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October 25, 2014

07:08

In Drosophila, chromosomes have been extensively reorganized during evolution, with most rearrangements affecting the gene order in chromosomal elements but not their gene content. The level of reorganization and the evidence for breakpoint reuse vary both between and within elements. The subito gene stands out as a gene involved in multiple rearrangements both because of its active single-gene transposition and because it is the nearest gene to diverse rearrangements breakpoints. Indeed, subito has undergone three single-gene transpositions and it is the nearest gene to the breakpoints of other single-gene transpositions and of two chromosomal inversions. Given that subito is involved in meiosis and therefore active in the female germ line, the high number of nearby fixed breakages might be related among others to the presumed high accessibility of the subito region to the machinery associated with double-strand breaks repair. A second important contributor would be the reduced and simple regulatory region of subito, which would imply that a fraction of the rearrangements originating from subito nearby breakages would have not affected either its pattern or timing of expression and would have, thus, not resulted in reduced fitness.

07:08

Many organisms survive fluctuating and extreme environmental conditions by manifesting multiple distinct phenotypes during adulthood by means of developmental processes that enable phenotypic plasticity. We report on the discovery of putative plasticity-enabling genes that are involved in transforming the gill of the euryhaline teleost fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, from its freshwater to its seawater gill-type, a process that alters both morphology and function. Gene expression that normally enables osmotic plasticity is inhibited by arsenic. Gene sets defined by antagonistic interactions between arsenic and salinity show reduced transcriptional variation among individual fish, suggesting unusually accurate and precise regulatory control of these genes, consistent with the hypothesis that they participate in a canalized developmental response. We observe that natural selection acts to preserve canalized gene expression in populations of killifish that are most tolerant to abrupt salinity change and that these populations show the least variability in their transcription of genes enabling plasticity of the gill. We found that genes participating in this highly canalized and conserved plasticity-enabling response had significantly fewer and less complex associations with transcriptional regulators than genes that respond only to arsenic or salinity. Collectively these findings, which are drawn from the relationships between environmental challenge, plasticity, and canalization among populations, suggest that the selective processes that facilitate phenotypic plasticity do so by targeting the regulatory networks that gives rise to the response. These findings also provide a generalized, conceptual framework of how genes might interact with the environment and evolve toward the development of plastic traits.

07:08

Recombination between double-stranded DNA molecules is a key genetic process which occurs in a wide variety of organisms. Usually, crossing-over (CO) occurs during meiosis between genotypes with 98.0–99.9% sequence identity, because within-population nucleotide diversity only rarely exceeds 2%. However, some species are hypervariable and it is unclear how CO can occur between genotypes with less than 90% sequence identity. Here, we study CO in Schizophyllum commune, a hypervariable cosmopolitan basidiomycete mushroom, a frequently encountered decayer of woody substrates. We crossed two haploid individuals, from the United States and from Russia, and obtained genome sequences for their 17 offspring. The average genetic distance between the parents was 14%, making it possible to study CO at very high resolution. We found reduced levels of linkage disequilibrium between loci flanking the CO sites indicating that they are mostly confined to hotspots of recombination. Furthermore, CO events preferentially occurred in regions under stronger negative selection, in particular within exons that showed reduced levels of nucleotide diversity. Apparently, in hypervariable species CO must avoid regions of higher divergence between the recombining genomes due to limitations imposed by the mismatch repair system, with regions under strong negative selection providing the opportunity for recombination. These patterns are opposite to those observed in a number of less variable species indicating that population genomics of hypervariable species may reveal novel biological phenomena.

07:08

Detecting positive selection in species with heterogeneous habitats and complex demography is notoriously difficult and prone to statistical biases. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana exemplifies this problem: In spite of the large amounts of data, little evidence for classic selective sweeps has been found. Moreover, many aspects of the demography are unclear, which makes it hard to judge whether the few signals are indeed signs of selection, or false positives caused by demographic events. Here, we focus on Swedish A. thaliana and we find that the demography can be approximated as a two-population model. Careful analysis of the data shows that such a two island model is characterized by a very old split time that significantly predates the last glacial maximum followed by secondary contact with strong migration. We evaluate selection based on this demography and find that this secondary contact model strongly affects the power to detect sweeps. Moreover, it affects the power differently for northern Sweden (more false positives) as compared with southern Sweden (more false negatives). However, even when the demographic history is accounted for, sweep signals in northern Sweden are stronger than in southern Sweden, with little or no positional overlap. Further simulations including the complex demography and selection confirm that this is not compatible with global selection acting on both populations, and thus can be taken as evidence for local selection within subpopulations of Swedish A. thaliana. This study demonstrates the necessity of combining demographic analyses and sweep scans for the detection of selection, particularly when selection acts predominantly local.

07:08

Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII–FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy.

07:08

Estimating phylogenetic trees from sequence data is an extremely challenging and important statistical task. Within the maximum-likelihood paradigm, the best tree is a point estimate. To determine how strongly the data support such an evolutionary scenario, a hypothesis testing methodology is required. To this end, the Kishino–Hasegawa (KH) test was developed to determine whether one topology is significantly more supported by the sequence data than another one. This test and its derivatives are widely used in phylogenetics and phylogenomics. Here, we show that the KH test is biased in the presence of alignment error and can lead to erroneous conclusions. Using simulations we demonstrated that due to alignment errors the KH test often rejects one of the competing topologies, even though both topologies are equally supported by the data. Specifically, we show that the KH test favors the guide tree used to align the analyzed sequences. Further, branch length optimization renders the test too conservative. We propose two possible corrections for these biases. First, we evaluated the impact of removing unreliable alignment columns and found out that it decreases the bias at the cost of substantially reducing the test’s power. Second, we developed a parametric test that entirely abolishes the biases without data filtering. This test incorporates the alignment construction step into the test’s hypothesis, thus removing the above guide tree effect. We extend this methodology for the case of multiple-topology comparisons and demonstrate the applicability of the new methodology on an exemplary data set.

07:08

Studies of natural selection, followed by functional validation, are shedding light on understanding of genetic mechanisms underlying human evolution and adaptation. Classic methods for detecting selection, such as the integrated haplotype score (iHS) and Fay and Wu’s H statistic, are useful for candidate gene searching underlying positive selection. These methods, however, have limited capability to localize causal variants in selection target regions. In this study, we developed a novel method based on conditional coalescent tree to detect recent positive selection by counting unbalanced mutations on coalescent gene genealogies. Extensive simulation studies revealed that our method is more robust than many other approaches against biases due to various demographic effects, including population bottleneck, expansion, or stratification, while not sacrificing its power. Furthermore, our method demonstrated its superiority in localizing causal variants from massive linked genetic variants. The rate of successful localization was about 20–40% higher than that of other state-of-the-art methods on simulated data sets. On empirical data, validated functional causal variants of four well-known positive selected genes were all successfully localized by our method, such as ADH1B, MCM6, APOL1, and HBB. Finally, the computational efficiency of this new method was much higher than that of iHS implementations, that is, 24–66 times faster than the REHH package, and more than 10,000 times faster than the original iHS implementation. These magnitudes make our method suitable for applying on large sequencing data sets. Software can be downloaded from https://github.com/wavefancy/scct.

07:08

Orthology inference is central to phylogenomic analyses. Phylogenomic data sets commonly include transcriptomes and low-coverage genomes that are incomplete and contain errors and isoforms. These properties can severely violate the underlying assumptions of orthology inference with existing heuristics. We present a procedure that uses phylogenies for both homology and orthology assignment. The procedure first uses similarity scores to infer putative homologs that are then aligned, constructed into phylogenies, and pruned of spurious branches caused by deep paralogs, misassembly, frameshifts, or recombination. These final homologs are then used to identify orthologs. We explore four alternative tree-based orthology inference approaches, of which two are new. These accommodate gene and genome duplications as well as gene tree discordance. We demonstrate these methods in three published data sets including the grape family, Hymenoptera, and millipedes with divergence times ranging from approximately 100 to over 400 Ma. The procedure significantly increased the completeness and accuracy of the inferred homologs and orthologs. We also found that data sets that are more recently diverged and/or include more high-coverage genomes had more complete sets of orthologs. To explicitly evaluate sources of conflicting phylogenetic signals, we applied serial jackknife analyses of gene regions keeping each locus intact. The methods described here can scale to over 100 taxa. They have been implemented in python with independent scripts for each step, making it easy to modify or incorporate them into existing pipelines. All scripts are available from https://bitbucket.org/yangya/phylogenomic_dataset_construction.

06:00
Background: Elucidating the mechanisms underlying coevolution of ligands and receptors is an important challenge in molecular evolutionary biology. Peptide hormones and their receptors are excellent models for such efforts, given the relative ease of examining evolutionary changes in genes encoding for both molecules. Most vertebrates possess multiple genes for both the decapeptide gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and for the GnRH receptor. The evolutionary history of the receptor family, including ancestral copy number and timing of duplications and deletions, has been the subject of controversy. Results: We report here for the first time sequences of three distinct GnRH receptor genes in salamanders (axolotls, Ambystoma mexicanum), which are orthologous to three GnRH receptors from ranid frogs. To understand the origin of these genes within the larger evolutionary context of the gene family, we performed phylogenetic analyses and probabilistic protein homology searches of GnRH receptor genes in vertebrates and their near relatives. Our analyses revealed four points that alter previous views about the evolution of the GnRH receptor gene family. First, the ?mammalian? pituitary type GnRH receptor, which is the sole GnRH receptor in humans and previously presumed to be highly derived because it lacks the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain typical of most G-protein coupled receptors, is actually an ancient gene that originated in the common ancestor of jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Second, unlike previous studies, we classify vertebrate GnRH receptors into five subfamilies. Third, the order of subfamily origins is the inverse of previous proposed models. Fourth, the number of GnRH receptor genes has been dynamic in vertebrates and their ancestors, with multiple duplications and losses. Conclusion: Our results provide a novel evolutionary framework for generating hypotheses concerning the functional importance of structural characteristics of vertebrate GnRH receptors. We show that five subfamilies of vertebrate GnRH receptors evolved early in the vertebrate phylogeny, followed by several independent instances of gene loss. Chief among cases of gene loss are humans, best described as degenerate with respect to GnRH receptors because we retain only a single, ancient gene.
02:58

—_000_87FCC0D1FF47BB4E8B42E4989C746A862B9F0FA4EXCHMBOX6exchuc_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable *Position Announcement: Molecular Biology of Social Insects (Entomology)* **Assistant Professor/Assistant Entomologist** Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, California, http://bit.ly/Hxmhk0 *POSITION: *Molecular Biology of Social Insects.* The Department of Entomology invites applications for a tenure-track position, 9-month appointment, available July 1, 2015. The position has 25% Instruction and Research and 75% Organized Research in the Agricultural Experiment Station http://bit.ly/1cKvnDJ. Applicants must hold a Ph.D. in Entomology, Molecular Biology, or a related discipline; post-doctoral experience is preferred. The focus of the position will be on the functional connection between social behaviors and genetic, epigenetic, neurophysiological and chemical pathways. Areas of research emphasis may include, but are not limited to, pheromone perception, responses to semiochemicals, regulation of social interactions, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying caste determination, and evolution of sociality. *RESPONSIBILITIES:* Develop an extramurally funded research program to conduct basic and applied research in the area of molecular biology of social insects. Teaching responsibilities include supervision of graduate students, participation in undergraduate biological science instruction. The development of new undergraduate courses in behavioral genetics would be encouraged as well as a graduate level course within the candidates’ field of interest. Participation in graduate training within Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics; Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology; and Cellular, Molecular and Developmental Biology interdepartmental programs would be encouraged. *APPLICATION:* Applications should include a curriculum vitae (6 pages maximum), statements of research interests (3 pages maximum), teaching interests and philosophy (2 pages maximum), pdf files for up to three papers, and four letters of references. All application materials should be sent to: http://bit.ly/1wwhmmR Questions regarding this position should be directed to Dr. Timothy Paine, Chair of the Molecular Biology of Social Insects Search Committee at timothy.paine@ucr.edu *APPLICATION DEADLINE: *Evaluation of applications will begin December 1, 2014, but the position will remain open until filled. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. —_000_87FCC0D1FF47BB4E8B42E4989C746A862B9F0FA4EXCHMBOX6exchuc_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}*Position Announcement: Molecular Biology of Social Insects (Entomology)* **Assistant Professor/Assistant Entomologist** Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, California,http://bit.ly/Hxmhk0 *POSITION: *Molecular Biology of Social Insects.* The Department of Entomology invites applications for a tenure-track position, 9-month appointment, available July 1, 2015. The position has 25% Instruction and Research and 75% Organized Research in the Agricultural Experiment Station http://bit.ly/1cKvnDJ. Applicants must hold a Ph.D. in Entomology, Molecular Biology, or a related discipline; post-doctoral experience is preferred. The focus of the position will be on the functional connection between social behaviors and genetic, epigenetic, neurophysiological and chemical pathways. Areas of research emphasis may include, but are not limited to, pheromone perception, responses to semiochemicals, regulation of social interactions, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying caste determination, and evolution of sociality. *RESPONSIBILITIES:* Develop an extramurally funded research program to conduct basic and applied research in the area of molecular biology of social insects. Teaching responsibilities include supervision of graduate students, participation in undergraduate biological science instruction. The development of new undergraduate courses in behavioral genetics would be encouraged as well as a graduate level course within the candidates’ field of interest. Participation in graduate training within Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics; Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology; and Cellular, Molecular and Developmental Biology interdepartmental programs would be encouraged. *APPLICATION:* Applications should include a curriculum vitae (6 pages maximum), statements of research interests (3 pages maximum), teaching interests and philosophy (2 pages maximum), pdf files for up to three papers, and four letters of references. All application materials should be sent to:http://bit.ly/1wwhmmR Questions regarding this position should be directed to Dr. Timothy Paine, Chair of the Molecular Biology of Social Insects Search Committee at timothy.paine@ucr.edu *APPLICATION DEADLINE: *Evaluation of applications will begin December 1, 2014, but the position will remain open until filled. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. —_000_87FCC0D1FF47BB4E8B42E4989C746A862B9F0FA4EXCHMBOX6exchuc via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:58
Postdoctoral Position at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities A postdoctoral researcher is sought to conduct comparative phylogenetic studies of the effects of polyploidy and breeding system on rates of evolution. This project is a collaboration between the labs of Emma Goldberg in the Dept of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior at the University of Minnesota (where the position will be based) and Itay Mayrose in the Dept of Molecular Biology and Ecology of Plants at Tel Aviv University. More information about our labs is available at and . The postdoc will work with unparalleled datasets on plant chromosome counts and breeding system, and s/he will develop and apply new phylogenetic comparative methods to uncover the micro- and macroevolutionary consequences of these traits. In addition to the specific projects we have in mind regarding rates of sequence evolution and lineage diversification, there is substantial flexibility in developing projects within the general theme. Work will include methods developmen via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:41

Registrations for the next edition of the European course on “Comparative Genomics” are open. This course is organized by the Ecole Normale Suprieure (ENS) of Lyon (France) since 2008. It is aimed at students from the ENS and is open to master and PhD students from European universities. The course focuses on major discoveries, big challenges, innovative concepts and original approaches in the field of comparative genomics, their applications in biology, medicine and biotechnology, and their impact on society. This year the course will be held on 26 January - 6 February 2015 at the ENS (Lyon, France). Registration is free. Lectures are in English. The preliminary program and registration form are available at: http://bit.ly/ICfmGK Jean-Nicolas Volff (ENS, Lyon) and Cline Brochier (Univ. Lyon1) via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:27
Biological Control of Weeds Position Sidney, Montana Interdisciplinary: Research Entomologist/ Ecologist, GS-0414/0408-12/13 Salary Range of $69,497 - $107,434 per year (GS 12 or 13). Promotion potential of GS-15. The United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Northern Plains Agricultural Research Laboratory, Pest Management Research Unit in Sidney, Montana is seeking a permanent full-time Research Ecologist/ Entomologist as a lead investigator in classical biological control of invasive plants of the Northern Great Plains. The research focuses on plant and insect ecology; plant-herbivore interactions; characterization of ecological factors affecting biological control agents (insects or other arthropods) and invasive weeds; invasion ecology; host-specificity and efficacy studies of potential biological control agents; non-target effects of biocontrol on ecological communities; post-release efficacy studies; and long-term monitoring. For details and to apply, see http://1.usa.gov/1wp813A. Reference Job Announcement Number ARS-D14W-0060A or search USAJOBS for positions in Sidney, MT. Applications must be postmarked by November 19, 2014. U.S. citizenship is required. USDA/ARS is an equal opportunity employer and provider. Questions? Contact: John Gaskin (406) 433-2020. John Gaskin Botanist/Research Leader PMRU Acting Research Leader ASRU USDA ARS NPARL 1500 N. Central Ave. Sidney, MT 59270 USA Office: 406.433.2020 Cell: 406.489.1384 Fax: 406.433.5038 “Gaskin, John” via Gmail
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01:55

Simons-University of Pennsylvania Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematical Biology The Departments of Mathematics and Biology at the University of Pennsylvania invite applications for postdoctoral fellowships at the interface of mathematics and biology. These positions are open to candidates who have demonstrated excellence and productivity in research. A Ph.D. or equivalent degree in Biology, Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science, or related fields is required. Highly qualified mathematicians and statisticians wishing to transition into biology are also encouraged to apply. The fellows will be encouraged to interact and collaborate with various research groups on campus. Funding for the fellowships will be provided by the Math+X Simons Chair awarded to Prof. Yun S. Song, who will join the University in Summer 2015. Applications should be submitted online through MathJobs.org (http://bit.ly/1DKQrYO) and include a curriculum vitae and a research statement. In addition, applicants should arrange to have three letters of reference submitted online. Review of applications will begin December 15, 2014 and will continue until the positions are filled. The Departments of Mathematics and Biology are strongly committed to Penn’s Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence and to establishing a more diverse faculty (for more information see: http://bit.ly/1eC8Ath). The University of Pennsylvania is an EOE. Minorities/Women/Individuals with disabilities/Protected Veterans are encouraged to apply.  via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:09

Dear Evoldir, Next Generation Bioinformatics User Group AND Scottish Phylogeny Discussion Group joint meeting 8 December 2014, 12:30 PM onwards, University of St Andrews A buffet lunch will be followed by a talk from invited speaker DR JO DICKS (National Collection of Yeast Cultures http://bit.ly/1xmzYWu, Institute of Food Research, Norwich): “Estimating and exploiting yeast NGS-based phylogenies for industrial biotechnology”. Over the course of the afternoon, the meeting will continue with several contributed talks. This part of the programme is still expanding. If you’d like to give a talk, please just give the title when you register. Attendance is free but please register in advance. Details and registration: http://bit.ly/1z6EVqB Daniel Barker http://bit.ly/1xmzXBN University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland : No SC013532 via Gmail

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01:09
POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH FELLOW IN THE BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY AND GENETICS OF SOCIAL SYSTEMS Full time, 3 years fixed term Expected start date: 1 January 2015 Salary range: starting at £31,342 and rising to £37,394. It is normal to appoint at the first point of the salary scale. Closing date for applications: 19 November 2014 Interviews will be held during 3-11 December 2014. A full-time, NERC-funded, 3-year postdoctoral research position is available in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Sussex. The position offers an exciting opportunity to join a research team led by Prof Jeremy Field working on the behavioural and evolutionary ecology of social systems (http://bit.ly/1r626t3). The main aim of the project is to use a combination of approaches from behavioural ecology and quantitative genetics to investigate queen-worker coadaptation and conflict in primitively eusocial sweat bees (Lasioglossum). The resolution of reproductive conflicts has been well studied both theoretically and empirically in eusocial Hymenoptera. However, much less is known about the coevolutionary process involved, and the underlying trait architecture. The work will lead to a comprehensive understanding of queen-worker coevolution, including the first tests of several key hypotheses. Work will be carried out at Sussex University, also involving collaboration with Prof Mathias Kölliker (University of Basel, Switzerland: http://bit.ly/1xmzYWo). The project will involve a combination of large-scale field experiments in the UK, and genetic work using microsatellite markers. There will be a technician working on the project who will carry out much of the molecular work. The successful applicant will have a Ph.D in behavioural/evolutionary biology. Experience with animal social systems and quantitative genetics, and experience of fieldwork, molecular techniques and statistical analysis using ‘R’ and similar programs would all be useful, but it is not necessary to have experience in all of these areas. Possession of a clean driving licence is essential. The Evolution, Behaviour and Environment (EBE) Subject Group in the School of Life Sciences at Sussex (http://bit.ly/16uRakA) is a thriving research environment providing ample opportunities to interact with leading senior researchers and their groups. The successful applicant will particularly benefit from an exceptional, on a world scale, concentration of research expertise that focusses on social behaviour in insects. Jeremy Field, Francis Ratnieks, Bill Hughes, Dave Goulson, Tom Collett and Paul Graham all lead well-established research groups. Our seminar series have a correspondingly strong (though by no means exclusive) focus on social evolution. Full details of the post, with information about where to submit an application, salary and the University of Sussex application form, are available at: http://bit.ly/1xmzYWq. Please note that the full application, including CV, covering letter and completed standard application form should be sent to lifescirecruitment@sussex.ac.uk Informal enquiries: Jeremy Field (j.field@sussex.ac.uk) Professor Jeremy Field School of Life Sciences, John Maynard Smith Building, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK j.field@sussex.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1r626t3 Tel 01273 877135 Jeremy Field via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:50

Masters Graduate Assistantships in Ecology and Evolution at the College of William and Mary The Biology Department at the College of William and Mary is recruiting new research Masters students in ecology and evolution to start in Fall 2015. Full assistantships are provided to nearly all students. We offer a two-year research-intensive Masters program where students are supported by teaching assistantships and full tuition waivers. For many students, getting a Masters in two years and writing publications and grants is the ideal preparation for applying to highly competitive Ph.D. programs or jobs. We have a great track record of our recent MS students going on to excellent PhD programs and professional positions. With a low student-to-faculty ratio (approximately 10 new students each year with 23 full-time faculty) we can offer an intimate and highly personalized research and education experience. Importantly, we have real strengths in many aspects of ecology and evolution. We are one of the few smaller universities that have many evolutionary biologists and ecologists on their faculty, including: John Swaddle (sexual selection/behavioral ecology), Martha Case (plant systematics/pollination ecology), Jon Allen (evolution and development), Joshua Puzey (evolutionary genomics), Helen Murphy (evolutionary genetics/experimental evolution), Drew LaMar (mathematical modeling), Paul Heideman (physiological evolution), Dan Cristol (behavioral ecology/ecotoxicology), Harmony Dalgleish (forest ecology), Laurie Sanderson (functional ecology), Randy Chambers (wetlands ecology), Kurt Williamson (viral ecology), and Matthias Leu (conservation/landscape ecology). The proximity of William and Mary to county, state, and federal parks as well as the Chesapeake Bay allows for extensive field research opportunities. Deadline for applications is February 1, but you should contact potential advisors soon. You can get general information about our program from the department website: http://bit.ly/1t0SkeX and more on potential advisors here: Harmony Dalgleish: http://bit.ly/1nDJu7R Kurt Williamson: http://bit.ly/1t0Si75 Randy Chambers: http://bit.ly/1nDJtkn Jon Allen: http://bit.ly/1t0SkeZ Dan Cristol: http://bit.ly/1nDJtAB Matthias Leu: http://bit.ly/1nDJu7V Drew LaMar: http://bit.ly/1nDJuo9 Helen Murphy: http://bit.ly/1t0Sinp Laurie Sanderson: http://bit.ly/1nDJuob Paul Heideman: http://bit.ly/1t0Sint Joshua Puzey: http://bit.ly/1nDJuod Martha Case: http://bit.ly/1nDJuog (on sabbatical 2015, not taking new students) John Swaddle: http://bit.ly/1t0Skfb (on sabbatical in 2015; not taking new students) via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:35

Deadline reminder - TODAY Friday 24th. Its a great event, but filling up fast! 16th YOUNG SYSTEMATISTS’ FORUM Friday, 21 November 2014, 9:30 am Please note date change from earlier announcement Venue: Flett Lecture Theatre, Natural History Museum, London, UK The annual Young Systematists’ Forum represents an exciting setting for Masters, PhD and young postdoctoral researchers to present their data, often for the first time, to a scientific audience interested in taxonomy, systematics and phylogenetics. This well-established event provides an important opportunity for budding systematists to discuss their research in front of their peers within a supportive environment. Supervisors and other established systematists are also encouraged to attend. Prizes will be awarded for the most promising oral and poster presentation as judged by a small panel on the day. Again the YSF will be held the day after the Molluscan Forum (http://bit.ly/1yM3Fo7 ) also at the NHM, so that you can attned both meetings. If you are attending both you will need to register for each meeting separately. Since talk slots are limited, we ask that you register for a talk in one meeting and poster in the other, so everyone gets time in the limelight! Registration is FREE. Send applications by e-mail to (YSF.SystematicsAssociation@gmail.com), supplying your name, contact and academic address, academic level (MSc student, PhD student or postdoc), and stating whether or not you wish to give an oral or poster presentation. Space will be allocated subject to availability and for a balanced programme of animal, plant, algal, microbial, molecular and other research. Non-presenting attendees are also very welcome - please register as above. Abstracts must be submitted by e-mail in English no later than Friday 24 October 2014. The body text should not exceed 150 words in length. If the presentation is co-authored, the actual speaker (oral) or presenter (poster) must be clearly indicated in BOLD text. All registered attendants will receive further information about the meeting, including abstracts, by e-mail one week in advance. This information will also be displayed on the Systematics Association website (www.systass.org). *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* Dr Ellinor MICHEL Department of Life Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road SW7 5BD London UK tel: +44-207-942-5516 -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* http://bit.ly/YjDjuAwww.systass.org). *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* Dr Ellinor MICHEL Department of Life Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road SW7 5BD London UK tel: +44-207-942-5516 -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* http://bit.ly/YjDjuA -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR