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November 18, 2014

05:00
Background: Some clover species, particularly Trifolium subterraneum, have previously been reported to have highly unusual plastomes, relative to closely related legumes, enlarged with many duplications, gene losses and the presence of DNA unique to Trifolium, which may represent horizontal transfer. In order to pinpoint the evolutionary origin of this phenomenon within the genus Trifolium, we sequenced and assembled the plastomes of eight additional Trifolium species widely sampled from across the genus. Results: The Trifolium plastomes fell into two groups: those of Trifolium boissieri, T. strictum and T. glanduliferum (representing subgenus Chronosemium and subg. Trifolium section Paramesus) were tractable, assembled readily and were not unusual in the general context of Fabeae plastomes. The other Trifolium species (“core Trifolium”) proved refractory to assembly mainly because of numerous short duplications. These species form a single clade, which we call the “refractory clade” (comprising subg, Trifolium sections Lupinaster, Trifolium, Trichocephalum, Vesicastrum and Trifoliastrum). The characteristics of the refractory clade are the presence of numerous short duplications and 7-15% longer genomes than the tractable species. Molecular dating estimates that the origin of the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the refractory clade is approximately 13.1 million years ago (MYA). This is considerably younger than the estimated MRCA ages of Trifolium (c. 18.6 MYA) and Trifolium subg. Trifolium (16.1 MYA). Conclusions: We conclude that the unusual repetitive plastome type previously characterized in Trifolium subterraneum had a single origin within Trifolium and is characteristic of most (but not all) species of subgenus Trifolium. It appears that an ancestral plastome within Trifolium underwent an evolutionary change resulting in plastomes that either actively promoted, were permissive to, or were unable to control, duplications within the genome. The precise mechanism of this important change in the mode and tempo of plastome evolution deserves further investigation.
03:28
To whom it may concern; I am trying to locate any tissue or DNA from mice carrying the resistance allele Fv-4r or Akvr-1, which confers resistance to murine leukemia virus (MuLV). We are screening a wild population of mice for the frequency of this allele via PCR and need a positive control. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Brent W. Young MSc. Conservation Genetics Research Specialist Dean Lab Molecular and Computational Biology University of Southern California lab: 1-213-740-7316 email: brentwyo@usc.edu Brent Young via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:28
—_000_37A77888A16E4DD3B0D1F9E5447837C6ukyedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Weisrock Lab at the University of Kentucky (sweb.uky.edu/~dweis2) is recruiting a PhD student to begin graduate work in Fall 2015. We are a diverse research group working on evolutionary, population, and conservation biology projects using genetic data in a variety of taxa, including amphibians, primates, freshwater insects, and freshwater mussels. Graduate students in the lab are encouraged to develop independent thesis projects. This year we will be especially interested in students who seek training in the computational analysis of genomic data, particularly in the fields of molecular evolution and phylogenetics. Students will have an opportunity to integrate into a recently funded NSF collaborative project investigating the evolution of gene trees across loci that exhibit different evolutionary and functional properties. This work, combining both salamander and lemur study systems, is in collaboration with Dr. Anne Yoder at Duke University, and PhD students participating in this project will interact with a team of graduate students, postdocs, and PIs across institutions. Research Assistant support is available for work on this project. The Department of Biology at UK is home to multiple faculty with research programs in evolution and genomics. More information about the Department can be found at bio.as.uky.edu Students interested in learning more about a potential PhD opportunity should contact Dr. David Weisrock (dweis2@uky.edu). Department of Biology University of Kentucky 101 Thomas Hunt Morgan Building Lexington, KY 40506 859-257-2249 dweis2@uky.edu http://bit.ly/1uCOhb3 —_000_37A77888A16E4DD3B0D1F9E5447837C6ukyedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Weisrock Lab at the University of Kentucky (sweb.uky.edu/~dweis2) is recruiting a PhD student to begin graduate work in Fall 2015. We are a diverse research group working on evolutionary, population, and conservation biology projects using genetic data in a variety of taxa, including amphibians, primates, freshwater insects, and freshwater mussels.  Graduate students in the lab are encouraged to develop independent thesis projects. This year we will be especially interested in students who seek training in the computational analysis of genomic data, particularly in the fields of molecular evolution and phylogenetics. Students will have an opportunity to integrate into a recently funded NSF collaborative project investigating the evolution of gene trees across loci that exhibit different evolutionary and functional properties. This work, combining both salamander and lemur study systems, is in collaboration with Dr. Anne Yoder at Duke University, and PhD students participating in this project will interact with a team of graduate students, postdocs, and PIs across institutions. Research Assistant support is available for work on this project. The Department of Biology at UK is home to multiple faculty with research programs in evolution and genomics. More information about the Department can be found at bio.as.uky.edu Students interested in learning more about a potential PhD opportunity should contact Dr. David Weisrock (dweis2@uky.edu). Department of Biology University of Kentucky 101 Thomas Hunt Morgan Building Lexington, KY 40506 859-257-2249 dweis2@uky.edu http://bit.ly/1uCOhb3
—_000_37A77888A16E4DD3B0D1F9E5447837C6ukyedu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:11
Title Ecology and Evolutionary Biology-University of Tennessee at Knoxville (PhD and Masters positions) Description The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville seeks motivated applicants for PhD and MS research degree programs. Our students explore a broad range of areas: evolutionary biology, evolutionary theory, behavioral and population genetics, animal behavior, plant biology, computational, mathematical and theoretical ecology, and more. We provide funding to both Masters and PhD students and we only admit students when we are confident that funding will be available to cover their tuition fees, salary and health insurance throughout their course of study, provided the individual is making appropriate academic progress. Depending on the student, that funding would be provided through a fellowship, research assistantship or teaching assistantship. Graduate students in EEB typically apply to work with a particular advisor. Applicants should contact potential advisors well in advance of the January 1 application deadline to talk about research interests and opportunities. If interested but unsure about which advisors might be a good match for your interests, please contact the current chair of Graduate Admission in the department, Paul Armsworth (p.armsworth@utk.edu). More information about applying to EEB at UTK is at http://bit.ly/1qRm239. “Ward, Shelby” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:10
A Postdoctoral position in Landscape genomics and quantitative genetics for climate-change adapted grasslands available in France at INRA URP3F research unit POSITION DESCRIPTION. The INRA URP3F research unit is seeking for a post-doctoral researcher to contribute to a European research network project (GrassLandscape) aiming to discover genetic variability involved in the climatic adaptation of a grassland species (perennial ryegrass) at the scale of Europe. The main objective of this post-doctoral research will be to analyse SNP and phenotypic data released by the project in combination with environmental data (notably climatic data) extracted from fine-resolution databases in order to detect signal of selection (i.e. climate driven selection). Based on association models between genomic polymorphisms and environmental variations, the candidate will (i) map the spatial distribution of genomic markers linked to adaptive diversity in present climatic conditions and (ii) foresee possible shifts in the spatial range fitting these markers in the context of several climate change scenarios. Based on these results, he will define allelic profiles expected to provide climatic adaptation at regional scale over Europe under the foreseen future climatic conditions. The post-doctoral fellow is expected to have a background in population and landscape genomics and to have expertise in population genetics, statistics and ecology. An experience in mining large databases and in using Geographical Information Software would be appreciated. CONDITIONS. This post-doctoral position is offered in the frame of the AgreenSkills postdoctoral fellowship program. It is opened to young researchers having less than 7 years of postdoctoral research experience and having spent not more than 12 months in France within the last 3 years. The appointment is for a three years duration provisionally starting from September 1st 2015. Deadline for application is March 1st 2015 but it is advised to apply as soon as possible. Candidates eligible to the AgreenSkills programme benefit from attractive working conditions (gross monthly salary about €3500 for young researchers). The post-doctoral fellow will be hosted at the INRA URP3F research unit in Lusignan (France) where he will get direct support from the coordinator of the project GrassLandscape (Jean-Paul Sampoux). The fellow will also work in close collaboration with Pr. Stéphanie Manel (stays at her EPHE-BEV-CEFE lab in Montpellier, France). INRA URP3F has extensive experience in research aiming to improve services provided by grasslands. It combines skills in quantitative and population genetics, plant breeding and genetic resource conservation, plant eco-physiology and agronomy and it will thus offer a stimulating interdisciplinary environment to the fellow. EPHE–BEV-CEFE aims to better understand biological and ecological evolutionary processes in the evolutionary dynamics of populations facing heterogeneous environments in space and time (e.g. global change). It has internationally recognized skills in landscape genetics. HOW TO APPLY . Candidates can apply by sending a copy of their CV and a motivation letter to JP. Sampoux and S. Manel (jean-paul.sampoux@lusignan.inra.fr; Stephanie.manel@cefe.cnrs.fr) Stéphanie Manel Stephanie MANEL via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:52

The Kawahara Lab at the University of Florida, Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH) is seeking a postdoctoral fellow to develop a project using museum collection data to study bat-moth interactions. The proposed project will involve the candidate applying for the NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Biology (PRFB), Track 2. The Kawahara Lab is currently conducting a large scale, NSF-funded study to understand how bats and moths have engaged in an evolutionary arms race for over 50 million years. Moths have evolved many different defensive strategies, including ultrasonic ears, stridulating genitalia, wing morphology, and additional anti-predatory behaviors. The ideal candidate will develop an innovative, collaborative research program (funded by an NSF fellowship) that complements ongoing work in the Kawahara Lab. The ideal research program would capitalize on the strengths of the FLMNH Lepidoptera collection (one of the largest Lepidoptera collections in the world) a nd the phylogenomics expertise in the Kawahara Lab. The candidate should be a US citizen. The ideal candidate will have experience with museum collections, geometric morphometrics, and have an interest in using museum specimen data to link behavioral, morphological, and phylogenetic data. The Kawahara Lab includes 3 postdocs, 5 graduate students, 2 technicians, and numerous undergraduate and high school students. The FLMNH is located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. It is home to iDigBio and the FLMNH collections includes over 40 million specimens, including 5-10 million Lepidoptera specimens. For further information, contact Akito Kawahara at: kawahara@flmnh.ufl.edu Information on the PRFB can be found at: http://1.usa.gov/1qRjMcn via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:35
2nd Young Natural History scientists’ Meeting 2nd Circular 4th – 6th February 2015 Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Paris, France) The Bureau des Doctorants et Étudiants du Muséum (association for students and young researchers working at the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris), Doc’up (association for PhD students working at Université Pierre et Marie Curie) and Timarcha (association for young naturalists) are pleased to announce the opening of the registration and abstract submission to the second Young Natural History scientists’ Meeting hosted at the MNHN, Paris, France on February 4th-6th, 2015. We invite submissions for oral and poster presentations on this website on all aspects of natural history within four broad themes: - Biodiversity Dynamics and Conservation - Earth and Planetary Sciences - Mankind, Prehistory, Nature and Societies - Systematics, Evolution and Comparative Anatomy Submission deadline: 30th November More information can be found in the circular : http://bit.ly/1uCCMAD Please feel free to circulate to colleagues who may be interested in attending, and don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions about the meeting (assobdem@mnhn.fr). We look forward to meeting you in Paris! Kind regards, The BDEM, Doc’up and Timarcha Christie Le Coeur via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:18
Next talk: Matt Rasmussen, Counsyl Mathematical and visualization tools for working with ancestral recombination graphs Tuesday, December 16, 2014, 10:00 AM PST The fields of phylogenetics and population genetics share several important models including gene trees, species trees, ancestral recombination graphs (ARGs), and pedigrees. These models are all closely related and can be viewed as subgraphs of one another. Amongst them, the ARG is particularly central and if inferred efficiently can enable many applications such as inference of selection and demography. Here, I will review various helpful mathematical tools for working with ARGs, including what we call the threading algorithm, the branch graph, and the leaf trace visualization. For more details see http://bit.ly/16UKCta. Frederick “Erick” Matsen, Assistant Member Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center http://bit.ly/18kRSvK Erick Matsen via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:18
This is a molecular developmental biologist position, but researchers taking an evolutionary approach are invited to apply. *ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN MOLECULAR DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON * The Department of Biology at the University of Massachusetts Boston seeks applicants for a full-time tenure track Assistant Professor in Molecular Developmental Biology to begin in September 1, 2015. The successful applicant is expected to establish an externally funded research program, direct the research of students at the doctoral, masters and undergraduate levels, and interact with a dynamic group of cell signaling molecular biologists, geneticists and colleagues in the new Center for Personalized Cancer Therapy and the Developmental Science Research Center. Applicants must have a PhD and professional experience in molecular and developmental biology or related fields and preference will be given to individuals who have a record of external funding. Applications will be particularly welcome from candidates who utilize creative experimental approaches combining molecular, cellular and developmental biology, genetics and bioinformatics, including research in model systems. Excellence in teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels is expected. Application materials must be submitted online: http://bit.ly/1He084w Please include a statement of teaching and research interests and goals, *curriculum vitae*, and 3-5 representative reprints. Applicants should also include contact information for three references. For further information, visit the Biology Department website at http://bit.ly/19EnoGn, or contact Linda Huang, Chair of Search Committee, at linda.huang@umb.edu or Rick Kesseli, Chair of Biology at rick.kesseli@umb.edu. Review of applications will begin on December 29, 2014 and will continue until the position is filled. UMass Boston provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment. Doug Woodhams Doug Woodhams via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:59
A repeat of the course titled ‘ADVANCING IN R’ has been arranged for April 20th - 24th 2015 The content designed to bridge the gap between basic R coding and more advanced statistical modelling. The course is aimed at PhD students and post docs (although people at any stage of their career are welcome) with basic to moderate knowledge in R. It will be held at SCENE (Scottish Center for Ecology and the Natural Environment), Glasgow, United Kingdom. Course content is as follows and will be based on biological/ecological data… Module 1 Introduction & data visualization using (graphics) and (ggplot2) Module 2 Univariate regression, diagnostics & plotting fits Module 3 Adding additional continuous predictors (multiple regression); scaling & collinearity Module 4 Adding factorial (categorical) predictors & incorporating interactions (ANCOVA) Module 5 Model selection & simplification (likelihood ratio tests, AIC) Module 6 Mixed effects models in theory & practice Module 7 Generalised Linear Models (binomial and count data) Module 8 Nonlinear models (polynomial & mechanistic models) Module 9 Combining methods (e.g., nonlinear mixed effect (NLME) models & generalised linear mixed effect (GLMM) models) Module 10 One-on-one consultations/other advanced topics Cost is 385 for the 5 days including lunches and refreshments or 585 for an all inclusive option which includes the addition of accommodation, all meals and refreshments. There is also the possibility (depending on time) to have one on one sessions regarding your own data! For further details or questions please email oliverhooker@prstatistics.co.uk or visit http://bit.ly/1v1Pet4 Oliver Hooker PhD research student University of Glasgow +44 (0) 1360 870 510 +44 (0) 7966 500 340 o.hooker.1@research.gla.ac.uk Oliver Hooker via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:09
Dear colleagues, My co-authors and I are trying to survey which species of birds masturbate for a phylogenetic analysis. There is a pretty good literature on masturbation in mammals, but hardly anything on birds. As there are several theories about why masturbation has evolved, we would be extremely grateful if anyone who is very familiar with behaviour in a particular bird species would be willing to complete the following survey and send it back to me at: t.price@liverpool.ac.uk Many thanks, and sorry for the unusual request. Tom Price, University of Liverpool Questionnaire about masturbation in birds What we want to know: Please tell us about any bird species you have seen masturbate, or any species where you are reasonably confident you would have observed masturbation if it occurred regularly in that species. If you are expert in multiple species, it would be great if you would tell us about as many of them as you can, using multiple sheets if you want, or focus on the species you are most confident about. Feel free to answer N/A or “don’t know” to any of the questions below. The behaviour we are looking for: We define masturbation as a bird having sex with an inanimate object or their own body (e.g. beak). Birds typically masturbate by rubbing their cloaca against an inanimate object, often a rock, branch, or something in their cage. This may lead to ejaculation in males. Species of bird: Have you observed masturbation by a bird of this species (Y/N)? If not, how confident are you that you would have seen it if it occurred (very/fairly/not very/not confident)? If you did see masturbation in this species: What was the sex of the birds that masturbated (M/F/both)? Approximately how many individuals of this species have you seen masturbate? Were they in captivity (captive/wild)? Were they solitary (alone/with same sex/with opposite sex/with both sexes)? Were they hand reared (hand/parent)? Were they adult (juvenile/adult)? Do you consider the bird(s) to have been in good condition (good/bad)? Are there any other details you think we should know? Please forward your questionnaire or any questions to: Dr Tom Price: t.price@liverpool.ac.uk Tom Price Institute of Integrative Biology Biosciences Building, Crown Street University of Liverpool Liverpool L69 7ZB +44 151 795 4523 http://bit.ly/14D6GuD http://bit.ly/1xKSfyh “Price, Thomas” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:09
Systematics Research Fund – 2014/15 call for applications The Systematics Research Fund is a joint fund of the Linnean Society of London and the Systematics Association. It provides grants for small-scale research projects in the field of systematics. The 2014/2015 application round is now open. The deadline for applications is Friday 16th January 2015. The SRF typically supports fieldwork expenditure, the purchase of scientific equipment or expertise (e.g. buying time on analytical equipment), specimen preparation (including the cost of temporary technical assistance), and publication costs. However, the fund is unable to cover article processing charges. Projects of a more general or educational nature may also be considered, provided that they include a strong systematic component. The fund does not provide support for attendance at scientific meetings, student maintenance or tuition fees, nor for bench fees. Projects already substantially funded by other bodies may be disadvantaged. Successful projects are selected by a panel of systematists who represent a wide range of conceptual interests and taxonomic groups. The value of any single award will not exceed £1500. Please note that the applicant named on the application form must be a current member of the Linnean Society of London or the Systematics Association to be eligible for funding. For more information, please see: http://bit.ly/1iOmTgk Dr Mark Carine Plants Division, Department of Life Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road London SW7 5BD United Kingdom Tel: 020 7942 5541 Mark Carine via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:49
The Taylor Lab in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico is seeking a Senior Lab Tech in Microbial Ecology. The lab investigates fungal biodiversity and the evolutionary ecology of plant-microbe interactions, particularly mycorrhizae and biological nitrogen fixation, using field and molecular methods. This position will involve molecular analyses related to two recent NSF grants, one investigating climate-change related disruption of grass-endophyte interactions along elevational gradients in the Rocky Mountains, the second investigating the potential for associations with mycorrhizal fungi to underlie niche-partitioning in hyperdiverse epiphytic orchid communities of Costa Rican rainforest (see award IDs 1354972 and 1355155). For more information about the lab, please see taylorlabunm.weebly.com and borealfungi.uaf.edu. The senior technician will be involved in various aspects of laboratory management, including student mentoring. The main duties will be to push forward cutting-edge plant microbiome molecular analyses. A core duty will be the preparation of amplicon libraries for NGS sequencing. There may also be opportunities to participate in fieldwork in Costa Rica and Alaska. Leadership and success in bringing projects to fruition will be rewarded with numerous opportunities for authorship on scientific publications. A bachelors degree in biology, biochemistry, microbiology or related field is required, an MS is preferred. Experience beyond the classroom with standard microbiological and molecular methods including DNA extraction, PCR and sequencing is essential. Skills in more advanced methods, especially NGS methods such as RADseq, RNAseq, or anchored-hybrid-enrichment-sequencing are desirable. Strong organizational skills and basic data management experience are also essential, while scripting/programming skills (e.g. linux system administration, Perl, PHP, python) would be a major plus. For additional information and to apply for the position, please follow this link: http://bit.ly/1uCfsCX Applications should include a cover letter, resume, unofficial transcripts and contact information for at least three references. Start date is flexible and position is open until filled; for best consideration, applications should be received before December 15th. The University of New Mexico is the flagship university in the state with 36,000 students and 40 PhD programs. Interactions with Los Alamos and Sandia National Labs contribute to a vigorous research climate. The main UNM campus is located in Albuquerque, a city of ~800,000 situated on the Rio Grande River at 5000 feet in elevation. Days are sunny and warm while nights are cool. At the transition between the Sonoran Desert and the Great Plains Grasslands and surrounded by mountains, Albuquerque is ideally situated for both cultural and outdoor explorations. The 10,000 foot Sandia Crest is only a 40 minute drive, while the epicurean, cultural and artistic delights of Santa Fe are only an hour away. Numerous other attractions may be found in all directions, such as Chaco Canyon, Bandolier National Park, White Sands National Monument, and many mountain ranges and ski resorts. If you have questions about the position, please email Lee Taylor at fflt@unm.edu. Donald Lee Taylor via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

November 17, 2014

22:00
What are the limits of adaptation? What determines long-term evolutionary rates? How predictable is evolution? The field of experimental evolution has grown tremendously over the last decade. This growth reflects both a greater appreciation of the power of experimental evolution for testing evolutionary hypotheses and, especially recently, the new power of genomic methods for analyzing changes in experimentally evolved lineages. But most experiments are fairly short, typically lasting only a few tens or hundreds of generations in plants/animals or microbes, respectively. Long-term evolution experiments are still rare, but are crucial in gaining a better understanding of evolutionary processes and outcomes, and in answering some of the most important basic and applied questions in biology. This catalysis meeting will bring together leading researchers in experimental evolution, population genetics, molecular evolution, theory and many other fields to develop a roadmap for the future of long-term evolution experiments. The meeting’s aims are: (i) To identify the most important biological questions that can be addressed using long-term evolution experiments; (ii) To synthesise information on existing long-term evolution experiments that were both intentional (e.g. lab-based) and unintentional (e.g. disease outbreaks, the pet trade, stock centres, and industrial processes); (iii) To identify opportunities to answer existing questions with existing data and/or experiments; (iv) To plan new long-term evolution experiments in a variety of systems; This meeting will establish an international network of collaborating labs that will result in new research directions, new training opportunities, and a grand vision for the future of long-term evolution experiments.
Source: NESCent
18:52

Erick Matsen wrote:

The next series on http://phyloseminar.org will be about ancestral recombination graphs.

What would people like to see after that?

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

01:51
—Apple-Mail=_43377C84-9CC6-4CC1-88B8-7794CEB0A618 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8 ESEB 2015 SYMPOSIUM ON SPECIATION GENOMICS Dear colleagues, We are pleased to invite you to attend/contribute to the symposium CHARTING THE GENOMIC LANDSCAPE OF SPECIATION which will be held at the 15th Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) in Lausanne, Switzerland, 10th - 14th August 2015. We welcome contributions from both empiricists and theorists interested in understanding genomic patterns of speciation. INVITED SPEAKERS - Nicolas Bierne (Institut de Sciences de l’Evolution-Montpellier, France) - Mohamed Noor (Duke University, USA) ORGANIZERS - Anja Westram (Sheffield, UK) - Mark Ravinet (NIG, Japan) - Juan Galindo (Vigo, Spain) - Rui Faria (Porto, Portugal) NB: Although only two organisers are officially listed, the idea for the symposium was conceived by a group of four people who are all contributing to its organisation. WEBSITE (Symposium No. 34) http://bit.ly/1AEbj5O DESCRIPTION: Understanding how speciation with gene flow works at the genomic level is currently a major focus of speciation biology. Genome scans between diverging populations have become widespread, demonstrating that the extent of differentiation can be quite variable across the genome. Highly differentiated regions are often interpreted as resulting from divergent selection, therefore playing an important role in speciation. This view is prominently expressed in the striking metaphor of ‘speciation islands’. Yet some debate remains. Is differentiation generated by divergent natural selection acting as a barrier to otherwise homogenising gene flow? Or by recombination rate variation and/or intrinsic incompatibilities? Might differentiation occur when gene flow ceases and local adaptation increases the rate of lineage sorting in some parts of the genome but not others? And what genomic features affect homogenising gene flow? Being able to distinguish these alternative explanations i s fundamental for understanding the genomic basis of speciation with gene flow. This symposium will explore this debate, bringing together empirical evidence from different perspectives and focusing on emerging approaches for identifying the processes that cause the rugged landscape of genomic differentiation. DETAILS: Registration for ESEB 2015 and abstract submission for all symposiums is now available at: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbW . Please be aware the deadline for submitting abstracts for both talk and posters is 10th January 2015. Please be sure to state your preference for a talk or poster when submitting your abstract. All four organisers will evaluate the submissions and we hope to finalise our selections by early March. When selecting presentations, we aim to take into account gender balance. If you have any further questions, don’t hesitate to contact us (mravinet@nig.ac.jp ; a.westram@sheffield.ac.uk ) We look forward to reading your abstracts and discussing speciation with you at ESEB 2015! Mark, Anja, Juan and Rui —Apple-Mail=_43377C84-9CC6-4CC1-88B8-7794CEB0A618 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8 ESEB 2015 SYMPOSIUM ON SPECIATION GENOMICS
Dear colleagues,
We are pleased to invite you to attend/contribute to the symposium CHARTING THE GENOMIC LANDSCAPE OF SPECIATION which will be held at the 15th Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) in Lausanne, Switzerland, 10th - 14th August 2015. We welcome contributions from both empiricists and theorists interested in understanding genomic patterns of speciation.
INVITED SPEAKERS- Nicolas Bierne (Institut de Sciences de l’Evolution-Montpellier, France)- Mohamed Noor (Duke University, USA)
ORGANIZERS- Anja Westram (Sheffield, UK)- Mark Ravinet (NIG, Japan)- Juan Galindo (Vigo, Spain) - Rui Faria (Porto, Portugal)
NB: Although only two organisers are officially listed, the idea for the symposium was conceived by a group of four people who are all contributing to its organisation.
WEBSITE (Symposium No. 34)http://bit.ly/1AEbj5O
DESCRIPTION:
Understanding how speciation with gene flow wor ks at the genomic level is currently a major focus of speciation biology. Genome scans between diverging populations have become widespread, demonstrating that the extent of differentiation can be quite variable across the genome. Highly differentiated regions are often interpreted as resulting from divergent selection, therefore playing an important role in speciation. This view is prominently expressed in the striking metaphor of ‘speciation islands’. Yet some debate remains. Is differentiation generated by divergent natural selection acting as a barrier to otherwise homogenising gene flow? Or by recombination rate variation and/or intrinsic incompatibilities? Might differentiation occur when gene flow ceases and local adaptation increases the rate of lineage sorting in some parts of the genome but not others? And what genomic features affect homogenising gene flow? Being able to distinguish these alternative explanations is fundamental for understanding the genomic basis of speciation with gene flow. This symposium will explore this debate, bringing together empirical evidence from different perspectives and focusing on emerging approaches for identifying the processes that cause the rugged landscape of genomic differentiation. 
DETAILS:
Registration for ESEB 2015 and abstract submission for all symposiums is now available at: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbW
Please be aware the deadline for submitting abstracts for both talk and posters is 10th January 2015. Please be sure to state your preference for a talk or poster when submitting your abstract. All four organisers will evaluate the submissions and we hope to finalise our selections by early Marc h. When selecting presentations, we aim to take into account gender balance. 
If you have any further questions, don’t hesitate to contact us (mravinet@nig.ac.jpa.westram@sheffield.ac.uk)
We look forward to reading your abstracts and discussing speciation with you at ESEB 2015!
Mark, Anja, Juan and Rui —Apple-Mail=_43377C84-9CC6-4CC1-88B8-7794CEB0A61 via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:14
—Apple-Mail=_AF3DE699-850E-4B71-A123-637E71E7E8E7 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8 Dear Dr Golding, I would be very grateful if you could re-post this advert for a RA on evoldir. Best wishes, Richard Merrill Internship to study sexual conflict and diversification in Neotropical butterflies. We are seeking a research intern to work at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama from February/March 2015 for a period of approximately 6 months. The project is a collaboration between STRI and the University of Cambridge, UK. The internship will assist with experiments exploring the potential role of sexual conflict in driving warning pattern divergence in Heliconius butterflies (for more information please see http://bit.ly/18EOGKU and http://bit.ly/13gZCQc ). The intern will join a vibrant community of scientists studying the origins and maintenance of tropical diversity (see http://bit.ly/1k9tggc ). The project is based in Gamboa (central Panama) and the intern will be responsible for experiments looking at female-specific costs associated with warning colour patterns. In addition, the intern will assist with ongoing projects looking at behaviours that reduce gene-flow across the species barrier. This will involve breeding butterflies, assisting with crossing experiments and conducting behavioural assays. Applicants must be able to work independently and be committed to spending considerable time in Panama. A knowledge of Spanish and the ability to drive would be useful but not essential. A stipend of US$800/month will be provided to cover accommodation and living costs in Panama . Please send applications, or further questions, to Richard Merrill (r.merrill@zoo.cam.ac.uk ) with a CV and the names and contact details of two referees. Please use the subject header: “STRI RESEARCH ASSISTANT” before 7th December 2014. via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:57

Dear colleagues, It is my pleasure to announce that the SMBE satellite meeting “Investigating biological adaptation with NGS: data and models” is going to take place at the Hameau de l’toile, which is a conference center close to Montpellier (South of France). More details about the meeting are available online: http://bit.ly/1sXmWf7 The deadline for pre-registration is December 17, 2014. Michael BLUM (University of Grenoble) via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:57

Postdoctoral Fellow in Statistical and Computational Genomics at University of Chicago Applications are invited for postdoctoral researchers to join Dr. Xin He’s group at Department of Human Genetics of University of Chicago. The research in our lab focuses on developing and employing computational/statistical tools to identify genes and regulatory elements involved in complex diseases and to understand the mechanisms of their functions. We take highly integrative approaches combining whole exome/genome sequencing data, expression and epigenomic data, and gene networks. For more information of our research, please visit: http://xinhelab.org. Some potential projects include: (1) Statistical methods for mapping disease genes from whole genome sequencing data, incorporating biological annotations of both coding and non-coding sequences. (2) Identification of transcriptional regulatory networks underlying human diseases. (3) Analysis and utilization of systems genetic data, such as expression or DNA methylation QTL, in the context of studying diseases. The applicant(s) is expected to hold a doctoral degree in a related field, such as computational biology/bioinformatics, population and statistical genetics, (bio)statistics or computer science. Candidates with a degree in biological sciences are also encouraged to apply if they have demonstrated experience in computational or statistical work. The start date for this position is flexible and the salary will be competitive. Please send your CV and a list of three references to xinhe@uchicago.edu. Candidates are welcome to include one or two of their best published or preprint manuscript(s). xinhe2@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
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Applications are invited for two PhD studentships eligible for NERC funding: (1) Evolutionary rescue in the face of climate change? Testing for local adaptation at the southern range margins of European butterflies (Supervisors; Dr Jon Bridle, University of Bristol, Dr Rob Wilson, University of Exeter) (2) The role of habitat heterogeneity in climate-proofing conservation: integrating effects of microclimate on population dynamics and local adaptation (Supervisors: Dr Rob Wilson, University of Exeter, Dr Jon Bridle, University of Bristol) Please see: http://bit.ly/18aRVQe and http://bit.ly/11ignMC and below for more details of these projects, and the application procedure. These studentships will be competitively awarded, and fully funded, and are open to all EU applicants. However, funding for living costs as well as tuition fees is only available for UK students. The deadline for applications is 15th January 2015. Please contact Jon Bridle (jon.bridle@bristol.ac.uk) or Rob Wilson (R.J.Wilson@exeter.ac.uk) in the first instance for informal discussion. (1) Evolutionary rescue in the face of climate change? Testing for local adaptation at the southern range margins of European butterflies We are looking for a highly-motivated student to test the ecological effects of climate change on butterfly communities, and the role of evolution in increasing their resilience. Profound effects on ecosystem function are predicted as climate change generates rapid shifts in species geographical distributions. Many organisms have already contracted their ranges at equatorial margins to higher altitudes, and expanded their ranges as their poleward margins become increasingly habitable. However, these responses seem limited by rates of evolution. Although most generalist species have shifted their ranges, most specialist species remain trapped in increasingly fragmented habitats, apparently because they cannot adapt to local conditions at their ecological margins. Defining critical levels of environmental change therefore depends on understanding how easily (and how quickly) evolutionary rescue can occur at ecological margins. This project will explore evolution in European butterflies at their southern (contacting) margins in comparison to that observed at their northern (expanding) margins. Adaptive divergence may be easier at contracting margins because population sizes are initially high, making genetic variation locally available. By contrast, at expanding margins evolution may require the spread of novel mutations from distant populations, or may cause the rapid loss of adaptive variation. You will: (i) conduct butterfly and host plant surveys in central Spain, and comparing their thermal niches to our previous data; (ii) Use population genomics to test for local adaptation at contracting range margins in comparison to those involved in poleward expansions; (iii) conduct field transplant experiments to test for adaptive divergence in maternal behaviour and larval survival and and by testing larval growth rate at different altitudes. You will be based at the University of Bristol, with periods at the University of Exeter, and two field seasons in Madrid. You will receive expert training in population ecology and genomics, spatial ecology, and the application of evolutionary theory to conservation policy. (2) The role of habitat heterogeneity in climate-proofing conservation: integrating effects of microclimate on population dynamics and local adaptation There is an urgent need to understand and predict where species will persist under climate change. Conventional bioclimate models neglect the capacity of local variation in habitat (topography and vegetation structure) to drive the regional dynamics and distributions of species through their effects on local adaptation and population dynamics. This project will combine empirical databases and modelling with field and experimental work to test the importance of habitat heterogeneity for the conservation of an exemplar system, butterfly species breeding in fragmented habitats in Britain. You will: (i) Use remotely-sensed and ground-truthed vegetation information combined with fine-resolution microclimate models to develop composite maps of habitat and microclimate for the Brown Argus and Silver-studded blue butterflies in South-West England; (ii) Analyse existing population monitoring databases to test effects of modelled spatial and temporal variation in habitat and microclimate on the population dynamics of these species for the past three decades; (iii) Carry out field sampling of egg-laying sites to detect the effects of habitat heterogeneity on local ecological specialisation, and genome scans combined with association-based (Isolation-By-Adaptation) statistical approaches to identify signatures of evolutionary change. The ultimate aim will be to combine the information on habitat, population dynamics and local adaptation to model metapopulation dynamics for each species in the region under scenarios of regional climate change, and thus to identify priority sites, habitat types, or landscapes for conservation. You will be based at the University of Exeter, with periods at the University of Bristol and the NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology in Wallingford, as well as two field seasons in South-West England. You will receive expert training in population ecology and genomics, spatial ecology, and the application of evolutionary theory to conservation policy. Dr Jon Bridle School of Biological Sciences Room 2A03, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, BS8 1TQ Tel. (+44) 117 394 1174 (x41174) jon.bridle@bristol.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1vgSqn7 Jon Bridle via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR