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January 22, 2015

02:48
A research associate position is available in the laboratory of Janna Fierst in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alabama. My lab works on a broad array of projects addressing evolutionary questions with computational approaches. This position is to support bioinformatics and computational projects through consultation, research and hands-on support, provide system administration for UNIX and Macintosh servers, assist in mentoring student projects, and coordinate lab activities. This is a full-time staff position with an initial appointment of one year and renewal subject to performance. The successful candidate will have: - An MS in Computational Biology or a related field (Genetics, Evolution, Biology, Computer science, Physics, Mathematics, Statistics, or Bioinformatics) - A strong bioinformatics and biostatistics background - Experience with UNIX environments - Programming proficiency (e.g. Python, Perl, C++) - Software development experience - Familiarity with the statistical computing language R To apply, please submit an application to the University of Alabama jobs website http://bit.ly/151U9Am for job #499830. The application should include a current CV/Resume, a cover letter discussing the applicants background, research experience, and career goals, and contact information for 3 references. Application review begins February 1 and the start date is negotiable. Contact Janna Fierst (jlfierst@ua.edu) with questions regarding the position or application process. The University of Alabama is an equal opportunity employer and women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Janna L. Fierst Assistant Professor Department of Biological Sciences The University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Office: SEC 1339 Phone: 205-348-1830 http://bit.ly/1DXokYL Janna Fierst via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:12
Dear Colleagues, We are writing to invite you to submit abstracts to our symposium on *novel functional approaches to evolutionary genomics*, which will be held as part of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution (SMBE) meeting, July 12-16 in Vienna, Austria. *Confirmed Speakers Rick Livesey - http://bit.ly/1uwUKXn Greg Wray - http://bit.ly/1CEFAhx *Symposium description Formal testing of many evolutionary hypotheses, especially in closely related mammals, has been difficult until now due to practical and ethical constraints. However, recent advances in cellular biology, such as the development of induced pluripotent stem cell and genome editing technologies and genomics, like single cell sequencing, can open the door to powerful new ways of studying evolution. These technologies are bringing together multiple groups with diverse interests and perspectives, and transforming studies of functional evolution that were previously intractable in non-model organisms like the great apes. Our symposium will highlight research that incorporates these novel approaches to enrich our understanding of evolutionary function and process, such as mechanisms of gene regulation or the importance of developmental contributions to phenotypic divergence. *Registration Abstracts for oral presentations should be sent by February 8, 2015. Abstracts for poster presentations should be sent by March 29, 2015. Travel awards and childcare support are available. http://bit.ly/1xIlYts Please contact us with any questions. We look forward to seeing you in Vienna! Nicholas Banovich (nbanovich@uchicago.edu) Irene Gallego Romero (ireneg@uchicago.edu) Nicholas Banovich via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:34
*Postdoc**toral Associate** Position in Computational Biology at Virginia Tech* *Description: * The laboratory of Dr. Song Li invites applications for a post-doc position in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech. Li lab focuses on developing computational algorithms that integrate large-scale data to address key questions in comparative genomics. The lab has the following ongoing projects: 1) Understanding the evolution of alternative splicing and antisense transcripts using RNA-seq data in diverse species. 2) Identifying active regulatory networks controlling cell type- or condition-specific gene expression. Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of gene regulatory networks. 3) Developing Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based gene prediction method that incorporates diverse genomic data and evolutionary conservation to improve gene and splicing variant discovery and annotation. *Qualifications**: * Ph.D in Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Computer Science, Applied Mathematics or other related field. Track record of publications in bioinformatics, computational biology or comparative genomics. Strong programming skills in Python, Perl, Java, C++, R or other language. Experience with Linux and high performance computing environment. Demonstrated ability in developing novel statistical or machine learning methods in computational biology. Experience in genome scale data analysis such as analysis of microarray, ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq data, network analysis, biological sequence analysis or other relevant computational genomics experience. Highly motivated for interdisciplinary research, excellent communication skills, and the ability to work independently as well as within a research group Initial appointment is one year, with possible extension depending on performance. The interested applicants should send their C.V., available date, and names of three references to songli(at)vt.edu. Review of applications will begin January 31th 2015. *Faculty Profile*: http://bit.ly/15CBHjb *Lab Website:* http://bit.ly/1Jk18ST Song Li via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:34

The NTNU University Museum is seeking a highly qualified postdoctoral researcher for a project on environmental barcoding/metabarcoding of freshwater invertebrates. The position is for 3 years, preferably with start June 1, 2015 and is connected to a project funded by the Research Council of Norway and the Norwegian Environment Agency that involves partners from Canada, Germany and Norway. Please see the full announcement for details and how to apply: http://bit.ly/15CBHjf Best regards Torbjrn via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:16
The Economo Lab (http://bit.ly/1dSYDrw) at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (www.oist.jp), Japan, is seeking applicants for a postdoctoral position. Our research investigates ecological and evolutionary processes generating and maintaining biodiversity across spatial scales and levels of biological organization, with an empirical focus on ant biodiversity. Ongoing projects (http://bit.ly/1rIZmVx) include understanding the macroevolutionary dynamics of the hyperdiverse ant genus Pheidole, global biodiversity patterns in ants, the island biogeography of Pacific Island ants, genomic approaches to community ecology, and biodiversity theory. Towards those ends, we integrate a variety of approaches including quantitative theory, phylogenetics, high-performance computing, ecoinformatics, morphometrics, field sampling, and traditional collections-based taxonomy. Within these general research areas, the postdoc project is flexible and can be adapted to the interests and skills of the postdoc. Applicants having experience with model-based inference of population and evolutionary processes and working with next-generation sequence data are especially encouraged to apply. The successful candidate will be provided funding to pursue their research and attend meetings, technician support, and access to state-of-the art facilities and equipment on the OIST campus. These resources include a 4000-core computer, a high-throughput ecological genomics pipeline, www.oist.jp), Japan, is seeking applicants for a postdoctoral position. Our research investigates ecological and evolutionary processes generating and maintaining biodiversity across spatial scales and levels of biological organization, with an empirical focus on ant biodiversity. Ongoing projects (http://bit.ly/1rIZmVx) include understanding the macroevolutionary dynamics of the hyperdiverse ant genus Pheidole, global biodiversity patterns in ants, the island biogeography of Pacific Island ants, genomic approaches to community ecology, and biodiversity theory. Towards those ends, we integrate a variety of approaches including quantitative theory, phylogenetics, high-performance computing, ecoinformatics, morphometrics, field sampling, and traditional collections-based taxonomy. Within these general research areas, the postdoc project is flexible and can be adapted to the interests and skills of the postdoc. Applicants having experience with model-based inference of population and evolutionary processes and working with next-generation sequence data are especially encouraged to apply. The successful candidate will be provided funding to pursue their research and attend meetings, technician support, and access to state-of-the art facilities and equipment on the OIST campus. These resources include a 4000-core computer, a high-throughput ecological genomics pipeline, an X-ray micro-CT, SEM/TEM, confocal microscopes, etc. There will be numerous opportunities to work closely with other research groups at OIST and elsewhere. To apply, please send your CV, including a list of references, and a cover letter describing your scientific background and interests as a combined PDF by email to with $B!H(BPostdoc Application$B!I(B in the subject line. Review will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Informal enquiries or questions are also welcome at . The start date is flexible. Candidates must have a PhD in Ecology/Evolution or related field at the time of commencing the position. About OIST: The Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (www.oist.jp) is a new interdisciplinary graduate university located in the seaside village of Onna-son. The institute is international by design; the working language is English and researchers are split between Japanese and foreign nationalities. Knowledge of Japanese is not required, and our relocation staff will assist you with moving to Okinawa and setting up your living situation. The institute is located in a beautiful ecological setting adjacent to coral reefs and subtropical forest, and offers a competitive package for postdoctoral scientists. For more information on OIST, see recent articles in Nature (http://bit.ly/1dSYFQo) (http://bit.ly/1rIZmVA), the Economist (http://econ.st/1dSYDry), and info on our lab website (http://bit.ly/1rIZlRwwww.oist.jp) is a new interdisciplinary graduate university located in the seaside village of Onna-son. The institute is international by design; the working language is English and researchers are split between Japanese and foreign nationalities. Knowledge of Japanese is not required, and our relocation staff will assist you with moving to Okinawa and setting up your living situation. The institute is located in a beautiful ecological setting adjacent to coral reefs and subtropical forest, and offers a competitive package for postdoctoral scientists. For more information on OIST, see recent articles in Nature (http://bit.ly/1dSYFQo) (http://bit.ly/1rIZmVA), the Economist (http://econ.st/1dSYDry), and info on our lab website (http://bit.ly/1rIZlRw). via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:58

Dear colleagues and friends, herewith we would like to remind you of the fourth GOEvol meeting on February 18th, 2015 at the University of Gttingen, Germany. Please note that the registration deadline is extended until February, 6th 2015. GOEvol is a local network of PhD students and postdocs working on various evolutionary questions in Gttingen. The major aim of the network is to provide a platform for exchange. More information about GOEvol, a preliminary program for the upcoming meeting and the online registration are available on the GOEvol website: http://bit.ly/1w1GunV This year’s meeting aims at building on the already established U4 network (http://bit.ly/1uzTUDh), a strategic partnership between Ghent University (Belgium), the University of Gttingen (Germany), the University of Groningen (Netherlands), and Uppsala University (Sweden). Our upcoming meeting will give an overview of evolutionary research at these four Universities followed by a discussion about shared teaching possibilities. Please consider to present your data (contributed talk or poster) and specify your decision during the registration process. Registration and abstract submission deadline is February, 6th 2015. The registration fee of 5 EUR will be paid at the registration desk. Feel free to contact us if you have any queries or questions. We are looking forward to welcome many of you at the GOEvol meeting 2015! The GOEvol Team Jens Bast Juliane Germer Lukas Geyrhofer Ines Herlitze Nico Posnien Natascha Zhang Digest: What? GOEvol IV Meeting When? February 18, 2015 Where? Georg-August-University Gttingen Ernst-Caspari-Haus (GZMB) Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 11 37077 Gttingen Germany Information and registration: http://bit.ly/1w1GunV via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

January 21, 2015

23:34
Evolutionary Biology Workshop in the Alps 19-25 June 2015, Riederalp, Switzerland Application Deadline: February 15. Target participants: PhD students, advanced Master students The main goals of this annual workshop, based on a concept developed by Stephen Stearns and John Maynard Smith, are to develop the following skills: • developing your scientific ideas through discussions in groups; • thinking critically and expressing oneself clearly; • turning a general idea into a research project; • writing a research proposal and defending it. Faculty: Judith Mank (University College London) Andrew Read (Pennsylvania State University) Tanja Schwander (University of Lausanne) John Pannell (University of Lausanne) Tadeusz Kawecki (University of Lausanne) It is you, the students, who will be in charge in this course. You will be divided in groups of 4-5 students. In those groups, you will work on your ideas. You, as a group, will decide what the important open questions in broadly defined evolutionary biology are, you will choose one, and attempt to develop a proposal for a research project that will address it. The faculty will visit the groups during the discussions to answer your questions, provide coaching and give you feedback on your projects, but they will generally take the back seat. Additionally, the faculty will give talks about their research and be available for informal discussion with individual students. At the end you will present your projects to other participants, and we will party. The workshop will take place in Villa Cassel (http://bit.ly/1Jjwbyh), at 2000 m of altitude, a >100 year old villa where Winston Churchill once stayed, amid the magnificent mountain landscape of a UNESCO World Heritage Site, walking distance from the largest glacier of the Alps. This isolated site will help you to concentrate on the course while giving you also the chance to enjoy the views and the alpine flora. Costs: CHF 530.- for room and board. 3 ETSC credit points To apply, send a single file (pdf or rtf) containing a short motivation letter including a brief summary of your research interest, a cv, and the name of your scientific advisor to Caroline Betto-Colliard , with Cc to tadeusz.kawecki@unil.ch . via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
05:00
Background: Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) can be divided into four subspecies. Substantial phylogenetic evidence suggests that these subspecies can be grouped into two distinct lineages: a western African group that includes P. t. verus and P. t. ellioti and a central/eastern African group that includes P. t. troglodytes and P. t. schweinfurthii. The geographic division of these two lineages occurs in Cameroon, where the rages of P. t. ellioti and P. t. troglodytes appear to converge at the Sanaga River. Remarkably, few population genetic studies have included wild chimpanzees from this region. Results: We analyzed microsatellite genotypes of 187 wild, unrelated chimpanzees, and mitochondrial control region sequencing data from 604 chimpanzees. We found that chimpanzees in Cameroon and eastern Nigeria comprise at least two, and likely three populations. Both the mtDNA and microsatellite data suggest that there is a primary separation of P. t. troglodytes in southern Cameroon from P. t. ellioti north and west of the Sanaga River. These two populations split ~200-250 thousand years ago (kya), but have exchanged one migrant per generation since separating. In addition, P. t. ellioti consists of two populations that split from one another ~4 kya. One population is located in the rainforests of western Cameroon and eastern Nigeria, whereas the second population appears to be confined to a savannah-woodland mosaic in central Cameroon. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that there are as many as three genetically distinct populations of chimpanzees in Cameroon and eastern Nigeria. P. t. troglodytes in southern Cameroon comprises one population that is separated from two populations of P. t. ellioti in western and central Cameroon, respectively. P. t. ellioti and P. t. troglodytes appear to be characterized by a pattern of isolation-with-migration, and thus, we propose that neutral processes alone can not explain the differentiation of P. t. ellioti and P. t. troglodytes.
05:00
Background: The Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti) is found in the Gulf of Guinea biodiversity hotspot located in western equatorial Africa. This subspecies is threatened by habitat fragmentation due to logging and agricultural development, hunting for the bushmeat trade, and possibly climate change. Although P. t. ellioti appears to be geographically separated from the neighboring central chimpanzee (P. t. troglodytes) by the Sanaga River, recent population genetics studies of chimpanzees from across this region suggest that additional factors may also be important in their separation. The main aims of this study were: 1) to model the distribution of suitable habitat for P. t. ellioti across Cameroon and Nigeria, and P. t. troglodytes in southern Cameroon, 2) to determine which environmental factors best predict their optimal habitats, and 3) to compare modeled niches and test for their levels of divergence from one another. A final aim of this study was to examine the ways that climate change might impact suitable chimpanzee habitat across the region under various scenarios. Results: Ecological niche models (ENMs) were created using the software package Maxent for the three populations of chimpanzees that have been inferred to exist in Cameroon and eastern Nigeria: (i) P. t. troglodytes in southern Cameroon, (ii) P. t. ellioti in northwestern Cameroon, and (iii) P. t. ellioti in central Cameroon. ENMs for each population were compared using the niche comparison test in ENMtools, which revealed complete niche divergence with very little geographic overlap of suitable habitat between populations. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a positive relationship may exist between environmental variation and the partitioning of genetic variation found in chimpanzees across this region. ENMs for each population were also projected under three different climate change scenarios for years 2020, 2050, and 2080. Suitable habitat of P. t. ellioti in northwest Cameroon / eastern Nigeria is expected to remain largely unchanged through 2080 in all considered scenarios. In contrast, P. t. ellioti in central Cameroon, which represents half of the population of this subspecies, is expected to experience drastic reductions in its ecotone habitat over the coming century.
05:00
Background: The mechanisms that underlie the diversification of tropical animals remain poorly understood, but new approaches that combine geo-spatial modeling with spatially explicit genetic data are providing fresh insights on this topic. Data about the diversification of tropical mammals remain particularly sparse, and vanishingly few opportunities exist to study endangered large mammals that increasingly exist only in isolated pockets. The chimpanzees of Cameroon represent a unique opportunity to examine the mechanisms that promote genetic differentiation in tropical mammals because the region is home to two chimpanzee subspecies: Pan troglodytes ellioti and P. t. trogolodytes. Their ranges converge in central Cameroon, which is a geographically, climatically and environmentally complex region that presents an unparalleled opportunity to examine the roles of rivers and/or environmental variation in influencing the evolution of chimpanzee populations. Results: We analyzed microsatellite genotypes and mtDNA HVRI sequencing data from wild chimpanzees sampled at a fine geographic scale across Cameroon and eastern Nigeria using a spatially explicit approach based upon Generalized Dissimilarity Modeling. Both the Sanaga River and environmental variation were found to contribute to driving separation of the subspecies. The importance of environmental variation differed among subspecies. Gene-environment associations were weak in P. t. troglodytes, whereas environmental variation was found to play a much larger role in shaping patterns of genetic differentiation in P. t. ellioti. Conclusions: We found that both the Sanaga River and environmental variation likely play a role in shaping patterns of chimpanzee genetic diversity. Future studies using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data are necessary to further understand how rivers and environmental variation contribute to shaping patterns of genetic variation in chimpanzees.
03:41
—_000_10FDFF55785AB84FB87A9246CD777FC4A90537msgdb10utadutoled_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Ph.D. Student Research Assistantship in Fish Genetics and Ecology Dept. Environmental Sciences and Lake Erie Center, University of Toledo Toledo, OH Closing Date: Feb. 1, 2015 for priority consideration, late applications accepted Web Address: http://bit.ly/1seQy6U Description PhD research assistantship for new project on Yellow Perch population genomics/genetics, Next-generation Sequencing, environmental DNA, kin selection, and chemical cues that may regulate homing. Ph.D. in Biology-Ecology Track through The Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Toledo http://bit.ly/1Jd8zLv. State of the art project in Dr. Carol Stepien’s Great Lakes Genetics/Genomics Lab http://bit.ly/1seQy6U, which is nationally and internationally well-known, well-published, and well-funded, with excellent placement of graduate students as federal agency researchers, postdocs, and university professors. Project work will be at the University of Toledo’s Lake Erie Center (http://bit.ly/YNTWi5). Apply now to begin the Fall 2015 semester. Ok to start i n summer 2015 too. RAship: $23,000-$25,000 annual stipend, tuition, general fees, and student medical insurance paid. Qualifications Excellent, hard-working Ph.D. graduate student to begin fall or summer 2015 (get your application in now) for dissertation research on yellow perch population genetics and genomics, next-generation DNAsequencing, environmental DNA, and kin selection and chemical cues that may regulate homing. Accomplished in writing, PCR, statistics, and field and laboratory skills. Preference to MS degree in hand and publication(s) in molecular ecology, fisheries, population genetics, or a related field. Required: GPA 3.0+, GRE (verbal+quantitative) of 1100 (303 on the new GRE grading scale) and 4.5 analytical writing, respectively. Foreign students: minimum TOEFL of 250 (computer-based, or 600 paper-based) and 450 (150 on the new GRE grading scale) on the verbal GRE are required. How to Apply Send CV, cover letter, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores, TOEFL if foreign applicant to Dr. Carol Stepien via carol.stepien@utoledo.edu. Must meet minimum scores above. Apply to PhD in Biology-Ecology track in Dept. Environmental Sciences: http://bit.ly/1yJYlmc The University of Toledo is an Equal Access, Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer and Educator and is committed to increasing the diversity of our campus. Contact Dr. Carol Stepien University of Toledo Lake Erie Center and Dept. Environmental Sciences 6200 Bayshore Rd. Toledo OH 43616 Phone: 4195308362 Fax: 4195308399 carol.stepien@utoledo.edu —_000_10FDFF55785AB84FB87A9246CD777FC4A90537msgdb10utadutoled_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Ph.D. Student Research Assistantship in Fish Genetics and Ecology Dept. Environmental Sciences and Lake Erie Center, University of Toledo  Toledo, OH Closing Date: Feb. 1, 2015 for priority consideration, late applications accepted Web Address: http://bit.ly/1seQy6U Description PhD research assistantship for new project on Yellow Perch population genomics/genetics, Next-generation Sequencing, environmental DNA, kin selection, and chemical cues that may regulate homing. Ph.D. in Biology-Ecology Track through The Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Toledo  http://bit.ly/1Jd8zLv. State of the art project in Dr. Carol Stepien’s Great Lakes Genetics/Genomics Lab http://bit.ly/1Jd8yaH;which is nationally and internationally well-known, well-published, and well-funded, with excellent placement of graduate students as federal agency researchers, postdocs, and university professors. Project work will be at the University of Toledo’s Lake Erie Center (http://bit.ly/YNTWi5).  Apply now to begin the Fall 2015 semester. Ok to start in summer 2015 too. RAship: $23,000-$25,000 annual stipend, tuition, general fees, and student medical insurance paid. Qualifications Excellent, hard-working Ph.D. graduate student to begin fall or summer 2015 (get your application in now) for dissertation research on yellow perch population genetics and genomics, next-generation DNAsequencing, environmental DNA, and kin selection and chemical cues that may regulate homing. Accomplished in writing, PCR, statistics, and field and laboratory skills. Preference to MS degree in hand and publication(s) in molecular ecology, fisheries, population genetics, or a related field.  Required: GPA 3.0+, GRE (verbal+quantitative) of 1100 (303 on the new GRE grading scale) and 4.5 analytical writing, respectively. Foreign students: minimum TOEFL of  250 (computer-based, or 600 paper-based) and 450 (150 on the new GRE grading scale) on the verbal GRE are required.  How to Apply Send CV, cover letter, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores, TOEFL if foreign applicant to Dr. Carol Stepien via carol.stepien@utoledo.edu.  Must meet minimum scores above. Apply to PhD in Biology-Ecology track in Dept. Environmental Sciences:  http://bit.ly/1yJYlmc The University of Toledo is an Equal Access, Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer and Educator and is committed to increasing the diversity of our campus. Contact Dr. Carol Stepien University of Toledo Lake Erie Center and Dept. Environmental Sciences 6200 Bayshore Rd. Toledo OH 43616 Phone: 4195308362 Fax: 4195308399carol.stepien@utoledo.edu —_000_10FDFF55785AB84FB87A9246CD777FC4A90537msgdb10utadutoled via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:41

A PhD student position is currently available at Stockholm University and Science for Life Laboratory in the research group of Dr. Tanja Slotte. The complete ad for this position is available on the Stockholm University webpage: http://bit.ly/1Jd8xU4 Project description We are recruiting a PhD student to work within the project “Evolutionary consequences of dominance at a locus under long-term balancing selection”, which is funded by the Swedish Research Council. The aim of this project is to investigate evolutionary processes at the self-incompatibility locus (S-locus) in Brassicaceae plants. In particular, we wish to characterize the genetic basis of recurrent losses of self-incompatibility and the evolutionary consequences of S-locus dominance, both at the sequence and phenotypic level. The project will entail sequencing and evolutionary genetic analysis of S-locus alleles, phenotypic characterization of progeny from controlled crosses, and analyses of large-scale expression and methylation data. We will mainly focus on the crucifer genus Capsella (Brassicaceae), an emerging model for the study of mating system evolution. Infrastructure and environment The student will be based in the Slotte lab (http://bit.ly/1yJ6Jm1), a part of the Dept. of Ecology, Environment and Plant Science, Stockholm University (http://bit.ly/1yJ6KGz). We are located at Science for Life Laboratory in Stockholm (http://bit.ly/17a7QLt), which holds considerable expertise in high-throughput sequencing technology and bioinformatics. The working atmosphere is international with English as the working language, and the position offers plenty of opportunities for scientific exchange with both genomicists, evolutionary biologists and ecologists at SciLifeLab and Stockholm University. The city of Stockholm is known for its beauty, its buildings and architecture and its abundant clean and open water. Qualifications To be accepted for the PhD program, the applicant must have a University degree in Biology at the advanced level (e.g. Masters) of at least 240 credits, including at least 60 credits at the advanced level, or equivalent knowledge. Previous degrees should also include a thesis of at least 30 credits at advanced level in a relevant subject. Terms of employment The PhD study should be completed within four years of full time study. Besides studies, the PhD-student may be involved in teaching and other duties to a maximum of 20 %, in which case the study time will be extended correspondingly. Selection criteria The selection is based on the applicant’s ability to successfully pursue the research education. Special emphasis is put on the applicant’s knowledge and skills within the subject area, ability to express her/himself verbally and in writing, analytical aptitude, creativity, initiative and independence, and a capacity for working together with other researchers. Previous experience of evolutionary genomic analyses and basic molecular genetic lab work is desirable. Experience of experimental plant work is beneficial. The evaluation will be made based on the relevance of past education and experience, grades from previous university courses (in particular at the advanced level), the quality and ambition of the independent project work, references, the cover letter motivating the candidate’s interest, and interviews. Information For further information, please contact the project leader Tanja Slotte, tanja.slotte@su.se, at the Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Personal webpage: http://bit.ly/1yJ6Jm1 University webpage: http://bit.ly/1yJ6KGB Science for Life Laboratory: http://bit.ly/17a7QLt Union representatives Anqi Lindblom-Ahlm (Saco-S) and Lisbeth Hggberg (Fackfrbundet ST), tel. 08-16 2000 (exchange), and Gunnar Stenberg (SEKO), tel. 070-316 43 41. Application The application should contain a letter of intent (one to two pages that explain why you are interested in working on this project, why you are interested in studying for a PhD, what you hope to accomplish during your PhD studies, and what skills you can bring to this project), CV, transcripts of all university courses with grades, a copy of your university degree, degree project thesis (or, if not yet completely finished, a draft version or related writing), name and contact information of two references, and any other documents you would like to include. Welcome with your application, marked with the reference number SU FV-0071-15 as one single pdf-file no later than March 1st, 2015, by e-mail to:registrator@su.se. State the reference number SU FV-0071-15 also in the subject line of your e-mail. Stockholm University strives to be a workplace, which is free from discrimination and offers equal opportunities to everyone. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:48

—e89a8f503a5cfc06ce050d1dc3be Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Each year, the La Kretz Center sponsors this hands-on workshop, held jointly at our Field Station and Stunt Ranch. Our goal is to provide training and access to the most current issues and techniques in population genomics, and how these tools can be applied to pressing conservation problems. Conservation biology and genetics have had a long and intimate relationship, and constitute one of the key applications of evolutionary analysis to real-world biological problems. The impacts of population genetics, phylogenetics and phylogeography have been particularly striking for conservation biology, and have helped solve some of the most pressing problems in biological conservation. As the field of landscape-based genetics continues to grow and mature, the increasing availability of genomic-level data, analytical models and methods stand to make profound new contributions to our ability to identify and protect at-risk populations and recover those that are most endangered. However, genomic level analyses also carry a heavy burden”data sets are enormous, often requiring diverse computational approaches for assembly, quality control and analysis. This annual workshop will provide a comfortable, informal training environment for a small group of motivated graduate students to explore how conservation problems can best be addressed with genomic-level data. Our goal is to provide hands-on experience on the efficient collection, troubleshooting, and analysis of large data sets for conservation-relevant problems. One of the highlights of our workshop is active participation from members of several US government agencies who are at the forefront of endangered species protection and management, providing a forum for exploring the most relevant aspects of conservation genomics to managers. The UCLA/La Kretz workshop will be held at the La Kretz Field Station ( http://bit.ly/1aXROSZ) and Stunt Ranch Reserve (http://bit.ly/1BdyJvO) in the heart of the Santa Monica Mountains. Only 30 miles from UCLA (and LAX airport), but nestled in the relatively undeveloped 160,000 acre Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, the Field Station provides an ideal location that brings exciting new developments in genomic science and pressing needs in conservation and management together in a single setting. Our current instructor list, drawn from UCLA faculty and several other southern California partners, includes: Jonathon Chang Ben Fitzpatrick Paul Gugger Kirk Lohmueller Evan McCartney-Melstad Mark Phuong Peter Ralph Brad Shaffer Victoria Sork Phil Spinks Bob Wayne Ying Zhen (Additional instructors may be added) Topics covered include: Overview of traditional conservation genetics Next generation platforms: the best tool for the job Data management pipelines: Quality Control Data storage Data organization Data types and analyses: SNPs Sequences Exploring very large data sets Functional genomic data Genomic data and GIS Visualizing geographic structure and demographic history Conservation phylogenomics Prerequisites Available housing limits course enrollment to ~20 students. Preference is given to doctoral candidates who are in the early to middle stages of their thesis research, and who have completed sufficient prerequisites (through previous coursework or research experience) to have some familiarity with using a command line interface or programming languages (i.e. Perl, python etc.). Postdocs, faculty, and government researchers may also apply, but preference will be given to graduate students. Admission and Fees Applicants will be admitted based on academic qualifications and appropriateness of research interests. The course fee is $425. This includes food and lodging at the La Kretz Field Station, as well as any incidental fees, for the duration of the course (arriving Sunday March 22, departing Friday March 27). In addition, course participants who would like to extend their stay at the field station for the remainder of the weekend may do so for no extra charge. For those opting to stay the weekend, departure time will be by 5:00 pm on Sunday March 29. Application Forms and Information Visit the UCLA/La Kretz Center for California Conservation Science website for additional information and to download an application form: http://bit.ly/1ursdm3 Application Deadline Applications are due by February 2, 2015. Please send a completed application form and one letter of recommendation from your major advisor. Students will be notified via e-mail by February 9, 2015 of acceptance. Applications should be emailed as PDFs to: Phil Spinks; email: pqspinks@g.ucla.edu —e89a8f503a5cfc06ce050d1dc3be Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Each year, the La Kretz Center sponsors this hands-on workshop, held jointly at our Field Station and Stunt Ranch. Our goal is to provide training and access to the most current issues and techniques in population genomics, and how these tools can be applied to pressing conservation problems.Conservation biology and genetics have had a long and intimate relationship, and constitute one of the key applications of evolutionary analysis to real-world biological problems. The impacts of population genetics, phylogenetics and phylogeography have been particularly striking for conservation biology, and have helped solve some of the most pressing problems in biological conservation.As the field of landscape-based genetics continues to grow and mature, the increasing availability of genomic-level data, analytical models and methods stand to make profound new contributions to our ability to identify and protect at-risk populatio ns and recover those that are most endangered. However, genomic level analyses also carry a heavy burden”data sets are enormous, often requiring diverse computational approaches for assembly, quality control and analysis.This annual workshop will provide a comfortable, informal training environment for a small group of motivated graduate students to explore how conservation problems can best be addressed with genomic-level data. Our goal is to provide hands-on experience on the efficient collection, troubleshooting, and analysis of large data sets for conservation-relevant problems. One of the highlights of our workshop is active participation from members of several US government agencies who are at the forefront of endangered species protection and management, providing a forum for exploring the most relevant aspects of conservation genomics to managers.The UCLA/La Kretz workshop will be held at the La Kretz Field Stati on (http://bit.ly/1aXROSZ) and Stunt Ranch Reserve (http://bit.ly/1BdyJvO) in the heart of the Santa Monica Mountains. Only 30 miles from UCLA (and LAX airport), but nestled in the relatively undeveloped 160,000 acre Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, the Field Station provides an ideal location that brings exciting new developments in genomic science and pressing needs in conservation and management together in a single setting.Our current instructor list, drawn from UCLA faculty and several other southern California partners, includes:Jonathon ChangBen FitzpatrickPaul GuggerKirk LohmuellerEvan McCartney-MelstadMark PhuongPeter RalphBrad ShafferVictoria SorkPhil Spin ksBob WayneYing Zhen(Additional instructors may be added)Topics covered include:Overview of traditional conservation geneticsNext generation platforms: the best tool for the jobData management pipelines:Quality ControlData storageData organizationData types and analyses:SNPsSequencesExploring very large data setsFunctional genomic dataGenomic data and GISVisualizing geographic structure and demographic historyConservation phylogenomicsPrerequisitesAvailable housing limits course enrollment to ~20 students. Preference is given to doctoral candidates who are in the early to middle stages of their thesis research, and who have completed sufficient prerequisites (through previous coursework or research experience) to have some famili arity with using a command line interface or programming languages (i.e. Perl, python etc.). Postdocs, faculty, and government researchers may also apply, but preference will be given to graduate students.Admission and FeesApplicants will be admitted based on academic qualifications and appropriateness of research interests. The course fee is $425. This includes food and lodging at the La Kretz Field Station, as well as any incidental fees, for the duration of the course (arriving Sunday March 22, departing Friday March 27). In addition, course participants who would like to extend their stay at the field station for the remainder of the weekend may do so for no extra charge. For those opting to stay the weekend, departure time will be by 5:00 pm on Sunday March 29.Application Forms and InformationVisit the UCLA/La Kretz Center for California Conservation Science website f or additional information and to download an application form:http://bit.ly/1ursdm3Application DeadlineApplications are due by February 2, 2015. Please send a completed application form and one letter of recommendation from your major advisor. Students will be notified via e-mail by February 9, 2015 of acceptance.Applications should be emailed as PDFs to: Phil Spinks; email: pqspinks@g.ucla.edu —e89a8f503a5cfc06ce050d1dc3b via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:48
Two Postdoctoral Positions Available at the Caccone Lab at Yale University The Caccone laboratory associated with the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies (YIBS), the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) and the School of Public Health (EPH) invites applications for two post-doctoral positions. The first position involves supporting the Center for Systematics and Conservation Genetics within the YIBS Institute. This center mission is to support research and education in evolutionary and ecological genetics at Yale University. Thus, the optimal candidate should have a strong collaborative personality and like to train undergraduate and graduate students in a variety of DNA based techniques. The postdoc will be involved in several research projects carried out within this YIBS center. One long-running project is on Giant Galapagos tortoises evolutionary, ecological, and conservation genetics. One project key to this position is using genomic tools to identify hybrid tortoises with ancestry in extinct species using hybrid capture approaches and high-throughput sequencing. There are several other large genomic datasets available and extensive samples from across the Galapagos tortoise radiation providing scope for the postdoc to develop evolutionary and population genomic projects with these and additional data in line with their independent interests. Interest in applying genomictools to conservation questions is essential, as is experience with both the lab work and bioinformatic analysis of large genomic-scale datasets for population genetic/genomic questions. Field work experience is also preferred, but not required. The preferred start date for this position is 1st April 2015. The second position is funded by an NIH based program project with the overall goal of understanding the transmission epidemiology of tsetse transmitted diseases in East Africa. This particularposition involves studying the population genetics and genomics of tsetse flies in East Africa (Glossina fuscipes and Glossina pallidipes) to assess their population structure to aid in their monitoring and control. The project involve collecting and analyzing microsatellite and SNP markers to understand patterns and levels of genetic diversity, as well as understand the possible drivers that are shaping the observed patterns. This will also include analysis of environmental and microbial (Wolbachia and others components of the microbial community) data. The optimal candidate should have previous experience in analyzing population genetic data (DNA sequence and microsatellites), preferably have worked with environmental data, be familiar with population genomic analyses, and in general have some bioinformatics expertise to be able to analyze large datasets. This project is part of a long-term collaboration with Dr Aksoy (Yale School of Public Health) and several scientists and Institutions in East Africa. As this project has a strong field component, the postdoc will be expected to participate in the field-based activities and be involved in its coordination and progress. We study the tsetse fly (Glossina sp.) to investigate the physiological, molecular and genetic mechanisms that underlie 1) vector population structures in east-Africa (Uganda and Kenya), 2) tsetse host-African trypanosome interactions, 3) tsetse host-endosymbiotic bacteria interactions, and 4) tsetses unique viviparous reproductive biology. The genome sequence of tsetse and all of its associated microbial partners are now available, making the system highly tractable. The position is available immediately. Yale University offers exciting opportunities for academic achievement and professional growth. New Haven, which is conveniently located between Boston and New York City, is a dynamic city with cultural resources that include world-renowned museums, theatres,concert halls and fine dining establishments. Salary and benefits are according to Yale and NIH guidelines. Candidates should provide their CV and a short research interest statement to Adalgisa Caccone (Adalgisa.Caccone@yale.edu). Adalgisa Caccone Senior Research Scientist ESC 140 Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Yale University 21 Sachem St. New Haven, CT 06520 Tel 203-432-5259 fax 203-432-7394 “Caccone, Gisella” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:11

Dear Evoldir, Phylogeny reconstruction software, LVB 3.2 Beta, has been released. Compared to earlier releases of LVB it is much faster, more flexible and now has a full Open Source license. Download LVB here: http://bit.ly/1xwWn2Q - Daniel via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:54

—_000_3583952D9A2A694CABBA5983B4D8A6D1164BB24ASCOMP0936wurnet_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable TravelGrants - ConservationGenomics Dear colleagues, The European Research Networking Programme “ConGenOmics” invites applications for travel grants intended to foster collaborations between European researchers working on topics related to conservation genomics. We will support the exchange of researchers within Europe, ideally targeting at early careers researchers such as PhD students and postdocs. We invite applications for short visits (up to 2 weeks) or longer exchanges (up to 3 months) to foster scientific interactions between institutions from different countries. The planned visits should be directly relevant to the scope of the ConGenOmics network programme, which include topics such as: - Development and transfer of genomic knowledge and approaches in a conservation context - Experimental study of the (genomic) mechanisms behind important biological processes of relevance for conservation - Application and development of data handling and processing strategies in conservation genomics - Application of community and metagenomics in conservation biological context Please note that the congenomics programme is funded by the European Science Foundation and that only exchanges between European countries can be considered. Exchanges between member countries of the congenomics network will be prioritized. After assessment of scientific merit and relevance to the ConGenOmics network, priority will be given to applications in the following order: - knowledge exchange between contributing countries of the ESF ConGenOmics network - knowledge exchange between a contributing country and a non-contributing ESF member country or the associated USA Ecogenomics network Ecological Genomics Institute (EGI) at Kansas State University (KSU) - knowledge exchange between a contributing country and a non-ESF member country in Europe (Researchers from countries with ESF Observer status not contributing to the ConGenOmics network are considered non-ESF) **Contributing member countries are: Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. Further information and instructions on how to apply are available at http://bit.ly/1doiQpP Deadline for submission: 1 March 2015 —_000_3583952D9A2A694CABBA5983B4D8A6D1164BB24ASCOMP0936wurnet_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Source: EVOLDIR
01:38

A two-year postdoctoral position in population genomics of plant mating system shifts is currently available at Stockholm University and Science for Life Laboratory in the research group of Dr. Tanja Slotte. The complete ad for this position is available on the Stockholm University webpage: http://bit.ly/1xwR0Ax Background Plant mating systems, such as shifts from outcrossing to selfing, have profound effects on levels and structuring of genetic variation, and are expected to have a marked effect on the impact of natural selection. We are interested in quantifying the effects of mating system shifts on the efficacy of selection using population genomic and phylogenomic data. For a recent example of our work on this topic in Capsella rubella, see e.g. Slotte et al. 2013 Nature Genetics 45:831-5. Project The post-doc will contribute to population genomic analyses of several parallel mating system shifts in the Brassicaceae. This will include investigating population structure, demographic shifts and assessing the impact of natural selection in different populations and species that vary in their outcrossing rates. Whole-genome and whole-transcriptome sequence data sets are already available, and more are currently being generated in the lab. The project offers plenty of opportunities for post-docs to pursue their own ideas using available genomic data. Infrastructure and environment The postdoctoral associate will be based in the Slotte lab (http://bit.ly/1yJ6Jm1), a part of the Dept. of Ecology, Environment and Plant Science, Stockholm University (http://bit.ly/1yJ6KGz). We are located at Science for Life Laboratory in Stockholm (http://bit.ly/17a7QLt), which holds considerable expertise in high-throughput sequencing technology and bioinformatics. The working atmosphere is international with English as the working language, and the position offers plenty of opportunities for scientific exchange with both genomicists, evolutionary biologists and ecologists at SciLifeLab and Stockholm University. The city of Stockholm is known for its beauty, its buildings and architecture and its abundant clean and open water. Eligibility The applicant must hold a doctoral degree from an accredited college/university in population genetics, phylogenetics, phylogeography, or a related subject relevant to the project. Previous experience of population genetic analyses and molecular genetic lab work is desirable. Previous experience of population genetic analyses of mating system effects, phylogeographic analyses, and/or phylogenetic analyses of factors determining rates of diversification is especially advantageous. Experience of plant sampling/field work and knowledge in R/Python is beneficial. The successful candidate must be highly motivated, creatively thinking and have a record of high quality scientific publications. Excellent written and spoken English language skills are required. Terms of employment The position is a two year full-time appointment as a postdoctoral research associate. The position is available immediately. The starting date is negotiable. Selection criteria The successful applicant will be selected based on the qualifications specified above. References and interviews will be used during the selection process to assess the qualifications of the applicants. Information For further information, please contact the project leader Tanja Slotte, tanja.slotte@su.se, the Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Personal webpage: http://bit.ly/15x2TzD University webpage: http://bit.ly/1yJ6KGB Science for Life Laboratory: http://bit.ly/17a7QLt Union representatives Anqi Lindblom-Ahlm (Saco-S) and Lisbeth Hggberg (Fackfrbundet ST), tel. 08-16 2000 (switchboard), and Gunnar Stenberg (SEKO), tel. 070-316 43 41. Application Applications should consist of the following in a single electronic file (pdf) 1 Cover letter 2 Copy of diploma or other proof of PhD degree 3 Curriculum vitae, including publication list 4 Copies of three representative publications 5 Brief statement (no longer than two pages) describing research interests, research experience and career goals 6 Contact information (name, address, phone number and email address) for 2-3 references Welcome with your application, marked with the reference number SU FV-0088-15, no later than February 10th, 2015, by e-mail to: registrator@su.se. Please state the reference number SU FV-0088-15 in the subject line of your e-mail. Stockholm University strives to be a workplace, which is free from discrimination and offers equal opportunities to everyone. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:38

A PhD position is available for 3 years at the University of Berne to detect patterns of selection in the human genome. The exact subject of the PhD will depend on the qualifications of the candidate but he/she could work on the detection of selection in gene networks (1, 2) based on levels of genomic and expression diversity, the effect of past range expansions on functional genomic diversity (3, 4) of various human groups, or the detection and the measure of levels of background selection in the human genome. We are looking for a highly motivated individual with a good background in population genomics or bioinformatics and good written and oral communication skills. Computational, programming and statistical skills are a plus for the position. The PhD candidate will be mainly supervised by L. Excoffier, but the PhD student should also interact with Prof. Marc Robinson-Rechavi in Lausanne, with Dr. Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas, a new group leader at IEE, and with other senior members of the CMPG lab. The CMPG lab is hosted by the Institute of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Berne, and it offers a very international and stimulating research environment. It is also affiliated to the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) and the successful PhD candidate will join its PhD training network to further his/her education. Berne is ideally located in the middle of Switzerland and Europe, and provides rich cultural and outdoor activities. The gross salary starts at around 32,000 CHF per year and will follow the University of Berne progression scale. Please send an application letter stating your motivation for the position, a CV, and contact information of two references to laurent.excoffier@iee.unibe.ch. The position remains open until filled, and the successful candidate could start as early as February 2015. See the web page http://bit.ly/138R15w for a copy of this information and links with more details on this position. References: 1. J. T. Daub et al., Mol Biol Evol 30, 1544 (Jul, 2013). 2. M. Foll, O. E. Gaggiotti, J. T. Daub, A. Vatsiou, L. Excoffier, Am J Hum Genet 95, 394 (Oct 2, 2014). 3. S. Peischl, I. Dupanloup, M. Kirkpatrick, L. Excoffier, Mol Ecol, (Sep 18, 2013). 4. V. Sousa, S. Peischl, L. Excoffier, Curr Opin Genet Dev 29C, 22 (Aug 23, 2014). via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:16
*14th International Rotifer Symposium* The 14th International Rotifer Symposium will be held in esk Budjovice, Czech Republic, from August 30th to September 4th, 2015. All researchers interested in rotifers, as well as researchers working on topics that relate to rotifer biology should join us. Related topics include, but are not limited to the following: Acanthocephalans; Aging; Aquaculture; Anhydrobiosis; Asexuals; Biogeography; Diapause; Dispersal; Evolution; Population dynamics; etc. All research topics relating to rotifers will be discussed, including their ecological roles in aquatic systems, their evolutionary processes and adaptations, their use in ecotoxicology, the surprising asexual genomes of bdelloids, and more. Need more information about the symposium? Visit the IRS14 webpage! *http://bit.ly/1ALBbXS *Additional highlights* *Invited speakers* Nelson Hairston, Claudia Ricci, Karine Van Doninck, Scott Monks, Holger Herlyn *http://bit.ly/1ALBemo *Workshop on multivariate statistics* Petr milauer and Jan uspa Lep will provide an introduction to advanced multivariate statistics in which you can learn how to use these techniques in rotifer studies. *http://bit.ly/1ALBbXY *Workshop on dormancy* Discussing the ecological and evolutionary role of rotifer resting eggs. *Workshop on bdelloid rotifers* To know more about the taxonomy, ecology, and genetics of these fascinating organisms. *Flyer of the meeting* *http://bit.ly/1ALBceh Diego Fontaneto via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:16
PhD Studentship: Genomics and genetic architecture in a wild bird Supervisor: Jon Slate (University of Sheffield); collaborators: Ben Sheldon (Oxford), Marcel Visser (Netherlands Institute of Ecology), Martien Groenen (Wageningen). This project is part of the recently funded Centre for Advanced Modelling (see below) at the University of Sheffield. The student will utilise a recently collected dataset of 600,000 SNP genetic markers, typed in approximately 2000 great tits, making it one of the largest genetic datasets for any natural population. The aim of the project is to understand the genetic architecture of quantitative traits in a population of great tits that has been the focus of a long-term individual-based study, running since 1947. One of the aims of the project will be to determine whether an individual’s genome can predict its phenotype. So-called genomic prediction or genomic selection underpins modern animal and plant breeding, as well as personalised medicine, but it has never been attempted in the context of environmental or ecological research. The project builds on an ERC grant previously held by JS and will run alongside a recently funded NERC grant on genomic prediction. There will be opportunities for the student to collaborate with great tit ecologists in Oxford and with ecologists and genome biologists at NIOO-KNAW and Wageningen University in the Netherlands. The laboratory and phenotypic data are already collected so the project is risk-free in terms of data collection. The project is ideally suited to a mathematics, physics or computer science graduate, or to a biological sciences graduate with evidence of strong quantitative skills (e.g. MSc in genomics or bioinformatics related discipline). Enquiries to Jon Slate (j.slate@sheffield.ac.uk). Centre for Advanced Biological Modelling This PhD project is funded by Leverhulme Trust-Centre for Advanced Biological Modelling at the University of Sheffield. The Centre for Advanced Biological Modelling (CABM) will harness cutting edge mathematical and computing skills to address major problems in biology. Biology at the University of Sheffield is defined by its strength in combining approaches across time-scales from ecological to evolutionary, and has been the subject of significant recent investment. Exploiting this breadth of research excellence, the areas of focus for the CABM will extend our cutting edge research in basic biology by harnessing the latest mathematical and computational techniques. The recruitment process of the CABM will focus on attracting outstanding students from the physical and mathematical sciences, and training them to address leading biological problems. This multi-disciplinary initiative will transform our research excellence in organismal biology and fill a chronic training gap in the biology. Its legacy will be a cohort of research scientists at the cutting edge of biological modelling with the skills to tackle major societal problems. Selection process: Short listing will take place as soon as possible after the closing date and the successful applicants will be notified promptly. Short listed applicants will be invited for an interview to take place at the University of Sheffield on the 27th February 2015. More details at http://bit.ly/1ALBe5W Jon Slate via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR