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December 19, 2014

06:04

Influenza B viruses make a considerable contribution to morbidity attributed to seasonal influenza. Currently circulating influenza B isolates are known to belong to two antigenically distinct lineages referred to as B/Victoria and B/Yamagata. Frequent exchange of genomic segments of these two lineages has been noted in the past, but the observed patterns of reassortment have not been formalized in detail. We investigate interlineage reassortments by comparing phylogenetic trees across genomic segments. Our analyses indicate that of the eight segments of influenza B viruses only segments coding for polymerase basic 1 and 2 (PB1 and PB2) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins have maintained separate Victoria and Yamagata lineages and that currently circulating strains possess PB1, PB2, and HA segments derived entirely from one or the other lineage; other segments have repeatedly reassorted between lineages thereby reducing genetic diversity. We argue that this difference between segments is due to selection against reassortant viruses with mixed-lineage PB1, PB2, and HA segments. Given sufficient time and continued recruitment to the reassortment-isolated PB1–PB2–HA gene complex, we expect influenza B viruses to eventually undergo sympatric speciation.

06:04

Snake venom gene evolution has been studied intensively over the past several decades, yet most previous studies have lacked the context of complete snake genomes and the full context of gene expression across diverse snake tissues. We took a novel approach to studying snake venom evolution by leveraging the complete genome of the Burmese python, including information from tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. We identified the orthologs of snake venom genes in the python genome, and conducted detailed analysis of gene expression of these venom homologs to identify patterns that differ between snake venom gene families and all other genes. We found that venom gene homologs in the python are expressed in many different tissues outside of oral glands, which illustrates the pitfalls of using transcriptomic data alone to define "venom toxins." We hypothesize that the python may represent an ancestral state prior to major venom development, which is supported by our finding that the expansion of venom gene families is largely restricted to highly venomous caenophidian snakes. Therefore, the python provides insight into biases in which genes were recruited for snake venom systems. Python venom homologs are generally expressed at lower levels, have higher variance among tissues, and are expressed in fewer organs compared with all other python genes. We propose a model for the evolution of snake venoms in which venom genes are recruited preferentially from genes with particular expression profile characteristics, which facilitate a nearly neutral transition toward specialized venom system expression.

06:04

Yeast species represent an ideal model system for population genomic studies but large-scale polymorphism surveys have only been reported for species of the Saccharomyces genus so far. Hence, little is known about intraspecific diversity and evolution in yeast. To obtain a new insight into the evolutionary forces shaping natural populations, we sequenced the genomes of an expansive worldwide collection of isolates from a species distantly related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Lachancea kluyveri (formerly S. kluyveri). We identified 6.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms and showed that a large introgression event of 1 Mb of GC-rich sequence in the chromosomal arm probably occurred in the last common ancestor of all L. kluyveri strains. Our population genomic data clearly revealed that this 1-Mb region underwent a molecular evolution pattern very different from the rest of the genome. It is characterized by a higher recombination rate, with a dramatically elevated A:T -> G:C substitution rate, which is the signature of an increased GC-biased gene conversion. In addition, the predicted base composition at equilibrium demonstrates that the chromosome-scale compositional heterogeneity will persist after the genome has reached mutational equilibrium. Altogether, the data presented herein clearly show that distinct recombination and substitution regimes can coexist and lead to different evolutionary patterns within a single genome.

06:04

Unresolved questions about evolution of the large and diverse legume family include the timing of polyploidy (whole-genome duplication; WGDs) relative to the origin of the major lineages within the Fabaceae and to the origin of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Previous work has established that a WGD affects most lineages in the Papilionoideae and occurred sometime after the divergence of the papilionoid and mimosoid clades, but the exact timing has been unknown. The history of WGD has also not been established for legume lineages outside the Papilionoideae. We investigated the presence and timing of WGDs in the legumes by querying thousands of phylogenetic trees constructed from transcriptome and genome data from 20 diverse legumes and 17 outgroup species. The timing of duplications in the gene trees indicates that the papilionoid WGD occurred in the common ancestor of all papilionoids. The earliest diverging lineages of the Papilionoideae include both nodulating taxa, such as the genistoids (e.g., lupin), dalbergioids (e.g., peanut), phaseoloids (e.g., beans), and galegoids (=Hologalegina, e.g., clovers), and clades with nonnodulating taxa including Xanthocercis and Cladrastis (evaluated in this study). We also found evidence for several independent WGDs near the base of other major legume lineages, including the Mimosoideae–Cassiinae–Caesalpinieae (MCC), Detarieae, and Cercideae clades. Nodulation is found in the MCC and papilionoid clades, both of which experienced ancestral WGDs. However, there are numerous nonnodulating lineages in both clades, making it unclear whether the phylogenetic distribution of nodulation is due to independent gains or a single origin followed by multiple losses.

06:04

Lentiviruses infect a wide range of mammal species. Much remains unknown about their deep history and host distribution. Here, we report the discovery of an endogenous lentivirus within the genome of the Sunda flying lemur (Galeopterus variegatus) (which we designate "Galeopterus variegatus endogenous lentivirus" [GvaELV]). We estimate the GvaELV genome invasion to have occurred more than 14 Ma, supporting an ancient origin of the lentivirus clade and an ancient lentiviral infection in colugo. Phylogenetic analyses show that GvaELV is a sister group of all previously known lentiviruses. The GvaELV genome appears to possess some primitive genomic features of a lentivirus, encoding not only a trans-activator of transcription (tat) gene but also two additional putative accessory genes that share no discernible similarity with other lentiviral accessory genes. The discovery of GvaELV provides novel insights into the prehistory and host distribution of lentivirus.

06:04

Widespread premature termination codon mutations (PTCs) were recently observed in human and fly populations. We took advantage of the population resequencing data in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel to investigate how the expression profile and the evolutionary age of genes shaped the allele frequency distribution of PTCs. After generating a high-quality data set of PTCs, we clustered genes harboring PTCs into three categories: genes encoding low-frequency PTCs (≤1.5%), moderate-frequency PTCs (1.5–10%), and high-frequency PTCs (>10%). All three groups show narrow transcription compared with PTC-free genes, with the moderate- and high-PTC frequency groups showing a pronounced pattern. Moreover, nearly half (42%) of the PTC-encoding genes are not expressed in any tissue. Interestingly, the moderate-frequency PTC group is strongly enriched for genes expressed in midgut, whereas genes harboring high-frequency PTCs tend to have sex-specific expression. We further find that although young genes born in the last 60 My compose a mere 9% of the genome, they represent 16%, 30%, and 50% of the genes containing low-, moderate-, and high-frequency PTCs, respectively. Among DNA-based and RNA-based duplicated genes, the child copy is approximately twice as likely to contain PTCs as the parent copy, whereas young de novo genes are as likely to encode PTCs as DNA-based duplicated new genes. Based on these results, we conclude that expression profile and gene age jointly shaped the landscape of PTC-mediated gene loss. Therefore, we propose that new genes may need a long time to become stably maintained after the origination.

06:04

Mutations are the source of evolutionary variation. The interactions of multiple mutations can have important effects on fitness and evolutionary trajectories. We have recently described the distribution of fitness effects of all single mutations for a nine-amino-acid region of yeast Hsp90 (Hsp82) implicated in substrate binding. Here, we report and discuss the distribution of intragenic epistatic effects within this region in seven Hsp90 point mutant backgrounds of neutral to slightly deleterious effect, resulting in an analysis of more than 1,000 double mutants. We find negative epistasis between substitutions to be common, and positive epistasis to be rare—resulting in a pattern that indicates a drastic change in the distribution of fitness effects one step away from the wild type. This can be well explained by a concave relationship between phenotype and genotype (i.e., a concave shape of the local fitness landscape), suggesting mutational robustness intrinsic to the local sequence space. Structural analyses indicate that, in this region, epistatic effects are most pronounced when a solvent-inaccessible position is involved in the interaction. In contrast, all 18 observations of positive epistasis involved at least one mutation at a solvent-exposed position. By combining the analysis of evolutionary and biophysical properties of an epistatic landscape, these results contribute to a more detailed understanding of the complexity of protein evolution.

06:04

We estimated the spontaneous mutation rate in Heliconius melpomene by genome sequencing of a pair of parents and 30 of their offspring, based on the ratio of number of de novo heterozygotes to the number of callable site-individuals. We detected nine new mutations, each one affecting a single site in a single offspring. This yields an estimated mutation rate of 2.9 x 10–9 (95% confidence interval, 1.3 x 10–9–5.5 x 10–9), which is similar to recent estimates in Drosophila melanogaster, the only other insect species in which the mutation rate has been directly estimated. We infer that recent effective population size of H. melpomene is about 2 million, a substantially lower value than its census size, suggesting a role for natural selection reducing diversity. We estimate that H. melpomene diverged from its Müllerian comimic H. erato about 6 Ma, a somewhat later date than estimates based on a local molecular clock.

06:04

Several methods have been proposed to test for introgression across genomes. One method tests for a genome-wide excess of shared derived alleles between taxa using Patterson’s D statistic, but does not establish which loci show such an excess or whether the excess is due to introgression or ancestral population structure. Several recent studies have extended the use of D by applying the statistic to small genomic regions, rather than genome-wide. Here, we use simulations and whole-genome data from Heliconius butterflies to investigate the behavior of D in small genomic regions. We find that D is unreliable in this situation as it gives inflated values when effective population size is low, causing D outliers to cluster in genomic regions of reduced diversity. As an alternative, we propose a related statistic $${\widehat{f}}_{d}$$, a modified version of a statistic originally developed to estimate the genome-wide fraction of admixture. $${\widehat{f}}_{d}$$ is not subject to the same biases as D, and is better at identifying introgressed loci. Finally, we show that both D and $${\widehat{f}}_{d}$$ outliers tend to cluster in regions of low absolute divergence (dXY), which can confound a recently proposed test for differentiating introgression from shared ancestral variation at individual loci.

06:04

Phylostratigraphy is a method for dating the evolutionary emergence of a gene or gene family by identifying its homologs across the tree of life, typically by using BLAST searches. Applying this method to all genes in a species, or genomic phylostratigraphy, allows investigation of genome-wide patterns in new gene origination at different evolutionary times and thus has been extensively used. However, gene age estimation depends on the challenging task of detecting distant homologs via sequence similarity, which is expected to have differential accuracies for different genes. Here, we evaluate the accuracy of phylostratigraphy by realistic computer simulation with parameters estimated from genomic data, and investigate the impact of its error on findings of genome evolution. We show that 1) phylostratigraphy substantially underestimates gene age for a considerable fraction of genes, 2) the error is especially serious when the protein evolves rapidly, is short, and/or its most conserved block of sites is small, and 3) these errors create spurious nonuniform distributions of various gene properties among age groups, many of which cannot be predicted a priori. Given the high likelihood that conclusions about gene age are faulty, we advocate the use of realistic simulation to determine if observations from phylostratigraphy are explainable, at least qualitatively, by a null model of biased measurement, and in all cases, critical evaluation of results.

06:04

Large phylogenomics data sets require fast tree inference methods, especially for maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenies. Fast programs exist, but due to inherent heuristics to find optimal trees, it is not clear whether the best tree is found. Thus, there is need for additional approaches that employ different search strategies to find ML trees and that are at the same time as fast as currently available ML programs. We show that a combination of hill-climbing approaches and a stochastic perturbation method can be time-efficiently implemented. If we allow the same CPU time as RAxML and PhyML, then our software IQ-TREE found higher likelihoods between 62.2% and 87.1% of the studied alignments, thus efficiently exploring the tree-space. If we use the IQ-TREE stopping rule, RAxML and PhyML are faster in 75.7% and 47.1% of the DNA alignments and 42.2% and 100% of the protein alignments, respectively. However, the range of obtaining higher likelihoods with IQ-TREE improves to 73.3–97.1%. IQ-TREE is freely available at http://www.cibiv.at/software/iqtree.

06:04

Our understanding of genome-wide and comparative sequence information has been broadened considerably by the databases available from the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Bioinformatics Department. In particular, the identification and visualization of genomic sequences, present in some species but absent in others, led to fundamental insights into gene and genome evolution. However, the UCSC tools currently enable one to visualize orthologous genomic loci for a range of species in only a single locus. For large-scale comparative analyses of such presence/absence patterns a multilocus view would be more desirable. Such a tool would enable us to compare thousands of relevant loci simultaneously and to resolve many different questions about, for example, phylogeny, specific aspects of genome and gene evolution, such as the gain or loss of exons and introns, the emergence of novel transposed elements, nonprotein-coding RNAs, and viral genomic particles. Here, we present the first tool to facilitate the parallel analysis of thousands of genomic loci for cross-species presence/absence patterns based on multiway genome alignments. This genome presence/absence compiler uses annotated or other compilations of coordinates of genomic locations and compiles all presence/absence patterns in a flexible, color-coded table linked to the individual UCSC Genome Browser alignments. We provide examples of the versatile information content of such a screening system especially for 7SL-derived transposed elements, nuclear mitochondrial DNA, DNA transposons, and miRNAs in primates (http://www.bioinformatics.uni-muenster.de/tools/gpac, last accessed October 1, 2014).

05:00
Background: Estimating divergence times in phylogenies using a molecular clock depends on accurate modeling of nucleotide substitution rates in DNA sequences. Rate heterogeneity among lineages is likely to affect estimates, especially in lineages with long stems and short crowns (?broom? clades) and no internal calibration. We evaluate the performance of the random local clocks model (RLC) and the more routinely employed uncorrelated lognormal relaxed clock model (UCLN) in situations in which a significant rate shift occurs on the stem branch of a broom clade. We compare the results of simulations to empirical results from analyses of a real rate-heterogeneous taxon ? Australian grass trees (Xanthorrhoea) ? whose substitution rate is slower than in its sister groups, as determined by relative rate tests. Results: In the simulated datasets, the RLC model performed much better than UCLN: RLC correctly estimated the age of the crown node of slow-rate broom clades, whereas UCLN estimates were consistently too young. Similarly, in the Xanthorrhoea dataset, UCLN returned significantly younger crown ages than RLC (mean estimates respectively 3?6 Ma versus 25?35 Ma). In both real and simulated datasets, Bayes Factor tests strongly favored the RLC model over the UCLN model. Conclusions: The choice of an unsuitable molecular clock model can strongly bias divergence time estimates. In particular, for data predicted to have more rate variation among than within clades, dating with RLC is much more likely to be accurate than with UCLN. The choice of clocks should be informed by the biology of the study group (e.g., life-form) or assessed with relative rate tests and post-hoc model comparisons.
05:00
Background: The majority of DNA contained within vertebrate genomes is non-coding, with a certain proportion of this thought to play regulatory roles during development. Conserved Non-coding Elements (CNEs) are an abundant group of putative regulatory sequences that are highly conserved across divergent groups and thus assumed to be under strong selective constraint. Many CNEs may contain regulatory factor binding sites, and their frequent spatial association with key developmental genes ? such as those regulating sensory system development ? suggests crucial roles in regulating gene expression and cellular patterning. Yet surprisingly little is known about the molecular evolution of CNEs across diverse mammalian taxa or their role in specific phenotypic adaptations. We examined 3,110 vertebrate-specific and ~82,000 mammalian-specific CNEs across 19 and 9 mammalian orders respectively, and tested for changes in the rate of evolution of CNEs located in the proximity of genes underlying the development or functioning of auditory systems. As we focused on CNEs putatively associated with genes underlying the development/functioning of auditory systems, we incorporated echolocating taxa in our dataset because of their highly specialised and derived auditory systems. Results: Phylogenetic reconstructions of concatenated CNEs broadly recovered accepted mammal relationships despite high levels of sequence conservation. We found that CNE substitution rates were highest in rodents and lowest in primates, consistent with previous findings. Comparisons of CNE substitution rates from several genomic regions containing genes linked to auditory system development and hearing revealed differences between echolocating and non-echolocating taxa. Wider taxonomic sampling of four CNEs associated with the homeobox genes Hmx2 and Hmx3 ? which are required for inner ear development ? revealed family-wise variation across diverse bat species. Specifically within one family of echolocating bats that utilise frequency-modulated echolocation calls varying widely in frequency and intensity high levels of sequence divergence were found. Conclusions: Levels of selective constraint acting on CNEs differed both across genomic locations and taxa, with observed variation in substitution rates of CNEs among bat species. More work is needed to determine whether this variation can be linked to echolocation, and wider taxonomic sampling is necessary to fully document levels of conservation in CNEs across diverse taxa.
01:58

Short name: USheffield. Paleogenomics Fully funded for a minimum of 3.5 years phd studentship is available at the University of Sheffield, department of Animal and Plant Sciences in collaboration with the University of York, Archeology department. Studentships are available to UK and EU students who meet the UK residency requirements. Title: Developing novell OMICs tools to identify the origin of ancient bio samples using ancient DNA Supervisors: Eran Elhaik, The University of Sheffield, Animal and Plant Sciences; Matthew Collins, University of York, Dept of Archeology; Michael Baird, DNA Diagnostics Center Job Description: What percentage of our DNA came from the Vikings or Ancient Romans? How migration waves affected the environment? These and other questions can now be approached using ancient DNA and novel bioinformatics tools. Coupling Ancient DNA, which is one of the most exciting emerging fields in genetics, with tools, such as the Geographical Population Structure (GPS), which that can find one’s village of origin using our DNA (http://bit.ly/13jpgqe tors-lived), we can make historical and evolutionary inferences. The successful candidate will do some of the work in the ancient DNA lab in the University of York and in one of the world leading companies in DNA tests, located in Ohio (USA). The candidate will gain most valuable experience both in “wet lab” techniques and bioinformatics. Requirements: We are seeking an outstanding graduate students who is self-motivated and can work independently, with an enthusiasm for a mix of field, lab and computer based work. Because major parts of the project involve NGS data analyses, modelling, and programming, we are interested in applicants with strong mathematical, bio-statistical, and/or computational skills, interested in paleo-genomics and in developing expertise in bioinformatics, genomics, and biodiversity while developing ties with a major US DNA diagnostics company. This is a very multidisciplinary project which provides multiple learning opportunities in various exciting and emerging fields. We place a strong emphasis on quantitative, analytical, and computational techniques, such as genomic modelling, bioinformatics, and a range of OMICs technologies. The successful candidates will spend about 6 months working in the Ancient DNA lab in York, learning how to sequence and assemble ancient genomes, and another 3 months in the US training with a DNA diagnosis company. To apply: Follow the instructions here: http://bit.ly/13jpgqg Eran Elhaik, Ph.D. http://bit.ly/Ng2eIU http://bit.ly/13jpgXu Department of Animal & Plant Sciences, Alfred Denny Building University of Sheffield, Western Bank Sheffield, S10 2TN, UK Phone: 0114 222 2704 Fax: 0114 222 0002 Email: e.elhaik@sheffield.ac.uk via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:44
Two Graduate Student Positions (MSc or PhD) in Comparative and Population Genomics of Symbiotic and Pathogenic Fungi - Corradi Lab The Corradi Lab is currently seeking two talented graduate students (MSc or PhD level). Students will be supervised by Dr. Nicolas Corradi within a CIFAR (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) - affiliated laboratory located in the Department of Biology of the University of Ottawa, Canada. Lab Website: http://bit.ly/OBmsOV The candidates are expected to contribute to some of the ongoing large-scale projects that focus on the Comparative and Population Genomics of two evolutionary unrelated groups of fungi: the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and the Microsporidia. Enquiries about specific projects can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca). Applicants are expected to have some background in comparative genomics or populations genetics/genomics. Prior experience in either Population Genetics, Environmental Genomics, Metagenomics, genome annotation, Environmental Sampling and Strain cultivation (AMF spores), Fungal taxonomy and programming will be seen as an asset for the final selection of the candidate. Basic knowledge of Linux is required. The lab is bilingual (English and French). For Non-Canadian candidates, Fluency in French is desired. A complete application package includes 1) a CV, 2) a short description of past research accomplishments and future goals, and 3) the names and e-mail addresses of at least 2 references. Evaluation of applications starts immediately and suitable candidates are expected to join the lab before September of 2015. The University of Ottawa is a large, research-intensive university, hosting over 40.000 students and located in the downtown core area of Canada’s capital city (http://bit.ly/OBmsOT). Ottawa is a vibrant, multicultural city with a very high quality of life (http://bit.ly/1dxMqIo) Applications can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca). Representative publications: - Parisot N. *, Pelin A. * et al. 2014.. Microsporidian genomes harbour a diverse array of transposable elements that demonstrate an ancestry of horizontal exchange with metazoa. Genome Biology and Evolution. 6 (9): 2289-2300. *Contributed equally. - Riley R. et al. 2014. Extreme Diversification of the MATA-HMG Gene Family in the Plant - Associated Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi. New Phytologist. 201: 254-268 - James T.Y et al. 2013. Shared signatures of parasitism and phylogenomics unite the Cryptomycota and Microsporidia. Current Biology. 23 (16), 1548-1553 - Tisserant E. et al. The arbuscular mycorrhizal Glomus genome provides insights into the evolution of the oldest plant symbiosis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - USA. 110 (50), 20117-20122R576-R577 - Pombert J.F. *, Selman M.* et al. 2012. Gain and loss of multiple functionally- related horizontally transferred genes in the reduced genomes of two microsporidian parasites. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - USA 109(31):12638-43 - Selman M. et al. 2011. Acquisition of an animal gene by two microsporidia. 2011. Current Biology 21: R576-R577 Nicolas Corradi via Gmail
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01:44
*Two year Postdoc opportunity in* ** *Statistical and Population Genomics* ** *Miguel Pérez-Enciso (*miguel.perez@uab.es*)* ** *Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG)* *Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain* ** *JOB DESCRIPTION* A two year postdoc position is available within the recently funded project ‘Next generation tools to exploit genome diversity in domestic species’. Two research topics are possible, or a mixture of both: 1- Use of sequence data in genomic selection. We will investigate by simulation, but using real sequence data, what are the potential advantages of sequence over high density genotyping under realistic genetic architectures. 2- To develop a population genetics model that mimic domestication and breed structure in livestock. Focusing in the pig species and using genomewide sequence data, the goal is to adjust a population genetics model that can be used as neutral model to test for selection. ** *THE RESEARCH TEAM* The PhD project wil be supervised by Miguel Pérez-Enciso (ICREA professor, http://bit.ly/1zDsMaZ; http://bit.ly/16ygpDA), in cooperation with S.E. Ramos-Onsins. Recent related publications include: Pérez-Enciso M. et al. On genetic differentiation between domesticpigs and Tibetan wild boars. Nature Genetics (correspondence), accepted. Nevado, N., et al. 2014. Re-sequencing studies of non-model organisms using closely-related reference genomes: optimal experimental designs and bioinformatics approaches for population genomics. Mol. Ecol. 23: 1764–1779. Pérez-Enciso, M. 2014. Genomic relationships computed from either next generation sequence or array SNP data. J. Anim. Breed. Genet. 131:85-96. Ramírez O, et al. 2014. Genome data from a sixteenth century pig illuminate modern breed relationships. Heredity doi: 10.1038/hdy.2014.81 Groenen et al. 2012. Analyses of pig genomes provide insight into porcine demography and evolution. Nature 491:393-8. The research will be developed in the recently built Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (www.cragenomica.es), based on campus of Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona (www.uab.es), Spain. ** *SALARY AND CONDITIONS* Annual gross salary is 29k €, the contract is available for one year and extendable to an additional year. The position is available starting May 2015 or as agreed. Candidates interested in the position should email me (miguel.perez@uab.es) their CV and names of two persons who can provide references. Miguel Perez-Enciso ICREA professor Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) and Facultat de Veterinaria UAB Campus Universitat Autonoma Barcelona Bellaterra E-08193 Spain Tel: +34 935636600 ext 3346 Fax: +34 935636601 miguel.perez@uab.es http://bit.ly/1zDsOPU http://bit.ly/16ygo2r http://bit.ly/1zDsMrf http://bit.ly/16ygo2twww.cragenomica.es), based on campus of Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona (www.uab.es), Spain. ** *SALARY AND CONDITIONS* Annual gross salary is 29k €, the contract is available for one year and extendable to an additional year. The position is available starting May 2015 or as agreed. Candidates interested in the position should email me (miguel.perez@uab.es) their CV and names of two persons who can provide references. Miguel Perez-Enciso ICREA professor Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) and Facultat de Veterinaria UAB Campus Universitat Autonoma Barcelona Bellaterra E-08193 Spain Tel: +34 935636600 ext 3346 Fax: +34 935636601 miguel.perez@uab.es http://bit.ly/1zDsOPU http://bit.ly/16ygo2r http://bit.ly/1zDsMrf http://bit.ly/16ygo2t miguel via Gmail
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01:29
Research Associate Position in Single Cell Phylogenomics University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada The Department of Botany seeks a well-trained highly motivated and enthusiastic individual interested in exploring the evolutionary biology of complex microbial life and their organelles using single cell genomics methods coupled with phylogenomic analyses as a Research Associate. The applicant must have a PhD or equivalent and at least three additional years of research experience. Expertise in eukaryotic biodiversity and evolutionary history, and the application of single cell genomics methods (genomic and transcriptomic datasets) and phylogenic analyses are essential. The applicant must have excellent written and oral communication skills and be highly organised. Basic molecular biology and analyses techniques are also highly desirable. The candidate must have a proven record of publication in significant journals in the field. [If there are particular duties and/or experience the applicants should have, please add them here. These will be used to prove why other applicants do not meet the criteria.] The position is available starting May 15 2015 for an initial period of one year with a possibility for extension subject to a satisfactory performance and funding. To apply, please send a cover letter outlining research experience and interest, a curriculum vitae and the names and contact information for 3 referees to Patrick Keeling, Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, 3529-6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, B. C. V6T 1Z4, Canada. Emailpkeeling@mail.ubc.ca. Fax (604) 822-6089. Closing date is Friday, January 23, 2015. UBC hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community. We especially welcome applications from visible minority group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others with the skills and knowledge to productively engage with diverse communities. Canadians and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. “Keeling, Patrick” via Gmail
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01:12
The lab of Célio F. B. Haddad has an opening for a postdoctoral position in biology of amphibians. The lab is located within the Department of Zoology at Universidade Estadual Paulista, State of São Paulo, Brazil, and maintains close interactions with an exceptionally large and diverse group of labs that work on amphibians over the world. Haddad’s lab is seeking a postdoctoral fellow to develop a project with *Brachycephalus*, an endemic genus of tiny frogs from the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. The fellowship will be provided by FAPESP (more information in www.fapesp.br/270). Start date should be immediate. Candidates should have experience with these amphibians and some required qualifications: 1) Ph.D. in Zoology or related field, obtained no more than one year ago; 2) experience with amphibians, including publications with the target taxonomic group; 3) skills to work with GIS and molecular evolutionary analysis; 4) availability to plan and to do fieldwork; 5) availability to live at Rio Claro, State of São Paulo, Brazil, during the execution of the project; 6) fluent English and personal interest to learn Portuguese; 7) exclusive dedication to the project. The selected candidate should work on the specific project “Diversification of *Brachycephalus *(Anura: Brachycephalidae): evolutionary patterns and processes”. To apply, please send a CV, a statement of the academic background and research interests and two recommendation letters to anfibioslagamar@gmail.com. The deadline for applications is January 18, 2015. The successful applicants will be contacted by e-mail to an interview, if necessary. The result will be disclosed by e-mail until January 25, 2015. Célio F. B. Haddad Professor Department of Zoology Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP) Rio Claro, SP, Brazil Célio Fernando Baptista Haddad via Gmail
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00:08
The International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology offers several fully funded PhD positions. The IMPRS is based in southern Germany and is jointly organized by the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen and Radolfzell and the University of Konstanz. Outstanding students of all nationalities with a deep commitment to basic research in Organismal Biology are invited to apply. More than 25 internationally recognized research groups actively participate in the PhD program and offer challenging, cutting-edge PhD projects in the fields of Behavioral Biology, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Physiology, and Neurobiology. The aim of the IMPRS is to provide first-class training and education for outstanding doctoral students from all over the world in a stimulating research environment. The competitive doctoral program provides its fellows with an excellent starting platform for a successful career in the fields of animal behaviour, ecology, evolution, physiology, and neurobiology. For 2015, we offer the following PhD projects: Evolutionary Genetics of the Embryo Mortality Puzzle in the Zebra Finch Ecological genomics in urbanizing burrowing owls Comparative Analysis of Sexual Selection in Parrots of the World Early Sexual Development of the Chicken Brain Collective Animal Behaviour Computational Approaches to the Experimental Study of Animal Collectives Two open PhD positions for own proposal elaboration within Organismal Biology For a list of all available PhD projects visit http://bit.ly/18czeMc. Our Offer All students accepted to the program will be supported by stipends or contracts. The program offers a dedicated teaching program, high quality research experience, and outstanding research facilities in an inspiring research and living environment. The working language is English. Each PhD student receives individual supervision and mentoring and is guided in her/his research work by a PhD advisory committee. The Max Planck Society and the University of Konstanz are equal opportunity employers. Your application Outstanding students of all nationalities with a deep commitment to basic research in Organismal Biology are invited to apply. Deadline for the application is January 15, 2015. Interviews with the applicants are scheduled for March 23-26, 2015. Candidates accepted into the program may start latest September 2015. Qualification: Applicants should hold a MSc or equivalent degree in biology or a related discipline at the point of enrollment. Queries should be mailed to the program office: IMPRS@uni-konstanz.de Application: You can only apply via the three-tier electronical application process on the Institutes webpage. For more information visit http://bit.ly/1zDbMBG. More information at www.orn.mpg.de/IMPRS and http://on.fb.me/18czeMdwww.orn.mpg.de/IMPRS and http://on.fb.me/18czeMd Mggi Hieber Ruiz via Gmail
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