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July 26, 2014

23:57

*Postdoctoral Fellowship* *Plant-Animal Interactions* *Plant-Animal Interactions*: The Dearing lab at the University of Utah invites applications for a postdoctoral fellow to participate in a study to understand the co-evolution of mammalian herbivores and plant defensive compounds. This collaborative project will investigate the role of a subfamily of detoxification enzymes with respect to dietary strategy. Few mammalian herbivores are capable of dietary specialization. Our preliminary data suggest the cytochrome P450 2B subfamily is critical in the biotransformation of plant secondary compounds, particularly terpenes. These enzymes may play a key role in dietary specialization since substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency of CYP2B enzymes can be greatly affected by small changes in amino acid sequence. The change of even a single amino acid, particularly in critical regions such as a substrate recognition site, can have notable effects on metabolism of substrates. Thus, the structure and copy number of CYP2B genes may be key in an herbivore$B!G(Bs ability specialize on a terpene-rich diet. The future work consists of characterizing and comparing the amino acid sequences of CYP2B enzymes of specialist and generalist woodrats (*Neotoma spp.*) and possibly other terpene feeders. We are currently sequencing the genome of *Neotoma lepida* with assembly expected by October 1, 2014. The successful applicant will use this new genomic information to amplify and sequence CYP2B genes from a variety of wild mammalian species, compare predicted protein sequence with respect to degree of dietary specialization, and characterize the function of the proteins purified from heterologous expression systems to determine the structural basis of functional differences. This research is a collaborative project with Dr. James Halpert, UConn and provides possibilities for interactions with his research group. For more information on previous research, see: http://bit.ly/1tOLIzL http://bit.ly/1utE5TF The ideal candidate will have experience accessing and evaluating genomic data, using molecular techniques, and have an interest in addressing questions of molecular evolution, molecular ecology or plant-animal interactions. Animal collection fieldwork is possible. The candidate should have at least one first authored publication in press. The Dearing lab provides a strong training and career development environment for candidates interested in academic positions. Teaching experience (Mammalogy) is a possibility for interested candidates. Applications will be reviewed as they are received through September 1st, 2014. The anticipated start date is October 15, 2014. Please send a C.V., statement of research interests that includes career goals (1-2 pgs), pdfs of papers, and contact information (emails and phone numbers) for at least 3 professional references to Dr. Denise Dearing, care of Jael Malenke, malenke@biology.utah.edu; please put $B!H(BPostdoctoral Applicant CYP2B$B!I(B in the Subject Line. jaelmalenke@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
23:26

Postdoctoral Research Fellows in HIV We invite applications from ambitious clinical or non-clinical postdoctoral scientists, to undertake research in a Flagship programme of the Wellcome Trust & MRC in South Africa We wish to attract high quality postdoctoral scientists to undertake HIV research at the Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies, University of KwaZulu Natal, South Africa (http://bit.ly/1roMYIp & http://bit.ly/WXvud0). The Centre is funded by the Wellcome Trust and is developing close academic links with University College London and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Up to five Postdoctoral Fellowships are available. Potential areas of study include population and biological aspects of HIV in the context of the South African epidemic although other areas of investigation will be considered. We particularly invite applications related to: - HIV transmission dynamics - Molecular epidemiology host-pathogen interaction - Geospatial approaches to the design of targeted HIV prevention strategies - Biostatistical approaches to epidemic causality - Causal impact evaluation of HIV interventions - Emergence of HIV drug resistance The Genomics Programme provides example of three post-docs fellowships topics: HIV Genomics & Bioinformatics I - This Fellowship aims to apply and develop bioinformatics software applications in order to understand phylogeography patterns of HIV transmission. (http://bit.ly/1roN0zY) HIV Genomics & Phylogenetics II - This Fellowship aims to develop and/or apply phylogenetic software applications to create a framework to identify epidemiologically important HIV strains. (http://bit.ly/1roN0A0) HIV & HTLV Bioinformatics & Phylogenetics III - This fellowship aims to apply and develop bioinformatics software applications to analyze large datasets of HIV-1 and HTLV-1 complete genomes. (http://bit.ly/1roN0A4) Applicants will have demonstrated their potential to become successful scientists through high quality publications and an innovative research plan. The successful candidates will be supported to apply for externally funded personal fellowships, which should be based at UCL or LSHTM in the UK. In such cases, we will supplement the Fellowship award with further research funding. The positions are based at the Africa Centre, which has a surveillance base near Mtubatuba (2 hours north of Durban) and superb laboratory facilities in Durban, although flexibility exists for time in South Africa and abroad Candidates will therefore be required to consider mentors at the Africa Centre as well as UCL/LSHTM. Please see: http://bit.ly/1roN0A5 http://bit.ly/1roN0A7 http://bit.ly/WXvutj http://bit.ly/WXvud0 Interested candidates holding a PhD, and with clear evidence of internationally competitive research (through high quality publications), are invited to send their CV?s and discuss their interest informally with one or more the following Africa Centre staff in the first instance, prior to formal application: Professor Deenan Pillay, Director of the Africa Centre. HIV drug resistance and pathogenesis (dpillay@africacentre.ac.za) Professor Tulio de Oliveira, Director of the Genomics Programme at Africa Centre. Molecular Epidemiology, Bioinformatics & Host/Pathogen Genomics ( tdeoliveira@africacentre.ac.za) Professor Frank Tanser, Director of Population Epidemiology Programme, Epidemiology (ftanser@africacentre.ac.za) Professor Till Barnighausen, Director of the Health & Impact Evaluation Programme. Biostatistics, Health Economics (tbarnighausen@africacentre.ac.za) Thanks Tulio Open access publications & information on my research group website www.bioafrica.net Prof. Tulio de Oliveira Programme Director (Genomics), Wellcome Trust Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies, South Africa Professor, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. Director, Southern African Treatment Resistance Network (SATuRN) Honorary, Research Department of Infection, University College of London (UCL), U.K. Email:tdeoliveira@africacentre.ac.za Twitter: http://bit.ly/WXvutk YouTube: http://bit.ly/WXvtpswww.bioafrica.net Prof. Tulio de Oliveira Programme Director (Genomics), Wellcome Trust Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies, South Africa Professor, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. Director, Southern African Treatment Resistance Network (SATuRN) Honorary, Research Department of Infection, University College of London (UCL), U.K. Email:tdeoliveira@africacentre.ac.za Twitter: http://bit.ly/WXvutk YouTube: http://bit.ly/WXvtps Skype: tuliodna, gmail: tuliodna@gmail.com Tel: +27 35 550 7542, Fax: +27 35 550 7500 tuliodna@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
18:00
Background: The colorful wing patterns of butterflies, a prime example of biodiversity, can change dramatically within closely related species. Wing pattern diversity is specifically present among papilionid butterflies. Whether a correlation between color and the evolution of these butterflies exists so far remained unsolved. Results: We here investigate the Cattlehearts, Parides, a small Neotropical genus of papilionid butterflies with 36 members, the wings of which are marked by distinctly colored patches. By applying various physical techniques, we investigate the coloration toolkit of the wing scales. The wing scales contain two different, wavelength-selective absorbing pigments, causing pigmentary colorations. Scale ridges with multilayered lamellae, lumen multilayers or gyroid photonic crystals in the scale lumen create structural colors that are variously combined with these pigmentary colors. Conclusions: The pigmentary and structural traits strongly correlate with the taxonomical distribution of Parides species. The experimental findings add crucial insight into the evolution of butterfly wing scales and show the importance of morphological parameter mapping for butterfly phylogenetics.
06:00
Background: Pathogens are a major regulatory force for host populations, especially under stressful conditions. Elevated temperatures may enhance the development of pathogens, increase the number of transmission stages, and can negatively influence host susceptibility depending on host thermal tolerance. As a net result, this can lead to a higher prevalence of epidemics during summer months. These conditions also apply to marine ecosystems, where possible ecological impacts and the population-specific potential for evolutionary responses to changing environments and increasing disease prevalence are, however, less known. Therefore, we investigated the influence of thermal stress on the evolutionary trajectories of disease resistance in three marine populations of three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus by combining the effects of elevated temperature and infection with a bacterial strain of Vibrio sp. using a common garden experiment. Results: We found that thermal stress had an impact on fish weight and especially on survival after infection after only short periods of thermal acclimation. Environmental stress reduced genetic differentiation (QST) between populations by releasing cryptic within-population variation. While life history traits displayed positive genetic correlations across environments with relatively weak genotype by environment interactions (GxE), environmental stress led to negative genetic correlations across environments in pathogen resistance. This reversal of genetic effects governing resistance is probably attributable to changing environment-dependent virulence mechanisms of the pathogen interacting differently with host genotypes, i.e. GPathogenxGHostxE or (GPathogenxE)x(GHostxE) interactions, rather than to pure host genetic effects, i.e. GHostxE interactions. Conclusion: To cope with climatic changes and the associated increase in pathogen virulence, host species require wide thermal tolerances and pathogen-resistant genotypes. The higher resistance we found for some families at elevated temperatures showed that there is evolutionary potential for resistance to Vibrio sp. in both thermal environments. The negative genetic correlation of pathogen resistance between thermal environments, on the other hand, indicates that adaptation to current conditions can be a weak predictor for performance in changing environments. The observed feedback on selective gradients exerted on life history traits may exacerbate this effect, as it can also modify the response to selection for other vital components of fitness.

July 25, 2014

23:34

Dear all, I was wondering if anyone has a Drosophila saltans line they might be able to send me a copy of? Needed asap ideally with a good number of flies so I can quickly build up to large numbers. Thanks very much in advance, Ben via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:21
We are looking for a talented, creative postdoc to help head up a 3-year NSF-funded project examining the molecular-functional-structural evolution of RNA interference (RNAi) in animals and plants. We are particularly interested in understanding how diversification of key proteins in the RNAi system produced the molecular-systems complexity necessary to support multicellularity in these two lineages. By comparing independent expansions of RNAi in animal and plant lineages, we expect to be able to begin understanding the extent to which plant and animal RNAi are functionally and structurally convergent. Our aim is to go beyond a catalog of molecular-functional evolution to begin figuring out the general principles by which molecular systems evolve and contribute to organism complexity. We use a variety of computational, in-vitro and cell-culture techniques to understand the evolution of molecular function, including ancestral protein resurrection, molecular dynamics simulations, binding kinetics experiments, and gene expression in human cells. We are open to and encourage the development of new methodologies for addressing these questions. Our lab has a general interest in comparative innate antiviral immunity and supports a variety of researchers working on related projects. We are generally a hard-working, relaxed group that enjoys creative, rigorous and innovative science in a cordial atmosphere fueled by lots of good coffee. For more information about our lab and other groups at UF, check out the following resources: http://on.fb.me/1piF9l7 http://bit.ly/1ulysqr http://bit.ly/16AFRXS http://bit.ly/1ulysqt http://ufgi.ufl.edu http://bit.ly/1piF9Br For more information, please contact: Bryan Kolaczkowski bryank@ufl.edu Assistant Professor University of Florida bryan kolaczkowski via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:11
Assistant Professor Evolutionary Ecology of Plants or Fungi Oregon State University The Department of Botany and Plant Pathology (http://bit.ly/Ux3KtQ) seeks applicants for a 9-month, full-time (1.0 FTE), tenure-track faculty position in Evolutionary Ecology of Plants or Fungi. The successful candidate will be expected to establish an innovative and competitive research program that pursues scholarly work in the area of Evolutionary Ecology. The research specialization within evolutionary ecology is open and includes, but is not limited to: plants, fungi, or plant-fungal interactions (e.g., mycorrhizae, endophytes, pathogens, etc.). Emphasis is placed on research that integrates across multiple levels of inquiry and combines field, experimental, laboratory and/or computational approaches, and is relevant to natural resources and/or agriculture. The candidate will also contribute to undergraduate and graduate education in introductory courses and/or in area of expertise; mentor and serve as research advisor to graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in their advanced degree programs in Botany and Plant Pathology, Molecular and Cell Biology, Environmental Science or related programs; and act as advisor and research mentor to undergraduate students. Required qualifications include a PhD with research experience relevant to Evolutionary Ecology of Plants or Fungi, and a commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity. Postdoctoral experience is strongly preferred. Other preferred qualifications include potential for developing an interdisciplinary research program and effective teaching. To review the position description and apply, go to posting #0012761 at http://bit.ly/1nFJ8fR. OSU is an AA/EOE. For full consideration, apply by 09/15/14 when review of applications will begin. Closing date is 10/15/14. Joey Spatafora via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:49
I am looking for Ph.D. students to join my newly formed research group in Fall 2015 in the Department of Psychology (Biopsychology Program Area) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Official start dates for these positions would be August 2015 or August 2016 but preliminary field or lab work could start as early as Spring 2015. My research group focuses on addressing questions at the interface of evolutionary ecology, behavior, and physiology in free-living mammalian species (see http://bit.ly/1nzOiZg). I am broadly interested in understanding how wild animals are affected by changes in their ecological or social environment and the behavioral and physiological mechanisms by which they adjust themselves to these altered environments. We address these questions using long-term observational data as well as performing large-scale experiments in the field. We aim to couple this field research with detailed mechanistic work from hormones to genomes. The exact objectives of the research projects are extremely flexible and will largely be determined by the student but I hope that they will overlap with the focus of my research group. I am particularly looking for students that are interested in blending field and laboratory research in free-living mammalian species and have previous experience carrying out field and/or lab research. Students that have an interest and experience in neuroscience or neurobiology are also encouraged to apply. Ph.D. students that are admitted to the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan are fully funded for five years. This support package includes tuition (Fall & Winter), salary (including 4 years of summer salary), and medical/dental insurance (all year round including the summer). Two and half of the years are fully-funded research assistant positions (no teaching) whereas the other two and half years are funded by half-time teaching assistant positions. External or University fellowships can also reduce teaching responsibilities. Funds for research expenses will also be available. In addition to this great financial support package, Ann Arbor is a great place to live and work! Applications to the Department of Psychology (http://goo.gl/Lxwdff) would be due by 1 December 2014 for the Fall 2015 start date. Admitted students would participate in the Biopsychology Program Area in the Department of Psychology (see graduate curriculum here: http://goo.gl/6Se3fc) but would also be able to take courses and participate informally in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Michigan (http://bit.ly/1cWSoaE). If you are interested in applying for these Ph.D. positions, please send me an email (dantzer@umich.edu) that contains your CV, GRE test scores (if available), and a brief description outlining your research interests and also why you would be interested in joining my research group. I will then respond outlining what you can expect from me as a supervisor as well as discuss possible research projects. -Ben Dantzer Ben Dantzer, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Psychology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA Email: dantzer@umich.edu Phone: 734-647-4952 Twitter: @ben_dantzer Web: http://bit.ly/1nzOiZg www.redsquirrel.ca http://bit.ly/1oov0spwww.redsquirrel.ca http://bit.ly/1oov0sp Benjamin Dantzer via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:19
Postdoctoral position in evolutionary genomics and speciation. P.I.: Dr. Kerry Shaw, Cornell University Research Project: A postdoctoral position is available to join an NSF-funded project in the laboratory of Kerry Shaw at Cornell University to study the evolution and genetics of traits involved in reproductive incompatibility and speciation in the Hawaiian cricket genus Laupala. Laupala species are recently diverged and ecologically and morphologically similar, but differ in traits involved in sexual isolation. Behavioral evolution involving these traits is thought to have played a large role in the rapid and extensive diversification of this genus. The genetic basis of acoustic variation will be studied using genomic approaches. A draft genome is available, and we seek to improve it as a means for identifying the genetic architecture of phenotypes involved in speciation. Requirements: The desired candidate will possess an interest in / experience with molecular tools, quantitative genetics, next gen sequencing, and associated statistical analyses (e.g. R/QTL). Bioinformatics skills (such as basic Linux knowledge, read mapping SNP calling) is desirable, and an interest in acquiring these skills is essential. Basic scripting skills (Perl, Python, Ruby) is a plus. An interest in the evolution of premating isolation is also beneficial, but no prior knowledge in this area is required. Cornell University has many labs and research groups dedicated to the study of evolution, genomics and behavior and ecology of speciation as well as bioinformatics. As such, it provides a rich academic environment for those interested in evolutionary genomics and speciation. To apply, email a statement of research interests, a curriculum vitae, and the email addresses of three references to Kerry Shaw (KLS4@cornell.edu). At least two years of funding are available. “Kerry L. Shaw” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

July 24, 2014

23:49

A three-year PhD studenship will be available, starting November 2014, at the University of Ferrara, Italy, in the human population genetics group led by Guido Barbujani. The call will be published at the end of July, and the selection process will take place in September. The studentship, supported by funds of the European Research Council project LanGeLin, will be hosted within the Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnologies. The study subject will be the comparison of genomic and linguistic diversity in worldwide populations. The successful candidate for this fellowship should be able to work in a multidisciplinary context, should have a good background in population genetics and biostatistics, and experience with the bioinformatic analysis of genomes. Potential candidates are encouraged to contact Guido Barbujani at this address: g.barbujani@unife.it. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
23:36

_Postdoc position in the theory of molecular errors and evolvability_ A postdoc position is available to work with Joanna Masel (http://bit.ly/1hmktJq) at the University of Arizona in Tucson. A popular tourist destination surrounded on all four sides by mountainous national and state parks, Tucson is a vibrant city of nearly a million people with an attractive climate. The EEB department in Tucson was ranked in the top 10 by US News & World Report. All molecular processes, from transcription to protein interactions, are subject to errors. We are interested in exploring the evolutionary consequences of this simple fact. In previous work (Rajon & Masel 2011 PNAS), we found that the evolution of error rates is bistable. One attractor represents a global proofreading solution that avoids making errors at many loci at once, the other a local robustness solution, where errors happen at high rates but the consequences of each error have evolved, one locus at a time, to be benign. Populations that evolved the local solution were much more evolvable, with selection acting on the consequences of errors acting as a playground to explore and prescreen possible future mutations. We are looking for a postdoc to extend this model to the case where there is variation in expression levels among loci. In this case, preliminary results suggest that bistability no longer occurs. The postdoc will study evolvability phenomena in this case, and also investigate controversial hypotheses surrounding the adaptive evolution of evolvability. A strong quantitative background, good programming skills, and previous modeling experience are all required. A background in evolutionary theory is strongly preferred. Some interest in the molecular biology of transcription, translation, protein folding and binding, and the errors in each of these processes is an advantage. The position is available immediately, and is renewable, with funding secured for at least two years. Contact Joanna Masel at masel@u.arizona.edu for more information and/or to apply. masel@email.arizona.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
06:00
Background: Early methods for estimating divergence times from gene sequence data relied on the assumption of a molecular clock. More sophisticated methods were created to model rate variation and used auto-correlation of rates, local clocks, or the so called ?uncorrelated relaxed clock? where substitution rates are assumed to be drawn from a parametric distribution. In the case of Bayesian inference methods the impact of the prior on branching times is not clearly understood, and if the amount of data is limited the posterior could be strongly influenced by the prior. Results: We develop a maximum likelihood method ? Physher ? that uses local or discrete clocks to estimate evolutionary rates and divergence times from heterochronous sequence data. Using two empirical data sets we show that our discrete clock estimates are similar to those obtained by other methods, and that Physher outperformed some methods in the estimation of the root age of an influenza virus data set. A simulation analysis suggests that Physher can outperform a Bayesian method when the real topology contains two long branches below the root node, even when evolution is strongly clock-like. Conclusions: These results suggest it is advisable to use a variety of methods to estimate evolutionary rates and divergence times from heterochronous sequence data. Physher and the associated data sets used here are available online at http://code.google.com/p/physher/.
02:06

COURSES SWISS INSTITUTE IN STATISTICAL GENETICS 2014 4 MODULES - Population Genetics Data Analysis - Elements of R for Genetics and Bioinformatics - Quantitative Genetics - Mixed Models in Quantitative Genetics — via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:51
Eawag and the Department of Aquatic Ecology seeks to recruit a : Postdoc in evolutionary ecology of aquatic ecosystems Eawag, the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, is a Swiss-based and internationally networked aquatic research institute within the ETH domain (Swiss Federal Institutes of Science and Technology). It is committed to the ecologically, economically and socially responsible management of water resources and aquatic ecosystems. The Postdoc will be funded by a Swiss National Science Foundation grant, entitled The eco-evolutionary dynamics of community assembly in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the project is to understand how ecological and evolutionary processes jointly drive community assembly in aquatic ecosystems. The project involves a combination large-scale experiments that manipulate the ecological and evolutionary diversity of food webs under contrasting environmental conditions, as well as the analysis of existing long-term datasets of plankton biodiversity dynamics in freshwater lakes. The project is broadly focused on aquatic food webs, including microbial, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and fish communities. Ultimately, the research addresses fundamental links between the ecology and evolution of food webs and the physical environment and biogeochemistry of ecosystems. We are looking for candidates with strong analytical abilities and a broad interest in ecology, evolution, and/or ecosystem science. It would be an asset to have experience with one or more of the following: analysis of large biodiversity datasets, community phylogenetics, molecular ecology, next generation sequencing. We offer a stimulating and international research environment, excellent research facilities and a lively and social working place. Eawags Center for Ecology, Evolution & Biogeochemistry (CEEB) is located in Kastanienbaum LU on the shore of Lake Lucerne and is a strong nucleus of Eawag research groups aimed at integrating evolutionary biology, community ecology, and ecosystem science http://bit.ly/126BsYf. The postdoc will interact with a diverse range of researchers studying community ecology, evolutionary biology, ecological genetics, ecosystem science, and applied environmental science. The project will also involve collaborations between researchers at Eawag (Dr. Blake Matthews, Dr. Helmut Brgmann) and the University of Geneva (Dr. Bas Ibelings). The starting date for the Postdoc is flexible, but a starting date in 2014 or early 2015 is preferred. The position is for between 2-3 years. Applications should include a cover letter, a curriculum vita, and three references. Copies of 3-5 prior publications will also be considered if made available via PDF. Applications must be submitted by 15 August 2014. For further information, consult http://bit.ly/1A9FFu2 or directly contact Dr. Blake Matthews: Tel: +41 58 765 2120, E-mail: blake.matthews@eawag.ch We look forward to receiving your application through this webpage, any other way of applying will not be considered. Please click on the link below, this will take you directly to the application form. http://bit.ly/1rNAiff “Matthews, Blake” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:38

This is a multipart message in MIME format. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:38
—_000_2658329440644AC0916C63E2FDA57E37missouriedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Elizabeth King (http://bit.ly/1mHuLSk) at the University of Missouri. The primary research aim in the King lab is to understand the genetic and physiological basis of life history evolution using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Much of our current work relies on the DSPR (http://flyrils.org), a large genetic mapping panel, and involves molecular genetics, large genomic data sets, bioinformatics, and advanced statistical techniques. All members of the King lab are expected to gain proficiency in the analysis of genomic datasets. While experience with scripting languages (R, perl, python) is not required, a willingness to learn is. Initial appointment is for 1 year with the possibility of renewal based on satisfactory performance and will include benefits and a competitive salary. The start date for the position is flexible, ideally no later than January 2015. Interested applicants should email Elizabeth King (kingeg@missouri.edu) and provide a brief cover letter, a C.V., and names and contact information for 3 references. The cover letter should include a description of previous research experience, interest in the position, and future career goals. The position will remain open until filled. The Division of Biological Sciences at MU (http://bit.ly/1sWcFnD) has research strengths in evolutionary biology, genetics and genomics, and quantitative biology. MU also boasts a highly collaborative research environment between departments within the life sciences (e.g., animal sciences, plant sciences, biomedical sciences, statistics, etc.). Columbia is a vibrant college town located in mid-Missouri, 2 hours from both Kansas City and St. Louis (http://bit.ly/1mHuLSn). Contact for all inquires and applications: Elizabeth (Libby) King Assistant Professor Division of Biological Sciences University of Missouri 401 Tucker Hall Columbia, MO, 65211, USA email: kingeg@missouri.edu website: http://bit.ly/1mHuLSk —_000_2658329440644AC0916C63E2FDA57E37missouriedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Elizabeth King (http://bit.ly/1mHuLSk) at the University of Missouri.  The primary research aim in the King lab is to understand the genetic and physiological basis of life history evolution using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Much of our current work relies on the DSPR (http://flyrils.org), a large genetic mapping panel, and involves molecular genetics, large genomic data sets, bioinformatics, and advanced statistical techniques. All members of the King lab are expected to gain proficiency in the analysis of genomic datasets. While experience with scripting languages (R, perl, python) is not required, a willingness to learn is. Initial appointment is for 1 year with the possibility of renewal based on satisfactory performance and will include benefits and a competitive salary.  The start date for the position is flexible, ideally no later than January 2015. Interested applicants should email Elizabeth King (kingeg@missouri.edu) and provide a brief cover letter, a C.V., and names and contact information for 3 references. The cover letter should include a description of previous research experience, interest in the position, and future career goals. The position will remain open until filled. The Division of Biological Sciences at MU (http://bit.ly/1sWcFnD) has research strengths in evolutionary biology, genetics and genomics, and quantitative biology. MU also boasts a highly collaborative research environment between departments within the life sciences (e.g., animal sciences, plant sciences, biomedical sciences, statistics, etc.). Columbia is a vibrant college town located in mid-Missouri, 2 hours from both Kansas City and St. Louis (http://bit.ly/1mHuLSn).    Contact for all inquires and applications: Elizabeth (Libby) King Assistant Professor Division of Biological Sciences University of Missouri 401 Tucker Hall Columbia, MO, 65211, USA email: kingeg@missouri.edu website: http://bit.ly/1mHuLSk —_000_2658329440644AC0916C63E2FDA57E37missouriedu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:51
Research Scientist: Mycologist Salary range 25,947-30,442 with appointment dependent on experience The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) is a recognised Centre of Excellence in plant and fungal diversity. Located in a UNESCO World Heritage city famed for its scientific innovation and cultural interest, the RBGE operates across a full range of activities from taxonomic monography to biodiversity genomics to ecosystem function and services. We are seeking to employ a mycologist at our Edinburgh Garden who is or will become an international scientific leader. The successful applicant’s research will explore fungal diversity (e.g. systematics, ecology, evolutionary biology) to address societal challenges. As examples, these challenges may include but are not restricted to (i) the role of fungal diversity in maintaining ecosystem function and services, (ii) best practice in managing fungal disease threats to native (non-crop) ecosystems, and/or (iii) providing tools to promote human understanding of harmful and useful fungal diversity. We are particularly interested in applicants who can demonstrate scientific excellence that is of international importance, and is also relevant to conservation policy in Scotland. Applicants must be educated to PhD level (with PhD already obtained or about to be obtained). You should be an excellent researcher with a proven track record appropriate for your career stage, and have strong scientific writing ability. You’ll also need to be an effective communicator with the ability to clearly articulate the relevance of your research to both specialist and non-specialist audiences, and good interpersonal skills will be essential to develop and maintain effective relationships with colleagues. A full job description and person specification can be downloaded from this page. Ideally we see the postholder working on a full-time basis, but we would consider applications from exceptional candidates looking to work part-time. Further details of RBGE’s science can be obtained from http://bit.ly/1rbfEo6. Informal enquiries or questions with regards to this post can be directed to Dr Chris Ellis, Head of Cryptogamic Plants and Fungi (c.ellis@rbge.org.uk). Interested applicants should send a CV and covering letter, outlining the skills and experience you could bring to the post, as well as a completed equal opportunities form , to recruitment@rbge.org.uk by 5pm GMT on Fri. 29th August 2014. If you have not heard from us within 2 weeks of the closing date please assume that your application has not been shortlisted on this occasion. No recruitment agencies please. The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is a charity registered in Scotland (No SC007983) Rebecca Yahr via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:07

The University of Oklahoma, Department of Biology invites applications for a post-doctoral fellow to work in the lab of Dr. Ingo Schlupp ( http://bit.ly/1nWzwaW). We seek a highly motivated, innovative scientist working in any area of Evolutionary Ecology. The Schlupp lab is working mainly with livebearing fishes, and experience with that group would be beneficial. The training and duties include carrying out research independently and seeking extramural funding. We seek a person that works well with Graduate and Undergraduate students. The post-doctoral scholar is expected to teach one course per semester. The topic of the course will be determined together with the Chair of Biology, Dr. Randall Hewes. The position is for four years, with annual renewal, and an annual salary of $40,000. The Department of Biology provides a vibrant, positive environment fostering excellence in Research and Teaching (http://bit.ly/1sVS5Ut). Norman is a safe, family friendly community with many of the benefits associated with a college town, including low cost of living. A PhD is required at the time of appointment. Applicants should send a single pdf containing the following items in order: cover letter, CV, research and teaching statement, and up to three reprints/preprints. Also, please provide contact information for two referees (name, affiliation, e-mail address, and telephone number). The pdf should be named with the candidates Lastname_Firstname and e-mailed to Dr. Ingo Schlupp at schlupp@ou.edu. Review of applications will begin August 15th and continue until the position is filled. The University of Oklahoma is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Dr. Ingo Schlupp Presidential Professor of Biology Associate Dean for Faculty and Research College of Arts and Sciences http://bit.ly/1nWzwaW ingoschlupp@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:06
***Bioinformatics Post-doctoral Researcher Position*** A post-doc position (initial contract for 1 year, with the possibility of renewals annually based on performance) co-supervised by Todd Schlenke and Sarah Schaack is available at Reed College in Portland, OR. We are searching for a post-doc who will be involved in several arthropod genomics projects going on in each of our labs. In the Schlenke lab, the focus will be on sequencing wasp genomes and using the data to study venom gene family evolution and horizontal transfer between parasitoids and their Drosophillid hosts. In the Schaack lab, projects will involve analyzing recently generated whole genome sequence and transcriptome data for a lepidopteran crop pest and other arthropods, as well as NGS data generated from long-term mutation-accumulation experiments using cladocerans. More information on the specific projects, as well as opportunities for independent projects, collaborative work, participation in outreach activities, and travel will be shared with shortlisted candidates. Requirements: Experience with manipulating and analyzing NGS sequence data, programming competency, and relevant computational skills. The successful candidate will also show evidence of excellent oral and written communication skills. Familiarity with arthropods is beneficial, but not required. Reed is a highly rigorous undergraduate institution with a strong research emphasis, which offers a unique training environment for post-docs. Features include close collaboration with the PIs, the opportunity to work with talented undergraduates, and the chance to network with other post-docs in the department and with biologists throughout Portland and the region. The scientific and intellectual environment at Reed is stimulating and provides a number of opportunities for interactions (including an excellent weekly seminar series, journal clubs, and discussion groups). Start date is flexible. Salary will be based on the NIH post-doc pay scale and will be commensurate with experience. To apply, submit a cover letter detailing your research interests, a CV, and contact information for 3 references to *reedSCHpostdoc@gmail.com *. To receive full consideration, send materials on or before Aug 10, 2014, however applicants will be considered until the position is filled. Reed College is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Candidates from underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. schaackmobile@gmail.com via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

July 23, 2014

23:51

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Source: EVOLDIR