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September 25, 2014

00:30

The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University invites applications for an Assistant Professor in physiology and functional biology. Focal research areas could include comparative, molecular, evolutionary, or ecological physiology, functional biology, biomechanics, or biomaterials science. We seek applicants who use creative approaches to address fundamental questions in organismal biology and who are eager to contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching in physiology and associated fields. A record of outstanding achievement and a promising research program are more important than the specific research area. Interested candidates should submit online a CV, three relevant reprints or manuscripts, brief research and teaching statements, and three letters of reference at http://bit.ly/1rcBs6E. Review of applications will begin on 1 November 2014. The search will remain open until the position is filled. Yale University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Yale values diversity among its students, staff, and faculty and strongly welcomes applications from women, persons with disabilities, protected veterans and under-represented groups. Thomas J. Near Associate Professor and Curator Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Peabody Museum of Natural History Yale University New Haven, CT 06520 USA (203) 432-3002 thomas.near@yale.edu thomas.near@yale.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:13
Dear colleagues, If interested in phenology and evolutionary adaptations to seasonality, please consider the session we are organizing at the Aquatic Sciences Meeting in Granada 22-27 February 2015: “When, and why then? Phenology and evolutionary adaptations to seasonality in aquatic ecosystems” http://bit.ly/1vjwHqd We invite you to submit an abstract. Deadline for abstract submission is 10 October. Best wishes, ystein Varpe & Monika Winder ystein Varpe Associate professor University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS) www.unis.no +47 97762645 oystein.varpe@unis.no Adjunct senior scientist Akvaplan-niva ystein Varpe via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

September 24, 2014

23:55

—Apple-Mail=_A3C708BF-897F-42EF-BEC8-7837E799E0A1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii A postdoctoral research position in insect population genomics is available in the laboratory of Felix Sperling, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta. We are looking for someone to join us on a project that uses NGS methods (particularly genotyping-by-sequencing) to investigate landscape ecology, population structure and speciation in the spruce budworm species complex in western Canada. Genotyping data is already at hand, but needs to be more fully analyzed and written up. There is also significant opportunity to pursue other research questions depending on your personal interests and demonstrated abilities. You must have a recent Ph.D. degree and previous research experience in population genetics and/or landscape ecology. Expertise and practical skills in genomic data analysis, next-gen sequencing, bioinformatics, quantitative ecology, molecular systematics or forest entomology would be highly advantageous. You must be highly motivated, ready to commit yourself to the project, and have excellent English language skills. The position includes a competitive salary with benefits, and is open immediately. The selected candidate should start no later than January 2015. The position has a fixed term that extends to the end of March 2016 and is funded by Alberta Innovates BioSolutions. Edmonton is a friendly, culturally diverse city with nearby access to a great variety of natural areas. The Sperling lab has an excellent track record in placing people in career positions, and supports diverse projects ranging across systematics, evolutionary ecology and entomology. Application process: Please send a cover letter outlining your relevant background and research interests, your CV, and contact information for three references to felix.sperling@ualberta.ca. Felix Sperling, Professor Department of Biological Sciences http://bit.ly/15dxHnl University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada http://bit.ly/1bZfVXi —Apple-Mail=_A3C708BF-897F-42EF-BEC8-7837E799E0A1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

A postdoctoral research position in insect population genomics is available in the laboratory of Felix Sperling, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta. We are looking for someone to join us on a project that uses NGS methods (particularly genotyping-by-sequencing) to investigate landscape ecology, population structure and speciation in the spruce budworm species complex in western Canada. Genotyping data is already at hand, but needs to be more fully analyzed and written up. There is also significant opportunity to pursue other research questions depending on your personal interests and demonstrated abilities.

You must have a recent Ph.D. degree and previous research experience in population genetics and/or landscape ecology. Expertise and practical skills in genomic data analysis, next-gen sequencing, bioinformatics, quantitative ecology, molecular systematics or forest entomology would be highly advantageous. You must be highly motivated, ready to commit yourself to the project, and have excellent English language skills.

The position includes a competitive salary with benefits, and is open immediately. The selected candidate should start no later than January 2015. The position has a fixed term that extends to the end of March 2016 and is funded by Alberta Innovates BioSolutions. Edmonton is a friendly, culturally diverse city with nearby access to a great variety of natural areas. The Sperling lab has an excellent track record in placing people in career positions, and supports diverse projects ranging across systematics, evolutionary ecology and entomology.

Application process: Please send a cover letter outlining your relevant background and research interests, your CV, and contact information for three references to felix.sperling@ualberta.ca.

Felix Sperling, Professor

Department of Biological Sciences  http://bit.ly/15dxHnl

University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

http://bit.ly/1bZfVXi

—Apple-Mail=_A3C708BF-897F-42EF-BEC8-7837E799E0A via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
23:39

Imperial College London Research Associate Reference number: SM208-14 closing date 21st October Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology; Imperial College London, School of Public Health Salary Range: 29,350 - 33,410 per annum The Fisher Lab is seeking a computationally-minded molecular epidemiologist/ecologist to join a research group investigating the evolutionary ecology of chytrid fungi causing global amphibian extinctions. Continuously funded since 2003 by UK Research Councils, we are investigating the patterns and processes that are leading to disease-driven amphibian declines by utilising population genomics, experimental ecology and fieldwork. Our work has been key to identifying the fungal lineages and species that are emerging to cause amphibian declines, and the vectors that are leading to the spread of these invasive pathogens. The project will focus on discovering new lineages of amphibian-infecting fungi from around the world, comparative genomics of the different lineages, and will seek to identify the regions from which contemporary infections originate. Funded by the Leverhulme Trust, the projects primary objective is to investigate the spatial epidemiology and molecular evolution of panzootic amphibian chytridiomycosis by: Characterising ancient and modern amphibian-associated chytrids using barcoding of ancient and contemporary DNA; Linking patterns of host-specificity, competition and virulence to the spatial origins of infecting lineages. An initial focus of the project will be the amphibian biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar. Our ultimate goal is to increase our awareness of evolutionary ecology of these pathogens, and the risk that they pose to species worldwide. Applicants should have a PhD or equivalent in one of the following areas: epidemiology, bioinformatics, computational biology or a related quantitative discipline. You should also be able to demonstrate strong knowledge of, and interest in, pathogen epidemiology as well as having experience of working with large and complex databases, programing and webdesign. The position is supported by a full time research assistant for two years This is a full time post for a fixed-term of three years. The candidate will join a vibrant department of over 130 epidemiologist at Imperial College London, recently ranked joint 2nd in the QS world University rankings. For informal enquiries please contact Professor Matthew Fisher: matthew.fisher@imperial.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1vjrxKJ -genomics-of-wildlife-infections/ via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
06:00
Background: Partulid tree snails are endemic to Pacific high islands and have experienced extraordinary rates of extinction in recent decades. Although they collectively range across a 10,000?km swath of Oceania, half of the family?s total species diversity is endemic to a single Eastern Pacific hot spot archipelago (the Society Islands) and all three partulid genera display highly distinctive distributions. Our goal was to investigate broad scale (range wide) and fine scale (within?Society Islands) molecular phylogenetic relationships of the two widespread genera, Partula and Samoana. What can such data tell us regarding the genesis of such divergent generic distribution patterns, and nominal species diversity levels across Oceania? Results: Museum, captive (zoo) and contemporary field specimens enabled us to genotype 54 of the ~120 recognized species, including many extinct or extirpated taxa, from 14 archipelagoes. The genera Partula and Samoana are products of very distinct diversification processes. Originating at the western edge of the familial range, the derived genus Samoana is a relatively recent arrival in the far eastern archipelagoes (Society, Austral, Marquesas) where it exhibits a stepping?stone phylogenetic pattern and has proven adept at both intra?and inter? archipelago colonization. The pronounced east?west geographic disjunction exhibited by the genus Partula stems from a much older long-distance dispersal event and its high taxonomic diversity in the Society Islands is a product of a long history of within?archipelago diversification. Conclusions: The central importance of isolation for partulid lineage persistence and diversification is evident in time-calibrated phylogenetic trees that show that remote archipelagoes least impacted by continental biotas bear the oldest clades and/or the most speciose radiations. In contemporary Oceania, that isolation is being progressively undermined and these tree snails are now directly exposed to introduced continental predators throughout the family?s range. Persistence of partulids in the wild will require proactive exclusion of alien predators in at least some designated refuge islands.
01:59

Graduate Opportunities at Northern Illinois University The Ecology, Evolution, Behavior, and Conservation faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Illinois University are seeking applicants to the department’s M.S. and Ph.D. graduate programs for the 2015-2016 academic year. Research interests among the faculty are diverse and include community ecology, restoration ecology, conservation genetics, vertebrate and invertebrate evolution, plant phylogenetics, behavioral ecology, microbial ecology, and bioinformatics. The EEBC faculty includes: -Nicholas A. Barber, plant-insect interactions, community ecology, and restoration ecology, http://bit.ly/Y0js2r -Neil W. Blackstone, invertebrate evolutionary biology, http://bit.ly/1mPDE2X -Melvin R. Duvall, plant phylogenomics, http://bit.ly/Y0jtmU -Holly P. Jones, restoration ecology and conservation biology, http://bit.ly/Y0jsiL -Bethia H. King, insect behavioral ecology, http://bit.ly/1mPDGIi -Richard B. King, evolutionary biology, herpetology, and conservation biology, http://bit.ly/Y0jsiR -Virginia L. Naples, comparative morphology and vertebrate paleontology, http://bit.ly/1mPDGIl -Karen E. Samonds, paleontology and paleobiogeography, http://bit.ly/Y0jtDi -Wesley D. Swingley, microbial ecology, http://bit.ly/1mPDE39 -Yanbin Yin, bioinformatics and evolutionary genomics, http://bit.ly/1mPDGYI Details of the graduate program and application process are available at http://bit.ly/Y0jvep. The department offers teaching assistantships that include 12 months of stipend support and tuition waiver. The deadline for application materials is January 1, 2015. However, prospective students should contact potential faculty advisors well in advance of applying to discuss research interests and relevant qualifications. Northern Illinois University is a 20,000-student research university situated an hour from downtown Chicago in DeKalb, Illinois, a diverse community of 50,000 with a low cost of living. Regional research resources include The Field Museum, Burpee Museum of Natural History, TNCs Nachusa Grasslands, Morton Arboretum, Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, NIUs Lorado Taft campus, and numerous local county forest preserves and state parks. Wesley Swingley Dept. of Biological Sciences Northern Illinois University Montgomery 333 DeKalb, IL 60115 Office: 815-753-7835 Lab: 815-753-7812 wswingley@niu.edu wesley.swingley@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:45

Post doctoral position in Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Agents of Infectious Disease at UNC Charlotte. Duties will include supporting projects through original research and publication, collaboration with other team members and stakeholders, and mentoring of students. The employee will also contribute to development of proposals for funding. Applicants should have experience in molecular systematics, biogeography, host-pathogen systems, and/or computational biology. Ph.D. required in biology, computer science, or related fields. send CV to unccpostdoc@gmail.com unccpostdoc@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:34

An opportunity is available for a PhD student to join Tim Connallons research group in the School of Biological Sciences at Monash University, in Melbourne, Australia. I am seeking creative and motivated students who wish to carry out original research in the general area of evolutionary theory. The specific project will be developed in collaboration with the successful candidate, and tailored to match their individual interests and strengths. Projects can potentially involve a combination of new theory development, and data analysis/experiments as a means to test predictions of theoretical models. Areas of interest in the lab largely fall within the realm of evolutionary genetics. Some recent and ongoing work focuses on the following areas: sexual dimorphism, the population genetics of adaptation, the maintenance of genetic variation, sex chromosome evolution, gene duplication and gene expression evolution, and coadaptation between cytoplasmic and nuclear genomes. Well-motivated projects that fall outside of these areas will also be encouraged. A keen interest in evolutionary biology is essential. Individuals with strong quantitative skills, and those with backgrounds in biology or another relevant field (e.g., mathematics, physics, computer science), are encouraged to apply. Successful candidates will be fully funded for 3.5 years, for full time research, with no teaching requirements. The annual stipend is approximately $25,000 AUD, tax-free, and additional expenses for research, coursework, and conference attendance will also be covered. Individuals of all nationalities are eligible. Domestic Australian and New Zealand candidates will be invited to apply for an Australian Postgraduate Award (approximately $25,000 AUD), with the additional potential for a competitive top-up scholarship (additional $5,000). Monash University is a member of Australias Group of Eight coalition, and is internationally recognized for excellence in research and teaching. The School of Biological Sciences (http://bit.ly/1n2gpy2) is home to a collegial and interdisciplinary research environment, with strengths in ecology, genetics and evolutionary biology. Monash is located in Melbourne, one of the most liveable cities in the world and a cultural and recreational hub. To apply, please send a CV, academic transcript, contact details for two academic references, and a brief outline of research interests to tim.connallon@monash.edu. Informal inquiries are welcome. Applicants must hold a Bachelors degree with first-class honours, or a masters degree. Review of applications will begin immediately, and short-listed candidates will be contacted to set up phone/Skype interviews. tim.connallon@monash.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:33

Dear Colleagues, There is a new edition of the course “Integration and modularity with geometric morphometrics - 4th edition”; April 7-10, 2015. INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Chris Klingenberg (University of Manchester, UK). The aim of the workshop is to provide participants with an overview of morphometric approaches to studying morphological integration and modularity. The concepts of integration and modularity will be introduced and discussed in different contexts (e.g. development, individual variation, evolutionary change). The theoretical basis and application of different methods for analyzing integration and modularity in geometric morphometric data will be presented. Lectures will be combined with hands-on demonstrations of the analyses. Participants are encouraged to bring their own morphometric data for analysis and discussion in the workshop. More information: http://bit.ly/18yObo5 or wrtiting to courses@transmittingscience.org These courses will be held in the Sabadell facilities of the Institut Catal de Paleontologia (Barcelona, Spain) and are co-organized by Transmitting Science and the Institut Catal de Paleontologia M. Crusafont. Place are limited and will be covered by strict registration order. Please feel free to distribute this information between your colleagues if you consider it appropriate. With best regards Soledad De Esteban-Trivigno, PhD soledad.esteban@transmittingscience.org via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:14
*National Science Foundation supported Ph.D. or Postdoctoral position* We seek applications for one PhD or Postdoctoral position, funded by the NSF project `An Integrative Investigation of Population Connectivity Using a Coral Reef Fish.’ The position can be based in the Boston Lab in the Department of Biology at Boston University or the Webb Lab in the Department of Biology at Colorado State University. *Project overview* Understanding the patterns of marine larval dispersal and population connectivity is central to understanding marine population dynamics, marine population divergence, and how to design effective networks of marine reserves. Over the last decade, three methods, each of which tells us something slightly different, have emerged as the leading contenders to provide the greatest insights into marine population connectivity: direct genetic methods, coupled biophysical models, and indirect genetic methods. We are conducting an integrative investigation of population connectivity, using all three methods, in one very tractable system: the neon goby, *Elacatinus lori*, on the Belizean Barrier Reef. The research has three main objectives: 1) determine the relationship between distance and the probability of successful dispersal measured using direct genetic methods; 2) determine the relationship between the probability of successful dispersal predicted by coupled biophysical models and that measured using direct genetic methods; and, 3) determine the relationship between spatial genetic structure predicted by evolutionary ecology models and that measured using indirect genetic methods. *Position description* The PhD or postdoc will work on objective 3 of the project, developing evolutionary ecology models that use data on patterns of larval dispersal to predict patterns of genetic structure. The candidate will have strong interests in ecology and evolution and a strong quantitative and computational background. We encourage applications from students in mathematics, physics, engineering and computer science who have demonstrable interest applying their skills in the fields of ecology and evolution, as well as applications from students in biology, ecology, evolution and marine science with an excellent quantitative and computational background. *How to apply* To apply, please e-mail Katie Hartmann (kahartma@rams.colostate.edu) with PDFs of your CV, transcript, GRE results, and a one page statement of your career aspirations and why you are interested in the position. If you have further questions about the position, please contact Peter Buston (buston@bu.edu) and Colleen Webb (Colleen.Webb@colostate.edu). Katherine Hartmann via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:11
Registration is now open for the International Society for Evolution, Medicine, & Public Health Inaugural Meeting , March 19-21 in Tempe Arizona. The meeting is co-sponsored by the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, & Public Health and the ASU Center for Evolution and Medicine . Charlie Nunn is the Chair of the Program Committee; Cynthia Beall and Randolph Nesse are working with him to create the program. Abstract submissions are welcome for talks, posters, discussions, and panel discussions. Full information is available at http://bit.ly/1vaNFak Register at http://bit.ly/1vaNHis Fees are substantially discounted for those who register early, and are refundable until February 15th. It will be an exciting and memorable meeting. Conference registration site Conference website Plenary Speakers - Harvey Fineberg , Institute of Medicine - Stephen Stearns, Yale University - Barbara Natterson-Horowitz , UCLA - Sir Peter Gluckman , University of Auckland - Ann Demogines , (Omenn Award Winner) BioFire Diagnostics - Ruslan Medzhitov , Yale rmnesse@gmail.com via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

September 23, 2014

23:53

Post-Doctoral Position in Plant Evolution A post-doctoral position is available in the laboratory of Jannice Friedman, in the Department of Biology at Syracuse University. Work in my lab is focused on the evolution of reproductive strategies in plants, and understanding both the genetics and ecology of divergent reproductive strategies. Current NSF-funded work is focused on understanding life history transitions between annual and perennial strategies in Mimulus guttatus, yellow monkeyflower. Other projects include the evolution of wind pollination and mating system evolution. Our research on Mimulus addresses the following questions: What is the genetic basis of differences between annual and perennial strategies in M. guttatus? How do seasonal cues determine flowering versus vegetative strategies? What are the fitness consequences and adaptive significance of this variation in the field? We use a combination of QTL mapping, next-gen sequencing, common garden experiments in the native range (western N. America), and greenhouse and laboratory work at Syracuse. The particular focus of this post-doc position will be tailored to the skills and expertise of the successful applicant, and the opportunity exists to develop new systems. The ideal candidate will use this appointment as an opportunity to develop and pursue novel and exciting questions. Preference will be given to candidates with a strong background in evolution, and experience with population or quantitative genetics and next-gen sequencing would be valuable. The position is available for 2 years, and will include a competitive salary and full benefits. The ideal start date would be January 2015 or earlier. Interested candidates are welcome to contact me by email at friedman@syr.edu. Applications should be submitted here: http://bit.ly/1B5x2i0 and should include: a brief description of past research accomplishments and future goals, CV, PDFs of two publications, and contact information for three referees. Jannice Friedman Assistant Professor Department of Biology Syracuse University 107 College Place Syracuse NY 13244 315.443.1564 friedman@syr.edu http://bit.ly/17kNIXT jannicefriedman@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
22:30

I have written before about How to interpret splits graphs. However, it is worth emphasizing a few points, so that people don't keep Mis-interpreting splits graphs.

A splits graph can potentially represent two main types of pattern. First, like a clustering analysis, it represents groups in the data that are in some way similar. Each group is represented by an explicit split in the graph (see Recognizing groups in splits graphs). The clusters may be hierarchically arranged (each group nested within another group), and they may overlap, so that objects can simultaneously be a member of more than one group. If the clusters do not overlap then the graph will be a tree.

Second, like on ordination analysis, a splits graph can summarize the multi-dimensional neighborhoods of the different objects. That is, the relative distance between the points on the graph summarizes the relationships among the objects — closer objects, as measured along the edges of the graph, are more similar.

These two patterns often appear in the same splits graph. Unfortunately, many published papers mis-interpret neighborhoods as splits. If there is an explicit split representing a cluster of interest, then the data can be said to support that possible cluster. However, if no such split exists, then the graph is agnostic with respect to that cluster — there might be no support for it in the data, or the split might be left out of the graph because other splits out-weigh it. So, graph objects occupying a particular neighborhood might not be well-supported by the original data, contrary to the interpretation sometimes seen in the literature.

This can be illustrated with a specific example, taken from: Sicoli MA, Holton G (2014) Linguistic phylogenies support back-migration from Beringia to Asia. PLOS One 9: e91722.


The splits graph is a consensus network, summarizing all of the splits with at least 10% support in 3000 MCMC bayesian trees. The authors note that the dashed line represents a "primary division" between the groups, and that the differently colored objects represent "clear groupings".

However, the dashed line is supported only by a small split, which has a larger contradictory split (that puts the North PCA group with the Plains-Apachean group). This split thus cannot be said to be well supported. Furthermore, the South Alaska grouping is not supported by any split shown in the graph (there are, however, two splits that combine uniquely to support it). That is, the South Alaska grouping represents a neighborhood rather than a supported cluster. Finally, the Alaska-Canada-1 grouping is also not supported by an uncontradicted split (ie. the tcb taa tau samples could as easily be part of the West Alaska grouping). All of the other identified groups are supported by unique and uncontradicted splits.

So, there are three types of pattern in this splits graph with respect to the groups of interest to the authors: uncontradicted splits, contradicted splits, and neighborhoods, representing good support, medium support and agnosticism, respectively. It is important to recognize these three possibilities, and to interpret them correctly with respect to "support" for any conclusions.

As an aside, I will point out that in the other splits graph in the same paper (a NeighborNet): the dashed line is not supported by any split, two of the colored groupings are not supported by any split, and two of the others have only a small contradicted split. Thus, the "primary division" and the "clear groupings" mostly represent neighborhoods, and are thus only dubiously supported.

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street. Room A103 (1st Floor) For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent
09:18
Following on from the discussion of the African chameleon data, I've started to explore Angelique Hjarding's data in more detail. The data is available from figshare (doi:10.6084/m9.figshare.1141858), so I've grabbed a copy and put it in github. Several things are immediately apparent.

  1. There is a lot of ungeoreferenced data. With a little work this could be geotagged and hence placed on a map.
  2. There are some errors with the georeferenced data (chameleons in Soutb America or off the coast, a locality in Tanzania that is now in Ethiopia, etc.).
  3. Rather alarmingly, most of the URLs to GBIF records that Angelique gives in the dataset no longer resolve.

The last point is worrying, and reflects the fact that at present you can't trust GBIF occurrence URLs to be stable over time. Most of the specimens in Angelique's data are probably still in GBIF, but the GBIF occurrenceID (and hence URL) will have changed. This pretty much kills any notion of reproducibility, and it will require some fussing to be able to find the new URLs for these records.

That the GBIF occurrenceIDs are no longer valid also makes it very difficult to make use of any data cleaning I or anyone else attempts with this data. If I georeference some of the specimens, I can't simply tell GBIF that I've got improved data. Nor is it obvious how I would give this information to the original providers using, say VertNet's github repositories. All in all a mess, and a sad reflection on our inability to have persistent identifiers for occurrences.

To help explore the data I've created some GeoJSON files to get a sense of the distribution of the data. Here are the point localities, a few have clearly got issues.



I also drew some polygons around points for the same taxon, to get a sense of their distributions.

Taxa represent by less than three distinct localities are presented by place marker, the rest by polygons.

I'll keep playing with this data as time allows, and try to get a sense of how hard it would be to go from what GBIF provides to what is actually going to be useful.
Source: iPhylo
06:00
Background: A central question for understanding the evolutionary responses of plant species to rapidly changing environments is the assessment of their potential for short-term (in one or a few generations) genetic change. In our study, we consider the case of Pinus pinaster Aiton (maritime pine), a widespread Mediterranean tree, and (i) test, under different experimental conditions (growth chamber and semi-natural), whether higher recruitment in the wild from the most successful mothers is due to better performance of their offspring; and (ii) evaluate genetic change in quantitative traits across generations at two different life stages (mature trees and seedlings) that are known to be under strong selection pressure in forest trees. Results: Genetic control was high for most traits (h 2  = 0.137-0.876) under the milder conditions of the growth chamber, but only for ontogenetic change (0.276), total height (0.415) and survival (0.719) under the more stressful semi-natural conditions. Significant phenotypic selection gradients were found in mature trees for traits related to seed quality (germination rate and number of empty seeds). Moreover, female relative reproductive success was significantly correlated with offspring performance for specific leaf area (SLA) in the growth chamber experiment, and stem mass fraction (SMF) in the experiment under semi-natural conditions, two adaptive traits related to abiotic stress-response in pines. Selection gradients based on genetic covariance of seedling traits and responses to selection at this stage involved traits related to biomass allocation (SMF) and growth (as decomposed by a Gompertz model) or delayed ontogenetic change, depending also on the testing environment. Conclusions: Despite the evidence of microevolutionary change in adaptive traits in maritime pine, directional or disruptive changes are difficult to predict due to variable selection at different life stages and environments. At mature-tree stages, higher female effective reproductive success can be explained by differences in their production of offspring (due to seed quality) and, to a lesser extent, by seemingly better adapted seedlings. Selection gradients and responses to selection for seedlings also differed across experimental conditions. The distinct processes involved at the two life stages (mature trees or seedlings) together with environment-specific responses advice caution when predicting likely evolutionary responses to environmental change in Mediterranean forest trees.
04:04
Dear colleagues, dear friends, How about discussing breakthrough science with a glass of excellent Spanish wine under the sun of Granada next February? Piero Calosi (Universit du Qubec Rimouski, Canada), Frank Melzner (IFM-GEOMAR, Germany), Pierre de Wit and myself (University of Gothenburg , Sweden) are organizing an exciting session at the 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting on 22-27 February 2015 at the Granada Congress and Exhibition Centre (Palacios de Exposiciones y Congresos de Granada) in Granada, Spain (http://bit.ly/1mHSQ2a ) We invite you to submit an abstract to be presented at the session: 068 - Trans-generational effects of climate change on marine species Anthropogenic driven marine climate change is projected to occur for thousands of years to come, and to have significant effects on many marine systems. While significant evolutionary responses are expected to occur during such persistent environmental change, most experimental studies to date have considered only short term effects and single life- history stages. Little is known about the trans-generational effects and the relative contribution of plasticity, epigenetic and evolution. This session will gather experts from different disciplines (climate change, eco-physiology, evolution, -omics) and explore the state of the art of the field and theoretical and experimental challenges associated with the investigation of the critical role of trans-generational effects in species responses to marine climate change. Questions we will address include: - Can exposure in a specific life-history stage carry-over to another? - Can phenotypic plasticity be used to predict evolutionary response and potential for adaptation? - What is the relative contribution of plasticity and selection? - What are the cost and mechanisms associated with phenotypic plasticity? - What is the contribution and mechanisms of epigenetics to adaptive response? Deadline for Submission of Abstracts is 10 Oct 2014 Registration: http://bit.ly/XSXiPu Session page: http://bit.ly/1mHSQiD Let us know if you have any questions Looking forward seeing you in Spain Sam Dupont Sam Dupont via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:48
Australian Tropical Herbarium Postdoctoral Research Fellow Ref. No. - 14210 Cairns The Australian Tropical Herbarium (ATH) seeks an outstanding and highly motivated postdoctoral researcher with expertise in plant molecular systematics to join our dynamic research team. The appointee will generate and analyse DNA data employing next-generation sequencing approaches to unravel the evolutionary history of one of Australia’s iconic sun orchids, Thelymitra. The sun orchids contribute to Australia’s remarkably rich and highly endemic flora of terrestrial orchids and represent one of the major radiations within the tribe Diurideae. The project aims to elucidate infrageneric relationships in Thelymitra based on next-generation sequencing approaches, to assess the taxonomic value of key morphological characters, and to improve our understanding of interspecific relationships in three species complexes (T. anntennifera, T. nuda and T. venosa). Expertise in the collection and analysis of next generation sequencing data will lead to high impact research outcomes. The ATH offers an unrivalled specimen collection of Australian tropical plants, full taxonomic research and field facilities including a comprehensively equipped molecular biology laboratory, and is situated adjacent to a range of tropical biomes including the World Heritage listed Queensland Wet Tropics rainforests. Visit us at www.ath.org.au. Employment Type: Appointment will be full-time for a fixed term of 2.5 years. Salary: Academic Level A - $75,353 - $80,635 per annum. Commencing salary will be in accordance with qualifications and experience. Benefits include a generous superannuation scheme with 17% employer contributions, five weeks annual recreation leave, flexible working arrangements and attractive options for salary packaging. Applications close on 12 October 2014. Applications must be lodged electronically using the online facility located at http://bit.ly/Y0lMXvwww.ath.org.au. Employment Type: Appointment will be full-time for a fixed term of 2.5 years. Salary: Academic Level A - $75,353 - $80,635 per annum. Commencing salary will be in accordance with qualifications and experience. Benefits include a generous superannuation scheme with 17% employer contributions, five weeks annual recreation leave, flexible working arrangements and attractive options for salary packaging. Applications close on 12 October 2014. Applications must be lodged electronically using the online facility located at http://bit.ly/Y0lMXv Dr. Katharina Schulte CSIRO/JCU Postdoctoral Research Fellow Australian Tropical Herbarium (CNS) & Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change (CTBCC) PLEASE NOTE: new phone number Phone: +61 (0)7 4232 1686 www.ath.org.au Postal: Sir Robert Norman Building (E2), James Cook University, Cairns Campus, PO Box 6811, Cairns QLD 4870 Street: Sir Robert Norman Building (E2), James Cook University, Cairns Campus, McGregor Road, Smithfield Qld 4878 [cid:3413883619_645370] “Schulte, Katharina” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:48
*PhD Student, Avian Behavioral Neurobiology, Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech* The Sewall lab in the Department of Biological Sciences at Virginia Tech is recruiting up to 2 PhD students. Research in the lab examines the effects of the ecological and social environment on neural plasticity, communication and social behavior in songbirds. The successful applicant(s) will conduct field and captive research on songbird communication and cognition, as well as histology, immunohistochemistry and molecular assays to examine makers of neural plasticity and brain function. Being accepted into the PhD program at Virginia Tech and Dr. Sewalls lab will provide extensive training in animal behavior, neurobiology and ecology by the PI, lab members, and a group of exceptional researchers in organismal biology, including Drs. Joel McGlothlin, Ignacio Moore, Dana Hawley and Bill Hopkins. Graduate students at Virginia Tech are provided a stipend and tuition coverage in exchange for service as a teaching or research assistant. To Apply: Send a cover letter summarizing your prior experience, professional goals, and research interests, as well as a CV and contact information for at least three academic references to Kendra Sewall ( ksewall@vt.edu). The application deadline funding through the graduate program is December 31st. For more information see links below. the Sewall lab: http://bit.ly/1lyVwJi Virginia Tech Biological Sciences: http://bit.ly/1mHNpAg Kendra Sewall, PhD Assistant Professor Biological Sciences 3024/3026 Derring Hall Virginia Tech 1405 Perry St Mail Code 0406 Blacksburg, VA 24061 540.231.5617 http://bit.ly/1mHNofJ Kendra Sewall via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:29
Curator of Ornithology Denver Museum of Nature & Science The Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS) invites applications for a Curator of Ornithology in the Department of Zoology, Research and Collections Division. We seek a scientist whose field and collections-based research addresses fundamental questions in modern avian evolutionary biology with some focus on the Rocky Mountain region. The successful candidate will 1) conduct and support original field and collections-based scientific research in areas of specialty such as avian systematics, evolutionary genetics/genomics, ecology, bioinformatics, and/or related fields, with an established track record of publications and extramural funding; 2) actively curate and continue to grow a large and important ornithology collection, and 3) help inspire public understanding of, and involvement in, science by supporting museum-based programming, exhibitry, and external outreach. The DMNS has 14 active curators and support staff spanning the fields of anthropology, earth sciences, health sciences, space sciences, and zoology. We have recently completed a state-of-the-art collections facility with modern collections workspaces and room for growth (http://bit.ly/1r3koQC). Additional facilities and resources include a core genetics lab, digital imaging equipment, a fleet of field vehicles, and field equipment. The museum has outstanding conservation, volunteer management, and library staff. The museum has strong local public support and close collaborations with local organizations and universities. Numerous opportunities are available to engage with the general public through educational programming and exhibits and to work with a large, highly trained volunteer corps. We are situated in an ideal geographic location for conducting regional fieldwork and research. The Department of Zoology is an outwardly focused and collegial team that engages in research with a strong regional focus in the Rocky Mountain and Great Plains. Current staff expertise is in arachnology, entomology, and mammalogy. The ornithology collection (~55,000 specimens, including eggs and nests) is sizeable, with excellent geographic, temporal, and taxonomic coverage, and continues to grow; it can be searched here: http://bit.ly/1uCcuLv. The Department has a full-time collections manager, office manager, grant-funded curatorial assistants, associates, and about 140 zoology volunteers who engage in science, collections, and outreach. Additional information about the DMNS Research and Collections Division and the Department of Zoology can be found here: http://bit.ly/1r3kp6R. A PhD is required at the start of the position and postdoctoral experience is preferred. The starting date of the position is flexible. Application Instructions: To apply, submit a single PDF file, which contains all of the following on single-spaced, single-sided pages in 12-point or larger font, via http://bit.ly/1uCctr2, by October 31, 2014: 1. A one-page cover letter that outlines your interest in the position, experience, and personal objectives. 2. A statement (three pages max.) that addresses the following equally: 1) your research interests, accomplishments, and future research/funding plans that include a regional focus; 2) your plans to dovetail your scholarship with the existing ornithology collection at the DMNS, and to continue to build and steward the ornithology collection; and 3) a summary of outreach areas where you are currently most effective, ways to leverage your skills within and beyond the museum to improve the publics understanding of science, and innovative approaches for leveraging the DMNS platform to effectively engage the general public and catalyze the next generation of scientifically literate youth. 3. A complete curriculum vitae which lists your in-press or published peer-reviewed publications, funding history, record of collections experience, and outreach. 4. A list of contact information for three professional references. Be advised that due to the high volume of applicants, we are only able to directly contact those candidates whose skills and background best fit the needs of the position, however please check your inbox and junk mail for any correspondence. If you are a returning applicant, please note that cover letters must be deleted, edited and then reattached to correspond with the position. No phone calls please. The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is an equal opportunity employer Gender/Minority/Veterans/Disabled. The Museum is dedicated to the goal of building a culturally diverse staff committed to serving the needs of all our visitors and we encourage applications from individuals of all backgrounds. John Demboski via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR