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April 8, 2015

01:38
BIOINFORMATICS FOR BIOLOGISTS - 19th - 23rd October 2015 - SCENE, Glasgow, United Kingdom The handling of large data-sets has become intractable without some level of bioinformatic literacy. Many biologists find that there is a steep learning curve to develop the confidence required to explore their genomics data-sets effectively. This bioinformatics short course includes a rich collection of hands-on instruction and lectures specifically intended to help novice users become comfortable with a range of tools currently used to analyse next-generation data. There is no prerequisite for this course other than a willingness to learn and to work hard throughout the week. The course will be held at SCENE (Scottish Center for Ecology and the Natural Environment), Glasgow, United Kingdom. The course is 5 days long and will have a day spent on each of the following; Linux, RNAseq, Assembly, Annotation and Python, more details on each of these day long modules and the course can be found at Costs start at 540 course only (student rate) and includes lunches and refreshments or 715 for an all-inclusive option (student rate) which includes all accommodation and meals full pricing and details on accommodation can be found via the website http://bit.ly/1v1Pet4 or for questions email oliverhooker@prstatistics.co.uk Please feel free to distribute this information among friends and colleagues where suitable Other upcoming courses include; ANALYSIS OF STABLE ISOTOPE DATA USING SIA-R; GENETIC DATA ANALYSIS IN R; APPLIED BAYESIAN MODELLING FOR ECOLOGISTS AND EPIDEMIOLOGISTS; SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF ECOLOGICAL DATA USING R; ADVANCING IN R; further details on all of these can be found at http://bit.ly/1v1Pet4 oliverhooker@prstatistics.co.uk via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:22
–_000_5F681CD90E62BE419AC60CFA64881A320A90312CITCIMEXCH02ucuc_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Wasmuth lab (www.wasmuthlab.org) is looking for a graduate student to investigate the link between genome evolution and the mechanisms that underlie the success of parasites. This work is part of an NSERC funded program. The project summary is at the end. The project is entirely computational, although in close collaboration with molecular biologists. The student is expected to have: 1. An undergraduate degree in life sciences (GPA > 3.6 / 4.0 or equivalent). 2. Demonstrable experience with a programming language such as Python or Perl. 3. A desire to undertake an independent research project. While preference will be given to Canadian applicants, exceptional international applicants will also be considered. The Wasmuth lab is situated at the University of Calgary, Canada. The student will be a member of two research communities. The first is the Host-Parasite Interactions training program (www.ucalgary.ca/hpi). Supported by a $2 million grant from NSERC, HPI involves 9 PIs across two universities. IT brings together expertise in genomics, immunology, molecular biology and ecology. HPI members receive a wealth of extra training opportunities and to help with research and future careers. We are also prominent in outreach projects with the general public, through collaboration with the Spark Science Centre (http://bit.ly/1O72If4). Finally, there is a growing bioinformatics research community, supported by three new PI hires. If you are interested, please send me an email (jwasmuth@ucalgary.ca) with: 1. CV. 2. Transcripts / course grades. 3. Letter explaining your motivation for undertaking graduate studies. 4. Contact details fowww.wasmuthlab.org) is looking for a graduate student to investigate the link between genome evolution and the mechanisms that underlie the success of parasites. This work is part of an NSERC funded program. The project summary is at the end. The project is entirely computational, although in close collaboration with molecular biologists. The student is expected to have: 1. An undergraduate degree in life sciences (GPA > 3.6 / 4.0 or equivalent). 2. Demonstrable experience with a programming language such as Python or Perl. 3. A desire to undertake an independent research project. While preference will be given to Canadian applicants, exceptional international applicants will also be considered. The Wasmuth lab is situated at the University of Calgary, Canada. The student will be a member of two research communities. The first is the Host-Parasite Interactions training program (www.ucalgary.ca/hpi). Supported by a $2 million grant from NSERC, HPI involves 9 PIs across two universities. IT brings together expertise in genomics, immunology, molecular biology and ecology. HPI members receive a wealth of extra training opportunities and to help with research and future careers. We are also prominent in outreach projects with the general public, through collaboration with the Spark Science Centre (http://bit.ly/1O72If4). Finally, there is a growing bioinformatics research community, supported by three new PI hires. If you are interested, please send me an email (jwasmuth@ucalgary.ca) with: 1. CV. 2. Transcripts / course grades. 3. Letter explaining your motivation for undertaking graduate studies. 4. Contact details for two people that are willing to write a letter of recommendation. Summary Species of nematodes are ubiquitous and significant parasites of animals and plants. This parasitism has evolved multiple times independently from free-living ancestral species. The biological mechanisms that support parasitism are encoded in the nematodes’ genomes. The long-term objectives of my research program are to understand which regions of the genome evolved, and how this lead to the origin and maintenance of the behaviour and biochemical traits that we observe in today’s parasitic nematodes. Using a combination of genomics, bioinformatics and evolutionary biology approaches, my research program examines the evolution of gene duplications and growth of gene families in the genomes of both free-living and parasitic nematodes. Large gene families are implicated in responding to an organism’s response to its environment. Changes in these gene families frequently correlate to the adaptation of a new environment, which can lead to the emergence of a new species. The fully sequenced genomes of over 20 nematode species of interest enable us to test various key questions in species evolution and to understand host-parasite interactions. James Wasmuth Assistant Professor, Host-Pathogen Interactions, University of Calgary www: wasmuthlab.org twitter: @jdwasmuth –_000_5F681CD90E62BE419AC60CFA64881A320A90312CITCIMEXCH02ucuc_ Content-Type: message/external-body; access-type=x-mutt-deleted; expiration=“Tue, 7 Apr 2015 19:29:14 -0400”; lengthd92 Content-Type: text/html; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable –_000_5F681CD90E62BE419AC60CFA64881A320A90312CITCIMEXCH02ucuc via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:22
–_000_BY2PR04MB6163163D6948AA57514547D95FD0BY2PR04MB616namprd_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable “Job: Evolution of Microbial Communities in Drosophila” A postdoctoral position to investigate the coevolutionary interactions between drosophilid flies and their gut microbiota is available in the laboratory of Dr Angela Douglas (Cornell University, USA). The successful candidate will be strongly motivated to use metagenomics and related high throughput sequence data to establish how microbial diversity, stability and function covary with phylogeny and function of different Drosophila fly species. The position contributes to a NSF-funded team across three laboratories (with Dr John Jaenike, University of Rochester and Dr Greg Loeb, Cornell University), and is highly collaborative. Applicants will have a PhD in a biological discipline and expertise in next-generation sequencing and analysis, with a proven track record of effective research output. Prior microbiome research and expertise in (meta)genomics, bioinformatics and multivariate statistics, and experience of team-working are an advantage. The successful candidates will join an integrated team of researchers committed to understand the evolution and function of animal-bacterial symbioses (http://bit.ly/1i05sMX). Applications should be sent by email to Angela Douglas (aes326@cornell.edu). Please include a CV, statement of research, and details of three referees. The covering letter should include an explanation of how your qualifications and experience make you a good candidate for this position. Informal inquiries are welcome. To ensure full consideration, all materials should be received by May 8th, 2012; however, applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Angela E. Douglas Daljit S. and Elaine Sarkaria Professor of Insect Physiology and Toxicology Department of Entomology and Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics 5134 Comstock Hall Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 USA Tel. +1-607-255-8539 FAX +1-607-255-0939 email aes326@cornell.edu http://bit.ly/1i05sMX –_000_BY2PR04MB6163163D6948AA57514547D95FD0BY2PR04MB616namprd_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Source: EVOLDIR
01:06

POSTDOC POSITION IN COMPARATIVE GENOMICS AND BIOINFORMATICS Applications are invited for a bioinformatics postdoctoral position in 
the research group of Laszlo G Nagy (Synthetic and Systems Biology Unit, Biological Research Center, Szeged, Hungary). We are now looking to hire new people with a background in bioinformatics, phylogenetics or fungal evolution. The Lab offers excellent training opportunities in fungal comparative genomics, cutting edge projects, abundant funding, an inspiring atmosphere and extensive collaborator network. The primary focus of the lab is understanding the general principles of convergent evolution and fungal multicellularity through comparative genomics, transcriptomics and single-cell transcriptomics of multicellular fruiting bodies in Basidiomycetes. Fruiting bodies represent some of the most complex morphological structures found in fungi, yet, their developmental and evolutionary origins are hardly known. Complex fruiting bodies have evolved independently several times in the Basidiomycetes, offering an excellent model system to study the genetic mechanisms of convergent evolution. The successful Candidate has: • PhD in bioinformatics, evolutionary biology, mycology or other relevant field • Experience in genomics, Perl and/or Python scripting • Good team player traits • Experience in working with fungi is a plus Contact and application – The starting date of the project is September 2015. The position will last for one year with the possibility of extension up to 4 years. If interested, send a motivation letter along with your CV to Laszlo Nagy (lnagy@brc.hu). via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:35

An 18-month postdoc position funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation is available in my group at the University of Zurich on “The Evolution and Genetics of Life-Histories over Three Centuries of Human Civilisation”. In this project you will use a unique genealogical dataset, covering three centuries and including thousands of individuals, to investigate how human life-histories are shaped by genes, culture and the environment. Combining ideas and techniques from biology, sociology and history, you will provide new insights into life as we know it. This project requires someone who is independent and creative, and who has a highly quantitative and evolutionary mind-set. The ideal candidate furthermore has experience with the handling and analysis of large individual-based datasets, (quantitative genetic) mixed models and has excellent R programming skills. While some knowledge of the German language would be an advantage, it is not essential. Our group works together closely with several other groups within our institute (www.ieu.uzh.ch), which makes for a stimulating and social working environment. The institute is very international and the working language is English. Although the earliest possible starting date is June 1 2015, the actual starting date is negotiable. Zurich consistently ranks amongst the cities with the highest quality of life. While it offers all the pleasures of living in a bigger city, thanks to its central location and excellent public transport system, it is easy to get out of the city and head for the mountains. Applications should include 1) a cover letter, including a brief description of what you have to offer to the project and our group, and what you hope to get back in return, 2) a detailed curriculum vitae and 3) the contact details of three references. This should be sent as a single pdf file to erik.postma@ieu.uzh.ch Review of applications starts on 27 April 2015, but candidates are considered until the position is filled. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me (erik.postma@ieu.uzh.ch), or visit www.erikpostma.net. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:15

@juliofdiaz wrote:

Hello, I am trying to use BEAST to infer the ancestry of intra-specific isolates (we have ~200). I currently have a list of SNPs called from illumina sequencing data. Since Im basing my BEAST analysis on these SNPs, is there a way to normalize the number of mutational events observed in each isolate to the size of the genome over which a high quality call is possible? Would this be even necessary? I assume one way of doing this would be to do some bootstrapping, but this would be too PC time consuming

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00:03
–_000_BY2PR04MB61652F1B46BFFEE7801229F95FD0BY2PR04MB616namprd_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable “Job: Evolution of Metabolic Cooperation in Insect-Microbial Symbiosis” A postdoctoral position in animal-microbial interactions is available immediately in the laboratory of Dr Angela Douglas (Cornell University, USA), to join a research team investigating the evolution of metabolite exchange between symbiotic bacteria and their animal hosts. The goals are to determine (1) how the coevolved metabolic networks of the interacting organisms are integrated, including network properties that may increase metabolic cooperation and reduce conflict among the partners; and (2) the contribution of systems-level variation in network properties to the functional variation among symbioses involving bacteria with genetically equivalent metabolic capabilities. The research involves metabolic modeling, including metabolic network reconstruction and flux balance analysis, together with genome/transcriptome sequencing and metabolite analysis in the context of coevolved symbioses; prior experience of working with genomes is essential, and experience of metabolic modeling and/or symbiotic associations is strongly preferred. The successful candidates will join an integrated team of researchers committed to understand the evolution and function of animal-bacterial symbioses (http://bit.ly/1i05sMX). Applications from candidates with a PhD in a biological discipline should be sent by email to Angela Douglas (aes326@cornell.edu). Please include a CV, statement of research, and details of three referees. The covering letter should include an explanation of how your qualifications and experience make you a good candidate for this position. Informal inquiries are welcome. To ensure full consideration, all materials should be received by May 8, 2015; however, applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Angela E. Douglas Daljit S. and Elaine Sarkaria Professor of Insect Physiology and Toxicology Department of Entomology and Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics 5134 Comstock Hall Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 USA Tel. +1-607-255-8539 FAX +1-607-255-0939 email aes326@cornell.edu http://bit.ly/1i05sMX –_000_BY2PR04MB61652F1B46BFFEE7801229F95FD0BY2PR04MB616namprd_ Content-Type: message/external-body; access-type=x-mutt-deleted; expiration=“Tue, 7 Apr 2015 19:28:57 -0400”; lengthU07 Content-Type: text/html; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable –_000_BY2PR04MB61652F1B46BFFEE7801229F95FD0BY2PR04MB616namprd via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

April 7, 2015

23:47
Excellent PhD opportunity Funded PhD position working on the Evolution of promiscuity in Seychelles warblers with Profs DS Richardson, J Komdeur and Dr H Dugdale Joint position at the University of East Anglia and the University of Groningen Deadline 24 April 2015 For more details, eligibility and how to apply go to http://bit.ly/1GJzOzk or http://bit.ly/1ajvbQ4 David S Richardson Professor in Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation Centre for Evolution, Ecology and Conservation School of Biological Sciences, UEA, Norwich NR4 7TJ, England e-mail: david.richardson@uea.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1GJzQqX [cid:image001.jpg@01CF9090.081618F0] UK Top 15 (14th in the Guardian University Guide 2015; 15th in the Complete University Guide 2015) UK Top 3 for Student Experience (Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey 2014) World top 1% (Times Higher Education World Rankings 2013-14) World Top 100 (Leiden Ranking 2014) “David Richardson (BIO)” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
22:30

Phylogenetic networks are intended to display reticulate evolutionary histories, rather than strictly divergent or transformational histories. This idea applies both to species and higher taxa (where the ancestors might be inferred), and to individuals and populations (where some of the ancestors might be sampled). However, the literature is still replete with studies that use one or more phylogenetic trees for displaying reticulate phylogenies.

A recent example is shown by: Umer Chaudhry, Elizabeth M. Redman, Muhammad Abbas, Raman Muthusamy, Kamran Ashraf, John S. Gilleard (2015) Genetic evidence for hybridisation between Haemonchus contortus and Haemonchus placei in natural field populations and its implications for interspecies transmission of anthelmintic resistance. International Journal for Parasitology 45: 149-159.

These authors sampled nematode parasites from sheep, goats, cattle and buffaloes at abattoirs in Pakistan and southern India. These parasites were morphologically characterized as being predominantly either Haemonchus contortus or Haemonchus placei. The worms were then genotyped in several ways, including: SNPs of rDNA ITS-2, microsatellite markers, sequences of nuclear isotype-1 of β-tubulin, and sequences of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4. The genotyping revealed several individual worms that were considered to be inter-species F1 hybrids.

The phylogenetic tree from the β-tubulin sequences is shown in the first figure. There were 25 haplotypes identified among the worms. Most of the worms were homozygous, with haplotypes that were identified as either H. contortus or H. placei. However, five worms were discovered to be heterozygous, with one haplotype considered to have come from each of the species.


The hybrid status of the worms is shown in the phylogenetic tree by having the hybrids appear twice, once for each of their haplotypes, with the other worms appearing only once. Thus, the actual reticulate history is not made visually obvious.

A better approach would be to use a phylogenetic network. This is straightforward in this case. From the perspective of the worms (rather than the haplotypes), the phylogenetic tree is a so-called MUL-tree, in which some of the taxon labels appear multiple times (and some appear only once). The labels that appear once represent homozygous worms, which can be seen as being "monoploid" for this locus. The labels that appear twice represent heterozygous worms, which can be seen as being "diploid".

MUL-trees where the labels represent different ploidy levels can easily be turned into a network using the Padre program. The result is shown in the next figure, which is therefore a hybridization network.


The actual history of the worms is now clear. Interestingly, one of the hybridization events seems to be older than the other four.

As an aside, it is also worth pointing out a mis-interpretation of the phylogenetic tree produced from the mitochondrial ND4 sequences. This tree is shown in the next figure — I have added the annotations at the right.


The phylogeny shows 12 haplotypes considered to be H. contortus and 14 haplotypes considered to be H. placei. One of the hybrids clearly has a H. contortus haplotype, indicating that its maternal parent came from this species. However, the other four hybrids cannot be unequivocally identified as having H. placei mothers (as claimed by the authors), as their haplotypes are all sisters to the H. placei haplotypes — all of the H. placei haplotypes share a common ancestor that is not shared with the hybrids. Given the root of the tree, H. placei is a more likely identification than is H. contortus, but the tree does not provide unequivocal evidence.

18:00
Background: Close range calls are produced by many animals during intra-specific interactions, such as during home range defence, playing, begging for food, and directing others. In this study, we investigated the most common close range vocalisation of lar gibbons (Hylobates lar), the ‘hoo’ call. Gibbons and siamangs (family Hylobatidae) are known for their conspicuous and elaborate songs, while quieter, close range vocalisations have received almost no empirical attention, perhaps due to the difficult observation conditions in their natural forest habitats. Results: We found that ‘hoo’ calls were emitted by both sexes in a variety of contexts, including feeding, separation from group members, encountering predators, interacting with neighbours, or as part of duet songs by the mated pair. Acoustic analyses revealed that ‘hoo’ calls varied in a number of spectral parameters as a function of the different contexts. Males’ and females’ ‘hoo’ calls showed similar variation in these context-specific parameter differences, although there were also consistent sex differences in frequency across contexts. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that lar gibbons are able to generate significant, context-dependent acoustic variation within their main social call, which potentially allows recipients to make inferences about the external events experienced by the caller. Communicating about different events by producing subtle acoustic variation within some call types appears to be a general feature of primate communication, which can increase the expressive power of vocal signals within the constraints of limited vocal tract flexibility that is typical for all non-human primates. In this sense, this study is of direct relevance for the on-going debate about the nature and origins of vocally-based referential communication and the evolution of human speech.
06:00
Background: Complex communities of bacteria inhabit the feathers of all birds. Under normal conditions, individuals maintain a healthy state by defending themselves against these potential invaders by preening. The immune system is only triggered when bacteria gain access into the body. Preening is, however, costly and may trade-off with investment in the immune system. To shed light on how birds balance the trade-off between immunity and preen secretions when facing high or low feather bacterial load, we experimentally manipulated feather bacteria load of feral pigeons (Columba livia), and investigated the effects on immune defenses. Results: Birds facing high feather bacterial load had lower immune response to PHA skin-swelling test (a measure of induced pro-inflammatory capacity) than controls, while birds facing low feather bacterial load had higher blood bacterial killing ability (a measure of the capacity to eliminate bacterial pathogens) than controls. No other components of the immune system (i.e., hemagglutination and hemolysis capacity of plasma, primary and secondary responses to KLH and quantity of blood parasites) were found to be affected by feather bacterial load. Conclusion: Pigeons had previously been shown to adjust preening to feather bacterial load. The decrease in the energetically costly inflammatory response of birds experiencing high bacterial load suggests a trade-off between investment in preen secretion and immunity and reinforces the idea that feather microbiota may have a strong impact on the ecology and evolution of the avian host.
00:35
Two positions for a Postdoctoral Academic Associate in marine visual ecology The Animal Evolutionary Ecology unit studies the evolution of mechanisms used by marine fish to modify ambient light by fluorescence or reflective structures. We study the adaptive function and underlying mechanisms of these processes using state-of-the-art spectrometry. Our focus is on co-evolutionary interactions between light-radiating fish species and the optical properties of their prey and predators as well as counter-adaptations in the latter. We have >150 saltwater tanks in 4 rooms with controlled light conditions for individual performance assessment in dedicated tasks. The successful candidate has a PhD in any or all of the following: Visual ecology, comparative analyses, theoretical and empirical analysis of light in natural environments, animal pigmentation, colour vision, bio-optics or neuroanatomy. A good background in statistics and experimental design is required. She/he is expected to develop a high-profile research programme, teach in marine/visual ecology and supervise students at the BSc, MSc and PhD level (120 h/year). Teaching is in English. Experience with diving is an asset. Formal employment procedures will be carried out by the Universitys Central Administration. The position is fulltime and limited to three years, with optional prolongation. The pay grade classification E13 refers to the German federal public service scale (TV-L). Disabled candidates will be given preference over other equally qualified applicants. The University seeks to raise the number of women in research and teaching and therefore urges qualified women to apply. Please send a single PDF to office.michiels@biologie.uni-tuebingen.de including a motivation letter as well as a full CV. Please include details on research interests and accomplishments, teaching experience, external funding plus names and email addresses of at least two referees. Screening will commence on 15 May 2015, and will continue until suitable candidates have been identified. Earliest appointment is 1 July 2015. Prof. Dr. N. Michiels, University of Tbingen, Department of Biology, Institute of Evolution and Ecology, Auf der Morgenstelle 28, 72076 Tbingen, Germany (nico.michiels@uni-tuebingen.de). Faculty of Science Department of Biology Institute of Evolution and Ecology Animal Evolutionary Ecology Nico Michiels via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:13
Greeting Colleagues, We are hoping to hire research assistant to work on the biodiversity of marine ciliates within the Biological Sciences department at Smith College, USA. The research project involves the use of molecular tools to explore biodiversity of eukaryotic microorganisms, particularly ciliates, in marine environments. The RA will also maintain data in a well-organized database, with attention paid to details of completeness and quality. This research project focuses on characterization of near-shore communities of oligotrich and choreotrich ciliates using DGGE and next generation sequencing technologies. This is a grant-funded, limited-term position with the possibility of renewal. Attached is a detailed description of the position. Please forward this email and attachment to anyone you think might be interested in this position. Thank you Dr. Jean-David Grattepanche and Dr. Laura A. Katz Jean-David GRATTEPANCHE , Postdoctoral fellow PhD in Biological Oceanography jgrattepanche@smith.edu http://bit.ly/1GGHeU0 Katz lab Department of Biological sciences Smith College 44 College Lane Northampton. MA 01063 “Jean-David GRATTEPANCHE (Smith mail)” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

April 6, 2015

23:52

An NSF-funded postdoctoral position is available in the lab of Dr. Joel McGlothlin in the Department of Biological Sciences at Virginia Tech. The successful candidate will collaborate with Dr. McGlothlin on a project investigating the evolution of voltage-gated sodium channels across birds and reptiles. The project will use DNA target enrichment to capture and sequence the sodium-channel gene family in a wide variety of species in order to characterize the evolutionary history of resistance to tetrodotoxin and other prey defenses. The postdoc will be responsible for both bioinformatic analyses of existing genomes and the generation and analysis of new sequences. The ideal candidate will possess both laboratory skills in molecular evolutionary genetics and experience mining and analyzing large genetic datasets. Minimum qualifications include a Ph.D. (completed by July 2015) in biology, ecology and evolutionary biology, or a related field; strong oral and written communication skills; the ability to work independently and as part of a research group; and a demonstrated ability to efficiently produce strong peer-reviewed publications. Candidates with a background in molecular evolution or bioinformatics will be given preference. Interested candidates should submit a curriculum vitae and statement of interest upon applying online at http://bit.ly/1COHQV0. Two letters of recommendation should be sent via email to joelmcg@vt.edu. Review of applications will begin June 1, 2015. Virginia Tech does not discriminate against employees, students, or applicants on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. For inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies, contact the executive director for Equity and Access at 540-231-8771 or Virginia Tech, North End Center, Suite 2300 (0318), 300 Turner St. NW, Blacksburg, VA 24061. If you are an individual with a disability and desire accommodation please contact the hiring department. Additional information: McGlothlin lab: http://bit.ly/IhC32s Application link: http://bit.ly/1COHQV0 Biological Sciences at VT: http://bit.ly/1GGD26E Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior at VT: http://bit.ly/1GGD4eJ via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

April 5, 2015

16:30

The cost of renting or leasing office space differs dramatically around the world. This is obviously of great importance to businesses, as their profitability depends on the balance between income and costs. Their expenditure on office space can thus determine whether or not it is profitable for them to do business in certain cities.


The CBRE Group Inc. is an American commercial real estate company, and they provide an annual Global Prime Office Occupancy Costs report that addresses this business cost. It is a survey of office occupancy costs for prime office space in a large number of cities worldwide. Occupancy costs for business premises represent rent, plus local taxes and service charges. The report notes that: "The occupation cost figures have also been adjusted to reflect different measurement practices from market to market."

Each report lists the top 50 most expensive office locations in the world during the previous year, along with the average occupancy cost (in US$ / sq ft / annum). The locations examined may be the central business district of each city or several parts of some cities, depending on how much office space is available. The list of locations continues to expand every year, but only the top 50 are ever listed in each report.

The CBRE web site currently contains the data for the years 2008-2010 and 2012-2014. There are 71 locations that have appeared in these six top-50 lists, although only 30 of them have appeared in the top 50 in all six years (and seven have appeared only once).

Of course, a phylogenetic network could be used to visualize the data for each location across the six reports, as a tool for exploratory data analysis. To create the network, I first calculated the similarity of the 30 locations using the Gower similarity; and a Neighbor-net analysis was then used to display the between-location similarities as a phylogenetic network. So, locations that are closely connected in the network are similar to each other based on their office costs across the six years, and those that are further apart are progressively more different from each other.


The network shows a gradient of decreasing office costs, from bottom-left to top-right. So, the consistently most expensive locations have been the West End of London and central Hong Kong, followed by Moscow and central Tokyo. London City and Kowloon, in Hong Kong, are not far behind, showing that you cannot avoid high costs for prime office space in these two cities.

Across the locations, the most expensive ones cost on average 3.4 times as much as the cheapest locations. Note that Midtown Manhattan is not nearly as expensive for office rental as it is for living accommodation. Switzerland has only two cities, and both of them are in the middle of the network; so it is not cheap, either.

In the network, Dubai and central Mumbai are isolated from the other locations because their office rents have decreased over the six reports. In the case of Mumbai, the most expensive offices recently have been in the Bandra Kurla complex, instead of Nariman Point.

April 3, 2015

23:49

Dear EvolDir list members We are writing to draw your attention to a symposium we are organising at this year’s Mathematical Modelling in Ecology and Evolution (MMEE) meeting in Paris, 8-10 July, on the ‘Origin and role of epigenetic information transmission in evolution.’ Our confirmed, invited speakers are: Olivier Rivoire (Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Physics, Grenoble, France) and Ido Pen (University of Groningen, The Netherlands). The symposium details are given below. If you would like to submit an abstract for a poster or talk at the symposium, please register at the meeting website, http://bit.ly/1BSL2ev, and select the symposium when prompted. The deadline for preregistration and abstracts is 1 May, the deadline for registration is 1 June. We hope to see many of you there! Best wishes, Sinead English, Jrme Enjalbert, Maud Tenaillon and Tobias Uller Symposium: Origin and role of epigenetic information transmission in evolution There is a mounting body of empirical evidence that information can be transmitted across generations through several channels other than variation in DNA sequence alone. Environmentally induced changes in gene expression can be inherited through incomplete resetting of methylation marks, for example, and parental behaviour affects offspring and subsequent descendants. Several theoretical papers have modelled these specific mechanisms. In spite of differences in the underlying mechanisms, these channels of genetic and non-genetic inheritance may be unified in their role as transmission of information across generations. Here, we propose a symposium to discuss the merits of such an approach. Specifically, is the information concept a useful framework to develop a theory of non-genetic inheritance? How do the insights generated from an information perspective compare to those from mechanistic models? Can we use this framework to predict the life-history and environmental conditions under which epigenetically regulated networks contribute to population adaptation to fitness landscapes? We will also discuss the origin and specific features (e.g., stability, inducibility) of information transmission under different mechanisms of inheritance: while DNA machinery seems to be selected for this purpose, it is less obvious how other mechanisms come to transmit information across generations. Sinead English Visiting Research Fellow, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge Research Associate, Mathematical Ecology Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford http://bit.ly/1NIgvGT sineadenglish@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:28
Dear Colleagues, The *5th International Workshop on the* *Genetics of Tree-Parasite Interactions* will take place at*Orlans, France, 23-28 August 2015*. The *deadline for abstract submission has been extended to the **15th of April*, which means that the deadlines for early bird registration and for abstract submission are now the same. All abstracts must be submitted online following this link . colloque international Genetics of tree-parasite interactions *PLEASE NOTE* : because several of you wondered how restrictive the term “genetics” is, we would like to tell you also what this workshop is not. *THIS WORKSHOP _IS NOT _RESTRICTED TO BREEDERS AND PLANT GENETICISTS* !! Maybe we should think of another name for the next edition of this workshop to make things clearer … As you can see from the tentative program , all aspects of tree-pathogen interactions, host side, pathogen side, from the cell to the landscape, will be covered. As an example, those of you not dealing with genetics at all but studying resistance/virulence/aggressiveness mechanisms will perfectly fit into the “/Resistance / tolerance and virulence / aggressiveness //*MECHANISMS*//and their genetic determinants/” session eventhough the genetic determinants are far from being elucidated. Sessions: 1 - Novel challenges due to EMERGING or NON-NATIVE pests and pathogens 2 - PHENOTYPING resistance and MONITORING parasites at different scales 3 - Resistance / tolerance and virulence / aggressiveness MECHANISMS and their genetic determinants 4 - Understanding host-parasite co-evolution: a requirement for DURABLE breeding & management strategies 5 - POPULATION GENETICS of pests, pathogens and vectors 6 - New GENOMIC tools and resources 7 - From genetics to management: INNOVATIVE strategies for disease/pest control Again, at this stage, the program is only tentative and it will all depend on the audience and on the submitted talks. The last session, entitled “/From genetics to management: //*INNOVATIVE*//strategies for disease/pest control/” could also include some talks on biological control … Organizers would like to remind you that there are *only 80 rooms available* at the Conference Hotel , so please make your hotel booking as soon as possible. We can advise you a few other hotels once this one is full but all of them are at non negligeable walking distance. So, please, do not restrain yourself from participating but *take your ticket **as soon as possible *(click here to visit de conference’s website ) as the number of participants will be limited for practical reasons and to foster discussions. Please note that registration fees *not only* include full access to the scientific program and all conference material *but also* the following : * a welcome cocktail reception (Sunday evening) * the following meals: Monday (Lunch+Diner), Tuesday (L+D), Thursday (L+D) * coffee breaks: Monday (2), Tuesday (2), Thursday (2), Friday (1) * Field trip + picnic basket + reception diner (Wednesday) which means that *participants will have very little additional expenses except travelling and lodging*. *Finally, for PhD students and their mentors, please remember also the offer below :* We are pleased to announce that thanks to the following sponsors : Rsultat de recherche d'images pour “us forest service” occhio Hettich *are offering **_free registration fees_**to 4 PhD students !!!* (i.e. 500 euro discount each) To encourage those of you who have to support high travel expenses, priority will be given to PhD students who come from distant countries _and_ who are accompanied by one fully paying participant from the same laboratory. Applicants must*submit their* abstract through the online submission system before April 1st 2015 and *reply this message* providing the following details : *- name: - institution/laboratory: - country and approximative travel expenses with details: - age: - name of fully paying participant from the same laboratory: - I am willing to give __oral presention, ___poster presentation, __ either oral or poster presentation - title of presentation: * Last but not least, for those coming with *accompanying persons*, you will find all the necessary information on the website . Three packages are being proposed, two of them include a visit to the magnificient Chambord Castle (see below). *Number of participants will be limited to 25* so, again, first arrived - first served ! Chateau de Chambord ** /*Organizing comittee*//*:*/ *Co-chairs: *Vronique Jorge et Arnaud Dowkiw (INRA Val de Loire, AGPF), Stphanie Bankhead-Dronnet (Universit d'Orlans, LBLGC) *Field tour:* Franois-Xavier Saintonge, French Ministry of Agriculture (DSF Nord Ouest) *Registrations and Logistics:* Patricia Montes et Olivier Bertel, INRA AGPF via Gmail
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Post doc: UNI-Lausanne, sex-chromosome evolution in amphibians Sex-determination systems within the frog family Ranidae appears extramely dynamic, with sex chromosomes that differ between closely related species or even conspecific populations. However, data gathered so far suggest that transitions occur among a limited set of chromosome pairs (out of a total of 13), and that male heterogamety is mostly conserved despite the high turnover. We want to further investigate these patterns across the family, document the evolution of sex-linked genes recently involved in non-recombining regions, and ultimately understand the reasons for the high rate of turnover. We have already collected samples of sexed adults and sibships from a series of species from different genera (Rana, Lithobates and Pelophylax), and developed a RADseq approach that allows us to identify sex chromosomes from these samples. The successful candidate will participate in the sampling effort to get additional species from the radiation, and take over the development and utilization of RADseq approaches in order to build sex-specific recombination maps, identify sex-linked markers, and map these markers to a reference genome. He/she will also have to analyze the patterns of transitions in a phylogenetic framework, and characterize patterns of X-Y differentiation. We expect candidates to have a solid background in evolutionary genomics and population genetics. Experience in RADseq or sequence capture and one or more scripting languages will be an advantage. The position is initially for one year with the possibility to renew for two more years. You will join a team already active and experienced in the field of sex-chromosome evolution, presently largely focused on the model species Rana temporaria. The phylogeny of ranid frogs is well resolved, and the RADseq approach already well mastererd in our lab. We are now in the process of assembling a draft genome for Rana temporaria, and expect it to be fully available by the end of June. The Department of Ecology and Evolution is large and thriving, with many research groups active in evolutionary ecology. It provides excellent facilities for research and training (see http://bit.ly/12p3XDp). The Dorigny campus offers excellent facilities for molecular and evolutionary biology, including multiple Illumina sequencers and the Vital-IT high-performance computing cluster. Applications including CV, publication list, research statement and addresses of references, should be sent by e-mail to nicolas.perrin@unil.ch. Applications received by Sunday May 3 will receive full consideration Nicolas Perrin Recent papers from our lab on sex-chromosome evolution Rodrigues et al. 2015. Sex-chromosome differentiation and ‘sex races’ in the common frog (Rana temporaria). Proc. B 282: 20142726, DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.2726 Blaser et al. 2014. Sex-chromosome turnovers: the hot potato model. Am. Nat. 183: 140-146. Dufresnes et al. 2014. Sex-chromosome differentiation parallels postglacial range expansion in European tree frogs (Hyla arborea). Evolution 68: 3445-3456. Rodrigues et al. 2014. Geographic variation in sex-chromosome differentiation in the common frog (Rana temporaria). Mol. Ecol. 23: 3409-3418. Blaser et al. 2013. Sex-chromosome turnover induced by deleterious mutation load. Evolution 67: 635-645. Brelsford et al. 2013. Homologous sex chromosomes in three deeply divergent anuran species. Evolution 67: 2434-2440. Rodrigues et al. 2013. Within-population polymorphism of sex-determination system in the common frog (Rana temporaria). JEB 26: 1569-1577. Grossen et al. 2012. The evolution of XY recombination: sexually antagonistic selection versus deleterious mutation load. Evolution 66: 3155-3166 Guerrero et al. 2012. Cryptic recombination in the ever-young sex chromosomes of Hylid frogs. JEB 25: 1947-1954. Grossen et al. 2011. Temperature-dependent turnovers in sex-determination mechanisms: a quantitative model. Evolution 65: 64-78. Stoeck et al. 2011. Ever-young sex chromosomes in European tree frogs. PLoS Biol 9(5): e1001062. Perrin Nicolas via Gmail
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Postdoc in Marine Microbiome Research The Stewart lab at Georgia Tech is looking for a postdoctoral fellow to study the microbiome of coral reef fishes. The postdoc will work jointly with Dr. Stewart and Dr. Danielle Dixson in the School of Biology to understand the diversity and evolution of the reef fish microbiome and its role in fish health and ecology. The work will involve collections at diverse field sites (e.g., Belize, Australia), experiments using aqua-cultured fish species, and a blend of molecular and bioinformatic analyses. The project utilizes a partnership with a major breeder and distributor of ornamental reef fish, enabling manipulations of diverse host species over developmental gradients and comparisons to wild populations. Research tasks will involve both culture-dependent and independent methods, with the latter focused on comparative analysis of single-cell genomic, metagenomic, and metatranscriptomic datasets. The postdoc will be encouraged to develop independent lines of research with in the broader goals of the project, and will work collaboratively with Dr. Stewart, Dr. Dixson, and graduate students to perform research and synthesize results for publication. The ideal candidate will be enthusiastic, motivated by experimental and analytical challenges, and proficient in bioinformatics and molecular microbiology techniques. Candidates should have a Ph.D. focusing on microbiome or symbiosis research (or a related topic). Knowledge of marine biology and microbial evolution is highly desirable. The School of Biology at Georgia Tech is a dynamic research environment with a strong core of researchers interested in marine systems, microbiology, and genomics. The Institute offers exceptional resources for bioinformatics and high-performance computing, and exciting opportunities for cross-departmental collaboration with computational scientists and earth and atmospheric scientists. Georgia Tech was recently voted one of the best places to work, and Atlanta is consistently ranked among the top ten places to live for young professionals. This position begins in late summer/fall 2015, although there is flexibility in the start date. Funding is available for at least two years, but is contingent upon satisfactory progress in year one; applicants should express their ability to commit to the project for the initial two years. Application materials should be emailed to the same address and should include a cover letter (describing your interest in the position, work experience, and availability), CV, and contact information (name, email, phone number) for at least three references. Please include the word “Postdoc” in the subject line. Salary will be competitive and commensurate with experience and will include fringe benefits. Review of applications will begin on May 1 and continue until the position is filled. Informal inquiries about the position can be sent to Frank Stewart at frank.stewart@biology.gatech.edu. Additional details about the Stewart lab can be found at http://b.gatech.edu/1NG3uxB Georgia Tech is a unit of the University System of Georgia and an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and requires compliance with the Immigration Control Reform Act of 1986. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
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The Leibniz Research Alliance INFECTIONS'21 funded by the Leibniz Association has been formed by the Research Center Borstel-Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences (FZB, www.fz-borstel.de) together with 13 institutions of the Leibniz association (Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering (ATB, www.atb-potsdam.de), Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM, www.bnitm.de), Leibniz-Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures (DSMZ, www.dsmz.de), GESIS-Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences (GESIS, www.gesis.org), GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA, www.giga-hamburg.de), Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology-Hans Knll Institute (HKI, www.leibniz-hki.de), Heinrich-Pette-Institute-Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology (HPI, www.hpi-hamburg.de), Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB, www.igb-berlin.de), Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW, www.izw-berlin.de), Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK, www.pik-potsdam.de), Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS, www.tropos.de), Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF, www.zalf.de), Leibniz Center for Tropical Marine Ecology (ZMT, www.zmt-bremen.de)) and 3 external partners (division of social sciences of the Hamburg University (UHH, http://bit.ly/1CZumXW), the Federal Research Institute for Animal Health (FLI, www.fli.bund.de) and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM, www.lshtm.ac.uk)). Despite significant progress in the combat of infectious diseases the past century, they remain a major challenge for human health worldwide. The emergence of novel infectious agents and multi-drug resistant microbial strains, ecological alterations caused by climate change and human activities such as re-naturation of ecosystems, provide ecological conditions facilitating the spread of important infections. Socio-economic determinants such as income, nourishment, housing and working conditions and access to health systems may influence the spread and outcome of infectious diseases. To address these issues, INFECTIONS'21 identified 4 cooperative and trans-disciplinary research projects, which will be performed by Interdisciplinary Research Groups (IRGs) spanning biomedical, ecological, socio-economic and political sciences with the goal of linking the diversity of expertise to study the spread of infectious diseases by looking at biotic, abiotic and social determinants. We therefore seek to fill the following positions: - 1 doctoral position in social science research on tuberculosis transmission - 1 doctoral position in evolutionary ecology of water borne diseases - 1 doctoral position in medical entomology - 1 doctoral position in aerosol transmission properties of human pathogens Specifically: 1 doctoral position in social science research on tuberculosis transmission (IRG1) - GESIS-FZB Specific tasks: Address the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in population groups which are only partly covered by public health care. Conduct an empirical study to collect data on the background of and conditions for infection transmission in order to identify starting points for intervention measures. The tasks of the doctoral student include conceptualization and implementation of the qualitative and quantitative parts of the empirical study as well as data analysis and publication of results. Requirements: The successful candidate will have an above-average degree in sociology, psychology, social sciences or a related subject, proven knowledge of social research methods, extended knowledge of a statistical software package (e.g. STATA, SPSS). Experience in planning and implementation of empirical studies are of advantage, very good written and spoken command of German and English, good organization skills, ability to work independently as well as in a team are essential. It is expected that the doctoral student interacts with scientists from a wide variety of fields. Position IRG1 will take place primarily under the auspices of GESIS, GIGA, HPI, HKI and FZB although interaction with other LFV ‘21 research groups will be strongly encouraged. The doctoral student will have primary desk facility space at GESIS, location Mannheim (Dr. Jette Schrder) and will spend time at the FZB (Prof. Stefan Ehlers). 1 doctoral position in evolutionary ecology of water borne diseases (IRG2) - IZW-IGB-ZALF-DSMZ Specific tasks: Next sequence generation characterization of pathogen (virus and bacteria) sequences from water; evolutionary analysis of pathogen sequences obtained to determine phylogenetic affiliations and estimate evolutionary dynamics of pathogen populations, including evaluation for positive selection on sequences relevant to virulence or stability in water and/or novel recombination events that might influence phenotype; determination of the effect of environmental factors, in particular water source characteristics on pathogen presence; analysis of environmental DNA of water samples to compare genetic diversity of potential host sequence diversity obtained directly from animals with their drinking sources. Requirements: The successful candidate will have a completed master’s / diploma degree in biological sciences or veterinary degree; clean driver’s licence; extensive experience in molecular biology, a strong interest in ecology and wildlife, conservation and evolutionary biology as well as biogeochemistry including chemical analysis of water samples. It is expected that the doctoral student interacts with scientists from a wide variety of fields. Previous experience in evolutionary biology or next generation sequencing analysis will be considered a major advantage. Position IRG2 will take place primarily under the auspices of the DSMZ, HPI, IGB, IZW, ZALF and ZMT although interaction with other LFV '21 research groups will be strongly encouraged. The doctoral student will have primary desk and laboratory facility space at the IZW (Prof. Alex Greenwood) and will spend substantial time at the IGB (Prof. Hans Peter Grossart), ZALF (Prof. Gunnar Lischeid) and DSMZ (Prof. Jrg Overmann). 1 doctoral position in medical entomology (IRG3) - ZALF-BNITM-FLI Specific tasks: Studies on potential mosquito and biting midge vectors of disease agents in urban and agricultural areas; ecological field and laboratory studies regarding the choice of, and the adaptation to, breeding sites, the tolerance towards pollution and the role of polluted water pools as breeding habitats; characterisation of breeding habitats and habitat cenoses, molecular screening for pathogens. Requirements: The successful candidate has a completed master’s / diploma degree in biological sciences with specialisation in entomology; experience in molecular biology; a strong interest in both field and laboratory work; clean driver’s licence. It is expected that the doctoral student interacts with scientists from a wide variety of fields. Position IRG3 will take place primarily under the auspices of the ZALF, BNITM and FLI although interaction with other LFV '21 research groups will be strongly encouraged. The doctoral student will have work and laboratory facility space at the ZALF (Dr. Doreen Werner) but will spend part of his/ her time at the BNITM (PD Dr. Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit) and/ or FLI (PD Dr. Helge Kampen). 1 doctoral position in aerosol transmission properties of human pathogens (IRG4) - FZB-HPI-TROPOS Specific tasks: Study aerosols containing pathogenic bacteria and viruses relevant for human health (tuberculosis, influenza). The candidate will analyze transmission dynamics in animal models (HPI) and the biophysical properties of isolated infectious particles (FZB), and model transmission under various atmospheric and climatic conditions (TROPOS, ATB). Requirements: The successful candidate will have a master’s degree either in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, biophysics, physics, or geosciences, a strong interest in research across disciplinary boundaries from infection biology to aerosol and atmospheric physics, curiosity beyond the tip of her/ his nose, flexibility and capability to work in different lab environments, willingness to work with virulent pathogens, experimental animals, and perform simulations using numerical models. Position IRG4 will take place primarily under the auspices of the FZB, HPI and TROPOS though interaction with other LFV '21 research groups will be strongly encouraged. The candidate will spend half of the time in Hamburg (HPI, FZB) and Leipzig (TROPOS). The doctoral student will have work and laboratory facility space at the FZB (Prof. Ulrich Schaible), HPI (Prof. Glsah Gabriel) and TROPOS (Dr. Kerstin Schepanski). Applications and working environment In our consortium we offer state-of-the-art methodology and stimulating research envirowww.fz-borstel.de) together with 13 institutions of the Leibniz association (Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering (ATB, www.atb-potsdam.de), Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM, www.bnitm.de), Leibniz-Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures (DSMZ, www.dsmz.de), GESIS-Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences (GESIS, www.gesis.org), GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA, www.giga-hamburg.de), Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology-Hans Knll Institute (HKI, www.leibniz-hki.de), Heinrich-Pette-Institute-Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology (HPI, www.hpi-hamburg.de), Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB, www.igb-berlin.de), Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW, www.izw-berlin.de), Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK, www.pik-potsdam.de), Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS, www.tropos.de), Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF, www.zalf.de), Leibniz Center for Tropical Marine Ecology (ZMT, www.zmt-bremen.de)) and 3 external partners (division of social sciences of the Hamburg University (UHH, http://bit.ly/1CZumXW), the Federal Research Institute for Animal Health (FLI, www.fli.bund.de) and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM, www.lshtm.ac.uk)). Despite significant progress in the combat of infectious diseases the past century, they remain a major challenge for human health worldwide. The emergence of novel infectious agents and multi-drug resistant microbial strains, ecological alterations caused by climate change and human activities such as re-naturation of ecosystems, provide ecological conditions facilitating the spread of important infections. Socio-economic determinants such as income, nourishment, housing and working conditions and access to health systems may influence the spread and outcome of infectious diseases. To address these issues, INFECTIONS'21 identified 4 cooperative and trans-disciplinary research projects, which will be performed by Interdisciplinary Research Groups (IRGs) spanning biomedical, ecological, socio-economic and political sciences with the goal of linking the diversity of expertise to study the spread of infectious diseases by looking at biotic, abiotic and social determinants. We therefore seek to fill the following positions: - 1 doctoral position in social science research on tuberculosis transmission - 1 doctoral position in evolutionary ecology of water borne diseases - 1 doctoral position in medical entomology - 1 doctoral position in aerosol transmission properties of human pathogens Specifically: 1 doctoral position in social science research on tuberculosis transmission (IRG1) - GESIS-FZB Specific tasks: Address the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in population groups which are only partly covered by public health care. Conduct an empirical study to collect data on the background of and conditions for infection transmission in order to identify starting points for intervention measures. The tasks of the doctoral student include conceptualization and implementation of the qualitative and quantitative parts of the empirical study as well as data analysis and publication of results. Requirements: The successful candidate will have an above-average degree in sociology, psychology, social sciences or a related subject, proven knowledge of social research methods, extended knowledge of a statistical software package (e.g. STATA, SPSS). Experience in planning and implementation of empirical studies are of advantage, very good written and spoken command of German and English, good organization skills, ability to work independently as well as in a team are essential. It is expected that the doctoral student interacts with scientists from a wide variety of fields. Position IRG1 will take place primarily under the auspices of GESIS, GIGA, HPI, HKI and FZB although interaction with other LFV '21 research groups will be strongly encouraged. The doctoral student will have primary desk facility space at GESIS, location Mannheim (Dr. Jette Schrder) and will spend time at the FZB (Prof. Stefan Ehlers). 1 doctoral position in evolutionary ecology of water borne diseases (IRG2) - IZW-IGB-ZALF-DSMZ Specific tasks: Next sequence generation characterization of pathogen (virus and bacteria) sequences from water; evolutionary analysis of pathogen sequences obtained to determine phylogenetic affiliations and estimate evolutionary dynamics of pathogen populations, including evaluation for positive selection on sequences relevant to virulence or stability in water and/or novel recombination events that might influence phenotype; determination of the effect of environmental factors, in particular water source characteristics on pathogen presence; analysis of environmental DNA of water samples to compare genetic diversity of potential host sequence diversity obtained directly from animals with their drinking sources. Requirements: The successful candidate will have a completed master’s / diploma degree in biological sciences or veterinary degree; clean driver’s licence; extensive experience in molecular biology, a strong interest in ecology and wildlife, conservation and evolutionary biology as well as biogeochemistry including chemical analysis of water samples. It is expected that the doctoral student interacts with scientists from a wide variety of fields. Previous experience in evolutionary biology or next generation sequencing analysis will be considered a major advantage. Position IRG2 will take place primarily under the auspices of the DSMZ, HPI, IGB, IZW, ZALF and ZMT although interaction with other LFV '21 research groups will be strongly encouraged. The doctoral student will have primary desk and laboratory facility space at the IZW (Prof. Alex Greenwood) and will spend substantial time at the IGB (Prof. Hans Peter Grossart), ZALF (Prof. Gunnar Lischeid) and DSMZ (Prof. Jrg Overmann). 1 doctoral position in medical entomology (IRG3) - ZALF-BNITM-FLI Specific tasks: Studies on potential mosquito and biting midge vectors of disease agents in urban and agricultural areas; ecological field and laboratory studies regarding the choice of, and the adaptation to, breeding sites, the tolerance towards pollution and the role of polluted water pools as breeding habitats; characterisation of breeding habitats and habitat cenoses, molecular screening for pathogens. Requirements: The successful candidate has a completed master’s / diploma degree in biological sciences with specialisation in entomology; experience in molecular biology; a strong interest in both field and laboratory work; clean driver’s licence. It is expected that the doctoral student interacts with scientists from a wide variety of fields. Position IRG3 will take place primarily under the auspices of the ZALF, BNITM and FLI although interaction with other LFV '21 research groups will be strongly encouraged. The doctoral student will have work and laboratory facility space at the ZALF (Dr. Doreen Werner) but will spend part of his/ her time at the BNITM (PD Dr. Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit) and/ or FLI (PD Dr. Helge Kampen). 1 doctoral position in aerosol transmission properties of human pathogens (IRG4) - FZB-HPI-TROPOS Specific tasks: Study aerosols containing pathogenic bacteria and viruses relevant for human health (tuberculosis, influenza). The candidate will analyze transmission dynamics in animal models (HPI) and the biophysical properties of isolated infectious particles (FZB), and model transmission under various atmospheric and climatic conditions (TROPOS, ATB). Requirements: The successful candidate will have a master’s degree either in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, biophysics, physics, or geosciences, a strong interest in research across disciplinary boundaries from infection biology to aerosol and atmospheric physics, curiosity beyond the tip of her/ his nose, flexibility and capability to work in different lab environments, willingness to work with virulent pathogens, experimental animals, and perform simulations using numerical models. Position IRG4 will take place primarily under the auspices of the FZB, HPI and TROPOS though interaction with other LFV '21 research groups will be strongly encouraged. The candidate will spend half of the time in Hamburg (HPI, FZB) and Leipzig (TROPOS). The doctoral student will have work and laboratory facility space at the FZB (Prof. Ulrich Schaible), HPI (Prof. Glsah Gabriel) and TROPOS (Dr. Kerstin Schepanski). Applications and working environment In our consortium we offer state-of-the-art methodology and stimulating research environments within a strong interdisciplinary, collaborative context. The doctoral positions are initially limited to three years and will start on June 1, 2015 at the earliest. Salary is according to TVD or TV-L (65%). As members of the Leibniz Association, all institutions of the LFV INFECTIONS'21 consortium are equal opportunity employers, determined to increase the proportion of women in successful scientific careers, and particularly encourages women to apply. Preference will be given to disabled applicants with the same qualifications. Enquiries or questions should be directed to: IRG1: Dr. Jette Schrder (jette.schroeder@gesis.org), IRG2: Prof. Alex Greenwood (greenwood@izw-berlin.de) and Stephanie Vollberg (vollberg@izw-berlin.de), IRG3: Dr. Doreen Werner (doreen.werner@zalf.de), IRG4: Prof. Ulrich Schaible (uschaible@fz-borstel.de) and Prof. Glsah Gabriel (guelsah.gabriel@hpi.uni-hamburg.de). Please send complete application documents including the position reference number, a letter explaining interests in and particular skills for this position, CV, copies of relevant degrees and names and contact details of two people who can provide a reference before April 19, 2015 to: IRG1: GESIS: Please apply here for online applications (key number: SDM-36) IRG2: IZW: www.izw-berlin.de, online-job-market (button “Apply online”) IRG3: ZALF: bewerbungen@zalf.de; doreen.werner@zalf.de (max. 5 MB) IRG4: FZB: personalmanagement@fz-borstel.de (key number 113-doctoral position), (max. 3 MB) “Vollberg, Stephanie” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR