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September 30, 2014

14:28

Erick Matsen wrote:

New from @tanja_stadler and co:

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov On age and species richness of higher taxa. T Stadler, DL Rabosky, RE Ricklefs and F Bokma, The American naturalist, Oct 2014

Abstract Many studies have tried to identify factors that explain differences in numbers of species between clades against the background assumption that older clades contain more species because they have had more time for diversity to accumulate. The finding in several recent studies that species richness of clades is decoupled from stem age has been interpreted as evidence for ecological limits to species richness. Here we demonstrate that the absence of a positive age-diversity relationship, or even a negative relationship, may also occur when taxa are defined based on time or some correlate of time such as genetic distance or perhaps morphological distinctness. Thus, inferring underlying processes from distributions of species across higher taxa requires caution concerning the way in which higher taxa are defined. When this definition is unclear, crown age is superior to stem age as a measure of clade age.

They were thinking about what models might not have a monotonically positive age-diversity relationship for clades:

Several studies have investigated relations between species richness and ages of higher taxa. Three methodological articles (Magallón and Sanderson 2001; Bokma 2003; Paradis 2003) prominently featuring the idea that E[n] = e(λ − μ)t have together been cited by more than 500 articles. Furthermore, Rabosky et al. (2012) investigated the behavior of a simple model where higher taxa originate under a Poisson process (see also Aldous et al. 2008; Maruvka et al. 2013). They found that such a model was expected to result in positive relationships between stem clade age and species richness, even when rates of species diversification varied among clades, provided that rates within clades were constant through time. As we have shown here, the expectation of a positive relationship between stem age and species richness may be incorrect, as it depends on the particular model of diversification and definition of higher taxa.

Many studies have identified young taxa as “unexpectedly” species rich, but our results show that such patterns can result from the manner in which higher taxa are delimited. For example, under scenarios i-b and ii-b, clades with young stem ages are expected to contain not fewer but more species than clades with old stem ages (table 1). In other words, studies may have incorrectly identified young taxa as unexpectedly species rich because they neglected how taxa were defined, and consequently incorrectly expected young taxa to be species poor.

Here is the model they consider:

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06:00
Background: Archaeology reports millenary cultural contacts between Peruvian Coast-Andes and the Amazon Yunga, a rainforest transitional region between Andes and Lower Amazonia. To clarify the relationships between cultural and biological evolution of these populations, in particular between Amazon Yungas and Andeans, we used DNA-sequence data, a model-based Bayesian approach and several statistical validations to infer a set of demographic parameters. Results: We found that the genetic diversity of the Shimaa (an Amazon Yunga population) is a subset of that of Quechuas from Central-Andes. Using the Isolation-with-Migration population genetics model, we inferred that the Shimaa ancestors were a small subgroup that split less than 5300?years ago (after the development of complex societies) from an ancestral Andean population. After the split, the most plausible scenario compatible with our results is that the ancestors of Shimaas moved toward the Peruvian Amazon Yunga and incorporated the culture and language of some of their neighbors, but not a substantial amount of their genes. We validated our results using Approximate Bayesian Computations, posterior predictive tests and the analysis of pseudo-observed datasets. Conclusions: We presented a case study in which model-based Bayesian approaches, combined with necessary statistical validations, shed light into the prehistoric demographic relationship between Andeans and a population from the Amazon Yunga. Our results offer a testable model for the peopling of this large transitional environmental region between the Andes and the Lower Amazonia. However, studies on larger samples and involving more populations of these regions are necessary to confirm if the predominant Andean biological origin of the Shimaas is the rule, and not the exception.
03:55
Postdoc in marine genomics at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. The Molecular Zoology Laboratory at the University of Johannesburg invites applications for postdoctoral positions for studying thermal adaptation in coastal invertebrates and/or fishes for 2015. As this work includes a significant genomic component, we are particularly interested in researchers who have experience with next-generating sequencing data analyses (or at least with unix-based bioinformatics). The fellowships are funded through the South African Network for Coastal and Oceanographic Research (SANCOR) and are open to both local and international researchers. The ‘official’ fellowship is valued at R120 000 p.a. + R30 000 for travel (1 R or ZAR = US$ 0.09), but top-up funding is available from the university. For details on eligibility, please see http://bit.ly/10iLVlL. The internal deadline is October 17. Interested researchers should please contact Dr Peter Teske directly at prteske@uj.ac.za *Dr Peter Teske* *Senior Lecturer: Department of ZoologyUniversity of Johannesburg, Kingsway CampusAuckland Park 2006South Africa* *Tel +27 (0)11 559 3373 * *Molecular Zoology Lab: http://bit.ly/1kSSYtN *Flinders University Molecular Ecology Lab: http://bit.ly/1mnB1iC Peter Teske via Gmail
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03:55

—089e013a03ac2909cc05043c38bf Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN PLANT BIOLOGY The Department of Plant and Microbial Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, has an opening for an Assistant Professor (tenure track, nine-month appointment) with an expected start date of July 1, 2015. We seek applications for a faculty member who will develop an internationally recognized, extramurally funded research program with a focus on whole plant biology. Areas of particular interest include fundamental aspects of development, such as growth, diversification, adaptations, and interactions of plants with microbes. The desirable candidate’s research will be expected to integrate a broad spectrum of genetic, physiological, computational, and genomic technologies. Candidates who use systems and/or synthetic biology approaches and conduct translational research with crops and/or naturally occurring populations are encouraged to apply. Candidates must have a strong background in experimental plant biology and the ability to contribute to instruction at the undergraduate and graduate level. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or equivalent by the time of application. Candidates must have postdoctoral experience by the date of hire and have a demonstrated excellence and originality in research. The successful applicant will join a dynamic and diverse community of biologists on the UC Berkeley campus in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology (http://bit.ly/1wTEmN5), and will have extensive opportunities for synergistic collaborations with the nearby USDA-ARS Plant Gene Expression Center (http://bit.ly/10iLUhQ), UC Berkeley Energy Biosciences Institute (http://bit.ly/1wTEmN8), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (http://www.lbl.gov/), Joint Genome Institute ( http://1.usa.gov/10iLUy4), and the Joint BioEnergy Institute ( http://www.jbei.org/). A curriculum vitae (your most recently updated C.V.), cover letter, statement of research (current and future research interests), statement of teaching (including experience and teaching philosophy), three to five letters of reference, statement of contributions to diversity (addressing past and/or potential contributions to diversity through research, teaching, and/or service), and up to five papers or other documents (optional) should be submitted via UC Berkeley’s online application system by the search closing date, November 14, 2014. http://bit.ly/10iLSq4 All letters will be treated as confidential per University of California policy and California state law. Please refer potential referees, including when letters are provided via a third party (i.e., dossier service or career center), to the UC Berkeley statement of confidentiality ( http://bit.ly/1wTEkon) prior to submitting their letters. via Gmail

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03:55
—_000_f4ed62c478094371a1900ab8add19818BLUPR05MB402namprd05pro_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable 5 DAYS TO REGISTER!!! Join the Kansas State University Ecological Genomics Institute for a three-day conference bringing together distinguished and renowned academics, students, postdoctorates, and others interested in the field. Participants will hear, present, and discuss research in a broad range of topics pertaining to ecological genomics. This year’s event will showcase research on the latest ecological genomics topics. Packed with speakers, poster abstract presentations, and networking opportunities, the 2014 Ecological Genomics Symposium will be an exciting and invigorating avenue for cross-disciplinary interactions. Early registration discounts end Friday, October 3, so register now! DON’T DELAY, PRICES INCREASE ON SATURDAY! When: October 31 - November 2, 2014 Where: Marriott Country Club Plaza Kansas City, MO Early bird registration fee: $285 ($190 for graduate and undergraduate students) Registration fee after October 4: $360 ($240 for students) —_000_f4ed62c478094371a1900ab8add19818BLUPR05MB402namprd05pro_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
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03:39

Behavioral Ecology Faculty Position ” Assistant Professor, UC Santa Barbara The Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology (EEMB; www.eemb.ucsb.edu) at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in Behavioral Ecology, broadly defined, at the rank of Assistant Professor. We are searching for a highly creative and interactive scholar who fits into our multidisciplinary department. The area and system of study are open, although we are most interested in candidates who study the fitness consequences or evolutionary outcomes of variation in behavioral strategies or who use comparative analyses relating behavior to the environment. We encourage applications from candidates who adopt an integrative, mechanistic approach and have a strong field component in their research. The candidate is expected to have or develop an internationally recognized research program, mentor graduate and undergraduate students in the candidate’s area of expertise, and teach both graduate and undergraduate courses. This position requires a PhD at the time of appointment. Applicants should submit: 1) a cover letter, 2) a curriculum vitae, 3) a statement of research that covers research accomplishments and future plans, 4) a statement of teaching experience and interests, 5) three selected publications, and 6) letters of recommendation from three to four persons with the ability to evaluate the candidate. EEMB is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service. Submit applications electronically at: http://bit.ly/1uZfLol.www.eemb.ucsb.edu) at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in Behavioral Ecology, broadly defined, at the rank of Assistant Professor. We are searching for a highly creative and interactive scholar who fits into our multidisciplinary department. The area and system of study are open, although we are most interested in candidates who study the fitness consequences or evolutionary outcomes of variation in behavioral strategies or who use comparative analyses relating behavior to the environment. We encourage applications from candidates who adopt an integrative, mechanistic approach and have a strong field component in their research. The candidate is expected to have or develop an internationally recognized research program, mentor graduate and undergraduate students in the candidate’s area of expertise, and teach both graduate and undergraduate courses. This position requires a PhD at the time of appointment. Applicants should submit: 1) a cover letter, 2) a curriculum vitae, 3) a statement of research that covers research accomplishments and future plans, 4) a statement of teaching experience and interests, 5) three selected publications, and 6) letters of recommendation from three to four persons with the ability to evaluate the candidate. EEMB is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service. Submit applications electronically at: http://bit.ly/1uZfLol. Review of applicants will begin November 15, 2014 and will continue until the position has been filled. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or any other characteristic protected by law including protected Veterans and individuals with disabilities. via Gmail

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03:22
Research Zoologist Department of Vertebrate Zoology National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution Potential applicants: Please note that with this advertisement we seek to recruit a career Research Zoologist for our department. The position has a four-year probationary period similar to the academic tenure system. With a satisfactory career review after four years, the incumbent can become a permanent Federal employee. The official advertisement is below. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History seeks a zoologist to conduct an integrative, specimen- or collection-based research program in vertebrate evolution and biodiversity, in the disciplines of herpetology, ichthyology, mammalogy, and/or ornithology, particularly herpetology. The successful candidate is expected to develop an internationally recognized research program that makes important contributions to understanding vertebrate evolution and biodiversity through integrative research involving phylogenetics, anatomy, development, genomics, biogeography, conservation, informatics, or related fields. Frequent publication of highly regarded papers in competitive, peer-reviewed journals, curation of collections in specialty area, service to the scientific community in leadership capacities, acquisition of external funding, engagement in outreach activities, and mentorship of students are expected. Full-time 4-year term appointment with full Government benefits to be filled at the GS-12 level; US citizenship required. The museum’s authorized salary range for this position at this time is $75,621 - $80,662 per annum. College transcripts and proof of U.S. accreditation for foreign study must be submitted online by the closing date of announcement or your application will be disqualified. For complete requirements and application procedures go to www.sihr.si.edu or www.usajobs.gov and refer to Announcement 14A-JW-299546-DEU-NMNH. The announcement opens Monday, September 29, 2014. Applications and all supporting documentation must be received on-line by Monday, October 27, 2014 and must reference the announcement number. All applicants will be notified by email when their application is received. The Smithsonian Institution is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Thanks very much, Helen James Research Zoologist and Curator Division of Birds, MRC-116 National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution Washington DC 20013-7012 Ph. 202-633-0792 “James, Helen” via Gmail
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03:22

Assistant Professor Position Molecular or Cellular Systems Biology University of Tennessee, Knoxville The Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of molecular and cellular systems biology. Systems biology seeks to understand and predict how molecules and cells interact and communicate to give rise to emergent properties and behaviors of biological systems. We seek applicants whose research interests lie in understanding central biological phenomena by analyzing multi-dimensional, or large-scale experimental data within a quantitative framework. Ideal candidates will integrate experimentation with biomolecules, genomes, cells, or organisms with a tailored computational approach, such as bioinformatics, in the case of an omic-centered program, and/or mathematical modeling. The successful candidate should address questions that complement existing strengths in the department (cellular and developmental biology, plant and microbial biology, structural biology, neurobiology; see http://bcmb.utk.edu/ for details). We anticipate that the candidate will also take advantage of scientific interactions with the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis on our campus or the nearby Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A PhD in a relevant field and postdoctoral research experience are required. The successful candidate is expected to establish an innovative, externally funded research program and contribute to the departmental teaching mission at the undergraduate and graduate levels. We are seeking candidates who will actively contribute to the diversity and intercultural goals of the University. The position will start as early as August 1, 2015, and the salary will be competitive. Applications should include a brief cover letter, CV with list of publications, a 2-3 page outline of research interests, and a description of teaching interests. Please email the application as a single pdf file to bcmbsysbio@utk.edu, and arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent directly to referenceletters@utk.edu. For informal inquiries please contact Albrecht von Arnim, PhD, at vonarnim@utk.edu. Review of applications will begin October 15, 2014 and will continue until the position is filled. The University of Tennessee is an EEO/AA/Title VI/Title IX/Section 504/ADA/ADEA institution in the provision of its education and employment programs and services. All qualified applicants will receive equal consideration for employment without regards to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, physical or mental disability, or covered veteran status. via Gmail

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02:52

A PhD position is available in the laboratory of Erik Dopman in the Department of Biology at Tufts University. Our research is a collaborative project with Rick Harrison at Cornell University, and the successful applicant will be part of a larger team at both Cornell and Tufts. Our work focuses on the evolution of barriers to gene exchange during speciation. We apply a combination of comparative and experimental approaches using the European corn borer moth as a model system. Corn borers are a textbook example of incipient speciation, in which one species splits into two through the evolution of multiple forms of reproductive isolation. Of 12 potential isolating barriers between corn borer “strains,” seven significantly reduce gene flow and five are either behavioral or ecological in nature. Current efforts are to identify the molecular genetic basis for traits contributing to reproductive isolation, to characterize the evolutionary history of these traits, and to evaluate the consequences of barrier loci on fitness and gene flow in nature. We seek a creative and motivated graduate student to work on speciation, adaptive evolution, or genome evolution. Students must have the ability to work with others and a sense of humor. Undergraduate coursework in evolutionary biology is required, as is prior research experience. Relevant and highly desirable experience includes application of molecular genetic techniques or computational analysis of gene or genome data. Relevant papers include: Wadsworth, C.B., Woods, W.A., Jr, Hahn, D.A., and Dopman, E.B. (2013). One phase of the dormancy developmental pathway is critical for the evolution of insect seasonality. J Evolution Biol 26(11):2359-68 Dopman, E. B., P. S. Robbins and A. Seaman. 2010. Components of reproductive isolation between North American pheromone strains of the European corn borer. Evolution 64:881-902. Dopman, E. B., L. Perez, S. Bogdanowicz and R. G. Harrison. 2005. Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European corn borer. PNAS 102:14706-14711. Dopman, E. B., S. M. Bogdanowicz and R. G. Harrison. 2004. Genetic mapping of sexual isolation between E and Z pheromone strains of the European corn borer. Genetics 167:301-309. The Dopman Lab (http://bit.ly/1rHlKQf) is in the Department of Biology and is a member of Tufts’ Collaborative Cluster in Genome Structure and Developmental Patterning. The Cluster focuses on genome to organism research and is located at a new Tufts facility on the main campus in Medford, MA. With two additional Tufts campuses (in Boston and Grafton), other research universities (Harvard, MIT, BU), and the vibrant city of Boston all within reach, Medford and Tufts are ideal places to live and work (http://bit.ly/1600Zpa). Interested individuals should contact Erik Dopman by e-mail (erik.dopman@tufts.edu) and describe their research interests, relevant educational background, and prior research experience. Also include a CV with GPA/GRE scores and the names and contact information of 2-3 references. Applications to the graduate program are due on 15 January, with departmental review occurring shortly thereafter. See http://bit.ly/1rHlLUe for more information on the graduate program. Informal inquiries are welcome. via Gmail

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02:23
OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY J.ROBERT STIFFLER ENDOWED PROFESSORSHIP IN PLANT SCIENCE The Department of Biological Sciences at Old Dominion University (http://bit.ly/YFzzTM), a state-supported Doctoral Research-Extensive institution invites applications and nominations for the endowed J. Robert Stiffler Professorship of Plant Science at the tenured/tenure track Professor or Associate Professor level. All candidates must demonstrate substantial research accomplishments with an established record of publications, a consistent record of independent peer-reviewed funding, have active competitive grants and a strong and successful graduate and undergraduate teaching and student mentoring record. Candidates with research programs and teaching expertise in one or more of the following areas are preferred: (1) molecular systematics, (2) plant conservation biology, (3) biogeography and/or phytogeography, (4) plant/animal interactions, and/or (5) ethnobotany. Experience in advanced genomics or transcriptomics is desirable. The ideal candidate will be active in university undergraduate and graduate programs, utilizing resources from the Norfolk Botanical Garden. Research related to the objectives Kaplan Orchid Conservatory and/or Blackwater Ecological Preserve is desirable. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or an equivalent degree in Plant Science, Botany or a closely related field. State salary support, funds from the endowment income of the J. Robert Stiffler Professorship and a competitive start-up package are available. The Department of Biological Sciences receives substantial support from state funds, from research grants from federal and other granting agencies and from endowment income funds. The Department has strong Ph.D. and M.S. graduate programs with over 100 students. The College of Sciences and the Department of Biological Sciences are undergoing a major expansion of research and educational programs. Five new faculty members joined the Department of Biological Sciences over the last two years and active searches for two additional faculty positions are in progress. Research and training grant expenditures increased in the College of Sciences by 44% over seven years to approximately $16M in FY 2013-14. Old Dominion University (www.odu.edu) is a state-supported, Carnegie doctoral research extensive institution enrolling approximately 25,000 students including 5,000 graduate students. Please submit electronically a curriculum vitae, a statement of research and teaching interests, and names, telephone numbers, and addresses (postal and email) of four references to: Professor Lytton John Musselman, Mary Payne Hogan Professor of Botany, Chair, Stiffler Search Committee at hortsearch@odu.edu Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Old Dominion University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Institution and requires compliance with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Daniel P. Hennelly Old Dominion University Office of Academic Affairs 2021 Koch Hall Norfolk, VA 23529-0011 Phone: 757 683-4559 FAX: 757 683-6888 “Hennelly, Daniel P.” via Gmail
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01:53
The Faculty of Agricultural Sciences invites applications for the position of a Full Professor (W3) of Bioinformatics at the Institute of Animal Husbandry and Breeding to be filled first in summer semester 2015. The successful candidate will teach management and analysis of omics-data in agriculture and life science in the study programmes of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and will participate in teaching in the Faculty of Natural Sciences and the Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences. The research focus of the professorship should be on the development of bioinformatic methods and algorithms and the analysis of massive DNA and RNA data sets from livestock and crop populations and associated microorganisms. This includes assembling and functional annotation of sequenced genes and transcripts as well as taxonomic and functional classification of data from microbiological metagenome projects. Interdisciplinary collaborations with associated research groups of the University of Hohenheim are expected. The position offers attractive conditions for first-time full professor appointees. Prerequisites for applicants are habilitation or an equivalent research and teaching record that may have been established during a Junior or Assistant Professorship. The advertised position is tenured. If appointed as full professor for the first time, the University of Hohenheim reserves its right to a probationary employment. With equal qualifications, preference will be given to candidates with disabilities. The University of Hohenheim seeks to increase the proportion of women in research and teaching, and strongly encourages qualified female scientists to apply. Applications should include a statement of your future research interests, a curriculum vitae, a documentation of academic achievements (copies), a list of publications, a list of third-party funded projects, a teaching record, information on teaching evaluations as well as three key publications. Please apply online at http://bit.ly/ZmRaAS before November 24th, 2014. Questions regarding the position may be directed to Prof. Dr. Markus Rodehutscord (markus.rodehutscord@uni-hohenheim.de). University of Hohenheim Faculty of Agricultural Sciences (300) 70593 Stuttgart Germany Best regards, Gaby Steinbeck agrar via Gmail
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01:23
*Faculty Position in Quantitative Evolution or Ecology* *Michigan State University* The interdisciplinary graduate program in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology & Behavior (EEBB) at Michigan State University (MSU) is seeking applications for a tenure-system Assistant Professor faculty position in *quantitative evolutionary biology or ecology*. The successful applicant will be able to demonstrate expertise and leadership in the study of fundamental questions in ecology, evolutionary biology, and/or behavior, establish an externally-funded research program that supports graduate training, and make significant contributions to both graduate and undergraduate teaching. Special consideration will be given to applicants who integrate empirical study of biological systems with cutting edge computational and quantitative methods. A competitive start-up and compensation package will be offered according to the applicant’s experience and qualifications.MSU has additional resources, as part of an Excellence Hiring Initiative, to recruit exceptional candidates at the Associate and Full Professor levels, especially those who would strengthen the impact and diversity of our research and teaching programs. With 136 graduate students and over 100 participating faculty, EEBB at MSU is one of the most successful graduate training programs in the world. The EEBB core curriculum provides students with broad training encompassing experimental, field, and theoretical approaches to the study ofecology, evolutionary biology, and behavior, as well as the computational, mathematical, and statistical methods used in these fields. The successful applicant will contribute to teaching in the EEBB core curriculum, and in the graduate and undergraduate programs of his or her home department.Depending upon research interests and programmatic fit, the successful applicant will have a tenure home in one of the following academic departments: Plant Biology , Microbiology and Molecular Genetics and Zoology . This new faculty member will also have the opportunity to participate in the NSF-funded BEACON Center for the Study of Evolution in Action . MSU is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer, committed to achieving excellence through a diverse workforce and an inclusive culture that encourages all people to reach their full potential. We actively encourage applications and/or nominations of women, persons of color, veterans, persons with disabilities and individuals who can contribute to the intellectual diversity and cultural richness at Michigan State University. MSU is committed to providing a work environment that supports employees’ work and personal life, and offers employment assistance to the spouse or partner of candidates for faculty and academic staff positions. Application materials should be submitted to the MSU Applicant Page (MAP) for faculty positions (online at https://jobs.msu.edu ; posting number 0194) as a single, concatenated pdf document that includes: a letter of interest, CV, a statement of research accomplishments and goals, and a statement of teaching accomplishments and goals. The research and teaching statements should highlight the applicant’s approach to achieving excellence through diversity. Three letters of recommendation should be submitted through the automated MAP/COMPASS web site.A separate pdf file containing three representative publications should be sent directly to the Search Committee at eebbsrch@msu.edu. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.Review of applications will begin on 3 November 2014. // Questions can be addressed to the Search Committee Chair (Fred Dyer) at eebbsrch@msu.edu. Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior Program Kay E. Holekamp, Director Pat Resler, Secretary 293 Farm Lane, Rm. 103 Giltner Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 Phone: (517) 432-1359 E-mail: eebb@msu.edu Website: www.eebb.msu.edu EEBB Office via Gmail
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01:07
Potential PhD project at the University of Tasmania, Australia Applications are currently being received for a 2015 commencement (deadline Oct 20th 2014). For more information please contact Prof Elissa Cameron (Elissa.Cameron@utas.edu.au) &/or Assoc Prof Erik Wapstra (Erik.Wapstra@utas.edu.au) at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Tasmania. The study of parental effects is a fundamental area in evolutionary ecology, but is characterised by poor integration of proximate causation and ultimate explanation. Parents influence the development of their young through both genetic and non-genetic effects, with sex allocation one maternal effect that can have profound implications for fitness. In mammals, the glucose hypothesis has been postulated to link the adaptive hypotheses of sex ratio adjustment and unify other proposed mechanisms. This PhD project will investigate the role of glucose as a unifying mechanism in sex allocation theory and the practical applications of skewing sex ratios for conservation purposes in mammals. Joanne McEvoy via Gmail
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00:50
Curator, Rancho La Brea The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) seeks a Curator for its renowned late Pleistocene Rancho La Brea collections housed at the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits. The successful candidate will conduct collection-based research in evolutionary biology and paleoecology including systematics, biogeography, climate change, and biodiversity science. The NHM, the largest natural history museum in the western United States, has recently finished a dramatic transformation including new ground-breaking exhibitions and a 3 acre wildlife garden. It anticipates completing a similar transformation at the Page Museum facility and adjacent La Brea Tar Pits during the next decade. The NHM’s mission is to inspire wonder, discovery, and responsibility for our natural and cultural worlds. Our strategic intent-“To be the best at communicating how our planet and life on it changes over time and why this matters”- guides our priorities for the next decade. The successful candidate will have a record of outstanding research and publications as well as excellent communication skills, a talent for collaboration across disciplines and an innate ability to engage and enthuse the public and stakeholders through his/her work. The Page Museum is the site museum for the La Brea Tar Pits, one of the world’s richest Ice Age fossil sites that has to date yielded an estimated 5 million specimens representing more than 600 species of animals and plants of Late Pleistocene age. These collections afford a huge potential for a broad array of research and public programs and are continuously growing through ongoing excavations. The successful candidate will be responsible for developing a dynamic, productive, and scientifically significant program of research to build a growing scientific and public profile, overseeing the development and curation of important collections, maintaining and strengthening the NHM’s presence in key professional and governmental networks, and establishing active internal NHM collaborations, especially with the Education and Exhibits, Marketing and Communications, and Advancement Departments. The successful candidate will have a Ph.D., a strong track record of published research, and experience in generating funding to support research. His/her demonstrated talent for successful public communications will enhance collaborations with non-scientists in the NHM’s Education and Exhibits, Marketing and Communications and Advancement Departments. Experience in collections management would be an advantage, as would an interest in creative ways of engaging the public in research (e.g., citizen science). The Curator will be expected to develop an active and publically engaging research program, develop working relationships with local universities, mentor students and postdoctoral fellows, and maintain research through obtaining competitive grants and/or funding from other external sources. The candidate must have the vision and capability to build a research program that can be integrated within the NHM’s ongoing efforts to document and interpret biotic responses to environmental change. He/she will manage the collection’s growth and undertake research in ways that increase both its scientific and public appeal. The ability to communicate effectively and engage with a wide variety of audiences, including the public and the NHM’s various stakeholders is paramount. The successful candidate will be expected to help oversee staff and supervise the NHM’s Rancho La Brea program including the collections and excavations. He/she will actively participate in a broad range of museum activities, such as exhibits, education, outreach, training of educators, public communications including, but not limited to, media interactions, and fundraising. More specifically, the successful candidate will be expected to play a key role in the ongoing transformation of the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits. The Curator will also be responsible for building productive ties with local universities, professional associations, educators, and other relevant organizations within the scientific and general community. This is a full-time position with a salary and title commensurate with experience, plus excellent benefits. Application deadline is December 1st, 2014. The starting date is July 1st, 2015. Applicants should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, salary history, and the full contact information of at least three professional references to thayden@nhm.org, Page Museum Curatorial Search, Research & Collections, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA. The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please, No Phone Calls, No Fax. Tyler W. Hayden Administrative Assistant Research and Collectins Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90007 Phone: 213-763-3508 Fax: 213-747-0204 Tyler Hayden via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:50
Austin Peay State University Department of Biology Assistant Professor V Biology Position No.: 105000 Position Summary: http://bit.ly/1ryKU1S The Biology Department at APSU seeks an outstanding candidate to fill a tenure-track position in Evolutionary Biology (Mammalogist) to start Fall semester 2015. The successful candidate must be committed to excellence in teaching. Salary is competitive and commensurate with education and experience. Duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to the following: - Teach a variety of courses including but not limited to: Principles of Biology, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Zoology, Animal or Human Physiology, Principles of Evolution, and Mammalogy; - Mentor undergraduate and graduate research students; - Develop active collaborations with faculty members at APSU and other institutions; and - Seek external funding for research. Required qualifications: - PhD in Biology or a related field. - ABD will be considered if all requirements are completed by date of hire, August, 2015. - Study of the evolution of molecular, cellular, functional, physiological, or behavioral traits of mammals; - A strong record of publications and grants; - Previous teaching experience at the collegiate level; and - Demonstrated ability to work with peers in a collegial manner. - A background search will be required of the successful candidate. Special Instructions to Applicants: Applications taken ONLINE ONLY at http://bit.ly/1xw0PD0 PLEASE ATTACH TEACHING PHILOSOPHY AND RESEARCH PHILOSOPHY to application. Applicant review will continue until the position is filled. Please refer all questions to facultyapplications@apsu.edu IT IS A CLASS A MISDEMEANOR TO MISREPRESENT ACADEMIC CREDENTIALS Austin Peay State University is an AA/EEO employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, status as a protected veteran, or age in its programs and activities. For inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies, contact Nondiscrimination@apsu.edu. Full Discrimination Policy: http://bit.ly/1ryKSHm “Gienger, Christopher M.” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

September 29, 2014

06:00
Background: Myxozoa are a diverse group of metazoan parasites with a very simple organization, which has for decades eluded their evolutionary origin. Their most prominent and characteristic feature is the polar capsule: a complex intracellular structure of the myxozoan spore, which plays a role in host infection. Striking morphological similarities have been found between myxozoan polar capsules and nematocysts, the stinging structures of cnidarians (corals, sea anemones and jellyfish) leading to the suggestion that Myxozoa and Cnidaria share a more recent common ancestry. This hypothesis has recently been supported by phylogenomic evidence and by the identification of a nematocyst specific minicollagen gene in the myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae. Here we searched genomes and transcriptomes of several myxozoan taxa for the presence of additional cnidarian specific genes and characterized these genes within a phylogenetic context. Results: Illumina assemblies of transcriptome or genome data of three myxozoan species (Enteromyxum leei, Kudoa iwatai, and Sphaeromyxa zaharoni) and of the enigmatic cnidarian parasite Polypodium hydriforme (Polypodiozoa) were mined using tBlastn searches with nematocyst-specific proteins as queries. Several orthologs of nematogalectins and minicollagens were identified. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that myxozoans possess three distinct minicollagens. We found that the cnidarian repertoire of nematogalectins is more complex than previously thought and we identified additional members of the nematogalectin family. Cnidarians were found to possess four nematogalectin / nematogalectin-related genes, while in myxozoans only three genes could be identified. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that myxozoans possess a diverse array of genes that are taxonomically restricted to Cnidaria. Characterization of these genes provide compelling evidence that polar capsules and nematocysts are homologous structures and that myxozoans are highly degenerate cnidarians. The diversity of minicollagens was higher than previously thought, with the presence of three minicollagen genes in myxozoans. Our phylogenetic results suggest that the different myxozoan sequences are the results of ancient divergences within Cnidaria and not of recent specializations of the polar capsule. For both minicollagen and nematogalectin, our results show that myxozoans possess less gene copies than their cnidarian counter parts, suggesting that the polar capsule gene repertoire was simplified with their reduced body plan.

September 28, 2014

23:55
Mammalian Behavior, Physiology, and Evolutionary Ecology Post-doc. I am seeking a postdoctoral research associate to work with my newly formed research group at the University of Michigan on questions at the intersection of behavior, physiology, and life histories in mammals. One broad aim of this research will be to document how developmental stress affects the physiology/behavior/life histories of wild mammalian species. This position will involve fieldwork in North America with free-living mammals in addition to detailed laboratory work to measure physiological, neurological, and genomic characteristics. The postdoctoral research associate will work collaboratively with my research group to address some specific research questions but will also have the scientific freedom to develop and address their own questions within our study systems. This will involve field and lab work, statistical analyses, writing papers and grant proposals, administrative work associated with the field/lab projects, supervising staff/undergraduates/graduates, and participating in outreach activities. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in a related field by the start of the position and should be highly skilled in either fieldwork or laboratory techniques but preferably both. Applicants should possess some combination of desired technical skills (e.g., field work, neuroscience, hormone/oxidative stress assays, qPCR, in situ hybridization, epigenetics, bioinformatics, quantitative genetics) and also advanced statistical skills and past evidence of publishing papers. Applicants with no experience in fieldwork but with highly developed laboratory skills are also encouraged to apply. All applicants should be highly motivated, organized, creative, and collaborative. This position will be based in my lab (Ben Dantzer) at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI) but will require fieldwork in other locations in North America. The initial position is a 12 month, full-time, and fixed-term position, with a second year depending upon performance. The start date is negotiable depending upon the candidate but ideally by 1 February 2015. To apply, please send to me via email (Dantzer@umich.edu) in a single PDF: 1) a cover letter outlining your research interests, skills, and why you are applying, 2) CV (containing at least 3 references), and 3) two recent first-authored publications. Please send these materials to me by 1 December 2014. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions or view my webpage (http://bit.ly/1nzOiZg). The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. -Ben Ben Dantzer, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Psychology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA Email: dantzer@umich.edu Phone: 734-615-2352 Twitter: @ben_dantzer Web: http://bit.ly/1nzOiZg www.redsquirrel.ca http://bit.ly/1oov0spwww.redsquirrel.ca http://bit.ly/1oov0sp Benjamin Dantzer via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
23:55
Dear Colleagues, I am seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral researcher with an exceptional background in bioinformatics, functional genomics, or evolutionary genomics. Experience analyzing Illumina sequence data, computer programming proficiency, and training in ecological or evolutionary genetics are highly desirable. We recently received generous funding for yeast evolutionary genomics research from the National Science Foundations Dimensions of Biodiversity Program ( http://1.usa.gov/1vnuUlV ) and the Pew Charitable Trusts ( http://bit.ly/1ruTJKa ). With Antonis Rokas (Vanderbilt) and Cletus P. Kurtzman (USDA), the Y1000+ Project ( http://1.usa.gov/1vnuUlW ) seeks to sequence and analyze the to complete genomes of all ~1,000 known species of Saccharomycotina yeasts and determine the genetic basis of their metabolic, ecological, and functional diversification. Yeasts are genetically more diverse than vertebrates and have remarkable metabolic dexterity, but most remain minimally characterized. They compete vigorously for nutrients in every continent and biome and can produce everything from beer to oil. The history of yeasts is recorded in their genome sequences. Now is the time to read it and tell their story! The Hittinger Lab has diverse funding for other basic and applied research from NSF, DOE, and USDA, but we are specifically expanding our basic research in ecological and evolutionary genomics. The complete advertisement and application instructions can be found here: http://bit.ly/1ruTKhh . The precise start date is flexible, but candidates should apply by November 30th to receive full consideration. Sincerely, Chris Todd Hittinger, Assistant Professor of Genetics Genome Center of Wisconsin J. F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution University of Wisconsin-Madison 425-G Henry Mall, 2434 Genetics/Biotechnology Center Madison, WI 53706-1580 cthittinger@wisc.edu, (608) 890-2586 http://bit.ly/1vnuUm0 Chris Hittinger via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
22:00
Baker’s Law (hereafter BL) states that self-compatible organisms are more likely to be successful colonizers after long-distance dispersal than self-incompatible organisms. This simple prediction draws a link between mating-system evolution and diverse fields of ecology and evolution such as dispersal biology and colonization, the evolution of range size and range limits, demography and Allee effect, and invasion biology. However, after >60 years of experimental research and theory development, the accumulated data yield varying, and often contradictory, support of BL. Our working group brings together a diverse array of researchers to assess predictions and assumptions of BL and elucidate ecological, evolutionary, and demographic parameters likely to determine the relationships between mating system, dispersal, and colonization success. To accomplish these goals we will: 1) Compile the voluminous literature on BL. 2) Link the BL data with two extensive databases gathered by prior NESCent support (seed germination and seed traits data; mating system data) and a NCEAS pollen limitation database. These expanded databases will include dispersal, range size, and life-history traits, thereby creating a powerful tool for testing various aspects of the relationship between mating-system and colonization success. 3) Employ macroevolutionary tools to map mating-system and dispersal traits onto the angiosperm phylogeny to assess evolutionary patterns and phylogenetically-corrected trait correlations. 4) Formalize BL using current population genetic theory and dispersal theory. Synthetic products of our working group should elucidate the links between dispersal and mating-system in colonization success, and will influence multiple fields of research in evolution for the foreseeable future.
Source: NESCent