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October 31, 2014

01:23
Position for one PhD student in Plant Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics at Stockholm University, Sweden We seek a PhD candidate to join a project examining how adaptive genetic variation and demographic processes influence evolutionary response and population dynamics in a changing environment. The research uses the perennial herb Primula farinosa as a model system, and focuses on the importance of variation in floral traits and life history in relation to differences in abiotic conditions, the intensity of biotic interactions, and climate. The project will combine demographic studies, field experiments, and population modeling, to address three main questions: (1) How is population viability influenced by local environmental conditions, grazing intensity and climatic variation?, (2) How does variation in abiotic environmental factors and grazing influence the genetic structure of plant populations?, and (3) How does the presence of genetic variation in traits of adaptive significance and evolutionary responses influence population viability in a changing environment? Specific subprojects can be tailored to the skills and interests of the successful candidate. The project is a collaboration between the labs of prof Johan Ehrln at the Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University and prof Jon gren at the Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University. We are currently recruiting one PhD student to be placed at Stockholm University and a postdoc to be placed at Uppsala University. We are looking for a candidate with a keen interest in population biology and eco-evolutionary dynamics. Previous experience of modelling, and field or experimental work is desirable. Proficiency in English is a requirement. The successful PhD student candidate should have a degree in Biology at the advanced level (e.g. Masters) of at least 240 credits, and will receive a postgraduate position for four years of full-time studies. Deadline for application is 20 November 2014 Please find the announcement, with all information about how to apply, at: http://bit.ly/1sOUECj For informal enquiries, please contact Johan Ehrln johan.ehrlen@su.se, +46-8-16 12 02, or Jon gren, jon.agren@ebc.uu.se, +46-18-471 2860. Jon gren Plant Ecology and Evolution Department of Ecology and Genetics, EBC Uppsala University Norbyvgen 18 D SE-752 36 Uppsala Sweden Jon gren via Gmail
01:23
Our lab is looking for a postdoc to spearhead the genomics portion of a five-year UNC-Duke collaborative project that aims to understand the physiological basis of magnetoreception in sea turtles and spiny lobsters. The candidate must have proven (ideally published) experience with assembling genomes and transcriptomes and then analyzing them for the presence and expression levels of particular genes, in this case those associated with the transportation and sequestration of iron and iron oxides. Additional experience with orientation and navigation, marine ecology, and biophysics is also desirable. Funding is available starting as early as January 1st, 2015, with the project lasting until September 30th, 2019. Pay will be based on experience and NIH guidelines. If interested, please send a CV and letter of intent to sjohnsen@duke.edu and arrange to have two reference letters sent to the same address. Snke Johnsen Professor of Biology Duke University “Sonke Johnsen, Ph.D.” via Gmail
00:50
Position for one Postdoc in Plant Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics at Uppsala University, Sweden We seek a Postdoc to join a project examining how adaptive genetic variation and demographic processes influence evolutionary response and population dynamics in a changing environment. The research uses the perennial herb Primula farinosa as a model system, and focuses on the importance of variation in floral traits and life history in relation to differences in abiotic conditions, the intensity of biotic interactions, and climate. The project will combine demographic studies, field experiments, and population modeling, to address three main questions: (1) How is population viability influenced by local environmental conditions, grazing intensity and climatic variation?, (2) How does variation in abiotic environmental factors and grazing influence the genetic structure of plant populations?, and (3) How does the presence of genetic variation in traits of adaptive significance and evolutionary responses influence population viability in a changing environment? Specific subprojects can be tailored to the skills and interests of the successful candidate. The project is a collaboration between the labs of prof Jon gren at the Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, and prof Johan Ehrln at the Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University. We are currently recruiting one postdoc to be placed at Uppsala University, and one PhD student to be placed at Stockholm University. We are looking for a candidate with a keen interest in population biology and eco-evolutionary dynamics. Previous experience of modelling, and field or experimental work is desirable. Proficiency in English is a requirement. The successful postdoc candidate should have a PhD completed within 3 years of the application deadline (reasons such as prolonged periods of illness and parental leave can motivate a longer period). The postdoc position lasts for two years. Deadline for application is 27 November 2014 Please find the announcement, with all information about how to apply, at: http://bit.ly/1ubmeAV For informal enquiries, please contact Jon gren, jon.agren@ebc.uu.se, +46-18-471 2860, or Johan Ehrln johan.ehrlen@su.se, +46-8-16 12 02. Jon gren Plant Ecology and Evolution Department of Ecology and Genetics, EBC Uppsala University Norbyvgen 18 D SE-752 36 Uppsala Sweden Jon gren via Gmail
00:19
Integrative Arthropod Biologist University of Kentucky Department of Entomology http://bit.ly/1q6PQsf Position: Assistant Professor of Entomology, Integrative Arthropod Biology, twelve- month, tenure track appointment, research (80%), teaching (20%) Description: The Department of Entomology at the University of Kentucky is seeking a broadly trained entomologist or biologist who will develop an internationally recognized, externally funded research program that integrates evolutionary, ecological, physiological, molecular and/or genomic approaches to study arthropod biology. The Department is particularly interested in an integrative biologist in one of the following areas: pollinator biology and their role in ecosystem functioning, arthropod vectors of pathogens affecting human health, or invasion biology. The individual is expected to develop a program that complements and enhances existing research programs at the University of Kentucky. Additionally, the individual is expected to expand the integrated graduate research program within the Department. This position includes a 20% teaching responsibility. The individual will be expected to participate in undergraduate and graduate education, including developing a course in their area of expertise and mentoring graduate students. Qualified candidates will participate in the graduate training of students, whose interests vary from population management and organismal insect biology to molecular biology and genomics. Qualifications: The successful applicant must have a PhD in Entomology or related discipline with demonstrated experience and publications in integrative arthropod research. Post-doctoral research, potential as both an independent researcher and as a member of a multidisciplinary team, and teaching experience are highly desirable. Applicants should be familiar with integrated research techniques, including ecological, molecular, genomic, and statistical methods. Salary and Benefits: Salary commensurate with background and experience; overview of benefits: http://bit.ly/1zPNJTl Application Procedure: Applicants should submit a CV, list of publications with up to (5) selected reprints, names and addresses of four individuals who may be contacted for letters of reference, copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and an application letter describing background and expertise specifically related to this research/teaching position at the University of Kentucky. Applications must be submitted electronically to the Integrated Employment System at the University of Kentucky (copy and paste into browser) http://bit.ly/1q6PQsg Application Deadline: January 15, 2015 or until a suitable candidate is identified Date Position is Available: July 1, 2015 or as mutually agreed upon The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is an equal opportunity organization and welcomes applications from women and minorities. Dr. Charles W. Fox Professor and Director of Graduate Studies Department of Entomology University of Kentucky Lexington, KY 40546-0091 phone: 859-904-9404 e-mail: cfox@uky.edu web: www.uky.edu/~cfox Charles Fox via Gmail
00:19
We encourage those with expertise in the evolution of plant-pollinator interactions, bee evolutionary biology, pollinator behavior, and the evolutionary ecology of native bee populations to apply for this position. *Assistant Professor, Pollinator Ecology* Position: Full-time, nine-month tenure-track faculty position with responsibilities for Research and Teaching, including advising graduate students, with a focus on pollinator-plant interactions, especially involving native bees. The successful applicant’s main responsibility will be to establish a prominent, externally-funded research program. In addition, the successful applicant will teach undergraduate and graduate courses, and participate in departmental, college, and university service activities. The position is jointly supported by the Department of Entomology, College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS), and the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, College of Biological Sciences (CBS), with tenure home negotiable. The position is located on the St. Paul Campus of the University of Minnesota. Responsibilities – Research: In response to national concern about declining bee pollinator populations, the successful candidate will develop an internationally recognized research program supported by external funding in pollinator ecology with an emphasis on the habitat, nesting, and foraging requirements, and surveys of native bee populations, in areas including Minnesota and the Upper Midwestern United States. Possible research topics include but are not limited to: enhancement of native bee populations and habitat in natural, agricultural and urban landscapes, integrated pollinator management, pollinator community ecology, impact of parasites and pathogens on native bee populations, pollination efficiency, floral specificity, and the ecology, evolution, and behavior of bee pollinators. Responsibilities – Teaching: The appointee is required to teach a course in pollinator ecology and a graduate-level course in their area of specialization. The use of innovative experiential learning and pedagogy is encouraged. Supervision of graduate students including those from culturally diverse backgrounds, student advising, and performance of University service are expected Inherent in faculty responsibilities is service to the department, college, and University, which may include serving on and/or chairing faculty committees, task forces, or development and implementation of university policies or programs. Qualifications - Required: • Ph.D. or equivalent degree in Entomology, Ecology, or related field by date of appointment. • Excellence in written and oral communication. • Research experience relevant to pollinator ecology, biology, and/or behavior. • Experience mentoring graduate or undergraduate students. • Research publication(s) in peer-reviewed journals. Qualifications – Desired: • Cross-disciplinary strengths in areas such as insect taxonomy, landscape ecology, behavioral ecology, conservation biology • Experience working in interdisciplinary teams including individuals from diverse backgrounds • Capacity and willingness to collaborate with state and federal agencies on issues related to pollinator protection - Evidence of success in obtaining extramural funding - Post-doctoral experience in pollinator biology and ecology - Demonstrated commitment to diversity and inclusion Salary and benefits: The tenure-track position will be filled at the rank of Assistant Professor with a full-time, nine-month (B-term) appointment in the Department of Entomology and/or the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior. Salary will be competitive and commensurate with professional experience and qualifications. Benefits include a competitive faculty retirement program, and group life, medical and dental insurance plans, disability benefits, sick leave, and sabbatical opportunities. Two months of summer salary for the first three (3) years will be covered. A competitive start-up package will be provided. Date Available: August 31, 2015 Application: Apply online to requisition number 194884 at http://bit.ly/1zPNLup, and attach CV, college-level transcripts, a statement of research and teaching interests, and future goals, along with the names and addresses of three references. Screening of applicant files will begin December 15, 2014. Any offer of employment is contingent upon the successful completion of a background check. Direct questions about the application process to: Felicia Christy Department of Entomology 218 Hodson Hall 1980 Folwell Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108 christy@umn.edu 612-624-3278 Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota: http://bit.ly/1q6PQs6 College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences: www.cfans.umn.edu For more information: Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior: http://bit.ly/1zPNJTf College of Biological Sciences: www.cbs.umn.edu As an institution committed to demonstrating excellence through diversity, the University of Minnesota is committed to hiring a diverse faculty and staff, and strongly encourage candidates from historically underrepresented groups to apply. Finalists will be expected to address their commitment and experience in working with diverse populations during the interview process. We welcome you to visit the CFANS Diversity and Inclusion web page at: http://bit.ly/1q6PRwhwww.cfans.umn.edu For more information: Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior: http://bit.ly/1zPNJTf College of Biological Sciences: www.cbs.umn.edu As an institution committed to demonstrating excellence through diversity, the University of Minnesota is committed to hiring a diverse faculty and staff, and strongly encourage candidates from historically underrepresented groups to apply. Finalists will be expected to address their commitment and experience in working with diverse populations during the interview process. We welcome you to visit the CFANS Diversity and Inclusion web page at: http://bit.ly/1q6PRwh David Moeller via Gmail
00:03

Dear EvolDir, For a project on the population genetics of Dactylorhizamajalis, we are looking for samples of D. incarnata and D. maculata to use as references. Does anybody have samples of DNA or leaf material that he or she would be willing to share? Best regards, Ludo. Dr. Ludo A.H. Muller Freie Universitt Berlin Institut fr Biologie - Botanik Altensteinstrae 6 14195 Berlin Germany Tel. +49 (0)30 838 56539 Fax +49 (0)30 838 4 56539 E-mail: ludo.muller@fu-berlin.de Homepage: http://bit.ly/1to9qDS ludo_muller@yahoo.com via Gmail

00:03
CATALYSIS MEETINGS Proposals for Catalysis Meetings in Evolutionary Medicine are now being accepted at The National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). We are looking to support innovative approaches to outstanding problems, specifically in areas realted to evolutionary medicine. Appropriate areas of inquiry include any field of evolutionary science that is relevant to medicine, or to human or animal health. Examples include, but are not limited to, evolution of infectious or zoonotic disease, evolutionary issues in global health, evolution of aging, evolution of fertility, autoimmune disease and allergy, evolutionary perspectives on cancer, and evolution of disease-relevant micro-organisms. Proposals that have a clear interdisciplinary focus, and involve evolutionary concepts in any health- or disease-related area, are strongly encouraged, as are proposals that demonstrate international participation and a mix of senior and emerging researchers, including graduate students. Deadline for proposals is Nov 1, 2014. All meetings must be completed by Sep 30, 2015. For more information, please see our website at http://bit.ly/1rKc0Dd GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS for NC GRADUATE STUDENTS Proposals for 1-semester Graduate Fellowships in fields related to Evolutionary Medicine are now being accepted at The National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). We are looking to support innovative approaches to outstanding problems in any field of evolutionary science that is relevant to medicine, or to human or animal health. Examples include, but are not limited to, evolution of infectious or zoonotic disease, evolutionary issues in global health, evolution of aging, evolution of fertility, autoimmune disease and allergy, evolutionary perspectives on cancer, and evolution of disease-relevant micro-organisms. Eligible students are those at any North Carolina academic institution with an accredited graduate program in a relevant field; students may remain resident at their home institution during the fellowship, or travel to another institution. Evidence of engagement, during the fellowship, with other activities relevant to evolutionary or comparative medicine in NC will be viewed positively. The deadlines is Nov 1 (for the spring semester 2015 fellowship), Feb 1 (for the summer semester 2015 fellowship) and Apr 1 (for the fall semester 2015fellowship). For more information, please see our website http://bit.ly/1rKc0De “Craig McClain, Ph.D.” via Gmail

October 30, 2014

01:11
Dear EvolDir members The University of Central Florida has several faculty positions open. We are hiring an Entomologist, a cluster of 3 Geospatial folks and 2 coastal ecologists/conservation biologists. All of these positions have an evolutionary aspect and we would encourage evolutionary biologists working in these areas to apply. For example, landscape geneticists would be a great fit in the Geospatial cluster etc. Please see the link below for the position announcements. http://bit.ly/13hN7Hx Best, Chris Christopher L. Parkinson, Ph.D. Professor and, Chair , Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Dept. of BiologyRm 424. University of Central Florida 4000 Central Florida Blvd. Orlando, FL 32816-2368 office: 407-823-4847 fax: 407-823-5769 http://bit.ly/XLgU8I Parkinson@ucf.edu 3 Geospatial Faculty positions 1 Entomologist 2 Coastal Ecology/conservation biology positions Geospatial Faculty Positions The University of Central Florida (UCF) is in a hiring campaign to recruit 200 new faculty for Fall 2015. UCF seeks to strengthen its research mission and academic offerings in the broad interdisciplinary area of Geospatial Analysis. In support of this effort, the College of Sciences has established three tenure-earning assistant professor positions expected to begin in fall 2015. Ideal candidates will have a strong background in the application of GIS and other geospatial analytical approaches to address questions in their research area, a desire to collectively build curricula centered on geospatial science, and a passion for integrating multiple disciplines to confront challenges facing society. Minimum qualifications include a Ph.D. from an accredited institution by the time of hire in a suitable field, a research record that demonstrates expertise in the use of geospatial analysis methods, and research and teaching interests that complement and expand existing departmental strengths. We seek candidates with the potential to develop high-quality, extramurally-funded research programs appropriate for a Carnegie very high research activity university and to help develop both undergraduate and graduate certificate programs in GIScience/Geospatial Analysis. Experience and commitment to collaborative, interdisciplinary research is highly desirable. Examples of research areas include (but are not limited to) conservation and sustainability, coupled human-natural systems, criminology, cultural/demographic/economic/political/social behavior and dynamics, environmental/social justice/health politics and policy, global change, human/natural disasters, landscape archaeology, national security, and urban studies and policy. UCF is committed to the development of new hires in interdisciplinary clusters. Faculty will be expected to strengthen both their tenure home department (Anthropology, Biology, Political Science, or Sociology) as well as the geospatial cluster. It is expected that there will be both individual and interdisciplinary infrastructure and startup associated with these three new positions. Each new faculty member will have a unique interdisciplinary mentoring team to foster intellectual breadth and to facilitate integrative capacity to strengthen the success of the cluster. Candidates must apply online at http://bit.ly/13hN7HA (Position #37456) and attach the following materials: a cover letter, curriculum vitae, and contact information for three professional references. In the cover letter candidates should address their background in geospatial analysis, current and planned future research directions, and GIScience courses that they could develop and teach, and should identify the department(s) for their potential tenure home. The search committee will begin reviewing applications December 1, 2014 and continue to accept applications until January 1, 2015. The University of Central Florida is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action employer. All applicants are encouraged to apply, including minorities, women, veterans, and individuals with disabilities. For more information about these positions please contact the Geospatial Cluster Search Chair, Dr. Cynthia Young, Associate Dean in the College of Sciences at Cynthia.Young@ucf.edu. Entomology Position The Department of Biology at the University of Central Florida (UCF) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor. The candidate’s research will address important questions in entomology using innovative approaches. Individuals with curatorial experience and interests in collections-based research are preferred. Candidates must have a demonstrated ability or strong potential to establish and maintain a vigorous, extramurally-funded research program, facilitate collaborations, and complement departmental strengths. See http://bit.ly/11Ts366 for department details. Applicants must have a Ph.D. from an accredited institution in a relevant field and appropriate post-doctoral training. Successful candidates will contribute to teaching and mentoring students in our undergraduate and graduate programs and oversee and develop as Curator the endowed Stuart M. Fullerton Collection of Arthropods (http://bit.ly/13hN7HD), a regional insect collection with over 500,000 specimens and with a dedicated collection manager. UCF has a strong research emphasis and provides competitive startup funds and teaching loads. UCF is designated as a research university of very high activity (RU/VH) by the Carnegie Foundation and an ‘Up-and-Coming School’ by U.S. News and World Report. This hire is part of multiple departmental hires and 200 new faculty positions university-wide in 2015-16, with more hires anticipated in coming years. Applicants must complete a job application at http://bit.ly/1wHmswF for position #36599. Separately, applicants must e-mail a single PDF document that includes a letter of intent, curriculum vitae, statements of research interests and teaching philosophy, and contact information for three references to: bio-search@ucf.edu with the subject line: #36599 Review of applications will begin January 5, 2015, with an anticipated start date of August 2015. The University of Central Florida is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply, including minorities, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities. As a Florida public university, UCF makes all application materials and selection procedures available to the public upon request. Christopher L. Parkinson, Ph.D. Professor and, Chair , Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Dept. of Biology Rm 424. University of Central Florida 4000 Central Florida Blvd. Orlando, FL 32816-2368 office: 407-823-4847 fax: 407-823-5769 http://bit.ly/XLgU8I Parkinson@ucf.edu Christopher Parkinson via Gmail
01:11

Grad student projects: Sex, Genomics, and Duckweeds Why reproduce sexually and what happens if you don’t? The Agrawal and Wright labs are engaged in a series of projects exploring the evolutionary causes and consequences of sexual reproduction in duckweed, a fast-growing aquatic plant that produces both clonally and via sexual reproduction. We have already obtained a number of genomic resources for several duckweed species and are using these data sets to infer historical rates of sex and relate this to the efficiency of past selection genome-wide. Lab and field studies are planned to study the ecological sources of selection on sex as well as to ground population genetics inferences. We are excited about using a combination of approaches to address one of the classic problems in evolutionary biology! There are graduate opportunities involving evolutionary genomics as well as lab and field experiments with duckweeds. Contact: Aneil Agrawal (a.agrawal@utoronto.ca) Agrawal Lab website: http://bit.ly/13hN6U9 or Stephen Wright (stephen.wright@utoronto.ca) Wright Lab website: http://bit.ly/13hN7r9 This research will be conducted within the vibrant research community at the University of Toronto’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology http://bit.ly/1e1wJOg via Gmail

00:53
POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: SOCIAL COMPETITION AND CO-OPERATION UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL, INSTITUTE OF INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY Full time post-doctoral position, 3 years fixed term Salary range: 32,277 - 37,394 The Mammalian Behaviour & Evolution Group at the University of Liverpool are seeking an enthusiastic individual with expertise in animal behaviour research to investigate how competition affects co-operative behaviour between female kin in wild house mice. You should have (or be about to obtain) a PhD relevant to behavioural research, with excellent experimental and communication skills. Experience in the study of reproductive competition and/or co-operative breeding would be advantageous. The post is available for 3 years. Based at the Leahurst Campus on the Wirral, the Mammalian Behaviour & Evolution research group (www.liv.ac.uk/mbe) currently comprises four full time members of academic staff, several associate members, a Senior Experimental Officer, five postdoctoral researchers, six research technicians and 10 postgraduate research students. In addition to weekly laboratory meetings and journal clubs, we interact regularly with research groups based at the Liverpool Campus, and share a joint weekly seminar series of external speakers in Evolution, Ecology and Behaviour. Closing date for applications: 21st November 2014 Further details: http://bit.ly/1wGHzQC Informal enquiries: Paula Stockley (p.stockley@liv.ac.uk) Dr Paula Stockley Mammalian Behaviour & Evolution Group University of Liverpool Leahurst Campus Chester High Road Neston CH64 7TE, UK tel: +44 151 794 6103 mail: p.stockley@liv.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1zhoo3swww.liv.ac.uk/mbe) currently comprises four full time members of academic staff, several associate members, a Senior Experimental Officer, five postdoctoral researchers, six research technicians and 10 postgraduate research students. In addition to weekly laboratory meetings and journal clubs, we interact regularly with research groups based at the Liverpool Campus, and share a joint weekly seminar series of external speakers in Evolution, Ecology and Behaviour. Closing date for applications: 21st November 2014 Further details: http://bit.ly/1wGHzQC Informal enquiries: Paula Stockley (p.stockley@liv.ac.uk) Dr Paula Stockley Mammalian Behaviour & Evolution Group University of Liverpool Leahurst Campus Chester High Road Neston CH64 7TE, UK tel: +44 151 794 6103 mail: p.stockley@liv.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1zhoo3s “Stockley, Paula” via Gmail
00:53

Developing theory to predict the effects of climate change on the fertility and reproduction of marine invertebrates Description: Human activities are changing the Earth’s climate and the Earth’s oceans. Air and water temperatures are increasing, and the uptake of CO2 into seawater is causing oceans to become more acidic. These changes are expected to be detrimental to marine invertebrates[1], a diverse group of species (e.g., sea urchins, corals, clams) that are often keystones in their ecosystems. Most marine invertebrates release their sperm and eggs directly into the water, where gametes meet and fertilization takes place. There is growing evidence that environmental change can impair gamete function and the fertilization process. However, whether these climate-mediated changes in marine invertebrate reproduction will affect population persistence and ecosystem stability is difficult to intuit. Mathematical models are urgently needed but do not exist. In this project, the student will combine mathematical and computational modelling with empirical testing to understand how climate change affects marine invertebrates and the ecosystems they support. With guidance from Tucker Gilman and Richard Preziosi, the student will develop advanced analytical models[2] and individual-based simulations[2,3] of marine ecosystems. With guidance from John Fitzpatrick and Ceri Lewis, the student will test the model predictions in vivo[1,4,5]. This work will take advantage of the University of Manchester’s Computational Shared Facility and of the University of Exeter’s Aquatic Resource Centre. Students with backgrounds in life sciences, physics, mathematics, or computer science would be well-suited for this project. Related Publications: 1.Lewis C et al. 2012. Marine Biology 160(8):2089-2101. 2.Gilman et al. 2012. Nature 483:328-330. 3.Gilman RT and Behm JE. 2011. Evolution 65(9):2592-2605. 4.Fitzpatrick et al. 2012. Evolution 66(9):2451-2460. 5.Fitzpatrick et al. 2010. Biology Letters 6:797-799. Advisory team: Tucker Gilman (University of Manchester): http://bit.ly/1zhoqbo John Fitzpatrick (University of Manchester): http://bit.ly/1wGHBYG Ceri Lewis (University of Exeter): http://bit.ly/1zhoqbq Richard Preziosi (University of Manchester): http://bit.ly/1wGHBYI How to Apply: This project is to be funded under the BBSRC Doctoral Training Programme. Projects under this scheme are competitively funded; i.e. there are more projects advertised than are available. If you are interested in this project, please make direct contact with the Principal Supervisor (tucker.gilman@manchester.ac.uk) to arrange to discuss the project further as soon as possible. You MUST also submit an online application form, full details on how to apply can be found on the University of Manchester’s BBSRC DTP website http://bit.ly/1zhoo3o via Gmail

October 29, 2014

23:50
PhD Research Fellow in Biology, Paleogenomics and Ancient DNA at CEES, Department of Biosciences A 3 year position as PhD Research Fellow is available at the Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Oslo. The fellowship will be for a period of 3 years. Tentative starting date: 01.02.2015. To send application, go to http://bit.ly/1zhegHI Job Description The main objective of this PhD project is to investigate strains of Yersinia pestis from different localities and periods of the second plague pandemic (14th-18th c.). With ancient DNA analysis it has been demonstrated that Y. pestis was the causative agent of all known historic plague pandemics with distinct variants circulating simultaneously through Europe during past outbreaks. Despite these findings, several questions which concern the plague and the historic Y. pestis strains remain open, theroutes of transmission of plague, the mechanisms of dissemination and the implication of wild and urban fauna. We have proposed to investigate the evolutionary and ecological processes behind the historic plague pandemics using a multidisciplinary approach involving paleogenomics with high-throughput sequencing methods. With this approach, we aim to generate data on genetic diversity among ancient strains and define bacterial population dynamics of the past. We also aim to understand spatial and temporal trajectories of transmission by relating the genomic information to climatological and ecological data. The successful candidate will join the multi-disciplinary, international team of MedPlag (“MedPlag: The medieval plagues: ecology, transmission modalities and routes of the infections”, Advanced Grant funded by the European Research Council (ERC)) that brings together experts from the fields of ancient DNA, ecology, evolution, microbiology, archaeology and history (http://bit.ly/1zhedMh). Requirements The Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences has a strategic ambition of being a leading research faculty. Candidates for these fellowships will be selected in accordance with this, and expected to be in the upper segment of their class with respect to academic credentials. We search for a candidate who has completed a MSc degree (or other education equivalent to a Norwegian degree) of high quality in biology, anthropology, evolutionary biology, bioinformatics or a field demonstrably relevant to the project description. The candidate should have a background within population genomics, bioinformatics or ancient DNA. The candidate should be able to document strong analytical skills and experience in the laboratory. Experience with ancient DNA, analytical or theoretical, and bioinformatics will be of advantage. The successful candidate will work with the ancient DNA group (Barbara Bramanti and Stephanie Hnsch) and closely with several researchers at the CEES with complementary skills, as well as with our international collaborators involved in the MedPlag project. We seek a highly motivated, enthusiastic person with the ambition to gain insight and publish papers in leading, international journals, in possession of good interpersonal skills and willing to collaborate with researchers across disciplines. The purpose of the fellowship is research training leading to a successful completion of a PhD degree. The fellowship requires admission to the research training program at the University of Oslo. The application to the PhD program must be submitted to the department no later than two months after taking up the position. For more information see: http://bit.ly/1m8QEOW http://bit.ly/1esINYa A good command of English is required. http://bit.ly/1pVJquh Salary: Position code 1017, Pay grade: 50 - 57 (NOK 429 700 - 482 800 per year) The application must include: .Application letter including a statement of interest, summarizing your scientific work and interests and describing how you fit the description of the person we seek. .CV (summarizing education, positions and academic experience). .Copies of educational certificates (bachelor and master), and transcript of records. .2 names and contact details of references (name, relation to candidate, e-mail and telephone number). .Academic publications (if any) may be included to be considered by the evaluation committee (up to 3). Foreign applicants are advised to attach an explanation of their University’s grading system. Please remember that all documents should be in English or a Scandinavian language. In accordance with the University of Oslo’s equal opportunities policy, we invite applications from all interested individuals regardless of gender or ethnicity. UiO has an agreement for all employees, aiming to secure rights to research results a.o. Olaf Kristian Sund via Gmail
23:36
Chungbuk National University in South Korea Postdoctoral research associate position on Genome sequencing of marine animals and invertebrates *The Marine Genome 100+ Korea* *project*, a newly initiated large scale genomics project, aims to determine the sequences of whole genomes and transcriptomes of > 100 selected marine species. The position will primarily involve the analysis of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) data from marine animals and invertebrates and extensive study of their genomes using phylogenomics and comparative genomics approaches. We seek a bright and highly motivated and enthusiastic person able to work both as part of a team and independently. The candidate will be responsible for: - Managing NGS data and analyses; - Proactively identifying and incorporating new algorithms and technology to automate the analysis of marine genomes and to extend the features of existing analysis pipeline; - Participating in a team of scientists to offer bioinformatics, genomics, transcriptomics and other omics solutions; - Training research staffs on the use of relevant bioinformatics software and tools; The successful candidate is required to possess the following: - Ph.D. or equivalent in Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, Genomics, Marine Biology or related field and experiences in two or more of the following areas: comparative genomics, transcriptome sequencing analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and/or genome wide association studies; - Experience with bioinformatics analyses, including programming in any scripting language (e.g. PERL or Python) and ability to handle a large data set efficiently using scripts, particularly in the analysis of NGS data; - Familiar with commercial and open-source bioinformatics tools and various public genomic databases; - Genome assembly of *de novo* genomes; - Knowledge of statistical software tools and packages (e.g. R); - Evidence of excellence in research and high productivity. Applicants should send a short research statement (including past, present, and future goals), CV, and the names and email addresses of at least 3 potential references as a single pdf file to Prof. Joong-Ki Park (Project PI: E-mail: jkpyou@chungbuk.ac.kr). Informal inquiries are also welcome. Best regards, Chungoo Chungoo Park, Ph.D. Assistant professor School of Biological Sciences and Technology Chonnam National University 300 Yongbong-Dong, Buk-Ku GwangJu, South Korea 500-757 Office phone: +82-62-530-1913 Fax: +82-62-530-2199 E-mail: chungoo@jnu.ac.kr ; chungoo.park@gmail.com “Chungoo (JNU)” via Gmail
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PhD and MS positions are available in lab of Mark Christie at Purdue University. Two positions are available for highly-motivated candidates interested in the ecology and evolution of fishes. For more information on research in the Christie lab please visit: http://bit.ly/1FUErWp Potential projects include: 1. Examining the rapid adaptation of introduced fishes into the Great Lakes, 2. Identifying the genetic and evolutionary consequences of domestication, captive breeding, and supplementation within a hatchery context, and 3. Using existing and novel approaches to determine patterns of larval dispersal in fishes. These are the main research themes in the Christie laboratory, but graduate students are free to explore independent lines of inquiry. All graduate students will be encouraged to use molecular tools including next-generation sequencing (e.g., RAD-Seq, RNA-Seq) to generate and analyze comprehensive genetic data sets. As such, previous research experience with molecular techniques, computational work, bioinformatics, and assisting with the design and implementation of experiments will be highly regarded. If you are interested in joining the lab, please contact me directly at markchristie@purdue.edu with a resume/CV and a brief description of your research interests and experience. Mark Christie via Gmail
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—001a11c2400c12e7560506886532 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 3 PhD opportunities available in the Molecular Evolution Lab at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia for a start from mid to late 2015. Open to all nationalities. Closing date: December 15th 2014 More information: http://bit.ly/138R3dG Project 1: The ecology and evolution of somatic mutation in plants Somatic mutations (mutations in the body tissues) are fundamentally important in the ecology and evolution of plants, and they have huge implications for agriculture and plant industry. Surprisingly though, very little is known about them. This project will use cutting-edge sequencing and bioinformatic approaches to gain some of the first insights into the causes and consequences of somatic mutation in plants. The work will be carried out on an experimental population of eucalyptus trees planted in the beautiful Australian alps. The research involves sequencing and comparing genomes to reconstruct the history of somatic mutations within individual plants. These histories will then be used to test hypotheses about the causes and consequences of somatic mutation within and between plants. The work will illuminate many fascinating and underexplored areas of biology, and there is great scope for students to develop the research in line with their interests. Project 2: Molecular evolution and macroevolution in acacias Why do some species evolve faster than others? Do rates of molecular evolution drive rates of speciation? Are rates of morphological and molecular evolution linked? This project will answer these and many other questions using acacias, one of the most iconic and species-rich plant groups in Australia, as a model system. The research will combine sequencing, phylogenetics, comparative analyses, and experimental work to gain a rich understanding of macro- and molecular evolution across the acacias. The initial focus will be on testing key hypotheses about the causes and consequences of molecular evolution, but following this there will be great scope for students to develop the research in line with their interests. Prospective applicants should ideally have an MSc in a related discipline (with a 50% research component), and additional relevant research experience and/or qualifications. For project 1, experience with scripting in Python and/or R, and the analysis of large short-read sequencing datasets would be a bonus. If you don’t have these skills, a willingness to learn them is absolutely essential. The 2014 MQRES full-time stipend rate is $25,392 pa tax exempt for 3 years. This can be supplemented by teaching and demonstrating. Applications should include 1) your CV, 2) a brief statement of your reasons for applying (max. 500 words) and the project you are applying to work on, 3) contact details of two academic referees, 4) nationality. Applications should be submitted electronically as a single PDF file. Applications for these positions (and initial enquiries) should be emailed by 15th December 2014 to: robert.lanfear@mq.edu.au Dr Robert Lanfear, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia via Gmail

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I am currently advertising three graduate student openings in my lab in the Department of Biology at the University of Saskatchewan (www.lanelab.ca). I envision two of these as most appropriate for Ph.D. students and one as most appropriate for an M.Sc. student. There is some latitude for broadening or tightening the focus, however, to accommodate alternatives. All will begin in either May or September, 2015. I have full funding for one of the Ph.D. positions. The other two positions will be supported by departmental or university-level teaching assistantships (competition for these funding sources will be in spring 2015). Graduate student funding at the UofS is quite competitive so, for all positions, the successful applicant will have a GPA >80% (converted to the UofS 1-100 scale) over the past two years of schooling and a degree in a relevant discipline (i.e., Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Physiology, Environmental Biology). Of note, while I certainly appreciate the hard work that is put into obtaining a degree in Biotechnology, I do not view this as relevant experience for these positions. The specific interests/experience of the successful candidate will vary to some extent on the project applied for, but in all cases, a passion for fieldwork (in beautiful places), strong scientific communication skills (both written and oral) and statistical proficiency (or a willingness to gain it) is necessary. If you are interested in applying for one of these positions, please submit a cv (including names and contact details of references), a short (1 pg) description of research interests and an unofficial copy of your transcripts to jeffrey.lane@usask.ca. Applications will be accepted up to Jan 31, 2015, but will be evaluated as theyre received. To ensure full consideration of your application, therefore, please submit asap. Any questions can be directed to Jeff Lane (email above). Hibernation biology of Columbian ground squirrels (Ph.D.) Columbian ground squirrels are resident in the northwest Rocky Mountains and populations in Kananaskis, Alberta have been studied since the early 1990s. We have recently shown that, in contrast to the overwhelming majority of reported phenological trends in response to climate change, emergence dates from hibernation in this population have been consistently delayed over the past two decades. This effect is likely due to an increasing prevalence of late-spring snowstorms in the area. This project will involve investigating additional phenological traits (e.g., entry into hibernation), physiological changes during the active (e.g., energy expenditure during reproduction) and hibernation season (e.g., body temperature profiles) and survival and reproductive success of individuals. In all cases, datasets collected over multiple years are available and can be built upon, and multiple completely censused populations are available for study. This is an ideal opportunity for a student to leverage a proven powerful study system to address important fundamental and applied research questions. Relevant literature: Lane, J.E., L.E.B. Kruuk, A. Charmantier, J.O. Murie and F.S. Dobson. 2012. Delayed phenology and reduced fitness associated with climate change in a wild hibernator. Nature 489: 554-557. Lane, J.E., L.E.B. Kruuk, A. Charmantier, J.O. Murie, D.W. Coltman, M. Buoro, S. Raveh and F.S. Dobson. 2011. A quantitative genetic analysis of hibernation emergence date in a wild population of Columbian ground squirrels. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 24: 1949-1959. Reproductive phenology of North American red squirrels (Ph.D.) The Kluane Red Squirrel Project (KRSP) was initiated in the late 1980s and now represents one of the longest running and most-comprehensive studies of a wild mammal in the world. Researchers from multiple universities are involved and exciting collaborations have produced many important, interdisciplinary findings. A clear strength of this project stems from our ability to quantify the primary food resource for individual red squirrels (white spruce seed, cached as cones). This project will involve investigation of phenological variation of individual red squirrels and its relationship to phenological variation in white spruce. Quantitative genetics analyses will be used to estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations (i.e., evolutionary potential) in phenological traits and opportunities are available to collaborate with other researchers in energetic physiology, population ecology, endocrinology and animal behaviour. All fieldwork will occur in the spectacular southwest Yukon Territory at KRSPs field camp. Relevant literature: Williams, C.T., J.E. Lane, M.M. Humphries, A.G. McAdam and S. Boutin. 2013. Reproductive phenology of a food-hoarding mast-seed consumer: resource- and density dependent benefits of early breeding in red squirrels. Oecologia 174: 777-788. Boutin, S. and J.E. Lane. 2014. Climate change and mammals: evolutionary versus plastic responses. Evolutionary Applications 7: 29-41. Resource use and population demographics of black tailed prairie dogs (M.Sc.) In 2014, we initiated a new project in collaboration with Parks Canada and the Calgary Zoo on the ecology of black tailed prairie dogs in southern Saskatchewan. Here, the species reaches its northern range limit, and colonies are only found in and around Grasslands National Park. Black-tailed prairie dogs are a key feature of the prairie ecosystem with numerous species relying on them (black-footed ferrets, burrowing owls and swift fox, to name a few). We have undertaken a complete colony-level census (> 200 individuals caught to date) and aim to maintain this as a long-term individual-based study. It should provide for an ideal opportunity to better understand the limits to species ranges, which, in the context of climate change are becoming increasingly relevant. This project will investigate multi-level habitat selection (at the individual, colony and population level), population viability and threats to population persistence (e.g., climate change, disease, predation). This is a rare opportunity to couple high-level fundamental research questions with direct on-the-ground management applications for this and associated species (most notably the extirpated black-footed ferret, currently the subject of an ambitious reintroduction program). “Lane, Jeffrey” via Gmail
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The CMPG lab (http://bit.ly/1veterm) at the University of Berne is opening 2 new PhD and 1 post-doc positions in January 2015. The*post*doc position is available for 1 year to model the pattern of genomic diversity created during range expansions. A computer simulation framework will be developed to 1) detect typical signatures of range expansions at the molecular level and 2) to co-estimate the distribution of fitness effects and the past history of populations from their patterns of genomic diversity. The first PhD position is in evolutionary theory under the main supervision of Dr. Stephan Peischl. It will consist in studying the interactions between ecology, demography and selection at range margins. The second PhD position is in human population genomics, and will be mainly supervised by Prof. Laurent Excoffier. It will consist in improving methods to detect selection at the gene network level and after range expansions in humans. The two PhD positions are available for 3 years. We are looking for highly motivated individuals with a good background in population genomics, statistics, and advanced computational skills, and with strong oral and written communication abilities. The CMPG lab is hosted by the Institute of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Berne, and it offers a very international and stimulating research environment. It is also affiliated to the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) which offers ample potential for interactions. Berne is ideally located in the middle of Switzerland and Europe, and provides rich cultural and outdoor activities. The gross salary of the post-doc candidate would be around 80,000 CHF per year and those of PhD students around 32,000 CHF, per year. All three positions are expected to start in January 2015. For any position, please send, before November 15th 2014, an application letter stating your motivation for the position, a CV, and contact information of two references to laurent.excoffier@iee.unibe.ch (for Post-Doc and PhD 2 positions) or stephan.peischl@iee.unibe.ch (for PhD 1). See the web page http://bit.ly/138R15w for a copy of this information and links with more details on these positions. via Gmail

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The Department of Zoology at Stockholm University has just opened a search for an Assistant Professor in Ethology. This is a four-year tenure-track position, with a career path with the opportunity for promotion to a permanent position as Associate Professor in Ethology at the department*. The field of ethology explains behavior, using micro- and/or macroevolutionary perspectives, through integration of mechanistic and adaptive approaches. The assistant professorship consists mainly of research but also some teaching (typically ca. 10% of the time) and supervision. At the Department of Zoology, research is being pursued in ecology, ethology, functional morphology, population genetics and systematics and evolution. The spirit of research is collaborative, both within the department and internationally. The department has a total of 16 permanent Associate Professor/Full Professor positions, and presently accommodates 45-50 staff and about the same number of PhD students. Research in ethology at the department currently covers a wide range of topics, including behavior, cognition and brain size in guppies, the ontogeny of social behavior in dogs and wolves, insect phenology, evolution of phenotype determination, predator psychology and the evolution of aposematism and mimicry in bird-insect interactions, bird migration, comparative methods, personality and social dominance in fowl, and foraging behavior in red deer and fallow deer. The department has laboratory space for large-scale studies of insects and fishes at the Stockholm campus, and also a large and well-equipped field station with great opportunities for ethological studies. Informal inquiries can be made to Prof. Olof Leimar (olof.leimar@zoologi.su.se). Note that applications should be submitted through the Stockholm University website, where further details also are available: http://bit.ly/1u65cEu Closing Date: Monday 15 December 2014 * Decisions about promotion will be based on the research and teaching expertise of the person awarded the assistant professorship, as evaluated in the fourth year of the position. For an ambitious and successful person, the chances of promotion are very high. See http://bit.ly/1u65cEv for a document detailing the formal requirements for promotion to associate professor. Olof Leimar, Professor Department of Zoology Stockholm University SE-106 91 Stockholm Sweden olof.leimar@zoologi.su.se http://bit.ly/1u65dIz Olof Leimar via Gmail
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The Hurtado and Mateos Lab at Texas A&M University is recruiting a postdoctoral research associate to join our team. The aim of the project is to apply next-generation sequencing and computational bioinformatics to understand genetic connectivity among blue crab populations from the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic US. The ideal candidate will be passionate about evolutionary and conservation genomics, and have excellent organization and communication skills. This position requires a Ph.D. in Population Genetics or related discipline and a successful research track indicated by publications in peer-reviewed journals, and presentations at professional conferences. Preference will be given to candidates with the following expertise: population genetics data analysis; gathering and analyzing high throughput DNA sequence data and microsatellites; and field work, especially in coastal habitats. The position is available for one year with the possibility of extending it an additional year based on performance and funding availability. Although the primary responsibility will be to contribute to an existing funded project, there may be opportunities to develop and pursue independent projects. Texas A&M University is in College Station, which offers an excellent living and work environment within easy reach of Houston and Austin. We strongly encourage women and members of underrepresented groups to apply. The University environment fosters work/life balance and is responsive to the needs of dual-career couples. To apply and obtain more details on the position, visit http://bit.ly/1E00ZDk (NOV# 08022). In your application, please include a cover letter that describes why you are interested in this position and highlights your expertise, as well as the names and contact details of 2-3 references. Please also submit a research statement summarizing your major research accomplishments to date. Review of applications will begin Nov. 3rd and continue until position is filled. For questions about this position please contact Luis A. Hurtado (lhurtado@tamu.edu) or Mariana Mateos (mmateos@tamu.edu). Sincerely, Mariana Mateos, Ph.D. Associate Professor Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Group and Faculty of Genetics Texas A&M University 320B Heep Laboratory Building 2258 TAMUS College Station, TX 77843-2258 Phone(office/lab): 979-847-9463 Fax 979-845-4096 Email: mmateos@tamu.edu http://bit.ly/1u65cEm My ResearcherID: http://bit.ly/1u65dIp Mariana Mateos via Gmail
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Opening, Postdoctoral Scholar, Morphometrics of the Cetacean Skull We are accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Scholar as part of a NSF funded project on the evolution of the cetacean skull at the New York Institute of Technology (Old Westbury Campus, New York). Details of the project can be found at the following link (http://1.usa.gov/100RXqm). The Postdoctoral Scholar will take a lead role in collecting quantitative data from skulls of living and fossil cetaceans and then using these data to test hypotheses relating cranial modularity to evolutionary changes in brain size, hearing capabilities, and feeding. The ideal candidate will have a strong background in morphometrics, mammalian cranial anatomy, and be able to conduct statistical analyses in a phylogenetic context. The Postdoctoral Scholar will collect data using a variety of tools and methods, including a high-resolution laser scanner, a microscribe 3D digitizer, and photogrammetry. This position is for two years, with a flexible start date tentatively scheduled for August 1, 2015. During this time, the Postdoctoral Scholar will be a part of the Anatomy Department in the College of Osteopathic Medicine. In addition to conducting research, the Postdoctoral Scholar is expected to assist in the teaching of human gross anatomy to medical students for a period of no more than 6 months. Experience in teaching human gross anatomy will be viewed positively but is not a requirement. The Postdoctoral Scholar will receive training on how to use a laser scanner, and during the analysis phase of the project, will travel to the UK to work with Senior Personnel Anjali Goswami (University College London). Minimal requirements are a Ph.D. in biology or related science by the start date and a demonstrated record of scholarship in morphometrics through peer-reviewed publications. The New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) is a non-profit independent, private institution of higher education with more than 12,000 students worldwide that are pursuing one of 90 degree programs, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees. The College of Osteopathic Medicine has more than 4000 alumni practicing medicine across the nation and around the world. The school has three health clinics, and students engage in clerkships at these facilities or the many affiliated hospitals and other health providers in the New York City area. To apply, please send your CV, a one page statement describing how your experience and interests match this position, and the names and contact information for three references by email to PI Jonathan Geisler (jgeisler@nyit.edu) by Dec. 1, 2014. If you are attending the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting in Berlin and would like to discuss this position there, please email Co-PI Brian Beatty (bbeatty@nyit.edu). Dr. Anjali Goswami Reader in Palaeobiology Department of Genetics, Evolution, and Environment and Department of Earth Sciences University College London Darwin Building 218A Gower Street London WC1E 6BT +44 (0)20 7679 2190 www.goswamilab.com “Goswami, Anjali” via Gmail