news aggregator

March 23, 2015

00:25
—_000_BF137EE0C0365B44ADC03D1A051AEC2F0EB80BB2INFPWXM004aduns_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable PhD position studying lizard personality, learning and metabolism at the University of New South Wales Dr. Daniel Noble and A/Professor Shinichi Nakagawa in the Evolution & Research Centre (E&ERC), at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) are seeking a highly motivated and enthusiastic student to study the covariation between metabolism, personality and learning in a model Australian lizard system. The student will join a newly formed lab group at UNSW and be part of an exciting multidisciplinary team building links between environmentally driven effects on phenotypic variation and the consequences of these effects on fitness. The student will combine theory with extensive experimental work manipulating incubation temperatures, taking behavioural and physiological measures, and establishing controlled semi-natural breeding experiments to obtain multigenerational data. They will use cutting edge molecular (e.g. SNP genotyping) and statistical tools (e.g. meta-analysis, Bayesian and individual-based modeling) during their candidature to address important topical questions in evolutionary and behavioural ecology. The student will also work with collaborators from Macquarie University, Sydney University, and The Australian National University in addition to other research groups at UNSW. We expect the student to travel to both international and national conferences to present the results of their work during their candidature. If you are interested in joining our exciting project at E&ERC, UNSW please send an email with an expression of interest, why you are interested in joining the lab and your CV to Dan (daniel.wa.noble@gmail.com) and Shinichi (s.nakagawa@unsw.edu.au). High quality applicants will apply for an APA scholarship through UNSW, which covers tuition and provides a stipend ($25,392/year; more details at: http://bit.ly/1G2MK3o). Opportunities exist to make additional income through teaching positions advertised in the department. Note that to apply for an APA scholarship, the candidate needs to be an Australian or New Zealand citizen or permanent resident. However, we welcome students who would like to bring their own scholarship to join our project. Shinichi Nakagawa —_000_BF137EE0C0365B44ADC03D1A051AEC2F0EB80BB2INFPWXM004aduns_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable PhD position studying lizard personality, learning and metabolism at the University of New South Wales Dr. Daniel Noble and A/Professor Shinichi Nakagawa in the Evolution & Research Centre (E&ERC), at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) are seeking a highly motivated and enthusiastic student to study the covariation between metabolism, personality and learning in a model Australian lizard system. The student will join a newly formed lab group at UNSW and be part of an exciting multidisciplinary team building links between environmentally driven effects on phenotypic variation and the consequences of these effects on fitness. The student will combine theory with extensive experimental work manipulating incubation temperatures, taking behavioural and physiological measures, and establishing controlled semi-natural breeding experiments to obtain multigenerational data. They will use cutting edge molecular (e.g. SNP genotyping) and statistical tools (e.g. meta-analysis, Bayesian and individual-based modeling) during their candidature to address important topical questions in evolutionary and behavioural ecology.  The student will also work with collaborators from Macquarie University, Sydney University, and The Australian National University in addition to other research groups at UNSW. We expect the student to travel to both international and national conferences to present the results of their work during their candidature. If you are interested in joining our exciting project at E&ERC, UNSW please send an email with an expression of interest, why you are interested in joining the lab and your CV to Dan (daniel.wa.noble@gmail.com) and Shinichi (s.nakagawa@unsw.edu.au). High quality applicants will apply for an APA scholarship through UNSW, which covers tuition and provides a stipend ($25,392/year; more details at: http://bit.ly/1G2MK3o). Opportunities exist to make additional income through teaching positions advertised in the department. Note that to apply for an APA scholarship, the candidate needs to be an Australian or New Zealand citizen or permanent resident. However, we welcome students who would like to bring their own scholarship to join our project. Shinichi Nakagawa —_000_BF137EE0C0365B44ADC03D1A051AEC2F0EB80BB2INFPWXM004aduns via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

March 22, 2015

23:57

Dear Colleagues, It is our pleasure to announce that the 6th International Barcode of Life Conference will be held at the University of Guelph, Canada, from August 18-21, 2015. This biannual conference series showcases the latest scientific achievements and socio-economic implications of work conducted by the DNA barcode research community. The theme of the 6th Conference, Barcodes to Biomes, signals the ongoing expansion of our community’s research agenda from studies on particular sets of species in particular places to investigations of entire biotic assembles at local and global scales. The conference features internationally renowned plenary speakers on topics ranging from evolution to ecology to conservation. The meeting also features diverse parallel sessions, a poster session, and social events that are included in registration. Eligible delegates may apply for a Travel Award as well as Student and Postdoctoral Prizes. Plenary Speakers include: Yves Basset, Louis Bernatchez, Mark Blaxter, David Castle, Melania Cristescu, Thibaud Decaens, Eduardo Eizirik, Brock Fenton, Dawn Field, Rosemary Gillespie, Charles Godfray, Mehrdad Hajibabaei, Illka Hanski, Paul Hebert, David Hik, Michael Hofreiter, Monte Hummel, Dan Janzen, Peter Kevan, Karl Kjer, Nancy Knowlton, John Kress, John La Salle, Thomas Lovejoy, Laurence Packer, Rod Page, Naomi Pierce, Stuart Pimm, David Posada, Sujeevan Ratnasingham, Paul Snelgrove, Bridget Stutchbury, Derek Tittensor, Jana Vamosi, Wolfgang Wagele, Tetsukazu Yahara Registration for the 6th International Barcode of Life Conference is now open and will continue throughout the conference. Further details can be found at: http://bit.ly/13mLnwn. Abstracts will be accepted until April 15, 2015. Please be so kind as to forward this announcement and the conference poster to others who may find this conference of interest. We hope to welcome you to Guelph in August! Conference poster: http://bit.ly/1MZDFtP Yours sincerely, The Conference Operating Committee, Sarah Adamowicz Mehrdad Hajibabaei Robert Hanner Paul Hebert info@dnabarcodes2015.org via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
17:30

Phylogenetic networks can be used to illustrate the history of any set of objects or concepts, provided that this history is a divergent one (ie. the history is not simply the transformation of objects through time).

Since I have recently been writing about sequence alignments, it is worthwhile to show an example of applying a network to sequence alignment programs. This comes from the paper by Chaisson MJ, Tesler G (2012) Mapping single molecule sequencing reads using basic local alignment with successive refinement (BLASR): application and theory. BMC Bioinformatics 13: 238.

The authors discuss programs that map reads from a sample genome onto a reference sequence. They note: "the relationship between many existing alignment methods is qualitatively illustrated in the figure."


Their legend reads:
The applications / corresponding computational restrictions shown are: (green) short pairwise alignment / detailed edit model; (yellow) database search / divergent homology detection; (red) whole genome alignment / alignment of long sequences with structural rearrangements; and (blue) short read mapping / rapid alignment of massive numbers of short sequences. Although solely illustrative, methods with more similar data structures or algorithmic approaches are on closer branches. The BLASR method combines data structures from short read alignment with optimization methods from whole genome alignment.The reticulation refers to their new program, which "maps reads using coarse alignment methods developed during WGA [whole genome alignment] studies, while speeding up these methods by using the advanced data structures employed in many NGS [next generation sequencing] mapping studies."

00:05

Applications are now invited for 15 PhD positions ($B!H(BEarly Stage Researchers$B!I(B) to be funded by the Marie-Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network $B!H(BMICROWINE-Microbial Metagenomics and the Modern Wine Industry$B!I(B, a multidisciplinary study on Viticulture and Wine Microbiology within the Horizon2020 programme of the European Union. Each PhD position is fully funded for 3 years. The positions are based at 13 institutions, in 8 countries, and cover a wide range of disciplines including microbial metagenomics, wine genetics, bioinformatics, geology, chemistry and mathematical modeling. ESR$B!G(Bs must commence no later than 1st September 2015. For full details on the network, sub-projects, host institutions, eligibility requirements, and how to apply please go to the project website at http://bit.ly/1CbYY8d Please note that applications are welcomed from any qualified applicants, regardless of gender, ethnicity or country of origin, but will only be considered if eligibility requirements are met and the application guidelines are strictly adhered to. For further information please contact the project administrator, Lea Ellegaard-Jensen at: info@microwine.eu Tom Gilbert Professor of Palaeogenomics Natural History Museum of Denmark tgilbert@snm.ku.dk via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:05

We are recruiting a postdoctoral research associate to work on the genetics of natural trait variation in a social microbe. This is a 36 month position based in Prof Chris Thompson’s Lab at the University of Manchester. The postdoc will work as part of a collaborative team that includes researchers at the University of Bath and the Federal University in Sao Carlos (Brazil). Further details about the project and the position are included below: Explaining why so much natural genetic variation exists in fitness related traits is a fundamental problem in evolutionary genetics. Many competing explanations have been proposed, but cleanly distinguishing between them experimentally has been challenging. For example, we find surprisingly high genetic variation in key fitness related social behaviour traits across a huge diversity of taxa, despite a general expectation that variation will be removed by selection. To understand the processes shaping such variation we will employ a novel combination of approaches to dissect the genetics and evolution of social and non-social traits using the social amoeba D. discoideum (Dd). The Dd system provides a uniquely powerful model to dissect the processes shaping genetic diversity in a natural microbial population, while providing critical insights into how the genomes of more complex species are shaped by evolution. Specifically, we will employ a powerful integration of computational, genomic and experimental approaches: . high throughput phenotyping will be used to quantify phenotypic variation in a range of social and non social traits. . whole genome sequencing will be used to identify genes that show sequence variation associated with natural diversity in social and non-social traits, . you will experimentally validate the causal role of natural genetic variants using cutting edge molecular and gene replacement techniques, . you will test whether the same genes affect both social and non-social traits, suggesting that they are constrained and their joint evolution is shaped by pleiotropy, . using this data we will develop models to determine the evolutionary processes that have shaped variation in this system. Together, these objectives will lead to fundamental advances in our understanding of the types of variation underlying phenotypic diversity in natural populations and the evolutionary processes shaping that variation. The Thompson lab at the University of Manchester has extensive experience in whole genome, molecular genetics and experimental evolution approaches in Dictyostelium. For further information, see http://bit.ly/1Blq3RA). Professor Chris Thompson Email: Christopher.thompson@manchester.ac.uk Telephone: 0161 275 1588 For further details and how to apply see: http://bit.ly/1Blq47O Note that this position is funded under the same project as previous advertised positions at the University of Bath based in the lab of Jason Wolf. For more information about these other positions, please see: Postdoc (36 months) using computational and empirical approaches to understand natural variation in social and non-social traits: http://bit.ly/1CbYY86 Technician (at least 24 months), who will contribute to all aspects of the project: http://bit.ly/1Blq1ZI (NOTE THAT THIS POSITION LISTS A MAY START DATE, BUT LATER START DATES ARE POSSIBLE) jason@evolutionarygenetics.org via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

March 21, 2015

23:28

Volunteer field assistants: We are looking for field assistants to help expand and monitor a colour-banded population of lovely fairy-wrens in Cairns (Queensland), Australia for a study on female ornamentation. Time periods: June or September 2015 (3 to 6 months). Duties include regular censusing of colour-banded birds, searching for and monitoring nests, mist-netting, recording song and measuring colouration, behavioural observations, video analysis, and data proofing. Working days are long, with early starts six days a week. Enthusiasm, self-motivation and organisation, and a strong work ethic are a must. Qualifications: experience monitoring colour-banded birds, nest-searching, and mist-netting. Good knowledge of English is a requirement. Must also be early riser, physically fit, able to work in extreme weather conditions, and enjoy basic shared living conditions. Having experience in behavioural observations and a driving licence is a plus but not a requirement. Accommodation is provided, but assistants cover travel to the site and their own food costs. The project will reimburse up to AUD$750/mo towards receipted food and travel expenses. For more information contact: Ana Leitao (avitorinoATstudent.unimelb.edu.au). To apply, please email a letter outlining previous relevant field research experience, and a CV including names and contact information for 3 referees. Applications received until the 9th of April 2015 will receive full consideration. Later applications may be considered. Ana V. Leito PhD candidate School of BioSciences (Building 147) University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 Australia anamvleitao@gmail.com avitorino@student.unimelb.edu.au Australia: +61 450 643 982 Portugal: +351 964 479 857 anamvleitao@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:03

The Baums lab in the Department of Biology at Penn State (http://bit.ly/1C8nYgp) is looking for an experienced researcher to conduct NSF-funded experiments on acclimatization of shallow-water corals to increased temperature as a result of the 2014 bleaching event in the Florida Keys. Responsibilities include organizing and conducting a microcosm experiment over three months in the Florida Keys (July -Sep 2015) with little supervision, requiring the researcher to live in the Florida Keys during this time. Experience with aquarium experiments on corals and AAUS SCUBA certification is required. The successful candidate will be proficient in using molecular tools such as gene expression analysis, RADtag sequencing and bacterial 16s tag sequencing as well as analysis of next generation sequencing data. An advanced degree in marine biology or molecular ecology or related fields is needed. This position will be filled at the research assistant or research associate level, depending upon education and experience. Candidate must be able to begin work on 1 June 2015. Position initially funded for 6 months with possibility of continuation. Applications must be submitted electronically at http://bit.ly/1Bg5C8l and include a cover letter detailing research interests and experience, a current CV and names and contact information for three references. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until position is filled. CAMPUS SECURITY CRIME STATISTICS: For more about safety at Penn State, and to review the Annual Security Report which contains information about crime statistics and other safety and security matters, please go to http://bit.ly/1uz49No , which will also provide you with detail on how to request a hard copy of the Annual Security Report. Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to minorities, women, veterans, disabled individuals, and other protected groups. Job URL: http://bit.ly/1Bg5C8l via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:03
Postdoctoral Fellow - Madagascar Biodiversity Genomics Applications are invited for a Postdoctoral Fellow - Madagascar Biodiversity Genomics within the Conservation Genetics Department at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium (http://bit.ly/1JFtnNO). Based in Omaha, Nebraska, the post doctoral researcher must have an interest and expertise in the generation and analysis of next-generation sequencing data of lemurs, tortoises, and other taxa from Madagascar. Duties: The successful applicant will construct genomic library for high throughput sequencing as well as assemble and analyze sequence data and manage next-generation sequence workflows. This individual will be responsible for development, implementation, and support of software applications related to variant detection and interpretation from high-throughput experiments involving multiple species of lemurs, tortoises, and taxa from Madagascar. Interested candidates should be highly motivated, organized, independent, and have extensive experience with molecular genomics and bioinformatics. Travel to Madagascar to support the field programs of OHDZA-CG is required for a minimum of five week intervals twice a year. Basic Qualifications: Applicants should hold a PhD in bioinformatics, computer science, molecular genomics or related field and have more than one year of experience in high-throughput genome sequence analysis. Applicants should be experienced at software related to next generation sequencing data and be able to manipulate genomic data for phylogenetics and phylogeography. Our groups focus is large-scale sequencing for phylogenetics, phylogeography and evolutionary studies of lemurs, tortoises and other taxa from Madagascar. Thus, previous experience in genome assemblies, annotation and analysis of next generation sequencing (NGS) are preferable. The ideal candidate will be independent, highly motivated, productive, and able to work effectively in a team with members from a variety of diverse backgrounds with outstanding written and verbal communication skills. The successful applicant must be interested in interdisciplinary science and field research and have a solid publication record that illustrates ability to conduct novel, independent research. Preferred Qualifications Candidates should have 3+ years of experience in molecular biology, genetics, or bioinformatics. The position requires proficiency in programming (Perl, C++) and Linux operating systems. Applicants are also expected to be familiar with bioinformatics tools and genomics databases and have extensive and creditable laboratory experience with constructing genomic libraries. Must be legally entitled to work in the USA. Visa sponsorship is not available. Appointment: The selected candidate will be based primarily at OHDZA-CG, but the individual will be required to travel and conduct field work with the projects under the management of the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership, ONG (http://bit.ly/1HdpvBI). The initial appointment is for duration of two-years, but may be renewable for an additional two years based on performance. Application: Applicants should send curriculum vitae, a statement of research interests and career goals, and the names and addresses of three academic references to: Dr. Edward E. Louis Director of Conservation Genetics Center for Conservation and Research Omahas Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium 3701 South 10th Street, Omaha, NE 68107 Email: genetics@omahazoo.com Candidates must also submit a copy of your application materials through the Omahas Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium career site at: http://bit.ly/1JFtnNO Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Genetics Department via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:29

The Baums lab in the Department of Biology at Penn State (http://bit.ly/1C8nYgp) is looking for an experienced researcher to conduct NSF-funded experiments on acclimatization of shallow-water corals to increased temperature as a result of the 2014 bleaching event in the Florida Keys. Responsibilities include organizing and conducting a microcosm experiment over three months in the Florida Keys (July - Sep 2015) with little supervision, requiring the researcher to live in the Florida Keys during this time. Experience with aquarium experiments on corals and AAUS SCUBA certification is required. The successful candidate will be proficient in using molecular tools such as gene expression analysis, RADtag sequencing and bacterial 16s tag sequencing as well as analysis of next generation sequencing data. An advanced degree in marine biology or molecular ecology or related fields is needed. This position will be filled at the research assistant or research associate level, depending upon education and experience. Candidate must be able to begin work on 1 June 2015. Position initially funded for 6 months with possibility of continuation. Applications must be submitted electronically at http://bit.ly/1Bg5C8l and include a cover letter detailing research interests and experience, a current CV and names and contact information for three references. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until position is filled. CAMPUS SECURITY CRIME STATISTICS: For more about safety at Penn State, and to review the Annual Security Report which contains information about crime statistics and other safety and security matters, please go to http://bit.ly/1uz49No , which will also provide you with detail on how to request a hard copy of the Annual Security Report. Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to minorities, women, veterans, disabled individuals, and other protected groups. Job URL: http://bit.ly/1Bg5C8l via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:58
NESCent/HHMI/SSE Evolution Film Festival/Video Contest Scientists and science educators of all stripes - students, postdocs, faculty, and full- or part-time science communicators - are invited to enter the Fifth Annual Evolution Video Competition, sponsored by the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent), Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Society for the Study of Evolution (SSE). To enter, please submit a video that explains a fun fact, key concept, compelling question, or exciting area of evolution research in THREE MINUTES OR LESS. Entries may be related or unrelated to your own research, and should be suitable for use in a classroom (K-12, undergraduate, graduate…your choice). Videos should be both informative and entertaining. (In other words, no taped lectures or narrated Powerpoint presentations!) Animations, music videos, and mini documentaries are all fair game. The finalists will be screened at the 2015 Evolution meeting in Guaruj, Brazil. (You do not need to attend the conference in order to enter a video.) In the past, our first-place and runner-up prizes were $1,000 credit and $500 credit, respectively, towards travel to a future conference. This year, the prizes will be the same amount, but in cold, hard, cash-money, baby! (Well…actually, in the form of a check, but you get the idea.) So make a video, and we’ll make it rain! The deadline to submit your video(s) is SUNDAY, MAY 31st, 2015 (11:00 PM, EST). For more information (and to see entries from previous years) please visit filmfestival.nescent.org or contact Jory Weintraub (jory@nescent.org). Jory P. Weintraub, PhD Assistant Director, Education & Outreach National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) 2024 West Main St., Suite A200, Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919.668.4578 Fax: 919.668.9198 Email: jory@nescent.org Skype: jory.weintraub “Weintraub, Jory P” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:58
The University of Bologna, the Department of Biological Geological and Environmental Sciences and the Molecular Zoology Lab (MoZoo Lab) invite you at the 6th Congress of the Italian Society of Evolutionary Biology that will be held in Bologna (Italy) from August 31 to September 3, 2015. You can find all the informations at the Conference website http://bit.ly/1FPqrOv The 6th SIBE congress wants to specifically promote exchanges and discussion among Italian and non-Italian evolutionary Biologists, with particular attention to young researchers. Symposia will cover different topics, including the most up-to-date thematic areas of Evolutionary Biology. A paricular attention will also be given to the dissemination of the nature and social role of evolutionary biologists to general public. The Conference is organized into 7 thematic symposia covering most of the fields of Evolutionary Biology. The Conference warmly welcomes all professional and non-professional Evolutionary Biologists, as well as teachers and science writers. It is also particularly addressed to young students and scientists and, through an informal and easy going atmosphere, wants to promote exchanges and synergies among scientists and/or amateurs. The Congress venue is conveniently located in the University Area, which is close to the historic part of the beautiful city of Bologna, the house of the oldest Univeristy in the world. We hope to see you in all in Bologna The Organizing Committee of the 6th Congress of the Italian Society of Evolutionary Biology Marco Passamonti via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:26
THE UNIVERSITY OF HUDDERSFIELD: DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCES The Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholarship Centre in Evolutionary Genomics Supervisors: Professor Martin B. Richards, Dr Maria Pala, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, Dr Martin Carr, Dr Stefano Vanin Five PhD Studentships in Evolutionary Genomics Closing date for applications: As soon as possible, and no later than April 30th, 2015 Funding availability: Funded PhD projects for UK/EU students We are seeking the first cohort of five PhD scholars in Evolutionary Genetics for the new Leverhulme Trust Centre at Huddersfield, to begin in October 2015. The scholars will receive training from leading experts in their respective fields and undertake cutting-edge research in archaeogenetics, palaeogenetics, bioinformatics, genomics, next-generation DNA sequencing, phylogenetics, population genetics, human evolution and forensic analysis. We envision openings this year in the archaeogenetics of Europe, Southeast Asia/ Pacific and Native Americans, in both humans and domestic animals, working with mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome and genome-wide variation (including ancient DNA), and in forensic analysis on molecular insect identification from South American and European archaeological burials. In eukaryotic evolution, research work will include the evolution of fungal genomes and transposable element families. The students will work in the new molecular biology/ancient DNA facilities at Huddersfield, alongside existing students in all of these areas and two research fellows who will provide day to day guidance, along with the academic staff. Applicants should hold a good first degree (and preferably also an MSc or MA) in Genetics, Molecular Biology, Statistics, Computing, Bioarchaeology, Biological Anthropology, or other relevant subject, and ideally have experience of generic biological lab techniques such as DNA extraction and PCR. For the insect-related project, a general knowledge of general entomology/zoology and invertebrate morphology is required. Although training and hands-on supervision will be provided, it is essential that the candidates can operate independently and take the initiative to direct their research. The studentship will cover the full cost of tuition fees for UK/EU students, and will pay an annual tax-free bursary of 14,057 for three years (RCUK rates). There are additional funds available for laboratory consumables and travel for conferences, visits to collaborating laboratories and sample procurement. To apply, please go to: http://bit.ly/1zTzGKN and complete the on-line application, ensuring you select full-time PhD Biology. Please type ‘Leverhulme Trust’ in the ‘Personal Statement’ field. Please then email your CV, transcripts and two letters of recommendation in support of your application to Professor Richards (email: m.b.richards@hud.ac.uk). Please indicate in your email which supervisor and kind of project you are interested in, and why you believe you are well-qualified for that project. For informal enquiries please contact: Archaeogenetics: Professor Richards on +44 (0)1484 471676 (email m.b.richards@hud.ac.uk) or Dr Maria Pala on +44 1484 472273 (m.pala@hud.ac.uk) Eukaryotic evolution: Dr Martin Carr on +44 (0)1484 471608 (m.carr@hud.ac.uk) Forensic entomology/funerary archaeology: Dr Stefano Vanin on +44 (0)1484 473179 (s.vanin@hud.ac.uk) Related web links: http://bit.ly/1zTzGKP http://bit.ly/174wf8R http://bit.ly/1zTzJWY University of Huddersfield inspiring tomorrow’s professionals. [http://bit.ly/1zTzJX0] Martin Richards via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:10
The Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) is an internationally known research center located at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. IGS offers five different workshops as part of a professional development program organized by Dr. Michelle Giglio, a faculty member at IGS with over 17 years of experience in genomics and bioinformatics. Dr. Giglio has recruited IGS faculty and staff to form a highly experienced instruction team to provide workshop participants with the knowledge and skills needed to engage in numerous `omics applications. All IGS workshops are hands-on, providing attendees with real-world challenges and experience. Please see our workshop dates listed below. IMPORTANT DATES: Metagenome Analysis October 13th - 16th, 2015 Introduction to Programming for Bioinformatics March 16th - 20th, 2015 Transcriptome Analysis May 18th - 20th, 2015 Prokaryotic Comparative Genomics September 29th - October 1st, 2015 Introduction to Genomics and Bioinformatics November 2nd - 6th, 2015 FOR MORE INFORMATION & REGISTRATION: http://bit.ly/1BtNBtc EMAIL: Renee Nathaniel Workshop Administrative Coordinator rnathaniel@som.umaryland.edu “Nathaniel, Renee” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

March 20, 2015

23:54

Casey Holliday (hollidayca@missouri.edu) and I (middletonk@missouri.edu) have an opening for a three-year, NSF-funded postdoc to study cranial biomechanics and evolution in dinosaurs in collaboration with Larry Witmer (Ohio University) and Julian Davis (University of Southern Indiana). Details and application information are below. Feel free to pass along to interested researchers and direct any questions to Casey or me. - via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
23:39

Dear Evoldir, We are analyzing a dataset sampled from several geographic locations (let’s say A,B,C,D,E,F). We would like to infer if there is evidence for a specific direction of gene flow and determine the gene flow rates… e.g. B—>C—>A—>D—>E—>F and if possible to exclude some other scenarios e.g. that there is somewhere a source population (perhaps unsampled) that contributed genes to each of the (sampled) sub-populations. Using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC), we can either infer parameters from a specific scenario, or do a model selection… I’m wondering however, if there is any software or theory that will allow a general inference of the “migration history” or gene flow history. Thanks a lot in advance Pavlos P.S. answers will be submitted back to Evoldir via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
18:00
Background: Populations of a species often differ in key traits. However, it is rarely known whether these differences are associated with genetic variation and evolved differences between populations, or are instead simply a plastic response to environmental differences experienced by the populations. Here we examine the interplay of plasticity and direct genetic control by investigating temperature-size relationships in populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura from North America. We used 27 isolines from three populations and exposed them to four temperature regimes (16°C, 20°C, 23°C, 26°C) to examine environmental, genetic and genotype-by-environment sources of variance in wing size. Results: By far the largest contribution to variation in wing size came from rearing temperature, with the largest flies emerging from the coolest temperatures. However, we also found a genetic signature that was counter to this pattern as flies originating from the northern, cooler population were consistently smaller than conspecifics from more southern, warmer populations when reared under the same laboratory conditions. Conclusions: We conclude that local selection on body size appears to be acting counter to the environmental effect of temperature. We find no evidence that local adaptation in phenotypic plasticity can explain this result, and suggest indirect selection on traits closely linked with body size, or patterns of chromosome inversion may instead be driving this relationship.
03:42
The Rhinella granulosa group consists of 13 species of toads distributed throughout open areas of South America and Panama. In this paper we perform a phylogenetic analysis considering all but one species of the group, employing five nuclear and four mitochondrial genes, for up to 7910 bp per specimen. Separate phylogenetic analyses under direct optimization (DO) of nuclear and mitochondrial sequences recovered the R. granulosa group as monophyletic and revealed topological incongruence that can be explained mainly by multiple events of hybridization and introgression, both mitochondrial and nuclear. The DO combined analysis, after the exclusion of putatively introgressed or heterozygous genomes, resulted in a phylogenetic hypothesis for the R. granulosa group in which most of the species are recovered as monophyletic, but with interspecific relationships poorly supported. The optimization of morphological (adult and larval), chromosomal, and behavioural characters resulted in 12 putative phenotypic synapomorphies for this species group and some other synapomorphies for internal clades. Our results indicate the need for additional population genetic studies on R. dorbignyi and R. fernandezae to corroborate the taxonomic status of both taxa. Finally, we discuss biological and genetic characteristics of Bufonidae, as possible explanations for the common occurrence of hybridization and introgression observed in some lineages of this family.
Source: Cladistics
03:09
Lab technician in Evolutionary/Ecological Genomics The Pespeni Lab in the Department of Biology at the University of Vermont is looking to hire an exceptionally motivated, organized, and skilled individual to work as a population genomics technician in our new research lab. We use genomics, developmental biology, and physiology to understand the underpinnings of resilience and vulnerability of marine species in the context of complex natural ecosystems, particularly changing climate conditions. The technician will assist the PI in managing the lab and conducting research, with the opportunity for co-authorship on scientific publications. Specific duties will include ordering supplies and equipment, maintaining equipment, processing samples for genetic and physiology assays, microscopy, preparing RNA and DNA samples for sequencing, performing basic data analyses, training students, and maintaining an organized, safe and productive lab environment. The lab offers an exciting, integrative and supportive work environment, with opportunities to be involved in a wide range of research projects. Minimum qualifications: V A bachelors degree in a related field or an equivalent combination of education and relevant experience in population genetics, molecular biology, or molecular ecology V Experience preparing reagents/buffers, gel electrophoresis, and PCR V Exceptional organizational skills and strong ability to accomplish tasks independently V Ability to master detailed laboratory procedures V Excellent communication and computer skills V The ability to lift at least thirty pounds Preferred Qualifications V Experience with aquaculture of marine organisms either as a hobbyist or professionally V Familiarity with scientific computing languages such as R, Python, or Perl, and working on command line V Strong knowledge in evolutionary biology and marine biology To apply, please visit the University of Vermont Jobs website http://bit.ly/1MPvm3I and search for Posting # S231PO. Please submit a resume, three (3) letters of reference, and a cover letter that highlights your previous experience in the laboratory. Review of applicants will begin immediately and continue until position is filled. The position will ideally begin in May. This is a full-time position, initially appointed for a period of 12 months with benefits. The position can be extended for at least one year depending on performance. More information about the Pespeni Lab can be found at http://bit.ly/1Fchv6J. Please contact Melissa Pespeni (mpespeni@uvm.edu) if you have any questions. Melissa Pespeni, Ph.D. Assistant Professor University of Vermont Department of Biology Marsh Life Sciences, Rm 326A 109 Carrigan Drive Burlington, Vermont 05405 Lab website: *http://bit.ly/1MPvjVI Melissa Pespeni via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:09

Genome Analysis and Bioinformatics Specialist The University of Kansas is recruiting a research scientist with expertise in genomics and bioinformatics. The position is associated with the NIH-funded K-INBRE (Kansas IDeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence) Bioinformatics Core, directed by Stuart Macdonald. We are seeking applications from dynamic, motivated individuals interested in providing computational biology and statistical expertise to help KU researchers develop and analyze genomics projects. The Bioinformatics Specialist will work closely with the KU Genome Sequencing Core facility to support investigators as they design genome biology experiments, particularly those that involve Illumina sequencing data. The user base of the K-INBRE Bioinformatics Core is broad, and the successful candidate can expect to work on a diverse array of problems in a range of systems. The Bioinformatics Specialist would also be able to develop their own research program, mentored by, and collaborating with the many KU research faculty with strong interests in genome biology (for example, Justin Blumenstiel, John Kelly, Erik Lundquist, Stuart Macdonald). Required qualifications: Masters in biology or computer science; Solid understanding of Linux/Unix, and demonstrated programming experience; A record of published, peer-reviewed research. Preferred qualifications include a PhD in biology or computer science, and experience with the analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Queries about the position can be directed to Stuart Macdonald (sjmac@ku.edu), director of the facility. Further details, and instructions on how to apply for the position can be found at http://bit.ly/1Fchv6B. The position is open and review of applications will begin on April 3 and continue until the position is filled. The K-INBRE Bioinformatics Core is closely associated with the Departments of Molecular Biosciences and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, the Center for Computational Biology, and with the NIH COBRE-funded Center for Molecular Analysis of Disease Pathways. The University has a strong group of model organism (Drosophila, C. elegans) genetics and genomics researchers, and a number of quantitative and evolutionary genetics labs. The broad range of questions in evolutionary and computational biology addressed by KU labs provides an active, collaborative environment for research. KU is an EO/AAE. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), age, national origin, disability, genetic information or protected Veteran status. K-INBRE http://bit.ly/1MPvjVD Stuart Macdonald http://bit.ly/1Fchv6D Department of Molecular Biosciences http://bit.ly/1MPvlNo Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology http://eeb.ku.edu/ Center for Molecular Analysis of Disease Pathways http://bit.ly/1FchxLN KU Genome Sequencing Core http://gsc.ku.edu/ ### Dr. Stuart J. Macdonald Director, K-INBRE Bioinformatics Core Facility Department of Molecular Biosciences 4043 Haworth Hall 1200 Sunnyside Avenue University of Kansas Lawrence KS 66045 ### office: 785-864-5362 lab: 785-864-5777 fax: 785-864-5321 email: sjmac@ku.edu ### via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:09

*Volunteer field assistants:* We are looking for field assistants to help expand and monitor a colour-banded population of lovely fairy-wrens in Cairns (Queensland), Australia for a study on female ornamentation. Time periods: June or September 2015 (3 to 6 months). Duties include regular censusing of colour-banded birds, searching for and monitoring nests, mist-netting, recording song and measuring colouration, behavioural observations, video analysis, and data proofing. Working days are long, with early starts six days a week. Enthusiasm, self-motivation and organisation, and a strong work ethic are a must. Qualifications: experience monitoring colour-banded birds, nest-searching, and mist-netting. Good knowledge of English is a requirement. Must also be early riser, physically fit, able to work in extreme weather conditions, and enjoy basic shared living conditions. Having experience in behavioural observations and a driving licence is a plus but not a requirement. Accommodation is provided, but assistants cover travel to the site and their own food costs. The project will reimburse up to AUD$750/mo towards receipted food and travel expenses. For more information contact: Ana Leitao (avitorinoATstudent.unimelb.edu.au). To apply, please email a letter outlining previous relevant field research experience, and a CV including names and contact information for 3 referees. Applications received until the 9th of April 2015 will receive full consideration. Later applications may be considered. Ana V. Leito PhD candidate School of BioSciences (Building 147) University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 Australia anamvleitao@gmail.com avitorino@student.unimelb.edu.au anamvleitao@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR