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August 14, 2014

03:19
PhD Position Evolutionary Ecology The GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel offers a PhD-position for an early stage researcher within the recently established Priority Program “Flexibility matters: Interplay between trait diversity and ecological dynamics using aquatic communities as model systems” (www.DynaTrait.de) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). We are seeking a highly motivated PhD student with strong interest in community, evolutionary and trait based ecology to join our interdisciplinary eco-evolutionary research team located at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre of Marine Science in Kiel, Germany. The overarching goal of the project is to assess the relative importance, and functional interdependencies of ecological and evolutionary processes within marine phytoplankton communities under external pressure. The experimental model system will consist of functionally different phytoplankton species, i.e. diatoms, cyanobacteria and coccolithophores that vary in terms of resource acquisition, productivity and environmental tolerances. The external forcing will be enhanced seawater CO2 concentration. The successful candidate will study the relative importance of the different components of response diversity, i.e. physiological plasticity, ecological species sorting, and adaptive evolution, to explain change of ecosystem functioning of selected experimental plankton communities in response to enhanced CO2 concentration. This will be achieved first, by a direct experimental approach, and second, by a theoretical Price-equation decomposition into plasticity components, ecological species sorting, and adaptive evolution. Trade-offs among stress tolerance and competitive abilities will be addressed in order to interpret the results. The PhD candidate is expected to work in close collaboration with a second PhD candidate studying how rapid ecological and evolutionary processes inhibit or mutually enhance each other in multispecies phytoplankton assemblages. Funding is available for three years. The anticipated starting date is 01 December 2014 or January 2015. The candidate must hold a Master of Science (or equivalent) degree in the field of biology, ecology, evolution, or related subjects. Experiences in experimental ecology or evolution and in statistical data analysis are required. The work includes semi-continuous microcosm experiments, microscopic quantification of different species and strains via light and electron microscopy and flow cytometry, and nutrient analyses. Experience in cultivation of phytoplankton is a plus. The candidate should have a strong interest in multidisciplinary research. The salary is according to the class 13 TVOD of the German tariffs for public employees (65%). The GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel seeks to increase the proportion of female scientists and therefore women are especially encouraged to apply. GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel also supports the employment of disabled persons. Persons with disabilities with appropriate qualifications and aptitudes will be employed preferentially. Please send your application for this post including research interests, a current CV, and contact details of two persons acting as referees not later than 14 September 2014 using the keyword “Evolutionary Ecology” to the following address: GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel Personalabteilung/Frau Moll Kennwort “Evolutionary Ecology” Wischhofstrasse 1-3 D-24148 Kiel Germany For further information, please contact Dr. Birte Matthiessen (bmatthiessen(at)geomar.de). For general information on research at the GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, see http://www.geomar.de. Birte Matthiessen GEOMAR Helmholtz-Zentrum fr Ozeanforschung Duesternbrooker Weg 20 D-24105 Kiel Germany Tel.: ++49-431 600 4408 Fax: ++49-431 600 4402 E-mail: bmatthiessen@geomar.de http://bit.ly/1sFlAKfwww.DynaTrait.de) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). We are seeking a highly motivated PhD student with strong interest in community, evolutionary and trait based ecology to join our interdisciplinary eco-evolutionary research team located at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre of Marine Science in Kiel, Germany. The overarching goal of the project is to assess the relative importance, and functional interdependencies of ecological and evolutionary processes within marine phytoplankton communities under external pressure. The experimental model system will consist of functionally different phytoplankton species, i.e. diatoms, cyanobacteria and coccolithophores that vary in terms of resource acquisition, productivity and environmental tolerances. The external forcing will be enhanced seawater CO2 concentration. The successful candidate will study the relative importance of the different components of response diversity, i.e. physiological plasticity, ecological species sorting, and adaptive evolution, to explain change of ecosystem functioning of selected experimental plankton communities in response to enhanced CO2 concentration. This will be achieved first, by a direct experimental approach, and second, by a theoretical Price-equation decomposition into plasticity components, ecological species sorting, and adaptive evolution. Trade-offs among stress tolerance and competitive abilities will be addressed in order to interpret the results. The PhD candidate is expected to work in close collaboration with a second PhD candidate studying how rapid ecological and evolutionary processes inhibit or mutually enhance each other in multispecies phytoplankton assemblages. Funding is available for three years. The anticipated starting date is 01 December 2014 or January 2015. The candidate must hold a Master of Science (or equivalent) degree in the field of biology, ecology, evolution, or related subjects. Experiences in experimental ecology or evolution and in statistical data analysis are required. The work includes semi-continuous microcosm experiments, microscopic quantification of different species and strains via light and electron microscopy and flow cytometry, and nutrient analyses. Experience in cultivation of phytoplankton is a plus. The candidate should have a strong interest in multidisciplinary research. The salary is according to the class 13 TVOD of the German tariffs for public employees (65%). The GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel seeks to increase the proportion of female scientists and therefore women are especially encouraged to apply. GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel also supports the employment of disabled persons. Persons with disabilities with appropriate qualifications and aptitudes will be employed preferentially. Please send your application for this post including research interests, a current CV, and contact details of two persons acting as referees not later than 14 September 2014 using the keyword “Evolutionary Ecology” to the following address: GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel Personalabteilung/Frau Moll Kennwort “Evolutionary Ecology” Wischhofstrasse 1-3 D-24148 Kiel Germany For further information, please contact Dr. Birte Matthiessen (bmatthiessen(at)geomar.de). For general information on research at the GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, see http://www.geomar.de. Birte Matthiessen GEOMAR Helmholtz-Zentrum fr Ozeanforschung Duesternbrooker Weg 20 D-24105 Kiel Germany Tel.: ++49-431 600 4408 Fax: ++49-431 600 4402 E-mail: bmatthiessen@geomar.de http://bit.ly/1sFlAKf Birte Matthiessen via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:03
Swansea, UK; Helicobacter pylori Genomics Helicobacter pylori cancer genomics, fully-funded PhD studentship available in the Sheppard laboratory (2014-2017). H. pylori infection is the principal pathophysiological step leading to initiation of the inflammatory response in gastric cancer patients. However, the severity of disease and the ultimate outcome is dependent upon a complex interaction between pathogen and host cell. Chronic inflammation is understood to induce cancer by increasing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and subsequent DNA damage. This could result from infection with any H. pylori strain, however, H. pylori populations are highly structured with numerous genotypes existing together in a single patient and these strains can have different disease causing potential. By characterizing variation in the core and accessory genome we will identify candidate associated genetic elements (alleles, SNPs) that are over represented in isolates from patients with certain types of cellular pathologies. These will be investigated in functional studies to improve understanding of disease causation. The successful applicant will join a multidisciplinary group focusing on population biology and evolution of bacterial pathogens of public health importance. Comparative genomics and functional characterisation approaches will examine the genetic structuring within pathogenic populations and answer fundamental questions about how genetic variation and genome plasticity influence adaptation and the evolution of pathogenicity. They will be responsible for sampling and culturing isolates, extracting DNA for genetic characterisation, analysing genomic data and carrying molecular and functional characterisation in the lab. Experimental approaches will provide training in CL2 containment techniques, in vitro mammalian cell culture, RT-qPCR and INCell Analyzer techniques. Bioinformatics training will involve state-of-the-art analysis of hundreds of whole genome sequences. This project will involve working within the MRC CLIMB consortium, directed by Dr Samuel Sheppard (http://bit.ly/1t25Gr3), and the Sheppard (http://bit.ly/1Bg5c5r) and Jenkins (http://bit.ly/1Bg599M) laboratories. Academic requirements: Candidates should have a 1st or 2:1 class honours degree in a relevant subject (genetics, microbiology, bioinformatics, molecular biology, or ecology). The successful candidate will be highly motivated, creative, independent and ideally have previous experience in a molecular biology laboratory or in bioinformatics research. Enthusiasm and practical experience in microbiology, molecular techniques (PCR, sequencing) and computer based genetic analysis are desirable, but training and support will be provided to strengthen these areas. Good English writing and oral skills are essential. Residency criteria: Due to funding restrictions, this studentship is available to UK/EU students only. The studentship covers the full cost of UK/EU tuition fees, plus a tax free stipend of 13,863 in year 1, ?14,279 in year 2, and ?14,707 in year 3. An additional 500 will also be available for research costs/conference attendance. To apply for this studentship please send a CV and covering letter to Dr Jane Mikhail: j.mikhail@swansea.ac.uk. Informal enquiries may also be directed to Dr Jane Mikhail at the email address above (tel: +44 (0)1792 295022) or Dr Sam Sheppard: s.k.sheppard@swansea.ac.uk Start date: October 2014 Closing date: 22nd August 2014 for more information and to apply http://bit.ly/1t25Izc Jane M Mikhail PhD Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Room 529, Level 5 Institute of Life Science 1 College of Medicine Swansea University Swansea SA2 8PP, UK j.mikhail@swansea.ac.uk 01792 295022 http://bit.ly/1Bg5c5r “Mikhail J.” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:47
POPULATION GENETICS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado Boulder is pleased to invite applications for a faculty position in Population Genetics at the Assistant Professor level. We are especially interested in individuals using genomic data for investigating microevolution. Qualifications include a Ph.D. degree and strong research, mentoring, and teaching credentials. Competitive start-up funding, laboratory development resources and ancillary support commensurate with the candidates needs and resource availability accompany this position. The successful candidate will contribute to research, mentoring, and teaching at graduate and undergraduate levels and will be expected to develop an externally funded research program. We offer a collaborative, intellectually stimulating, and supportive environment in which a new professor can thrive. For further information about the Department of EBIO, see http://bit.ly/1sY0zco . To apply, please collate the following into a single pdf file and attach as Document 1: cover letter, curriculum vitae, a list of at least three references and their contact information, and no more than four pages total on research, mentoring, and teaching. Application materials are accepted electronically at http://bit.ly/1sY0zcq, posting #F01649. Please make sure we have your application and supporting material by 15 October 2014, though we may accept later material as needed to achieve a successful outcome to this search. Dr. Rebecca Jo Safran Associate Professor Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology N317 Ramaley Hall University of Colorado Boulder Colorado 80309 email: rebecca.safran@colorado.edu phone: 303.735.1495 website: http://bit.ly/VojorU Rebecca J Safran via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:30
Can sexual selection drive social evolution? Insights from male dragons. While we know that access to mate can lead to the evolution of male coalition and alliances, our understanding of the extent sexual selection can shape social relationships is still unclear. Systems which exhibit alternative mating strategies offer great opportunities to gain greater insights into the ways by which differing mating strategies may influences patterns of social interactions and environment. This phd project will utilize the eastern water dragon (Intellagama lesueurii ) as a study system to investigate the extent to which sexual selection can shape social relationships. The project will combine the fields of genetics and behavioural ecology. Eastern water dragon is a large social, semi-aquatic and arboreal agamid lizard (Agamidae), native to Australia. Eastern water dragons exhibit elaborate social behaviours and a harem like mating system with males engaging in ritualised combat during the mating season (spring to late summer). Two types of male mating tactics have been described to date; males either exhibit strong territorial or non-territorial satellite behaviour. The study site is found within the Roma Street Parkland (RSP) (27 27’ 46” S, 153 1’ 11” E) located in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. RSP is a 16 hectare park and is the world’s largest subtropical garden in a city centre. It is also host to a large population of Eastern water dragons with a population size estimated to exceed 600 animals (Gardnier et al. PloS ONE doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096992). Ecological, behavioural surveys have been conducted on this population since October 2010 with morphological and DNA samples collected from more than 350 animals. Applicants will need to have an extremely competitive academic record and obtain an Australian Postgraduate Award or International Research and Fee Remission Scholarships (for details and scholarship application forms http://bit.ly/NS9g77). Scholarship round is open now and will close by October 4th. I would expect international applicants to hold a master and have at least one publication. Australian applicants will require a first class honours degree. If you are interested please email me your CV at cfrere@usc.edu.au. You can check my website (http://bit.ly/1uRRnph) if you wish to get more information about the work that is undertaken in my lab. Celine Frere PhD Research Fellow GeneCology Research Centre University of the Sunshine Coast mobile: 0423312893 celinefrerelab.com University of the Sunshine Coast, Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore DC, Queensland, 4558 Australia. CRICOS Provider No: 01595D Please consider the environment before printing this email. This email is confidential. If received in error, please delete it from your system. Celine Frere via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:15

I am writing to ask for the support of evolutionary biologists on an issue that lies at the intersection of *evolutionary biology, biosafety, and infectious diseases*, which has become more salient after recent incidents involving dangerous pathogens — flu, anthrax and smallpox — in federal labs in the US. The issue is the growing experimental effort to create via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:43

Tenure-track Assistant Professor in Systematic Biology, with expertise in Biodiversity Informatics Uppsala University is offering a tenure track position in systematic biology with a focus on biodiversity informatics. The primary requirement is a strong research record and well-defined research program in systematic biology encompassing diverse data types. Applicants should also be able to demonstrate significant knowledge of and expertise in designing and implementing a heterogeneous database aimed at addressing a set of well-focused evolutionary questions. The position is part of a major recruitment by the Swedish Science for Life Research Initiative (SciLifeLab: www.scilifelab.se). The successful candidate is expected to develop an independent internationally-competitive research program. The position may also include up to 20% teaching so that the candidate may acquire skills needed for promotion to associate professor (tenure). The position is funded for the first four years at 3 million sek/year (~300,000 ), to cover PI and additional salaries plus operating costs. Further information is available from http://bit.ly/Vo7OwP and http://bit.ly/1sXRxMH.www.scilifelab.se). The successful candidate is expected to develop an independent internationally-competitive research program. The position may also include up to 20% teaching so that the candidate may acquire skills needed for promotion to associate professor (tenure). The position is funded for the first four years at 3 million sek/year (~300,000 ), to cover PI and additional salaries plus operating costs. Further information is available from http://bit.ly/Vo7OwP and http://bit.ly/1sXRxMH. Please direct questions to Sandra Baldauf (head of systematic biology - sandra.baldauf@ebc.uu.se) or Irene Sderhll (head of department - irene.soderhall@ebc.uu.se). Application deadline is 30 September 2014. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:43

Symbioses becoming permanent: The origins and evolutionary trajectories of organelles An Arthur M. Sackler Colloquium on symbiosis will take place 15-17 October 2014 at the Beckman Center in Irvine, California. The meeting is co-sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences USA and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. There are still a few travel awards available for students and post-docs. More information can be found at this website: http://bit.ly/Vo7Ogt The agenda is as follows: October 15, 2014 5:30 pm Welcome reception 7:00 pm Distinctive Voices Public Lecture presented by Michael Gray, CIFAR Advisor, Dalhousie University October 16, 2014 7:00 am Buses from hotel to Beckman Center 7:15 am Registration and breakfast 8:00 am Session 1: Genomes (evolutionary rates, oddities, and reduction) Introduction and welcome remarks - W. Ford Doolittle, CIFAR Advisor & Patrick Keeling, CIFAR Program Director and Senior Fellow John McCutcheon, CIFAR Associate Fellow, University of Montana John Archibald, CIFAR Senior Fellow, Dalhousie University, Nuclear organelles Andrew Roger, CIFAR Senior Fellow, Dalhousie University, Organelle reduction Siv Andersson, Uppsala University, Alphaproteobacterial genome evolution David Smith, University of Western Ontario, Roots of genomic architecture variation 12:00 pm Lunch Daniel Sloan, Colorado State University, Cytonuclear co-evolution under extreme mitochondrial mutation rates John Allen, University College London, Why keep genomes? 3:15 pm Session 2: Integration/Control (trafficking, signaling, transporters) Debash Bhattacharya, Rutgers University, Transporters in organellogenesis Nancy Moran, University of Texas, Austin, Insect endosymbionts Geoff McFadden, University of Melbourne, Diversity of protein trafficking Chris Howe, Cambridge University, Why integrate? 5:35 pm Poster Session / Reception 6:30 pm Buffet dinner 7:45 pm Poster Session continues 8:30 pm Buses return to hotel October 17, 2014 7:00 am Buses from hotel to Beckman Center 7:15 am Breakfast 8:00 am Session 2 continues Steve Perlman, CIFAR Fellow, University of Victoria, Maternal transmission, sex ratio distortion, and mitochondria William Martin, Dsseldorf University, Endosymbiont and organelle, what’s the difference? Moriya Okhuma, Riken University, Metabolic integration across endosymbiotic communities 10:30 am Session 3: Theories and Models Eors Szathmary, Lornd University, A fresh look at cooperation in some major transitions, especially the origin of eukaryotes Marc Ereshefsky, University of Calgary, Evolutionary individuality 11:50 pm Lunch 1:30 pm Session 3 cont. Peter Godfrey-Smith, City University of New York, Individuality and the egalitarian transitions Maureen O’Malley, University of Sydney, Philosophical Reflections on Endosymbiosis: Implications for Evolutionary Theory Toby Kiers, University Amsterdam, Bacterial cooperativity 3:15 pm Closing remarks J. McCutcheon 3:30-4 pm Coffee and discussion or buses to airport and hotel via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:12
Masters project climate change ecology 30-50 ECTS Starting September 2014 Supervisors: Jelmer Samplonius MSc, Prof. Dr. Ir. Christiaan Both We are looking for 2 motivated Europe based MSc students that have affinity with climate change ecology Project 1: does trophic mismatch cause mistimed avian reproduction? One of the major ecological consequences of climate change is that phenological shifts are unequal across interdependent trophic levels. A key example in the literature is the great tit that has advanced its breeding date less than the peak date of one of its supposed main prey species: the caterpillars of the winter moth. As caterpillar peak dates have advanced twice as fast as great tit hatching dates, nestlings now grow up under worse conditions. However, key cornerstones to support this hypothesis are still lacking: 1) evidence that birds largely rely on winter moth caterpillars, and 2) experimental evidence that birds suffer from food limitation due to their reproductive timing. In spring 2014 we have performed a field experiment in which the hatch date of great tits was manipulated, and prey choice was monitored with nest box cameras. From a quick glance at the pictures I can already lift a tip of the veil: the trophic mismatch hypothesis appears to oversimplify the adaptive capacity of birds. The main task in this MSc project will be to quantify (from pictures) which prey items great tit parents bring to their nest depending on their seasonal timing. This will also be compared to components of fitness. Project 2: does climate change alter competitive interactions between resident and migrant passerines? Climate change can alter competitive interactions between resident and migrant birds by altering the overlap of their reproductive timing. Long distance migrants have little flexibility in adjusting their breeding time to year-to-year changes in temperature, and likely change gradually through a micro-evolutionary response. In contrast, residents can anticipate better, and thereby rely on phenotypic flexibility. In the increasingly warmer springs we thus expect less overlap in timing of breeding, and potentially a release in interspecific competition for food. In 2014, we experimentally created patches with more and less overlap in breeding dates between resident tits and migratory flycatchers, to study whether prey choice and fitness are affected. Your main task will be to quantify (from pictures) which prey items are caught by long distant migrant pied flycatchers depending on which competitive environment with resident great tits they breed in. This data will also be compared to components of fitness. The candidate should have a BSc degree in Biology and started a masters programme in Biology (Ecology, Zoology, Evolution, Conservation, Systematics) at a European University. The successful candidate is awarded European Credit Points for their project. The European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) allows you to transfer your points between universities. There will be no financial compensation (although your university or Erasmus may provide you with a scholarship for an international project) Interested? Contact: Jelmer Samplonius, j.m.samplonius[at]rug.nl, Animal Ecology Group University of Groningen “J.M.Samplonius” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:42

A three-year postdoc funded by NERC is available at the University of Sheffield (United Kingdom), in the department of Animal and Plant Sciences. The postdoc will work with Pascal-Antoine Christin (http://bit.ly/1jTJ7hA), in collaboration with Patrik Nosil (http://bit.ly/1kRiEUc) and Colin Osborne (http://bit.ly/1p8VKLD). * The project The goal of this project is to understand the drivers of lateral gene transfers among land plants and their impact on the evolution of novel adaptations. Genome data will be generated for closely related species of grasses (members of the Alloteropsis genus) that differ in their photosynthetic type as well as the number of lateral gene transfers they underwent. Phylogenetic analyses and bioinformatic tools will be applied to analyse (i) the events that allowed the lateral gene transfers, (ii) the history of mutations that diversified photosynthesis in the group, and (iii) the links between these two evolutionary processes. * What we require The postdoc will be responsible for generating the genomic data, and leading hypothesis-driven genomic analyses in an evolutionary context. He will perform innovative data analyses and disseminate the results of the project. Applications are invited from candidates with interests in molecular evolution and the use of large genetic datasets to address important questions in evolutionary biology. A PhD is required, as well as a demonstrated expertise in genomics, phylogenetics, or bioinformatics. Experience in UNIX and programming is preferred. * What we offer A three-year contract is offered. The postdoc will integrate into a thriving department, and will collaborate with groups studying evolution, genomics, ecology and physiology. Preferred start date: 1st Nov 2014. The position will remain open until a suitable candidate is found. To apply, contact Pascal-Antoine Christin by email (p.christin@sheffield.ac.uk) and include a CV and brief (1-page) statement of research interests. Further reading: Christin PA, et al. 2012. Adaptive evolution of C4 photosynthesis through recurrent lateral gene transfer. Current Biology 22: 445-449. Christin PA, et al. 2012. Multiple photosynthetic transitions, polyploidy, and lateral gene transfer in the grass subtribe Neurachninae. Journal of Experimental Botany 63: 6297-6308. Soria-Carrasco V, et al. 2014. Stick insect genomes reveal natural selection’s role in parallel speciation. Science 344: 738-742. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:28
Graduate position: PhD in Molecular Ecology of the Macadamia Lacebug PhD in Molecular Ecology of the Macadamia Lacebug EERC BEES UNSW, Profs Cassis & W Sherwin The project will investigate the identity, ecology and genetics of Macadamia lacebugs, which cause catastrophic crop loss in plantation Macadamia. In the face of increased deregistration of current insecticides, this pestiferous insect threatens the sustainability of the Macadamia industry. The proposed research will result in the determination of species and genetic diversity and species interactions of plantation and wild Macadamia Lacebugs. These results will provide the Macadamia industry a basis for designing an integrated pest management program and a sustainable future. We are looking for PhD candidates with solid molecular genetic experience; experience in fieldwork and/or entomology is an advantage. For suitable students, there is the possibility of giving a supplement of up to $8000 AUD pa on top of standard UNSW PhD scholarship rates, to make a total scholarship of up to $33000 AUD pa. PROCEDURE (1) DISCUSS: Email letter with CV, academic record, and details of two academic referees, to Prof Gerry Cassis (gcassis@unsw.edu.au) or Prof Bill Sherwin (W.Sherwin@unsw.edu.au). Your letter should explain how your results are sufficient to allow successful application for a SCHOLARSHIP at UNSW (see below). We cannot consider other applications. (2) PhD SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION http://bit.ly/1kD2mlO UNSW Scholarships cover fees and living allowance (stipend). Note different closing dates for international and local applicants. Typically, a first-class honours degree with a full-year research project is needed. For an appropriate student, an additional top-up scholarship of $8000 pa will be paid. (3) PhD CANDIDACY APPLICATION Submit with scholarship application: http://bit.ly/1l3MTeg Professor WB Sherwin Evolution & Ecology Research Centre Deputy Head, School of Biological Earth and Environmental Science, UNSW AUSTRALIA, Sydney NSW 2052 AUSTRALIA W.Sherwin@unsw.edu.au PH:61-2-9385-2119 FX: 61-2-9385-1558 http://bit.ly/1mA8giO CRICOS provider code 00098G William Sherwin via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:01

Two PhD projects are available in the group of Dr. Jan Engelstdter at The University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia). These projects aim at gaining a better understanding of how recombination affects adaptation in microbial populations. The first project is theoretical and will involve developing mathematical models and computer simulations that investigate the role of various ecological and population genetic factors in bringing about an advantage of recombination during microbial adaptation. For this position, strong quantitative skills and a background in either evolutionary genetics or mathematical modelling are required. Candidates with both biology and non-biology degrees (mathematics, physics, computer science) are encouraged to apply. The second project takes an experimental evolution approach. Here, bacteria recombining through either plasmids or natural transformation are adapted to different environmental conditions and the selective response is then dissected at the phenotypic and genomic level. For this position, a strong background in either evolutionary biology or microbiology is required. For both positions, good communication skills, scientific curiosity and enthusiasm for research in evolutionary biology are essential. For more details about our research and recent publications, see http://bit.ly/1dMmLid. Australian students interested in these positions are expected to be eligible for APA scholarships. For overseas students, funding can be obtained through competitive international PhD scholarship schemes at UQ. For more information about these schemes and formal requirements for PhD students as well as about the School of Biological Sciences at UQ, see below. Interested candidates should send a cover letter describing their motivation and research interests, CV, copy of degrees, and contact information for two academic references to: j.engelstaedter@uq.edu.au. Applications close on 31 August 2014. Qualifications Applicants require a Bachelor’s degree with Honours, Master of Science, MPhil or equivalent degrees. Australian and New Zealand applicants must have received first class Honours degrees. Several competitive scholarship schemes exist at the University of Queensland. The UQ Graduate School website provides further information on the entry requirements for admission to the PhD program (http://bit.ly/18QAArT) and scholarship details. Individuals successful in gaining a tuition-fee waiver scholarship usually also obtain a living stipend. For further information on the UQ application process please contact the Postgraduate Administration Officer Gail Walter (gj.walter@uq.edu.au). UQ and the School of Biological Sciences The School of Biological Sciences is a large and research-intensive unit at the University of Queensland, one of Australia’s most prestigious universities. The School has broad expertise across the disciplines of ecology and evolution, molecular and quantitative genetics, developmental biology, behaviour, plant and animal physiology, and conservation biology. Our research programs span all scales of biological organisation, from molecules and cells, to organisms, populations, species and communities, and take advantage of study animal and plant systems in a large variety of habitats (see http://bit.ly/1dbBtRC for detailed information on our research programs). via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:01

We invite applications for a PhD position in theoretical evolutionary genetics at The University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia). The successful applicant will be jointly supervised by Dr. Jan Engelstdter and Dr. Daniel Ortiz-Barrientos and will work on the role of recombination during speciation. The goal of this funded project is to develop mathematical and computational models investigating how recombination rates are expected to evolve during speciation with gene flow and how this in turn affects the evolution of divergence and reproductive isolation. The project will be tightly linked to an empirical study system (the Senecio lautus species complex) and benefit from, and in turn inform, ongoing whole genome sequencing and mapping projects in this species. For more details about our research, see http://bit.ly/1dMmLid and http://bit.ly/1cL9DFp. We are looking for a motivated student with strong quantitative skills and background in either evolutionary genetics or mathematical modelling. Candidates with non-biology degrees (mathematics, physics, computer science) are encouraged to apply. Good communication skills, scientific curiosity and enthusiasm for research in evolutionary biology are essential. Australian students interested in these positions are expected to be eligible for APA scholarships. For overseas students, funding can be obtained through competitive international PhD scholarship schemes at UQ. For more information about these schemes and formal requirements for PhD students as well as about the School of Biological Sciences at UQ, see below. Interested candidates should send a cover letter describing their motivation and research interests, CV, copy of degrees, and contact information for two academic references to: j.engelstaedter@uq.edu.au. Applications close on 31 August 2014. Qualifications Applicants require a Bachelor’s degree with Honours, Master of Science, MPhil or equivalent degrees. Australian and New Zealand applicants must have received first class Honours degrees. Several competitive scholarship schemes exist at the University of Queensland. The UQ Graduate School website provides further information on the entry requirements for admission to the PhD program (http://bit.ly/18QAArT) and scholarship details. Individuals successful in gaining a tuition-fee waiver scholarship usually also obtain a living stipend. For further information on the UQ application process please contact the Postgraduate Administration Officer Gail Walter (gj.walter@uq.edu.au). UQ and the School of Biological Sciences The School of Biological Sciences is a large and research-intensive unit at the University of Queensland, one of Australia’s most prestigious universities. The School has broad expertise across the disciplines of ecology and evolution, molecular and quantitative genetics, developmental biology, behaviour, plant and animal physiology, and conservation biology. Our research programs span all scales of biological organisation, from molecules and cells, to organisms, populations, species and communities, and take advantage of study animal and plant systems in a large variety of habitats (see http://bit.ly/1dbBtRC for detailed information on our research programs). via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

August 13, 2014

18:00
Background: In insect societies, intracolonial genetic variation is predicted to affect both colony efficiency and reproductive skew. However, because the effects of genetic variation on these two colony characteristics have been tested independently, it remains unclear whether they are affected by genetic variation independently or in a related manner. Here we test the effect of genetic variation on colony efficiency and reproductive skew in a rhinotermitid termite, Reticulitermes speratus, a species in which female-female pairs can facultatively found colonies. We established colonies using two types of female-female pairs: colonies founded by sisters (i.e., sister-pair colonies) and those founded by females from different colonies (i.e., unrelated-pair colonies). Colony growth and reproductive skew were then compared between the two types of incipient colonies. Results: At 15 months after colony foundation, unrelated-pair colonies were larger than sister-pair colonies, although the caste ratio between workers and nymphs, which were alternatively differentiated from young larvae, did not differ significantly. Microsatellite DNA analyses of both founders and their parthenogenetically produced offspring indicated that, in both sister-pair and unrelated-pair colonies, there was no significant skew in the production of eggs, larvae, workers and soldiers. Nymph production, however, was significantly more skewed in the sister-pair colonies than in unrelated-pair colonies. Because nymphs can develop into winged adults (alates) or nymphoid reproductives, they have a higher chance of direct reproduction than workers in this species. Conclusions: Our results support the idea that higher genetic variation among colony members could provide an increase in colony productivity, as shown in hymenopteran social insects. Moreover, this study suggests that low genetic variation (high relatedness) between founding females increases reproductive skew via one female preferentially channeling her relatives along the reproductive track. This study thus demonstrated that, in social insects, intracolonial genetic variation can simultaneously affect both colony efficiency and reproductive skew.
18:00
Background: Gene flow plays an important role in domestication history of domesticated species. However, little is known about the demographic history of domesticated silkworm involving gene flow with its wild relative. Results: In this study, four model-based evolutionary scenarios to describe the demographic history of B. mori were hypothesized. Using Approximate Bayesian Computation method and DNA sequence data from 29 nuclear loci, we found that the gene flow at bottleneck model is the most likely scenario for silkworm domestication. The starting time of silkworm domestication was estimated to be approximate 7,500 years ago; the time of domestication termination was 3,984 years ago. Using coalescent simulation analysis, we also found that bi-directional gene flow occurred during silkworm domestication. Conclusions: Estimates of silkworm domestication time are nearly consistent with the archeological evidence and our previous results. Importantly, we found that the bi-directional gene flow might occur during silkworm domestication. Our findings add a dimension to highlight the important role of gene flow in domestication of crops and animals.
02:39

ECOLOGY FIELD STATION DIRECTOR The Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh invites applications for a full-time faculty appointment at the rank of ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR (tenured) to serve as the Director of the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology (PLE), pending budgetary approval. PLE is a thriving field station in Northwestern Pennsylvania that has experienced tremendous growth in its missions of education, research, and outreach. We seek an outstanding scientist to continue an exciting research program in Ecology and Evolution working alongside of faculty in our broad-based Biology department, and to fulfill responsibilities of PLE Director, which will also include: * Strategic planning to enhance the research, teaching, and outreach missions of the field station * Oversight of research facilities, coordination of summer field courses as part of an educational consortium of regional universities, continued growth of outreach, and organization of conferences and retreats * Development of proposals for extramural funding * Supervision of staff and budget The successful candidate will have a strong national/international scientific reputation, a distinguished record of publications and research funding, and demonstrated teaching excellence. Experience with biological field station operations is desirable. To ensure full consideration, applications and reference letters should be received by October 15, 2014. Applicants should email a single PDF document, with “PLE Director Search” in the subject line, containing a curriculum vitae, a cover letter describing their interest, a 2-3 page statement of research accomplishments and future plans, and a brief description of teaching interests to biojobs@pitt.edu. Applicants should also arrange to have at least three letters of reference sent to biojobs@pitt.edu. Further information about PLE and the Department of Biological Sciences is available at: http://bit.ly/1Ad3H6I. The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and values equality of opportunity, human dignity and diversity. via Gmail

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02:08
PhD / PostDoc Position in Invasion Ecology -         open until filled The GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel offers a position for an early stage researcher (PhD/PostDoc) interested in studying adaptation of non-indigenous species to different salinities. The position will be within the project “Do Ponto-Caspian species have inherent advantages over Northern European or Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River species in colonizing new areas?” funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Sofja Kovalevskaja Award. The overarching goal of the project is to determine if species evolved in particular regions have inherent advantages over other species in colonizing new areas, and are those species capable to adapt to and invade habitats with different salinities than their populations are coming from. The successful candidate will conduct molecular genetic study on phylogenetically close species with and without invasion record native to Northern Europe, Great Lakes and Ponto-Caspian region whose populations naturally occur in different salinities to determine historical transitions from marine to brackish and freshwater habitats and vice versa. He/she will deduce if evolutionary transition of species to different salinities went in both directions (i.e., from marine to freshwater and from freshwater to marine habitats). Finally, he/she will determine if salinity transitions are more common for species with invasion record than for species without invasion record, and if they are more common for Ponto-Caspian than for Northern Europe or Great Lakes’ species. We are looking for an enthusiastic individual ideally with experience in molecular ecology, molecular genetic techniques and/or invasion ecology. Any experience with next generation sequencing is advantageous. Funding is available for 3 years. The anticipated starting date is 01. October 2014, however, the position remains open until a suitable candidate is found. Applicants must hold an MSc/PhD related to biological sciences, preferentially with a focus on molecular, quantitative and/or population genetics. Candidates should be willing to participate in extensive sampling in the Northern Europe, Great Lakes and Ponto-Caspian regions, have good organization skills, and be able to work independently and develop own scientific concepts. Excellent English communication skills are a prerequisite. The salary is according to the class 13 TVöD of the German tariffs for public employees (65% PhD student; 100% postdoc). The GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel seeks to increase the proportion of female scientists and therefore women are especially encouraged to apply. GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel also supports the employment of disabled persons. Persons with disabilities with appropriate qualifications and aptitudes will be employed preferentially. Applications including research interests, a current CV, and contact details of 3 referees should be sent to the following address using the keyword “Sofja Kovalevskaja Two”: GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel Personalabteilung/ Frau Frauke Lafrenz Kennwort “Sofja Kovalevskaja Two” Wischhofstraße 1-3 D-24148 Kiel Germany For further information, please contact Dr. Elizabeta Briski (ebriski(a)geomar.de). For general information on research at the GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, see http://www.geomar.de.   http://bit.ly/1l234tl Elizabeta Briski via Gmail
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01:52

—_000_D00FD1841F04Cjuliabowsherndsuedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable ASSISTANT PROFESSOR - PLANT ECOLOGICAL OR EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS Department of Biological Sciences, North Dakota State University The Department of Biological Sciences invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position to begin fall 2015. We seek applicants whose primary research interests are plant or plant-microbial biology using ecological genomics, evolutionary genomics or bioinformatics. We welcome applicants studying at all levels of inquiry from genetic, molecular or cellular mechanisms to community, landscape or ecosystem-level functions. Candidates must have a Ph.D. from an accredited institution in a discipline appropriate to the biological sciences and relevant post-doctoral experience. The successful candidate will be expected to develop an extramurally funded research program, supervise graduate students, and teach one course per semester at the undergraduate or graduate levels. All application materials must be submitted electronically at http://bit.ly/1sRaezF. Application materials include: a curriculum vitae; a maximum two-page description of research interests; a maximum two-page statement of teaching interests and philosophy; and contact information for three professional references. Review of applications will begin September 15, 2014 and continue until the position is filled. Visit http://bit.ly/1sRaezJ for additional details. NDSU is an EO/AA Employer and an ADVANCE institution; Women & traditionally underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. —_000_D00FD1841F04Cjuliabowsherndsuedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”iso-8859-1” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

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01:52
Postdoctoral Research Associate Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta Georgia, 30307 Bruce R. Levin, PI Experimental studies of the population and evolutionary biology of bacteria, antibiotic treatment and antibiotic resistance Approximately half the time of the successful candidate for this position will be devoted to ongoing experimental studies of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics and bacteria and the population and evolutionary dynamics of antibiotic treatment and resistance. These experiments will be performed in vitro (in plastico) with both planktonic and physically structured populations of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, and E. coli with single and pairs of antibiotics of different classes. The general goal of these experimental and the associated mathematical modeling studies is to improve the efficacy of antibiotic treatment protocols to clear bacterial infections whilst minimizing the likelihood of resistance emerging during the course of therapy. Of particular interest is to develop single and two-drug dosing regimes to treat infections with bacteria that are moderately non-susceptible (politically correct for resistant) to the treating antibiotic(s). The other half of the time of the successful candidate will be devoted to independent studies of their own design on related projects of the population and evolutionary biology of bacteria and their viruses, plasmids and other accessory genetic elements. Preference will be given to candidates that are passionate (fanatical) about research and of one of two ilks and experience: (1) Microbiologists and microbial molecular geneticists with an interest in and aptitude for quantitative studies of the population and evolutionary dynamics of bacteria. (2) Population and evolutionary biologists and geneticists with the extreme wisdom and good taste to work with (or want to work with) bacteria. In addition to the usual CV and statement of research interest and accomplishments, CANDIDATES WILL ONLY BE CONSIDERED IF THEY INCLUDE, (i) a cover letter indicating why and how this laboratory and these project fits into their career goals and aspirations, and (ii) an ~2 page proposal for the independent research elements of this position. These proposals should clearly specific the questions being addressed and include an outline of how they will be addressed and answered. Emory University is an Equal Opportunity/ Equal Access / Affirmative Action Employer, fully committed to achieving a diverse workforce. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment. Minorities that are under-represented in Population and Evolutionary Biology are encouraged to apply. For Information about our Laboratory, our ongoing research and recent publications, click on www.eclf.net. Applications should be submitted to blevin@emory.edu. Bruce R. Levin Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor Department of Biology Emory University 1510 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30322 USA (404) 727 2826 Office (404) 727 2880 Fax blevin@emory.edu www.eclf.net “Levin, Bruce” via Gmail
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01:52
The Natural History Museum, London (UK; Diana Percy) is offering a fully-funded 3 year PhD studentship jointly supervised with the University of Southampton (UK; Mark Chapman), and the University of British Columbia (Canada; Quentin Cronk), starting on 1 November 2014 (or as soon as possible thereafter). Deadline for applications: 19 September 2014 The studentship is only open to those who qualify for Home tuition fees (generally UK/EU residence). We are looking to recruit a student interested in studying the evolution and genomics of a Hawaiian plant gall radiation. Despite the economic importance of galling (many plant pests are gallers) very little is known about the molecular developmental processes underlying galling. This project will use the recently proposed and innovative approach of “evolutionary developmental transcriptomics”. Further, the project will use a novel application of “dual-RNAseq” to co-generate plant and insect transcriptomes under gall interaction. The project is in two parts: (i) the ecological and developmental characterization of gall biology in a insect-plant island radiation. This will involve fieldwork in the Hawaiian Islands. (ii) Genomic approaches to identify the genes, regulatory networks, and expression patterns involved in shifts to different gall phenotypes among closely related insect species. The project will use whole genome sequencing and de novo assembly of the plant and insect genomes (guided by reference genomes of Eucalyptus and Diaphorina/Trioza), together with leaf (infected and uninfected) and nymph transcriptomics to identify candidate genes associated with the perturbation of plant tissue during gall formation. Bioinformatics will include construction of gene coexpression networks to predict plant and insect gene regulatory networks (GRNs) and gene network modules (GNMs) using galled and ungalled leaves. Our approach will draw on recent developmental work on leaf shape using the generation of self-organizing maps (SOMs) and gene coexpression network analysis to describe GNM rewiring between evolutionary-developmental states. The PhD student will gain knowledge across a broad range of areas from fieldwork, lab work, systematics, genomics and evolution of development. Training will be in plant and insect genomics and development, candidate gene identification and Bayesian modelling methods, RNA and DNA collection and extraction, next generation sequencing methods, genomic assemblies and bioinformatics methods, and insect and plant biology. For further details contact Dr Diana Percy (d.percy@nhm.ac.uk) Interested parties will need to provide: - Curriculum vitae. - Covering letter outlining your interest in the particular PhD project, relevant skills training, experience and qualifications for research, and a statement of how this PhD project fits your career development plans. - Transcripts of undergraduate and Masters’ degree results. - Names and email addresses of two academic references including (if applicable) Masters’ project supervisor. “Percy, Diana” via Gmail
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01:25

—Apple-Mail-127-53959669 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii The Singh lab at North Carolina State University invites applications for a Postdoctoral Researcher position in population genomics. This project focuses on the causes and consequences of natural variation in recombination frequency in Drosophila melanogaster. Applicants must possess a PhD or equivalent in Biological Sciences or a related field. A strong background in population genetics, evolutionary genetics, experimental evolution, or meiosis is essential. Experience in genomics including the preparation of DNA and RNA samples for Next Generation Sequencing (Illumina Platform) is required. Working knowledge of tools and methods for the analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data, and familiarity with scientific computing languages such as R, MATLAB, Python, or Perl is also required. Experience with Drosophila is preferred. The successful candidate will interact with a diverse group of faculty, postdocs, and graduate students working in the areas of natural genetic variation at NC State. More information about the Singh lab can be found at http://bit.ly/VicLYi, and more information about the Department of Biological Sciences can be found at http://bit.ly/VicKDN. Review of application materials will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. To apply, please visit http://bit.ly/1vGbY4g. —Apple-Mail-127-53959669 Content-Type: message/external-body; access-type=x-mutt-deleted; expiration=”Tue, 12 Aug 2014 12:10:49 -0400”; length!486 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii —Apple-Mail-127-5395966 via Gmail

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