Dear colleagues, We are pleased to invite contributions to the symposium EVOLUTIONARY CONSEQUENCES OF SEXUALLY ANTAGONISTIC SELECTION This symposium will be held at the 15th Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) in Lausanne, Switzerland, August 10th-14th, 2015. INVITED SPEAKERS - William Rice (UC Santa Barbara) http://bit.ly/1F9uPGb - Steve Chenoweth (The University of Queensland) http://bit.ly/1v0ZH8u ORGANIZERS - Gran Arnqvist (Uppsala University) - Brian Hollis (University of Lausanne) SYMPOSIUM DESCRIPTION Males and females share a genome but are often subject to divergent selection. This simple fact results in tension between patterns of male and female adaptation. The aim of this symposium is to highlight phenotypes that experience intralocus sexual conflict as well as their genomic basis, in both laboratory and natural systems. This includes conflicts between the sexes in reproductive strategies, ecological niches, rates of aging, and gene expression, for example. We will also explore the larger significance of sexually antagonistic selection in the maintenance of genetic variation and the evolution of sex chromosomes. Submissions are invited for either talks (17 minutes including discussion) or posters. The study of sexually antagonistic fitness effects is an active field, with major progress in the last few years, and we are especially keen for contributions from early career researchers. Information about the conference and symposium, and registration and submission of abstracts, are now available at: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbW The deadline for abstract submission is January 10th, 2015. If you have any questions, feel free to contact either of us. We are looking forward to the symposium and hope to see you next year in Lausanne! Gran Arnqvist goran.arnqvist@ebc.uu.se Brian Hollis brian.hollis@unil.ch via Gmail

00:52

Volunteer field assistant position to study the maintenance of phenotypic variation in great tits in the Netherlands We are looking for a research assistant for the upcoming breeding season to join our project investigating sexual selection and reproductive investment in great tits. The research will be conducted in the Netherlands near Arnhem and will last throughout the breeding season, from April until the end of June. Our project investigates the potential of individual differences in mate choice and reproductive investment to maintain phenotypic variation in great tits. During the breeding season we will study parental investment of the great tits breeding in the study area in relation to plumage characters and partner quality. The project is based at the Wageningen University and is in collaboration with the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW). The volunteer will help the PhD student working on the project in the field. The work will involve monitoring the breeding birds in the study area, cross fostering of chicks, making video and audio recordings of the nest and banding the offspring. We ask: - Candidates should preferably have a BSc or higher in biology, behavioural ecology or a similar qualification - Ability to work in a team, good social and organizational skills - Willingness to work long days and if needed during weekends - Experience in handling and banding birds preferred - Driving license - Proficient level of English language We offer: This is a voluntary position but we may be able to offer travel and accommodation costs to the right candidate. For further information, please contact Lies Zandberg (lies.zandberg@wur.nl) or Dr. Camilla Hinde (camilla.hinde@wur.nl) or check the website of the research group (www. bhe.wur.nl). Application deadline 30 January 2015. Applications consisting of a CV and a motivation letter should be sent to Lies Zandberg (lies.zandberg@wur.nl) lies.zandberg@wur.nl via Gmail