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January 26, 2015

16:25

Erick Matsen wrote:

This paper appeared in a journal I don't commonly read, so I wanted to highlight it. The ideas are not new (as they acknowledge) but it's a good reminder that we should be fighting model mis-specification on all fronts. Comments, anyone?

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Correcting for sequencing error in maximum likelihood phylogeny inference. MK Kuhner and J McGill, G3 (Bethesda, Md.), 2014

Accurate phylogenies are critical to taxonomy as well as studies of speciation processes and other evolutionary patterns. Accurate branch lengths in phylogenies are critical for dating and rate measurements. Such accuracy may be jeopardized by unacknowledged sequencing error. We use simulated data to test a correction for DNA sequencing error in maximum likelihood phylogeny inference. Over a wide range of data polymorphism and true error rate, we found that correcting for sequencing error improves recovery of the branch lengths, even if the assumed error rate is up to twice the true error rate. Low error rates have little effect on recovery of the topology. When error is high, correction improves topological inference; however, when error is extremely high, using an assumed error rate greater than the true error rate leads to poor recovery of both topology and branch lengths. The error correction approach tested here was proposed in 2004 but has not been widely used, perhaps because researchers do not want to commit to an estimate of the error rate. This study shows that correction with an approximate error rate is generally preferable to ignoring the issue.

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January 25, 2015

23:18

Newcastle University is looking for excellent applicants for PhD projects funded through the NERC funded Doctoral Training Partnership IAPETUS. Two Evolutionary Genetics projects are available: Living on the edge: can adaptation at the edge of a species range accommodate rapid climatic change in a long-lived species? http://bit.ly/1yeaYCC Mating system evolution in a grassland species: self-compatibility and male sterility http://bit.ly/15BSUJc These two studentships are part of the NERC funded Doctoral Training Partnership IAPETUS. This has 12-16 PhD studentships available, with competition between a large number of projects. For full details of requirements and details how to apply: http://bit.ly/1yeaVGI Please note that IAPETUS is only able to consider applications from Home/European Union candidates. International (non-EU) candidates are not eligible to be considered. Also, a candidate from another EU country who has not been resident in the UK for 3 years or more prior to the commencement of their studies with IAPETUS, will only be eligible for a fees-only studentship Interested students are advised to apply early, the ultimate application deadline is 2nd February 2015. For further information on the two projects mentioned above: Dr Kirsten Wolff Reader in Evolutionary Genetics Newcastle University, School of Biology Devonshire Building 5th floor Newcastle NE1 7RU, UK Phone: 0191 208 4852 email: kirsten.wolff@ncl.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1bUMlfX kirsten.wolff@newcastle.ac.uk via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
16:30

It might be nice to live in a world where the mere fact that you are male or female does not attract attention to you within your profession. But while we are waiting for that day, you might like to ask yourself about women in systematics. David Archibald suggests that the tree produced by Anna Maria Redfield is "the first tree – creationist or evolutionary – by a woman and may well be the only such tree by a woman until well into the twentieth century."


Anna Maria Redfield (1800-1888, née Treadwell) is described in these terms by Michon Scott's Strange Science web site:
Born at the dawn of the 19th century, Anna Maria Redfield earned the equivalent of a master's degree from the first U.S. institution of higher learning devoted to female students: Ingham University, and became perhaps the first woman to design a tree-like diagram of animal life. Although tree-like, her diagram didn't show common ancestry but instead showed the "embranchements" established by Georges Cuvier: vertebrates, arthropods, mollusks, and "radiata" (today classified as cnidarian and echinoderm phyla). To be fair, this diagram was published before Darwin's Origin of Species but later editions of her work made no mention of evolution either. Instead, she wrote about our simian cousins, "The teeth, bones and muscles of the monkey decisively forbid the conclusion that he could by any ordinary natural process, ever be expanded into a Man." Still, her elegant work is great fun to behold even now.The tree-like diagram (shown in miniature above) was a wall chart (1.56 x 1.56 m) called A General View of the Animal Kingdom, published in 1857 by E.B. and E.C. Kellogg, New York. It is heavily illustrated with images of the taxa, their names, and brief notes: eg. "Man alone can articulate sounds, and is capable of improving his faculties or advancing his condition". Only three lithograph copies of the original tree are now known, one of which was sold at auction by Christie's in 2005 for £7,200.

The following year the same publishers produced a companion volume to the chart, called Zoölogical Science, or Nature in Living Forms: Adapted to Elucidate the Chart of the Animal Kingdom, and designed for the higher seminaries, common schools, libraries, and the family circle (1858, reprinted 1860, 1865, 1874). A copy is available in the Biodiversity Heritage Library. Only 57 original copies of the book are now known.

This book of 743 pages is richly illustrated, the artist being unacknowledged in the first edition but credited as E.D. Maltbie from then on. (He is presumably responsible for the chart as well.) The book has the frontispiece shown below, which is an edited version of the base of the tree.


Redfield and her chart have recently been discussed by Susan Butts (2011. Conservation of the Anna Maria Redfield wall chart: A General View of the Animal Kingdom. Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections Newsletter 25(1): 18-19). She notes:
The wall chart is a masterpiece, with intricate and accurate illustrations of representatives of the animal kingdom portrayed as a Tree of Life, which illuminates the relationships of the major groups of organisms. It is an important document in the study of biology and in the pioneering work of women in science. The wall chart has eloquent phrases, which express a Victorian humanistic view of nature (often intermingled with anthropomorphism, biblical overtones, and the biological superiority of humans).Redfield's views on evolution are clear from her book, indicating that the relationships shown represent affinity not evolution:
There is no evidence whatever that one species has succeeded, or been the result of transmutation of a former species.Butts notes that unfortunately Redfield "remains a relatively minor and poorly recorded figure in the history of women in science, let alone biological and evolution studies in general."

00:23

Applications for the PLANTS program are now open and due by March 1, 2015. This program will fund up to 12 US undergrads to attend the Botany 2015 meeting of the Botanical Society of America and affiliated societies July 25 - 29, 2015 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Meeting topics range across all levels of botany, including ecology, conservation, biodiversity, plant genomics, evolution, plant systematics, and botanical education. Peer mentors and senior mentors work with PLANTS students and attend talks with them, introduce them to colleagues, and generally make the meetings a welcoming place for them. There are also a number of social functions and career-oriented activities, specifically targeted at students for networking and fun. The meetings are a great way to understand the breadth of botanical research and education, to meet undergraduate and graduate students with similar interests, and to network with professionals in your area of interest. The program covers the normal costs of travel, registration, and food and accommodation at the meeting. An overview of the scientific conference will be available at http://bit.ly/1mb9hms APPLICATIONS DUE BY MARCH 1, 2015: Applications (http://bit.ly/1yfFs41) are open and due by March 1, 2015 and include your statement of interest, a letter of recommendation, and unofficial transcripts. Applications are welcome from all undergraduates who have interest in plant science; the admissions goal is to create a diverse pool of students attending the meetings. For questions, please contact the organizers Heather Cacanindin (HCacanindin@Botany.org) , Ann Sakai (aksakai@uci.edu), or Ann Hirsch (ahirsch@ucla.edu). aksakai@uci.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:05
One Postdoctoral Position in Single-Cell Genomics/Transcriptomics - University of Ottawa The Corradi Lab is currently seeking a postdoctoral fellow to work on a research project involving Single-Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics. The research will be supervised by Dr. Nicolas Corradi and carried out in a CIFAR (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) - affiliated laboratory located in the Department of Biology of the University of Ottawa, Canada. The position is funded for two years. The candidate will contribute to the funded NSF proposal ZygoLife (http://bit.ly/1C03uHA). The Postdoctoral Fellow will be using Single-Cell Transcriptomics and Genomics tools as a mean to gather first-hand, large-scale sequence data from several poorly studied species of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF). The resulting data will be analysed using bioinformatics tools, and compared to similar data obtained from other fungal lineages by collaborators within the Zygolife project to better understand the biology of these essential plant symbionts. Specific enquiries about the project can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca). Applicants are expected to have some background in Comparative Genomics or Molecular Mycology. Preference will be given to candidate with former experience in one or more of the following areas: AMF cultivation, AMF Taxonomy, Phylogenetics, Population Genetics, Environmental Genomics, Metagenomics. A complete application package includes a CV, a short description of past research accomplishments and future goals, and the names and e-mail addresses of at least 2 references. Evaluation of applications starts immediately and will continue until a suitable candidate is found. The University of Ottawa is a large, research-intensive university, hosting over 40.000 students and located in the downtown core area of Canada’s capital city (http://bit.ly/OBmsOT). Ottawa is a vibrant, multicultural city with a very high quality of life (http://bit.ly/1dxMqIo) Applications can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca). Representative publications: - Riley R. et al. 2014. Extreme Diversification of the MATA-HMG Gene Family in the Plant - Associated Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi. New Phytologist. 201: 254-268 - James T.Y et al. 2013. Shared signatures of parasitism and phylogenomics unite the Cryptomycota and Microsporidia. Current Biology. 23 (16), 1548-1553 - Tisserant E. et al. The arbuscular mycorrhizal Glomus genome provides insights into the evolution of the oldest plant symbiosis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - USA. 110 (50), 20117-20122R576-R577 - Pombert J.F. et al. 2012. Gain and loss of multiple functionally- related horizontally transferred genes in the reduced genomes of two microsporidian parasites. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - USA 109(31):12638-43 - Selman M. et al. 2011. Acquisition of an animal gene by two microsporidia. 2011. Current Biology 21: R576-R577 Nicolas Corradi Professeur Agrg / Associate Professor Boursier de l’Institut canadien en recherches avances / Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Universit d’Ottawa / University of Ottawa Dpartement de biologie / Department of Biology Pavillon Gendron / Gendron Hall Bureau 257 / Room 257 30 Marie Curie Priv. Ottawa ON Canada K1N 6N5 Tel. +1 (613) 5625800 # 6563 Website:http://bit.ly/OBmsOV Nicolas Corradi via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

January 24, 2015

23:21

*Funding of up to 43k is available to run symposia with slots available from 2017 onwards. Application deadline is 28th February 2015.* If you are interested in organising a New Phytologist Symposium, please complete the proposal pro forma ( http://bit.ly/1BpfpvW ) and email this to the Managing Editor (np-managinged@lancaster.ac.uk) by the end of February. Feel free to get in touch with any queries or for guidance on completing the proposal. The internationally renowned series of New Phytologist Symposia (NPS) aim to support emerging and key areas of research. Usually these meetings would be expected to extend over one to three days, with invited speakers and a maximum of 120 delegates. In this way we hope to provide an informal atmosphere for the stimulation and exchange of ideas and the building of collaborations. We particularly encourage the involvement of early career scientists and as such a number of travel grants will be awarded in association with each meeting. Information about past and upcoming symposia can be found here: http://bit.ly/1fDLmnd We also welcome workshop proposals throughout the year and we can support workshops scheduled from 2016 onwards. To submit a proposal for a workshop download and complete the proposal pro forma ( http://bit.ly/1BpfrUy ) and email this to the Managing Editor (np-managinged@lancaster.ac.uk). Further details can be found on the website: http://bit.ly/LvfkSc or feel free to get in touch with any queries. New Phytologist Workshops aim to facilitate advances in plant science by bringing together a small number of scientists (up to 20) who wish to focus and brainstorm a particular topic or issue. The format is intentionally flexible to suit a range of projects, but this might, for example, include a working group that intends to focus on analysing new data or indeed analysing old data in the light of new techniques and planning the way forward. Awards are usually in the region of 5-10k. Dr MICHAEL PANAGOPULOS Development Coordinator, New Phytologist New Phytologist Central Office, Bailrigg House, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YE, UK Tel: + 44 1524 592839 Fax: + 44 1524 594696 Email: m.panagopulos@lancaster.ac.uk Website: http://bit.ly/1fol1vD Twitter: @NewPhyt Facebook: http://bit.ly/LvfmcO The New Phytologist Trust, registered charity number 1154867 2013 Impact factor 6.545 New Phytologist Symposia 2015 Genomes of forest trees (Boston, USA) // Plant-microbe interactions (Munich, Germany) m.panagopulos@lancaster.ac.uk via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
16:32

Erick Matsen wrote:

MCEB - Mathematical and Computational Evolutionary Biology 21-25 June 2015 - Porquerolles Island, South of France.

Webpage: http://www.lirmm.fr/mceb2015/

Pre-registration deadline: February 10th Notification to applicants: February 28th Final list of attendees: April 1st

Scope: Mathematical and computational tools and concepts form an essential basis for modern evolutionary studies. The goal of the MCEB conference (at its 7th edition) is to bring together scientists with diverse backgrounds to present recent advances and discuss open problems in the field of mathematical and computational evolutionary biology. The theme of this year?s edition will be new data, new questions, new methods. New generation sequencing techniques have multiplied not just the amount, but also the types of genetic data produced, giving rise to new questions, and new methodologies to answer them. These methodologies are often cross-disciplinary, with applications to diverse research topics. General concepts, models, methods and algorithms will also be presented and discussed, just as during the previous conference editions.

Where and when: Porquerolles Island, near Hy?res, in the South of France, 21-25 June 2015.

Cost: Conference fees including accommodation for four nights, meals, coffee breaks, etc., will be between 300? and 630?, all inclusive, and will vary depending on the room. PhD students and postdocs will benefit of the cheapest rooms.

Keynote speakers:

David Bryant - http://www.maths.otago.ac.nz/~dbryant/ University of Otago, NZ Recovering phylogeny and demographics from SNPs: prospects and limitations

Jukka Corander - http://www.helsinki.fi/bsg/ Bayesian Statistics Group, University of Helsinki, FI ABC meets machine learning - fitting intractable models to genome data

Asger Hobolth - http://www.daimi.au.dk/~asger/ Bioinformatics Research Center (BiRC), Aarhus University, DK Modelling DNA sequence evolution within and between species

Philippe Lemey https://rega.kuleuven.be/cev/ecv/lab-members/PhilippeLemey.html Rega Institute, Clinical and Epidemiological Virology, BE Data integrating in viral evolutionary inference: from spatial dynamics to trait evolution

Bernard Moret - http://lcbb.epfl.ch/ Laboratory for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, EPFL, CH Phylogenetic Transfer of Knowledge

Ludovic Orlando - http://geogenetics.ku.dk/research_groups/palaeomix_group/ Center for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, DK Ancient DNA: from very old molecules to genomes and epigenomes

Molly Przeworski - http://przeworski.c2b2.columbia.edu/ Columbia University, New york, USA A population-genetic approach to the study of mutation and recombination in humans

For more information, visit the website at: http://www.lirmm.fr/mceb2015/

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04:26

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Source: EVOLDIR
04:05
NEW UPDATED ANNOUCEMENT MCEB - Mathematical and Computational Evolutionary Biology 21-25 June 2015 - Porquerolles Island, South of France. Webpage: http://bit.ly/1vWShF3 Pre-registration deadline: February 10th Notification to applicants: February 28th Final list of attendees: April 1st Scope: Mathematical and computational tools and concepts form an essential basis for modern evolutionary studies. The goal of the MCEB conference (at its 7th edition) is to bring together scientists with diverse backgrounds to present recent advances and discuss open problems in the field of mathematical and computational evolutionary biology. The theme of this year’s edition will be new data, new questions, new methods. New generation sequencing techniques have multiplied not just the amount, but also the types of genetic data produced, giving rise to new questions, and new methodologies to answer them. These methodologies are often cross-disciplinary, with applications to diverse research topics. General concepts, models, methods and algorithms will also be presented and discussed, just as during the previous conference editions. Where and when: Porquerolles Island, near Hyères, in the South of France, 21-25 June 2015. Cost: Conference fees including accommodation for four nights, meals, coffee breaks, etc., will be between 300€ and 630€, all inclusive, and will vary depending on the room. PhD students and postdocs will benefit of the cheapest rooms. Keynote speakers: David Bryant - http://bit.ly/1rBOy9k University of Otago, NZ Recovering phylogeny and demographics from SNPs: prospects and limitations Jukka Corander - http://bit.ly/1vWShF5 Bayesian Statistics Group, University of Helsinki, FI ABC meets machine learning - fitting intractable models to genome data Asger Hobolth - http://bit.ly/1rBOy9m Bioinformatics Research Center (BiRC), Aarhus University, DK Modelling DNA sequence evolution within and between species Philippe Lemey http://bit.ly/1vWSg45 Rega Institute, Clinical and Epidemiological Virology, BE Data integrating in viral evolutionary inference: from spatial dynamics to trait evolution Bernard Moret - http://lcbb.epfl.ch/ Laboratory for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, EPFL, CH Phylogenetic Transfer of Knowledge Ludovic Orlando - http://bit.ly/1qXj1Qw Center for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, DK Ancient DNA: from very old molecules to genomes and epigenomes Molly Przeworski - http://bit.ly/1nuHCrk Columbia University, New york, USA A population-genetic approach to the study of mutation and recombination in humans For more information, visit the website at: http://bit.ly/1vWShF3 Please forward this announcement. Olivier Gascuel via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
04:05

Ph.D. position in coevolutionary biology at the University of Idaho The Nuismer and Joyce labs at the University of Idaho are actively recruiting a Ph.D. student interested in developing novel statistical approaches for estimating the strength of coevolutionary selection within natural populations. Our overall goal is to develop Bayesian statistical tools that allow key parameters of existing coevolutionary models to be estimated using widely available data drawn from studies of phenotype matching and local adaptation. Through collaboration with Dr. Butch Brodie (University of Virginia), opportunities exist for developing and testing these new statistical tools using data on the well-studied interactions between toxic newts and their garter snake predators. Substantial scope exists for student driven innovation and extension to other types of data. Applicants with a strong background in mathematics, statistics, and computation are encouraged to apply. However, applications from students with a strong background in evolutionary biology or ecology who have a keen interest in learning to develop mathematical, statistical, and computational tools are also encouraged. Depending on the successful applicant’s background and primary interests, graduate work will take place in the Department of Biology (http://bit.ly/1fiSfvP), the Graduate Program in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (http://bit.ly/1fiSfvR), the Department of Mathematics (http://bit.ly/1r8AmKp), or the Department of Statistics (http://bit.ly/11SU7cI). We anticipate that funding will be primarily through a research assistantship, beginning in fall, 2015. To apply, please send an email describing your background and interests to Dr. Scott Nuismer (snuismer@uidaho.edu) or Dr. Paul Joyce (joyce@uidaho.edu). via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:44

Ten Early Career Research Fellowships in the Science Directorate at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew are now open for applications. Fellowships are available in the following departments: Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology Biodiversity Informatics and Spatial Analysis Identification and Naming Natural Capital Conservation Science Collections Details of these and other open positions in science at Kew are available at http://bit.ly/1yOyFDt. The deadline for applications is 15 February 2015. W.Baker@kew.org via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:25

Twenty nine positions in the Science Directorate at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew are now open for applications. Positions include: - Ten early career research fellowships - Research leader posts in the fields of taxonomy, systematics, evolution, nomenclature, eTaxonomy, collections, conservation, natural capital and plant health - Informatics positions - Technical, curatorial, policy and support roles The positions are listed below - see http://bit.ly/1yOyFDt for more details. The deadline for applications is 15 February 2015. Please circulate this information to interested colleagues. Research positions: Early Career Research Fellowship (10 positions available) Senior Research Leader - Plant Health Research Leader - Conservation Genetics Research Leader - Crop Plants Research Leader - Digital Collections Research Leader - Identification and Naming (Americas) Research Leader - Integrated Monography Research Leader - Plant & Fungal Names & eTaxonomy Senior Biodiversity Informatician Biodiversity Informatician Lead Developer - Drupal Technical positions: Senior Science Officer - Policy Imaging/EM Lab Technician Molecular Lab Technician Seed Germination Assistant Digital Collections Assistant Lab-based Collections Assistant Support positions: Science Administrator - Communications Support Officer to the Millennium Seed Bank Support Officer to the Senior Science Team W.Baker@kew.org via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:25

Research Faculty Positions (iGEM@Temple) Multiple multi-year research faculty positions (non tenure-track) are available in the Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine (iGEM) at Temple University in Philadelphia, USA. We are interested in early and mid-career scientists who integrate concepts, methods, and tools from evolutionary biology to address significant questions in biomedicine and phylogenomics. Successful candidates will have a primary focus on one or more of the following: large scale analytics of sequence and expression data, and development of methods and computational tools. They will be core faculty of iGEM @ Temple and one of the academic departments (e.g., Biology or Computer Science). They will work closely with and benefit from our expertise in molecular evolution, population genetics, phylogenomics, phylomedicine, and computational biology. Applicants should submit their detailed curriculum vitae and a summary of current and future research interests by e-mail to igem@temple.edu (send a single PDF file). Successful candidates will be provided for salary support for an initial period and they will work closely with one or more of the current or future tenured faculty in iGEM (http://bit.ly/1EEr1MB). They will be expected to develop a strong, extramurally funded, and collaborative research program. For all questions, please contact Sudhir Kumar by email (s.kumar@temple.edu). Temple University located is in the heart of historic Philadelphia, and is the sixth largest provider of graduate school education in the USA. Situated in close proximity to New York City and Washington DC, Philadelphia is home to a large biotech industry and has many outstanding academic and research institutions. Sudhir Kumar Director, iGEM@Temple s.kumar@temple.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:25

Evolutionary Informatics Faculty Positions (Assistant/Associate Professors) The Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine (iGEM) at Temple University invites applications for tenured and tenure-track faculty positions. We are interested in early and mid-career scientists who are developing theories, methods, algorithms, software, and resources for addressing significant problems in the domain of genome sequences and variation data. As core faculty of iGEM (http://bit.ly/YVV0zL), successful candidates will be part of an interdisciplinary team of world-class faculty in biology, genomics and computer and information sciences. The successful faculty will have their tenure home in the Department of Computer and Information Sciences. Applicants for the assistant professor position should have the potential to develop a significant, extramurally funded research program Applicants for the senior position are expected to have an outstanding and continuing track record of research and funding. Applicants should submit toigem@temple.edua single pdf containing a cover letter, a detailed curriculum vitae, a summary of current and future research interests, and a statement of teaching philosophy. Please include in the cover letter a link to a Google Scholar profile. Through their research and teaching statements applicants should inform the search committee about the transformative and cross-disciplinary aspects of their work. Review of applications will begin on March 21, 2015 and continue until the positions are filled. Temple University is located in the heart of historic Philadelphia, and is the sixth largest provider of graduate school education in the USA. Situated between New York City and Washington DC, Philadelphia is home to a large biotech industry and has many outstanding academic, research, and cultural institutions. Temple University is an equal opportunity, equal access, affirmative action employer committed to achieving a diverse community (AA, EOE, m/f/d/v). ==============Sudhir Kumar, Ph.D. Director, iGEM@Temple (http://bit.ly/YVV0zL) Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine Carnell Professor of Biology Temple University (SERC 710) Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA http://bit.ly/1EEr3UF http://bit.ly/1yOyFnd via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:45

Want to give a talk or a poster at the Systematics Association Biennial meeting (Oxford, UK 26-28 August 2015)? There is an exciting programme that includes both plenaries and thematic symposia, as well as contributed sessions. Scheduled symposia include: - The value of long term monitoring plots for plant systematics and ecology in the tropics - Comparative approaches to the origin of biodiversity - Accelerating the pace of taxonomy - Rooted in deep time: Palaeontological contributions to systematics Abstract submission now open: http://bit.ly/1Jy9MNF Registration for attendees is open too. The website for registration & accommodation bookings is here: http://bit.ly/1Jy9O8i *Registration Rates* 220 Full 3 day rate SA member 250 Full 3 day rate non-member 130 Student 3 day rate SA member 160 Student 3 day rate non-member 85 Full 1 day rate 60 Student 1 day rate The 3 day rate includes sandwich lunch (meat, fish and vegetarian) and 2 drinks receptions. The day rate includes sandwich lunch. *Accommodation* All accommodation, if desired must be booked for three nights. The accommodation is at Christchurch for 25th, 26th and 27th August with breakfast included. Prices shown are for all 3 nights. 186 Single standard room 261 Single ensuite room 384 Twin ensuite room 306 Twin set room (would suit two students sharing) 40 Conference dinner (menu choice available at conference) For further contact / queries, email: sabiennial2015@systass.org rcpm20@bath.ac.uk via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:45

Post Doctoral position in epigenetics and genome stability We are welcoming applications from enthusiastic and independent post-doctoral candidates to participate in our FRM grant-funded project related to epigenetics and genome stability. The fellowship is for 2 years and should start before June 2015. Background Genomic stability can be disturbed by the activity of repeated sequences such as transposable elements (TEs). Epigenetic mechanisms allow the silencing of these sequences. As a consequence, the presence of TEs in a genome may affect the chromatin structure of the regions in which they are inserted. Environmental factors have also been described as affecting genome stability, namely by affecting the rate of transposition„ and could be associated with environment related diseases such as cancer. Project The purpose of the project is to establish the link between TEs, environment and epigenetics. Drosophila is one of the best-fitted model for this project since we have an easy access to Drosophila natural variability, the species genome is small and harbors low amounts of TEs, and it is easily manipulated in the lab. The project consists in the analysis of Drosophila responses to stress by analyzing chromatin structure, piRNA abundances and mRNA levels, with an emphasis on TEs. Candidates The applicants are expected to have a strong background in epigenetics with a confirmed interest in genomics and evolutionary biology. Skills in data analysis and/or bioinformatics are necessary, but the candidate will benefit from the LBBE bioinformatics and statistical environment. The ideal candidate should be highly motivated, curious and enthusiastic to work in a collaborative team. Proven ability to identify research objectives and meet agreed deadlines, self-motivation and flexibility are essential. Excellent written and oral skills in English are required. Environment The host laboratory (LBBE) is a stimulating, cosmopolitan and pleasant place to work, where one can meet biologists, computer scientists, mathematicians and statisticians working on problems that range from ecology to medicine, through genomics and evolution. Lyon is the second largest city in France, is famous for its food, is a UNESCO World Heritage site and enjoys a very convenient central location in Europe. Please send one PDF file to Cristina Vieira cristina.vieira@univ-lyon1.fr including: - a cover letter - a concise summary of previous research activities (2 pages max) - a curriculum vitae including publication list - contact details for 2-3 referees applications will be selected by the end of March via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:23

A laboratory technician (Research Assistant III) position is available with Dr. Matthew Herron. This position is based at the University of Montana in Missoula, MT (but may also involve work in collaborating labs. The Herron Lab Group uses experimental evolution of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to understand the evolution of multicellularity. The person in this position will contribute to this project through collaboration with postdocs and graduate students; take on a specific line of investigation assigned by the principal investigator; and train and supervise undergraduate work-study students. The Research Assistant III will maintain orderly, up-to-date written and electronic notebooks consistent with standard NIH guidelines; actively participate in weekly group meetings; and significantly contribute to research communications and grants by analyzing and interpreting data, preparing publication-quality figures and tables, and composing the methods and results sections of manuscript narratives in a quality that would merit manuscript co-authorship. The person in this position will demonstrate expertise in molecular microbiology, microbial cell culture, and have a working knowledge of all aspects of nucleic acid preparation and analysis, PCR, and standard genetic analyses. Required skills include demonstrated ability to work independently,to recognize and creatively solve technical problems, to effectively transmit protocol knowledge to new students and postdocs, to assist lab personnel as needed, and to follow through on assigned tasks in a timely manner. Strong demonstrated ability in oral and written communication skills, demonstrated experience and expertise in molecular microbiology and microbial cell culture, and working knowledge of nucleic acid preparation and analysis, PCR, and standard genetic analyses are also required. Required Experience: bachelors degree in Biology, Chemistry or a related discipline and two (2) years of research experience or an equivalent combination of education and experience Preferred Qualifications: masters degree About the University of Montana University of Montana is located in Missoula, a vibrant community of 67,000, surrounded by mountain grandeur. The city has been singled out in national publications for its high quality of life and abundant recreational opportunities in surrounding state and national forests and nearby Glacier National Park and Yellowstone National Park complement a thriving intellectual atmosphere. HOW TO APPLY: Submit a Letter of Interest, detailed resume, and names and contact information for three professional references at http://bit.ly/1ybEPbr . via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:23
Dear all the information concerning the Evolutionary biology meeting at Marseilles can be found at the AEEB web site: www.aeeb.fr best regards Pierre Pierre PONTAROTTI via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:23
Postdoc position: Why do animals have personality? It’s a pleasure to announce a postdoctoral position in the research group of Dr Hanne Løvlie at Linköping University, Sweden, on the topic of animal personality. The project will focus on mechanisms underlying variation in personality, the link to variation in cognition and learning, and the role of underlying variation in the monoamine systems (i.e. serotonin, dopamine), and is in collaboration with Prof. Svante Winberg (Uppsala University). Despite intense recent research interest, we still do not know why animals have personality. This is partly because the architecture of animal personality is poorly understood. The aim of the announced position is to improve our overall understanding of the causes and consequences of variation in animal personality. More specifically the aim is to investigate the relationship between variation in personality and learning (together with other aspects of cognition), and their underlying genetic and physiological bases, with particular focus on the brain monoamines serotonin and dopamine. In other words, an exciting interdisciplinary project is offered that aims to improve our understanding of the relationships between personality and cognition, and their underlying mechanisms. We use the charismatic red junglefowl and domestic chickens as our main models, which together with excellent molecular tools enables a strong experimental approach. The post includes responsibility for conducting lab/fieldwork, carrying out behavioural and/or physiological experiments, analysing data and writing up results for publication. The postdoc will have access to previously collected behavioural, physiological and genetic data. To some extent is the topic of the project is flexible and can be tailored to fit the skills and interests of the successful candidate. Funding is available for two years, but is contingent on satisfactory progress in year one. The post doc is a stipend (i.e. no tax will be deducted) of 20,000SEK/month. The stipend does not give entitlement to sickness benefit, parental allowance, holiday pay or pension. Funding is awarded from Carl Trygger’s Foundation. Requirements The successful candidate should be enthusiastic and dedicated to science, with a PhD and possibly some postdoctoral experience in a field of relevance to the project (e.g. animal behaviour, evolutionary biology, molecular biology, quantitative genetics and/or neurobiology). The candidate should have demonstrated excellent quantitative and analytic skills, and excellent communication abilities, particularly in written English. The latter should be demonstrated by a proven track record of publication. The candidate should also demonstrate their ability to work as part of a team. Previous experience of working with vertebrates, especially birds, is advantageous, but not necessary. If you are interested in this position, please send: (1) a letter of motivation (including a brief description of research experience and why you are suitable for the announced position), (2) a CV including a list of publications and contact details of two referees to: hanne.lovlie@liu.se. Please merge all documents into a single pdf-file and include your name in the file name. Deadline for submitting an application is 9th of March 2015. The position has a negotiable start, but a start date before summer 2015 is preferred. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about the position! Linköping University is a modern university with a consistently growing biology division. A major research focus at the Biology division is on animal behaviour, including behavioural genetics and animal welfare. Linköping is located central in Sweden, only a couple of hours away from other university cities, like Stockholm, Uppsala and Lund. Hanne Løvlie, Assistant professor IFM Biology, AVIAN Behavioural Genomics and Physiology Group Linköping University 58183 Linköping, Sweden hanne.lovlie@liu.se Home page and more information: http://bit.ly/1ybEOV7 Hanne Lovlie via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
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Postdoc: WHERE : Institute of Computational Biology (IBC), Montpellier (France), http://bit.ly/1xBTByk WHAT : Methodological developments in evolutionary genomics Three-year post-doctoral position at the Institute of Computational Biology (IBC), Montpellier (France) : Methodological developments in evolutionary genomics. One young investigator position opens immediately at the Institute for Computational Biology (IBC, http://bit.ly/1xBTByk) of Montpellier (France) to work on the development of innovative inference methods and software in population genomics or phylogenetics to analyze large-scale genomic data in the fields of health, agronomy and environment (Work Package 2 evolutionary genomics of the IBC). The candidate will develop its own research on some of the following topics : selective processes, demographic history, spatial genetic processes, very large phylogenies reconstruction, gene/species tree reconciliation, using maximum likelihood, bayesian and simulation-based inference. We are seeking a candidate with a strong background in mathematical and computational evolutionary biology, with interest in applications and software development. The successfull candidate will work on his own project, build in collaboration with any researchers* involved in the WP2 project and working at the IBC labs (AGAP, CBGP, ISEM, I3M, LIRMM, MIVEGEC). IBC hires young investigators, typically with a PhD plus some post-doc experience, a high level of publishing, strong communication abilities, and a taste for multidisciplinary research. Working full-time at IBC, these young researchers will play a key role in Institute life. Most of their time will be devoted to scientific projects. In addition, they are expected to actively participate in the coordination of workpackages, in the hosting of foreign researchers and in the organization of seminars and events (summer schools, conferences…). In exchange, these young researchers will benefit from an exceptional environment thanks to the presence of numerous leading international researchers, not to mention significant autonomy for their work. Montpellier hosts one of the most vibrant communities of biodiversity research in Europe with several research centers of excellence in the field. This positions is open for up to 3 years with a salary above the French post-doc standard. Living at Montpellier: http://bit.ly/1rsnOrN Contacts WP2 Evolutionary Genetics  : Jean-Michel Marin : http://bit.ly/1ATaNjw Franois Rousset : http://bit.ly/1rsnOrR Vincent Ranwez : http://bit.ly/1ATaNjy Olivier Gascuel : http://bit.ly/1rsnOrT Submit my application : http://bit.ly/1ATaMfp * WP2 researchers : Vincent Berry, Franois Chevenet, Jean-Franois Dufayard, Olivier Gascuel, Mathieu Gautier, Raphal Leblois, Jean-Michel Marin, Miguel Navascus, Fabio Pardi, Martine Peeters, Pierre Pudlo, Vincent Ranwez, Franois Rousset, Cline Scornavacca, Renaud Vitalis. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR