news aggregator

August 19, 2015

00:13

We present a modified GPU (graphics processing unit) version of MrBayes, called ta(MC)3 (GPU MrBayes V3.1), for Bayesian phylogenetic inference on protein data sets. Our main contributions are 1) utilizing 64-bit variables, thereby enabling ta(MC)3 to process larger data sets than MrBayes; and 2) to use Kahan summation to improve accuracy, convergence rates, and consequently runtime. Versus the current fastest software, we achieve a speedup of up to around 2.5 (and up to around 90 vs. serial MrBayes), and more on multi-GPU hardware. GPU MrBayes V3.1 is available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/mrbayes-gpu/.

August 18, 2015

22:30

I thought that I should draw your attention to the current issue of the journal Systematic Biology, which contains more contributions about reticulate relationships than I have seen there before.

These include:

♦ Andrew R. Francis and Mike Steel (2015) Which phylogenetic networks are merely trees with additional arcs? Systematic Biology 64: 768-777. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syv037

A theoretical paper discussed by Leo in a previous blog post (Networks vs augmented trees).

♦ Jonathan Brassac and Frank R. Blattner (2015) Species-level phylogeny and polyploid relationships in Hordeum (Poaceae) inferred by next-generation sequencing and in silico cloning of multiple nuclear loci. Systematic Biology 64: 792-808. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syv035

Contains a tree of relationships among the diploid species, with the tetraploid and hexaploid species manually added as reticulations, to create a hybridization network.

♦ Noah W. M. Stenz, Bret Larget, David A. Baum, and Cécile Ané (2015) Exploring tree-like and non-tree-like patterns using genome sequences: an example using the inbreeding plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Systematic Biology 64: 809-823. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syv039

Contains a series of trees but no network. Nevertheless, the authors' analyses "identify instances of introgression and detect one clear case of reticulation among ecotypes that have come into contact".

♦ David A. Morrison (2015) Aristotle's Ladder, Darwin's Tree: The Evolution of Visual Metaphors for Biological Order, by J. David Archibald. Systematic Biology 64: 892-895. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syv038

A book review that castigates the book's author for hardly mentioning networks when writing about phylogenetic metaphors. There is a table summarizing some of the relevant publication history.

There is also one paper that possibly should be about networks but doesn't actually mention them.

♦ Thomas C. Giarla and Jacob A. Esselstyn (2015) The challenges of resolving a rapid, recent radiation: empirical and simulated phylogenomics of Philippine shrews. Systematic Biology 64: 727-740. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syv029

The authors collected data on "hundreds of ultraconserved elements and whole mitochondrial genomes" from multiple individuals of several species of shrews (Crocidura). They conclude that "the low support we obtained for backbone relationships ... reflects a real and appropriate lack of certainty. Our results illuminate the challenges of estimating a bifurcating tree in a rapid and recent radiation, providing a rare empirical example of a nearly simultaneous series of speciation events".

A NeighborNet analysis of the provided mitochondrial data is shown in the first figure. Clearly, all it says is that the individuals group into species, but there is no information in the data about the relationships among the species.


A NeighborNet analysis of the SNPs from the ultraconserved elements is shown in the second figure. This network is not that different, in that it does little more than group the individuals into species, with little information about relationships.


However, note also that the largest reticulation involves sp_FMNH146788 and mindorus_FMNH221890. These two samples are not closely related in the mitochondrial network. This hints that the sp_FMNH146788 sample may be a genotypic mixture, due perhaps to hybridization or introgression. The authors treat the specimen as representing a "heretofore undescribed taxon that shares introgressed mitochondrial DNA with true C. ninoyi."

18:00
Background: Pathogens evolve in a close antagonistic relationship with their hosts. The conventional theory proposes that evolution of virulence is highly dependent on the efficiency of direct host-to-host transmission. Many opportunistic pathogens, however, are not strictly dependent on the hosts due to their ability to reproduce in the free-living environment. Therefore it is likely that conflicting selection pressures for growth and survival outside versus within the host, rather than transmission potential, shape the evolution of virulence in opportunists. We tested the role of within-host selection in evolution of virulence by letting a pathogen Serratia marcescens db11 sequentially infect Drosophila melanogaster hosts and then compared the virulence to strains that evolved only in the outside-host environment. Results: We found that the pathogen adapted to both Drosophila melanogaster host and novel outside-host environment, leading to rapid evolutionary changes in the bacterial life-history traits including motility, in vitro growth rate, biomass yield, and secretion of extracellular proteases. Most significantly, selection within the host led to decreased virulence without decreased bacterial load while the selection lines in the outside-host environment maintained the same level of virulence with ancestral bacteria. Conclusions: This experimental evidence supports the idea that increased virulence is not an inevitable consequence of within-host adaptation even when the epidemiological restrictions are removed. Evolution of attenuated virulence could occur because of immune evasion within the host. Alternatively, rapid fluctuation between outside-host and within-host environments, which is typical for the life cycle of opportunistic bacterial pathogens, could lead to trade-offs that lower pathogen virulence.
18:00
Background: Life history traits like developmental time, age and size at maturity are directly related to fitness in all organisms and play a major role in adaptive evolution and speciation processes. Comparative genomic or transcriptomic approaches to identify positively selected genes involved in species divergence can help to generate hypotheses on the driving forces behind speciation. Here we use a bottom-up approach to investigate this hypothesis by comparative analysis of orthologous transcripts of four closely related European Radix species. Results: Snails of the genus Radix occupy species specific distribution ranges with distinct climatic niches, indicating a potential for natural selection driven speciation based on ecological niche differentiation. We then inferred phylogenetic relationships among the four Radix species based on whole mt-genomes plus 23 nuclear loci. Three different tests to infer selection and changes in amino acid properties yielded a total of 134 genes with signatures of positive selection. The majority of these genes belonged to the functional gene ontology categories “reproduction” and “genitalia” with an overrepresentation of the functions “development” and “growth rate”. Conclusions: We show here that Radix species divergence may be primarily enforced by selection on life history traits such as (larval-) development and growth rate. We thus hypothesise that life history differences may confer advantages under the according climate regimes, e.g., species occupying warmer and dryer habitats might have a fitness advantage with fast developing susceptible life stages, which are more tolerant to habitat desiccation.
18:00
Abstract Background: The introduction of foreign DNA by Lateral Gene Transfer (LGT) can quickly and drastically alter genome composition. Problems can arise if the genes introduced by LGT use codons that are not suited to the host’s translational machinery. Here we investigate compensatory adaptation of E. coli in response to the introduction of large volumes of codons that are rarely used by the host genome. Results: We analyze genome sequences from the E. coli/Shigella complex, and find that certain tRNA genes are present in multiple copies in two pathogenic Shigella and O157:H7 subgroups of E. coli. Furthermore, we show that the codons that correspond to these multi-copy number tRNA genes are enriched in the high copy number Selfish Genetic Elements (SGE’s) in Shigella and laterally introduced genes in O157:H7. We analyze the duplicate copies and find evidence for the selective retention of tRNA genes introduced by LGT in response to the changed codon content of the genome. Conclusion: These data support a model where the relatively rapid influx of LGT genes and SGE’s introduces a large number of genes maladapted to the host’s translational machinery. Under these conditions, it becomes advantageous for the host to retain tRNA genes that are required for the incorporation of amino acids at these codons. Subsequently, the increased number of copies of these specific tRNA genes adjusts the cellular tRNA pool to the demands set by global shifts in codon usage.
02:11
NorthernArizonaUniversity.molecular_biology.Informatics Postdoctoral Scholar Informatics and Computing Program Northern Arizona University Location: Flagstaff, AZ Closes: September 14th, 2015 Posting: 601178 Apply at: http://bit.ly/1UQm3Vm The Fofanov Bioinformatics Lab within the Informatics and Computing Program at Northern Arizona University is seeking a post-doctoral scholar to join its research team. This highly applied, research-heavy group is focused on designing High Throughput Sequence data computational and data mining tools for immediate and practical applications in areas of pathogen detection, environmental/clinical metagenomics, and rare variant (quasi-species) determination. Additional details on the people and projects of the lab can be found at www.fofanovlab.us. Our research is highly interdisciplinary, and the prospective post-doctoral scholar can anticipate involvement in all aspects of the work, from experimental design and sample collection, to molecular diagnostic tool design, to sequence data analysis and modeling. Individuals from fields ranging from Statistics to Molecular Biology are encouraged to apply, provided they meet the programming experience requirements.      Job responsibilities include but are not limited to: · Design and implementation of research projects · Training of graduate and undergraduate research students. · High Throughput Sequence data analysis · Software development, testing, and execution Eligibility: An earned PhD in Computer Science, Statistics, Bioinformatics, Genomics, Computational Biology or a related field by the time of the appointment Preferred Qualifications: * Demonstrated experience with at least one programming/scripting language * Demonstrated experience with High Throughput Sequencing data analysis * Experience with statistical/modelling packages (R, Matlab, SAS, or equivalent) * Proficiency with common Bioinformatics databases and tools * Experience with high performance and/or parallel computing environments * Experience with scripting languages (C-Shell, Python, Perl, or equivalent) * Experience with object oriented programming languages (C++, Java, or equivalent) * Working knowledge of basic data structures (trees, hashes, arrays, etc) * Strong publication record * Experience and/or commitment to work effectively with NAU’s diverse faculty, staff, and student populations. Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: * Demonstrated understanding of Molecular Biology concepts * Proficiency in UNIX operating system environment * Excellent written and verbal communication skills * Experience programming in UNIX environment * At least basic or intermediate understanding of database access and design * Ability to work effectively in diverse, interdisciplinary research environments How to Apply: A curriculum vitae, cover letter, three references and a letter of recommendation is required. Please send the letter of recommendation to Gretchen Povlsen at gretchen.povlsen@nau.edu. To apply for this position, please click http://bit.ly/1UQm3Vm You must submit your application by clicking on the “Submit” button by midnight of the application deadline. If you need assistance completing your application there are instructions available on line at http://bit.ly/1NpUJeuwww.fofanovlab.us. Our research is highly interdisciplinary, and the prospective post-doctoral scholar can anticipate involvement in all aspects of the work, from experimental design and sample collection, to molecular diagnostic tool design, to sequence data analysis and modeling. Individuals from fields ranging from Statistics to Molecular Biology are encouraged to apply, provided they meet the programming experience requirements.      Job responsibilities include but are not limited to: · Design and implementation of research projects · Training of graduate and undergraduate research students. · High Throughput Sequence data analysis · Software development, testing, and execution Eligibility: An earned PhD in Computer Science, Statistics, Bioinformatics, Genomics, Computational Biology or a related field by the time of the appointment Preferred Qualifications: * Demonstrated experience with at least one programming/scripting language * Demonstrated experience with High Throughput Sequencing data analysis * Experience with statistical/modelling packages (R, Matlab, SAS, or equivalent) * Proficiency with common Bioinformatics databases and tools * Experience with high performance and/or parallel computing environments * Experience with scripting languages (C-Shell, Python, Perl, or equivalent) * Experience with object oriented programming languages (C++, Java, or equivalent) * Working knowledge of basic data structures (trees, hashes, arrays, etc) * Strong publication record * Experience and/or commitment to work effectively with NAU’s diverse faculty, staff, and student populations. Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: * Demonstrated understanding of Molecular Biology concepts * Proficiency in UNIX operating system environment * Excellent written and verbal communication skills * Experience programming in UNIX environment * At least basic or intermediate understanding of database access and design * Ability to work effectively in diverse, interdisciplinary research environments How to Apply: A curriculum vitae, cover letter, three references and a letter of recommendation is required. Please send the letter of recommendation to Gretchen Povlsen at gretchen.povlsen@nau.edu. To apply for this position, please click http://bit.ly/1UQm3Vm You must submit your application by clicking on the “Submit” button by midnight of the application deadline. If you need assistance completing your application there are instructions available on line at http://bit.ly/1NpUJeu or in person in the Human Resources Department located in Building 91 on the NAU Campus - on the corner of Beaver and DuPont Streets. If you are an individual with a disability and need reasonable accommodation to participate in the hiring process please contact the Affirmative Action Office at 928-523-3312/TDD - 928-523-1006 or PO Box 4083, Flagstaff AZ 86011. Gretchen Rowe Povlsen via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:11
A post-doctoral fellowship is available in the research groups of Nick Goldman (EBI) and John Welch (Genetics Department, Cambridge University) under the EMBL-EBI / Cambridge Computational Biomedical Postdoctoral Fellowship scheme. The project is on bacterial gene gain and loss and emerging pathogenicity, and is described in full here: http://bit.ly/1UQm3Vk The EMBL-EBI / Cambridge Computational Biomedical Postdoctoral (“EBPOD”) Fellowship scheme is described here: http://bit.ly/1NpUJer The closing date for applications is 3 September 2015. Nick Goldman EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute Nick Goldman via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:56

–cNdxnHkX5QqsyA0e Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Disposition: inline Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit UTromsoe_Norway.PhD_candidate_Metabarcoding Application deadline: 15.09.2015 Ref.no: 2015/399 Troms University Museum has a PhD position vacant from 1st of July 2015 for applicants who wish to obtain the degree of Philosophiae Doctor (PhD). The position is attached to the research group in taxonomy and biodiversity. The appointment is for a period of four years. The PhD position will be connected to two ongoing projects. 1) The Norwegian Barcode of Life project (NorBol, http://bit.ly/1A8uBAg) is a national network of research institutions collaborating on DNA barcoding of organisms in Norway and a regional node in the International Barcode of Life Project (iBOL ). For vascular plants, we do low coverage shotgun sequencing of genomic DNA and assemble the whole plastid DNA, nuclear rDNA and large parts of mitochondrial genome. 2) The After Ice DNA Metabarcoding project (http://bit.ly/1E1Xpb4) explores the occurrence of boreal species at northern latitudes by ancient DNA analyses using the P6 loop of the plastid DNA trnL (UUA) intron. Lake sediments have been collected at key sites for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions in Norway and Svalbard. The PhD candidate will bridge these projects by developing laboratory and bioinformatic tools to apply shotgun sequencing on the ancient samples. This will provide valuable data which the candidate will use to explore effects of past climate change on e.g. species turnover, dispersal, extinction, and phylogenetic diversity. In both projects, we collaborate with colleges at the University Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, who run similar projects focused on the Alps, and the candidate is expected to spend a 3-6 month research stay there. http://bit.ly/1MzsI4Z? Prof. Inger Greve Alsos Troms University Museum NO-9037 Troms Norway Telephone: +47 77 62 07 96 Telefax: +47 77 64 51 05 Email: inger.g.alsos@uit.no http://bit.ly/1E1Xpb4 –cNdxnHkX5QqsyA0e Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Disposition: inline Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

UTromsoe_Norway.PhD_candidate_Metabarcoding

Application deadline: 15.09.2015

Ref.no: 2015/399 

 

Troms University Museum has a PhD position vacant from 1st of July 2015 for applicants who wish to obtain the degree of Philosophiae Doctor (PhD). The position is attached to the research group in taxonomy and biodiversity.

 

The appointment is for a period of four years.

The PhD position will be connected to two ongoing projects. 1) The Norwegian Barcode of Life project (NorBol, http://bit.ly/1A8uBAg) is a national network of research institutions collaborating on DNA barcoding of organisms in Norway and a regional node in the International Barcode of Life Project (iBOL). For vascular plants, we do low coverage shotgun sequencing of genomic DNA and assemble the whole plastid DNA, nuclear rDNA and large parts of mitochondrial genome. 2) The After Ice DNA Metabarcoding project (http://bit.ly/1E1Xpb4) explores the occurrence of boreal species at northern latitudes by ancient DNA analyses using the P6 loop of the plastid DNA trnL (UUA) intron. Lake sediments have been collected at key sites for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions in Norway and Svalbard. 

 

The PhD candidate will bridge these projects by developing laboratory and bioinformatic tools to apply shotgun sequencing on the ancient samples. This will provide valuable data which the candidate will use to explore effects of past climate change on e.g. species turnover, dispersal, extinction, and phylogenetic diversity. In both projects, we collaborate with colleges at the University Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, who run similar projects focused on the Alps, and the candidate is expected to spend a 3-6 month research stay there.

http://bit.ly/1MzsI4Z

****************************************************

Prof. Inger Greve Alsos

Troms University Museum

NO-9037 Troms

Norway

Telephone: +47 77 62 07 96

Telefax: +47 77 64 51 05

Email: inger.g.alsos@uit.no

http://bit.ly/1E1Xpb4

****************************************************

 

–cNdxnHkX5QqsyA0 via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:56

PhD position: physiological basis of experimental adaptation to malnutrition in Drosophila Tadeusz Kawecki’s research group, Dept. of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. The proposed project builds upon an evolution experiment in which replicate populations of fruit flies have adapted to larval malnutrition over 180 generations, evolving high tolerance to nutrient shortage at the expense of increased vulnerability to a food-borne pathogen (Vijendravarma et al, Ecology Letters doi: 10.1111/ele.12490). The project will address the physiological and molecular changes underlying these evolutionary changes; it will involve comparisons of gut physiology and histology, gene expression patterns, enzymatic activities, nutrient absorption/storage rates (using stable isotopes), as well as microbiome manipulations and genetic experiments. The ideal candidate should have a broad understanding of evolutionary concepts and some experience with basic molecular biology techniques. More information about the research group can be found under http://bit.ly/1NCbyRk. The position is foreseen for 4 years, with the initial salary of CHF 47,000 per year (plus a possible supplement for a contribution to teaching), the initial date between October 2015 and March 2016. The research environment is English-speaking and no-preexisting knowledge of French is required, but learning basic French would make living in Lausanne easier. It is a formal requirement that the student will have completed a Master or equivalent degree before starting the PhD (although not necessarily at the time of application). Lausanne is a medium-sized city on the shores of Lake Geneva, surrounded by a wine growing region recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and within one hour of the Alps. It offers a great variety of cultural, recreational and outdoor opportunities. With over 20 research groups, the Department of Ecology and Evolution (www.unil.ch/dee), is a strong center of research in evolutionary biology and a vibrant community which has just hosted the congress of European Society for Evolutionary Biology (wp.unil.ch/eseb2015/). The student will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of courses and workshops in the framework of doctoral programs “Ecology and Evolution” (http://bit.ly/1MzsI4X) and “Staromics” (http://bit.ly/1NCbwZNwww.unil.ch/dee), is a strong center of research in evolutionary biology and a vibrant community which has just hosted the congress of European Society for Evolutionary Biology (wp.unil.ch/eseb2015/). The student will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of courses and workshops in the framework of doctoral programs “Ecology and Evolution” (http://bit.ly/1MzsI4X) and “Staromics” (http://bit.ly/1NCbwZN). To apply, send a single pdf file with a motivation letter, cv, a description of your research experience and interest, and names of 2-3 referees to tadeusz.kawecki@unil.ch, with “PhD position” on the subject line. The review of applications will start on September 2, 2015 and will continue until a suitable candidate is found. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:56
PhD position in Evolutionary Ecology In the project “Evolutionary Responses to Variable and Unpredictable Environments” we will build a series of models to understand how within generation adaptations to variability and predictability in the environment (e.g. plasticity, insurance, and variance-sensitivity) coevolve with bet-hedging. We are seeking a PhD candidate to be part of a team of investigators on this project. We will be using different types of models, including individual-based simulation models and analytical models based on quantitative genetics. We are seeking a person with good understanding of evolutionary theory and preferably with some background in evolutionary ecology. Our candidate should have some competence in mathematics and computing, a strong logical sense and be interested in developing theory. Further information about the position can be found here: http://bit.ly/1MzsKd8 or obtained from Dr. Irja Ida Ratikainen, Department of Biology, NTNU, Tel. +47 47344606, E-mail: irja.i.ratikainen@ntnu.no. Further information about the Department can be found at http://bit.ly/172stfv Applications must be submitted electronically through www.jobbnorge.no. The reference number of the position is: NT- 54/15 Application deadline: September 4th 2015 Irja Ida Ratikainen Researcher, CBD (Centre for Biodiversity Dynamics) Department of Biology Norwegian University of Science and Technology http://bit.ly/1MzsI4Vwww.jobbnorge.no. The reference number of the position is: NT- 54/15 Application deadline: September 4th 2015 Irja Ida Ratikainen Researcher, CBD (Centre for Biodiversity Dynamics) Department of Biology Norwegian University of Science and Technology http://bit.ly/1MzsI4V Irja Ida Ratikainen via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:41

We are seeking a postdoctoral researcher for a collaborative project (between the labs of Sandra Rehan at the University of New Hampshire and Amy Toth at Iowa State University) investigating evolutionary genomics of sociality in bees. The project will investigate the types of genomic changes that are associated with the earliest origins of very simple sociality and then its subsequent elaboration into advanced eusociality. It utilizes a unique clade of bees, the Xylocopinae (carpenter bees), where social behavior ranges enormously, from solitary through to highly complex, but with many intermediate and very weakly social species. For an outline of the conceptual foundation of this project, see Rehan and Toth 2015 “Climbing the social ladder: the molecular evolution of sociality” in Trends in Ecology and Evolution. http://bit.ly/1DZPXm7 A Postdoctoral Fellowship position is available for three years. This highly interdisciplinary project will involve field work with bees in different areas of the US and Australia, high throughput DNA- and RNA- sequencing, and extensive bioinformatic and statistical analyses. Importantly, the postdoc will have the opportunity to work with a large data set and the latest advances in genomics, bioinformatics and computational biology as part of this project. The successful candidate will have a PhD in a relevant area, and a strong background in social evolution and genomics. They will demonstrate computational and bioinformatics skills (experience in handling and analysing next-generation sequencing data; competence in programming e.g. Perl, R, Python would be an advantage). The University of New Hampshire is an Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applications from women and underrepresented groups. If interested, please send a CV, names of three references, and a short statement of interests to Sandra Rehan sandra.rehan@unh.edu by September 8, 2015. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:26
Assistant Professor: Evolutionary Biology The Division of Biological Sciences (www.biology.ucsd.edu), Section of Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, invites applications for a faculty position at the tenure-track Assistant Professor level in Evolutionary Biology. We are broadly searching for an evolutionary biologist. Research topics could include, but are not limited to, vertebrate biology, evolutionary ecology, or comparative or population genomics. All candidates must have earned a Ph.D. or equivalent degree, and be committed to teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. In addition to excellence and creativity in research and scholarship, successful candidates must also demonstrate a commitment to equity and inclusion in higher education. We are especially interested in candidates who have created or contributed to programs that aim to increase access and success of underrepresented students and/or faculty in the sciences, and/or have detailed plans to accomplish such goals. The Division of Biological Sciences at UCSD is a vibrant center of scientific discovery, innovation, and collaboration. Our large research base spans many areas of biology and has one of the most celebrated graduate programs in the country. We are committed to academic excellence and diversity within the faculty, staff, and student body. This is where discovery comes to life. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and based on University of California pay scales. Completed applications received by October 1, 2015 will be assured of consideration. Interested applicants must submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, 3-5 references, statement of research, statement of teaching, a statement describing their past experience and leadership in fostering equity and diversity and/or their potential to make future contributions, and 3-5 publications. For information on preparing diversity statements and divisional initiatives to promote diversity, see: http://bit.ly/1vsvhwR and http://bit.ly/1e4ZERb. Applications must be submitted through the University of California San Diego’s Academic Personnel RECRUIT System at: http://bit.ly/1NfzBZ2 Further details about the required application material can be found at: http://bit.ly/1AZNdzewww.biology.ucsd.edu), Section of Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, invites applications for a faculty position at the tenure-track Assistant Professor level in Evolutionary Biology. We are broadly searching for an evolutionary biologist. Research topics could include, but are not limited to, vertebrate biology, evolutionary ecology, or comparative or population genomics. All candidates must have earned a Ph.D. or equivalent degree, and be committed to teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. In addition to excellence and creativity in research and scholarship, successful candidates must also demonstrate a commitment to equity and inclusion in higher education. We are especially interested in candidates who have created or contributed to programs that aim to increase access and success of underrepresented students and/or faculty in the sciences, and/or have detailed plans to accomplish such goals. The Division of Biological Sciences at UCSD is a vibrant center of scientific discovery, innovation, and collaboration. Our large research base spans many areas of biology and has one of the most celebrated graduate programs in the country. We are committed to academic excellence and diversity within the faculty, staff, and student body. This is where discovery comes to life. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and based on University of California pay scales. Completed applications received by October 1, 2015 will be assured of consideration. Interested applicants must submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, 3-5 references, statement of research, statement of teaching, a statement describing their past experience and leadership in fostering equity and diversity and/or their potential to make future contributions, and 3-5 publications. For information on preparing diversity statements and divisional initiatives to promote diversity, see: http://bit.ly/1vsvhwR and http://bit.ly/1e4ZERb. Applications must be submitted through the University of California San Diego’s Academic Personnel RECRUIT System at: http://bit.ly/1NfzBZ2 Further details about the required application material can be found at: http://bit.ly/1AZNdze UCSD is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer with a strong institutional commitment to excellence through diversity. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to gender, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. “Ta, Laura” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:11
= Dr. William Gelbart It is with great sadness that we report the passing of Dr. William (Bill) Gelbart. Bill was professor of molecular and cellular biology at Harvard University. His laboratory focused on understanding the molecular basis of pattern formation in higher animals, focusing on cell-cell signaling related to the decapentaplegic pathway. Beyond his many research contributions, Bill is well respected for his leadership in the Drosophila community. He has served as Principal Investigator for FlyBase since the project was initiated in 1991. He was also a trusted advisor to many other community effortsXincluding WormBase, Zebrafish Information Network, The Arabidopsis Information Resource, and many othersXand served on the National Advisory Council for the National Human Genome Research Institute. Bill earned his BS in biology from Brooklyn College in 1966 and his PhD in genetics from the University of Wisconsin in 1971. He did postdoctoral work with Ed Lewis at Caltech and Art Chovnick at the University of Connecticut before moving to Harvard in 1976. In addition to his research and teaching during his tenure at Harvard, Bill served as the Head Tutor for the undergraduate concentration in biology and as program director for an interdepartmental predoctoral training program in genetics and genomics. Bill is survived by his devoted wife, Susan; his loving daughters Marnie, Courtney, and Jennifer; his adoring grandchildren Delilah, Theodore, and Amelia; a brother and sister-in-law; many nieces, nephews and dear friends. A memorial service honoring Bill will take place at a later date. The family has requested that in in lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the The Greater Boston Food Bank or WGBH (Boston’s PBS station). Regards, FlyBase FlyBase News by FlyBase http://bit.ly/1NC7WyA 1001 E Third St Bloomington, IN 47405 USA FlyBase via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

August 17, 2015

07:19