news aggregator

September 13, 2014

18:00
Background: The Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) predicts that gestation duration, lactation duration, and their sum, total development time, are constrained by mass-specific basal metabolic rate such that they should scale with body mass with an exponent of 0.25. However, tests of the MTE’s predictions have yielded mixed results. In an effort to resolve this uncertainty, we used phylogenetically-controlled regression to investigate the allometries of gestation duration, lactation duration, and total development time in four well-studied mammalian orders, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Primates, and Rodentia. Results: The results we obtained are not consistent with the predictions of the MTE. Gestation duration scaling exponents are below 0.25 in all four orders. The scaling exponent for lactation duration is below 0.25 in Carnivora and Rodentia, indistinguishable from 0.25 in Artiodactyls, and steeper than 0.25 in Primates. Total development time scales with body mass as predicted by the MTE in Primates, but not in artiodactyls, carnivores, and rodents. In the latter three orders, the exponent is 0.15. Conclusions: Together, these results indicate that the influence of basal metabolic rate on mammalian maternal investment durations must be more complicated than the MTE envisages, and that other factors must play an important role. Future research needs to allow for the possibility that different factors drive gestation duration and lactation duration, and that the drivers of the two durations may differ among orders.
03:04

UHohenheim.ResarchAssistant.Genomics The newly established Department of Livestock Population Genomics at the University Hohenheim (Head Prof. Dr. Martin Hasselmann) invites applications for a *Research Assistant* position with 100% of the regular working hours (currently 39.8 hours per week), initially for the duration of 3 years with possible extension for at least 2 years after successful evaluation. We are seeking a highly motivated, team spirited and creative candidate who should have received a PhD/doctorate in the field of Genetics/Evolutionary Biology. A solid background in population genetics, evolutionary biology, bioinformatics and a variety of molecular techniques (e.g. protein expression, real-time PCR) is required. Experiences in the analyses of genomes and high-throughput sequencing data are essential. Participation in moderate teaching at Bachelor/Master level (4 Semester periods per week) is expected. The successful candidate should bring a strong interest to investigate organismic interaction with their abiotic and biotic environment at the molecular level in a stimulating scientific environment and well equipped research laboratories (see also http://bit.ly/1lYYj43). The payment would be in accordance with the collective agreement for public employees (TV-L E13). The University of Hohenheim is a modern university with a long tradition in the fields of agricultural and natural sciences. Research and teaching are characterized by internationality, innovation, multidisciplinarity, and consistency subject to high scientific standards. Embedded in an attractive and green environment, the University Hohenheim combines the advantages of a small campus area with the close vicinity to Stuttgart as lively and cultural centre. The University of Hohenheim is an equal opportunity employer that tries to increase the number of women in research and teaching. Applications of disabled persons will be given preference if appropriately qualified. Please send your applications, including CV with list of publications, copies of degree certificates, detailed statement of research interest (1-2 pages) and names of two referees as */one single pdf /*by email to Prof. Dr. M. Hasselmann, martin.hasselmann@uni-hohenheim.de. For more information, please contact Prof. Dr. M. Hasselmann by email or Telephone (+49 711 459 22481) The review of applications will begin by 01.10.2014 and late applications are considered until the position is filled. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:04
UPDATE The Frontiers in Phylogenetics Fourth Annual Symposium will be Webcast live >From the Warner Brothers Theatre, National Museum of American History on September 15, 2014, starting at 9 a.m. Watch it here http://bit.ly/1m1DcOS “Genome-Scale Phylogenetics: Analysing the Data” 9:00 Introductions Michael Braun,National Museum of Natural History 9:05 Welcome to the Smithsonian John Kress, Interim Undersecretary for Science, Smithsonian Institution 9:15 Overview and Logistics Guillermo Ort, George Washington University 9:25 Phylogenomics and Next-Generation Inferences: the Future of Phylogenetics in an Era of Big Data Lacey Knowles,University of Michigan 10:05 Break 10:30 Deep Metazoan Phylogeny and the Utility of Taxon-Specific Ortholog Sets Kevin Kocot,University of Queensland, Brisbane 11:10 A Phylogenomic View on the Early History of Gnasthostome Evolution: Is One Tree Enough? Ingo Ebersberger, Goethe University, Frankfurt 11:50 Lunch Break 1:30 Distinguishing Methodological and Biological Causes of Gene Tree Discordance in Phylogenomic Datasets Derrick Zwickl, University of Arizona 2:10 Filtering and Partitioning Strategies for Phylogenomic Analyses David Swofford, Duke University and National Evolutionary Synthesis Center 2:50 Break 3:10 Genome-scale Phylogenetics in the Presence of Hybridization and Incomplete Lineage Sorting Luay Nakhleh,Rice University 3:50 Joint Inference of Gene Trees and Species Trees at the Genomic Scale Bastien Boussau,University Claude Bernard, Lyon 4:30 Round Table Discussion With All Speakers Sponsored by the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, and the Washington Area Phylogenetics Consortium Any questions or for more information contact Brian Coyle Coyleb@si.edu National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution Washington DC “Coyle, Brian J.” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:48
—_000_5CB6DFD4BEB188468CDE88BEE402802FADE108F1exchmb1adpacifi_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Biology Department at Pacific University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant/Associate Professor of Biology in Evolutionary Biology to begin August 2015. We prefer taxonomic expertise in plants or fungi, but candidates with interests in other organisms will also be considered. Research interests should complement those of current faculty. This appointment will be at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor (depending on qualifications). Applicants must have a Ph.D. in a relevant discipline (post-doctoral experience preferred), teaching experience, and demonstrated commitment to excellence in teaching as well as scholarship involving undergraduates. Teaching responsibilities will include lower division courses (introductory biology, or new sophomore level courses in genetics or cell biology), one or more upper division courses in area(s) of expertise, and departmental service courses for majors or non-majors. The average teaching load is 10-12 contact hours/semester (including labs); a common course load is 3 lectures and 4 labs per academic year. Faculty also mentor senior capstone projects (literature reviews or research projects). We seek a collegial scholar-teacher whose research interests complement existing expertise in the department. We expect the successful candidate to establish an active research program with undergraduates. The research program must be successful and feasible in our liberal arts college setting; it should also be attractive to our student body, which includes many preparing for professional school in the health professions (e.g., optometry, physical therapy, pharmacy) as well as some pursuing teaching, environmental biology, and other professional work in the life sciences. Our research facilities include a greenhouse, and start-up funds are provided. Pacific University is particularly interested in candidates who can contribute, through their research, teaching, or service, to the diversity and excellence of the academic community. Minimum requirements for the position are a Ph.D. in Biology, or equivalent terminal research-based degree; one year college or university teaching experience (TA or instructor); and research experience and expertise in evolution. Pacific University is an independent, comprehensive university in Forest Grove, Oregon (about 25 miles west of Portland). The Biology department is part of the College of Arts and Sciences (ca. 1700 students), a liberal arts undergraduate college where faculty and staff are committed to an intimate, personalized education. The University also includes a College of Health Professions (including Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant Studies, Pharmacy, Dental Science and Professional Psychology), a College of Optometry, a College of Business, and a College of Education. The Biology Department currently has 10 permanent faculty members and 2 laboratory support staff. We are committed to learning through discovery in both the laboratory and the classroom. We graduate 35-50 majors each year. Many of our graduates pursue graduate or professional study in the health sciences or careers in teaching, biology research, or environmental biology. Application materials Please submit: 1. a cover letter that addresses your preparation/promise to teach in a liberal arts college with many pre-health professions students 2. CV 3. a teaching philosophy, with a separate section identifying courses you would feel qualified and comfortable teaching (upper and lower division) 4. a research statement, which should include a brief summary of prior research, a research plan for a liberal arts institution, and an argument for how your research program at Pacific would attract and involve undergraduates. Selection criteria will include feasibility of research plan and fit to our department and student body. 5. Unofficial graduate and undergraduate transcripts 6. Arrange for three letters of reference (at least one of which speaks directly to teaching ability and experience) to be submitted directly. 7. In October, candidates on our short list may be requested to submit evidence of teaching experience and excellence, such as teaching evaluations, reports from observers, or examples of teaching materials; please do not include these materials with your initial application. Please combine application materials 1-4 into a single file (.pdf or .doc), in the order listed above, with the following naming: Last name, First name, Evolution 2014. Send applications electronically to Patty Larkins (address below); put Evolutionary Biology 2014 as the subject in your e-mail. Patty Larkins, plarkins@pacificu.edu Administrative Assistant, School of Natural Sciences, Pacific University Review of applications will begin October 3 and continue until the position is filled. Contact Dr. Stacey Halpern (Biology Department Chair) with questions. NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY | It is the policy of Pacific University not to discriminate on the basis of sex, physical or mental disability, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, age, religious preference or disabled veteran or Vietnam Era status in admission and access to, or treatment in employment, educational programs or activities as required by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or any other classification protected under state or federal law, or city ordinance. Questions or complaints may be directed to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, 2043 College Way, Forest Grove, OR 97116, provost@pacificu.edu. This ad also available at: http://bit.ly/WWPxHU —_000_5CB6DFD4BEB188468CDE88BEE402802FADE108F1exchmb1adpacifi_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Source: EVOLDIR
02:48
*Postdoctoral Fellowship* *Molecular Evolution* *Evolution of detoxification enzymes*: The Dearing lab at the University of Utah invites applications for a postdoctoral fellow to participate in a study on the evolution of detoxification enzymes in mammalian herbivores. This collaborative project will investigate the detoxification enzymes in the cytochrome P450 subfamily 2B (CYP2B) and their role in the biotransformation of plant secondary compounds, particularly terpenes. Changes in the amino acid sequence, structure and copy number of CYP2B enzymes may be key to an herbivore$B!G(Bs ability specialize on a terpene-rich diet. Future work consists of sequencing, characterizing and comparing the amino acid sequences of CYP2B enzymes of specialist and generalist woodrats (*Neotoma spp.*) and possibly other mammalian terpene feeders. We are currently sequencing the genome of *Neotoma lepida* with assembly expected Fall 2014. Characterization of protein function will be achieved using heterologous expression systems in collaboration with Dr. James Halpert, UConn, and there are opportunities for interactions with his research group. For more information on previous related research, see: http://bit.ly/1m1Ckd6 http://bit.ly/1m1Ckd8 The ideal candidate should have a background in addressing questions of molecular evolution, molecular ecology or plant-animal interactions. Experience accessing and evaluating genomic data, using molecular techniques are desirable. The candidate should have at least one first authored publication in press. The Dearing lab provides a strong training and career development environment for candidates interested in academic positions. Teaching experience (Mammalogy) is a possibility for interested candidates, and animal collection fieldwork is possible. *Applications will be reviewed through Sept 26, 2014. *Expected start date is October 31st. Funding is anticipated for 2 years. Please send a C.V., statement of research interests that includes career goals (1-2 pgs), pdfs of papers, and contact information (emails and phone numbers) for at least 3 professional references to Dr. Denise Dearing, care of Jael Malenke, malenke@biology.utah.edu; please put $B!H(BPostdoctoral Applicant CYP2B$B!I(B in the Subject Line. Jael Malenke, Ph. D. Dept. of Biology University of Utah 257 S. 1400 E. Salt Lake City, UT 84112 malenke@biology.utah.edu jaelmalenke@gmail.com Jael Malenke via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:29

—_000_A67A4FDB38492D42875EEF0058E1163324FEC1A7BIOEXCHbiotamue_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”utf-8” Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 QSBwb3N0LWRvY3RvcmFsIHBvc2l0aW9uIGlzIGF2YWlsYWJsZSB0byB3b3JrIGluIEdpbCBSb3Nl bnRoYWzigJlzIGxhYiBhdCBUZXhhcyBBJk0gVW5pdmVyc2l0eSwgb24gYSBjb2xsYWJvcmF0aXZl IHByb2plY3Qgd2l0aCBQZXRlciBBbmRvbGZhdHRv4oCZcyBsYWIgYXQgUHJpbmNldG9uIFVuaXZl cnNpdHkuIFNhbGFyeSBpcyBhdmFpbGFibGUgZm9yIHR3byB5ZWFycywgd2l0aCB0aGUgb3Bwb3J0 dW5pdHkgdG8gYXBwbHkgZm9yIGZ1cnRoZXIgZnVuZGluZy4gVGhlIHBvc2l0aW9uIGlzIGF2YWls YWJsZSBpbW1lZGlhdGVseSwgYnV0IGEgZGVsYXllZCBzdGFydCBkYXRlIG1heSBiZSBuZWdvdGlh dGVkLiAgVGhlIGFpbSBvZiB0aGUgcHJvamVjdCBpcyB0byBhcHBseSBuZXh0LWdlbmVyYXRpb24g c2VxdWVuY2luZywgY29tcHV0YXRpb25hbCBiaW9pbmZvcm1hdGljcywgYW5kIGJlaGF2aW9yYWwg YXNzYXlzIHRvIGNoYXJhY3Rlcml6ZSBmdW5jdGlvbmFsIGludGVyYWN0aW9ucyBhbW9uZyBnZW5l cyByZXNwb25zaWJsZSBmb3Igc3BvbnRhbmVvdXMgbWVsYW5vbWEgaW4gbmF0dXJhbCBoeWJyaWRz IG9mIFhpcGhvcGhvcnVzIGZpc2guIFRoZSBpZGVhbCBjYW5kaWRhdGUgd2lsbCBiZSBhIHBhc3Np b25hdGUgZXZvbHV0aW9uYXJ5IG9yIGJlaGF2aW9yYWwgZ2VuZXRpY2lzdCB3aXRoIGV4Y2VsbGVu dCBjb21wdXRhdGlvbmFsIHNraWxscyBhbmQgZXhwZXJpZW5jZSB3aXRoIGJhc2ljIG1vbGVjdWxh ciBiaW9sb2d5LiBFeHBlcmllbmNlIHdpdGggbGFib3JhdG9yeSBzdHVkaWVzIG9mIGJlaGF2aW9y IGFuZC9vciBjb21tYW5kIG9mIFNwYW5pc2ggYXJlIGRlc2lyYWJsZS4NClRoZSB3b3JrIHdpbGwg YmUgYmFzZWQgYXQgVGV4YXMgQSZNIFVuaXZlcnNpdHkgaW4gQ29sbGVnZSBTdGF0aW9uLCB3aGlj aCBvZmZlcnMgYW4gZXhjZWxsZW50IGxpdmluZyBhbmQgd29yayBlbnZpcm9ubWVudCB3aXRoaW4g ZWFzeSByZWFjaCBvZiBIb3VzdG9uIGFuZCBBdXN0aW4uIFRoZSBwb3N0ZG9jIHdpbGwgaGF2ZSB0 aGUgb3Bwb3J0dW5pdHkgZm9yIG11bHRpcGxlIHZpc2l0cyB0byBBbmRvbGZhdHRv4oCZcyBsYWIg YXQgUHJpbmNldG9uIGFuZC9vciB0byB0aGUgQ0lDSEFaIGZpZWxkIHN0YXRpb24gaW4gTWV4aWNv 4oCZcyBTaWVycmEgTWFkcmUgT3JpZW50YWwuICBXZSBzdHJvbmdseSBlbmNvdXJhZ2UgZmVtYWxl LCBtaW5vcml0eSwgYW5kIExHQlRRIGFwcGxpY2FudHMuIFRoZSBVbml2ZXJzaXR5IGVudmlyb25t ZW50IGZvc3RlcnMgd29yay9saWZlIGJhbGFuY2UgYW5kIGlzIHJlc3BvbnNpdmUgdG8gdGhlIG5l ZWRzIG9mIGR1YWwtY2FyZWVyIGNvdXBsZXMuDQoNClBsZWFzZSBzZW5kIGEgYnJpZWYgZW1haWwg d2l0aCB5b3VyIENWIHRvIGdyb3NlbnRoYWxAYmlvLnRhbXUuZWR1PG1haWx0bzpncm9zZW50aGFs QGJpby50YW11LmVkdT4gZm9yIG1vcmUgaW5mb3JtYXRpb24uDQoNClRoYW5rcywNCg0KR2lsDQoN CkdpbCBHLiBSb3NlbnRoYWwsIFBoLkQuDQpQcm9mZXNzb3Igb2YgQmlvbG9neS8gUHJvZmVzc29y IG9mIEVjb2xvZ3kgJiBFdm9sdXRpb25hcnkgQmlvbG9neQ0KVGV4YXMgQSZNIFVuaXZlcnNpdHkN Cg0K —_000_A67A4FDB38492D42875EEF0058E1163324FEC1A7BIOEXCHbiotamue_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”utf-8” Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 PGh0bWwgeG1sbnM6dj0idXJuOnNjaGVtYXMtbWljcm9zb2Z0LWNvbTp2bWwiIHhtbG5zOm89InVy bjpzY2hlbWFzLW1pY3Jvc29mdC1jb206b2ZmaWNlOm9mZmljZSIgeG1sbnM6dz0idXJuOnNjaGVt YXMtbWljcm9zb2Z0LWNvbTpvZmZpY2U6d29yZCIgeG1sbnM6bT0iaHR0cDovL3NjaGVtYXMubWlj cm9zb2Z0LmNvbS9vZmZpY2UvMjAwNC8xMi9vbW1sIiB4bWxucz0iaHR0cDovL3d3dy53My5vcmcv VFIvUkVDLWh0bWw0MCI+DQo8aGVhZD4NCjxtZXRhIGh0dHAtZXF1aXY9IkNvbnRlbnQtVHlwZSIg Y29udGVudD0idGV4dC9odG1sOyBjaGFyc2V0PXV0Zi04Ij4NCjxtZXRhIG5hbWU9IkdlbmVyYXRv ciIgY29udGVudD0iTWljcm9zb2Z0IFdvcmQgMTQgKGZpbHRlcmVkIG1lZGl1bSkiPg0KPHN0eWxl PjwhLS0NCi8qIEZvbnQgRGVmaW5pdGlvbnMgKi8NCkBmb250LWZhY2UNCgl7Zm9udC1mYW1pbHk6 Q2FsaWJyaTsNCglwYW5vc2UtMToyIDE1IDUgMiAyIDIgNCAzIDIgNDt9DQpAZm9udC1mYWNlDQoJ e2ZvbnQtZmFtaWx5OlRhaG9tYTsNCglwYW5vc2UtMToyIDExIDYgNCAzIDUgNCA0IDIgNDt9DQov KiBTdHlsZSBEZWZpbml0aW9ucyAqLw0KcC5Nc29Ob3JtYWwsIGxpLk1zb05vcm1hbCwgZGl2Lk1z b05vcm1hbA0KCXttYXJnaW46MGluOw0KCW1hcmdpbi1ib3R0b206LjAwMDFwdDsNCglmb250LXNp emU6MTIuMHB0Ow0KCWZvbnQtZmFtaWx5OiJUaW1lcyBOZXcgUm9tYW4iLCJzZXJpZiI7fQ0KYTps aW5rLCBzcGFuLk1zb0h5cGVybGluaw0KCXttc28tc3R5bGUtcHJpb3JpdHk6OTk7DQoJY29sb3I6 Ymx1ZTsNCgl0ZXh0LWRlY29yYXRpb246dW5kZXJsaW5lO30NCmE6dmlzaXRlZCwgc3Bhbi5Nc29I eXBlcmxpbmtGb2xsb3dlZA0KCXttc28tc3R5bGUtcHJpb3JpdHk6OTk7DQoJY29sb3I6cHVycGxl Ow0KCXRleHQtZGVjb3JhdGlvbjp1bmRlcmxpbmU7fQ0KcC5Nc29BY2V0YXRlLCBsaS5Nc29BY2V0 YXRlLCBkaXYuTXNvQWNldGF0ZQ0KCXttc28tc3R5bGUtcHJpb3JpdHk6OTk7DQoJbXNvLXN0eWxl LWxpbms6IkJhbGxvb24gVGV4dCBDaGFyIjsNCgltYXJnaW46MGluOw0KCW1hcmdpbi1ib3R0b206 LjAwMDFwdDsNCglmb250LXNpemU6OC4wcHQ7DQoJZm9udC1mYW1pbHk6IlRhaG9tYSIsInNhbnMt c2VyaWYiO30NCnNwYW4uQmFsbG9vblRleHRDaGFyDQoJe21zby1zdHlsZS1uYW1lOiJCYWxsb29u IFRleHQgQ2hhciI7DQoJbXNvLXN0eWxlLXByaW9yaXR5Ojk5Ow0KCW1zby1zdHlsZS1saW5rOiJC YWxsb29uIFRleHQiOw0KCWZvbnQtZmFtaWx5OiJUYWhvbWEiLCJzYW5zLXNlcmlmIjt9DQpzcGFu LkVtYWlsU3R5bGUxOQ0KCXttc28tc3R5bGUtdHlwZTpwZXJzb25hbDsNCglmb250LWZhbWlseToi Q2FsaWJyaSIsInNhbnMtc2VyaWYiOw0KCWNvbG9yOiMxRjQ5N0Q7fQ0Kc3Bhbi5FbWFpbFN0eWxl MjANCgl7bXNvLXN0eWxlLXR5cGU6cGVyc29uYWwtcmVwbHk7DQoJZm9udC1mYW1pbHk6IkNhbGli cmkiLCJzYW5zLXNlcmlmIjsNCgljb2xvcjojMUY0OTdEO30NCi5Nc29DaHBEZWZhdWx0DQoJe21z by1zdHlsZS10eXBlOmV4cG9ydC1vbmx5Ow0KCWZvbnQtc2l6ZToxMC4wcHQ7fQ0KQHBhZ2UgV29y ZFNlY3Rpb24xDQoJe3NpemU6OC41aW4gMTEuMGluOw0KCW1hcmdpbjoxLjBpbiAxLjBpbiAxLjBp biAxLjBpbjt9DQpkaXYuV29yZFNlY3Rpb24xDQoJe3BhZ2U6V29yZFNlY3Rpb24xO30NCi0tPjwv c3R5bGU+PCEtLVtpZiBndGUgbXNvIDldPjx4bWw+DQo8bzpzaGFwZWRlZmF1bHRzIHY6ZXh0PSJl ZGl0IiBzcGlkbWF4PSIxMDI2IiAvPg0KPC94bWw+PCFbZW5kaWZdLS0+PCEtLVtpZiBndGUgbXNv IDldPjx4bWw+DQo8bzpzaGFwZWxheW91dCB2OmV4dD0iZWRpdCI+DQo8bzppZG1hcCB2OmV4dD0i ZWRpdCIgZGF0YT0iMSIgLz4NCjwvbzpzaGFwZWxheW91dD48L3htbD48IVtlbmRpZl0tLT4NCjwv aGVhZD4NCjxib2R5IGxhbmc9IkVOLVVTIiBsaW5rPSJibHVlIiB2bGluaz0icHVycGxlIj4NCjxk aXYgY2xhc3M9IldvcmRTZWN0aW9uMSI+DQo8cCBjbGFzcz0iTXNvTm9ybWFsIiBzdHlsZT0idGV4 dC1pbmRlbnQ6LjVpbiI+QSBwb3N0LWRvY3RvcmFsIHBvc2l0aW9uIGlzIGF2YWlsYWJsZSB0byB3 b3JrIGluIEdpbCBSb3NlbnRoYWzigJlzIGxhYiBhdCBUZXhhcyBBJmFtcDtNIFVuaXZlcnNpdHks IG9uIGEgY29sbGFib3JhdGl2ZSBwcm9qZWN0IHdpdGggUGV0ZXIgQW5kb2xmYXR0b+KAmXMgbGFi IGF0IFByaW5jZXRvbiBVbml2ZXJzaXR5LiBTYWxhcnkgaXMgYXZhaWxhYmxlIGZvciB0d28geWVh cnMsIHdpdGgNCiB0aGUgb3Bwb3J0dW5pdHkgdG8gYXBwbHkgZm9yIGZ1cnRoZXIgZnVuZGluZy4g VGhlIHBvc2l0aW9uIGlzIGF2YWlsYWJsZSBpbW1lZGlhdGVseSwgYnV0IGEgZGVsYXllZCBzdGFy dCBkYXRlIG1heSBiZSBuZWdvdGlhdGVkLiAmbmJzcDtUaGUgYWltIG9mIHRoZSBwcm9qZWN0IGlz IHRvIGFwcGx5IG5leHQtZ2VuZXJhdGlvbiBzZXF1ZW5jaW5nLCBjb21wdXRhdGlvbmFsIGJpb2lu Zm9ybWF0aWNzLCBhbmQgYmVoYXZpb3JhbCBhc3NheXMgdG8gY2hhcmFjdGVyaXplDQogZnVuY3Rp b25hbCBpbnRlcmFjdGlvbnMgYW1vbmcgZ2VuZXMgcmVzcG9uc2libGUgZm9yIHNwb250YW5lb3Vz IG1lbGFub21hIGluIG5hdHVyYWwgaHlicmlkcyBvZg0KPGk+WGlwaG9waG9ydXMgPC9pPmZpc2gu IFRoZSBpZGVhbCBjYW5kaWRhdGUgd2lsbCBiZSBhIHBhc3Npb25hdGUgZXZvbHV0aW9uYXJ5IG9y IGJlaGF2aW9yYWwgZ2VuZXRpY2lzdCB3aXRoIGV4Y2VsbGVudCBjb21wdXRhdGlvbmFsIHNraWxs cyBhbmQgZXhwZXJpZW5jZSB3aXRoIGJhc2ljIG1vbGVjdWxhciBiaW9sb2d5LiBFeHBlcmllbmNl IHdpdGggbGFib3JhdG9yeSBzdHVkaWVzIG9mIGJlaGF2aW9yIGFuZC9vciBjb21tYW5kIG9mIFNw YW5pc2gNCiBhcmUgZGVzaXJhYmxlLiA8bzpwPjwvbzpwPjwvcD4NCjxwIGNsYXNzPSJNc29Ob3Jt YWwiIHN0eWxlPSJ0ZXh0LWluZGVudDouNWluIj5UaGUgd29yayB3aWxsIGJlIGJhc2VkIGF0IFRl eGFzIEEmYW1wO00gVW5pdmVyc2l0eSBpbiBDb2xsZWdlIFN0YXRpb24sIHdoaWNoIG9mZmVycyBh biBleGNlbGxlbnQgbGl2aW5nIGFuZCB3b3JrIGVudmlyb25tZW50IHdpdGhpbiBlYXN5IHJlYWNo IG9mIEhvdXN0b24gYW5kIEF1c3Rpbi4gVGhlIHBvc3Rkb2Mgd2lsbCBoYXZlIHRoZSBvcHBvcnR1 bml0eSBmb3IgbXVsdGlwbGUNCiB2aXNpdHMgdG8gQW5kb2xmYXR0b+KAmXMgbGFiIGF0IFByaW5j ZXRvbiBhbmQvb3IgdG8gdGhlIENJQ0hBWiBmaWVsZCBzdGF0aW9uIGluIE1leGljb+KAmXMgU2ll cnJhIE1hZHJlIE9yaWVudGFsLiZuYnNwOyBXZSBzdHJvbmdseSBlbmNvdXJhZ2UgZmVtYWxlLCBt aW5vcml0eSwgYW5kIExHQlRRIGFwcGxpY2FudHMuIFRoZSBVbml2ZXJzaXR5IGVudmlyb25tZW50 IGZvc3RlcnMgd29yay9saWZlIGJhbGFuY2UgYW5kIGlzIHJlc3BvbnNpdmUgdG8gdGhlIG5lZWRz DQogb2YgZHVhbC1jYXJlZXIgY291cGxlcy4gPG86cD48L286cD48L3A+DQo8cCBjbGFzcz0iTXNv Tm9ybWFsIiBzdHlsZT0idGV4dC1pbmRlbnQ6LjVpbiI+PG86cD4mbmJzcDs8L286cD48L3A+DQo8 cCBjbGFzcz0iTXNvTm9ybWFsIiBzdHlsZT0idGV4dC1pbmRlbnQ6LjVpbiI+UGxlYXNlIHNlbmQg YSBicmllZiBlbWFpbCB3aXRoIHlvdXIgQ1YgdG8NCjxhIGhyZWY9Im1haWx0bzpncm9zZW50aGFs QGJpby50YW11LmVkdSI+Z3Jvc2VudGhhbEBiaW8udGFtdS5lZHU8L2E+IGZvciBtb3JlIGluZm9y bWF0aW9uLjxvOnA+PC9vOnA+PC9wPg0KPHAgY2xhc3M9Ik1zb05vcm1hbCIgc3R5bGU9InRleHQt aW5kZW50Oi41aW4iPjxvOnA+Jm5ic3A7PC9vOnA+PC9wPg0KPHAgY2xhc3M9Ik1zb05vcm1hbCIg c3R5bGU9InRleHQtaW5kZW50Oi41aW4iPlRoYW5rcyw8bzpwPjwvbzpwPjwvcD4NCjxwIGNsYXNz PSJNc29Ob3JtYWwiIHN0eWxlPSJ0ZXh0LWluZGVudDouNWluIj48bzpwPiZuYnNwOzwvbzpwPjwv cD4NCjxwIGNsYXNzPSJNc29Ob3JtYWwiIHN0eWxlPSJ0ZXh0LWluZGVudDouNWluIj5HaWw8bzpw PjwvbzpwPjwvcD4NCjxwIGNsYXNzPSJNc29Ob3JtYWwiIHN0eWxlPSJ0ZXh0LWluZGVudDouNWlu Ij48bzpwPiZuYnNwOzwvbzpwPjwvcD4NCjxwIGNsYXNzPSJNc29Ob3JtYWwiIHN0eWxlPSJ0ZXh0 LWluZGVudDouNWluIj5HaWwgRy4gUm9zZW50aGFsLCBQaC5ELjxvOnA+PC9vOnA+PC9wPg0KPHAg Y2xhc3M9Ik1zb05vcm1hbCIgc3R5bGU9InRleHQtaW5kZW50Oi41aW4iPlByb2Zlc3NvciBvZiBC aW9sb2d5LyBQcm9mZXNzb3Igb2YgRWNvbG9neSAmYW1wOyBFdm9sdXRpb25hcnkgQmlvbG9neTxv OnA+PC9vOnA+PC9wPg0KPHAgY2xhc3M9Ik1zb05vcm1hbCIgc3R5bGU9InRleHQtaW5kZW50Oi41 aW4iPlRleGFzIEEmYW1wO00gVW5pdmVyc2l0eTxzcGFuIHN0eWxlPSJmb250LXNpemU6MTEuMHB0 O2ZvbnQtZmFtaWx5OiZxdW90O0NhbGlicmkmcXVvdDssJnF1b3Q7c2Fucy1zZXJpZiZxdW90Oztj b2xvcjojMUY0OTdEIj48bzpwPjwvbzpwPjwvc3Bhbj48L3A+DQo8cCBjbGFzcz0iTXNvTm9ybWFs Ij48bzpwPiZuYnNwOzwvbzpwPjwvcD4NCjwvZGl2Pg0KPC9ib2R5Pg0KPC9odG1sPg0K —_000_A67A4FDB38492D42875EEF0058E1163324FEC1A7BIOEXCHbiotamue via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:14
Assistant/Associate Professor of Computational Genomics Tenure Track-9 month Academic Year Appointment – Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics College of Agriculture and Life Sciences – Cornell University Cornell is a community of scholars, known for intellectual rigor and engaged in deep and broad research, teaching tomorrow’s thought leaders to think otherwise, care for others, and create and disseminate knowledge with a public purpose. The Department invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the Assistant or Associate Professor level. We seek candidates who are developing innovative computational genomics methods to solve novel problems in genome biology, and are interested in interacting with experimental biologists who generate large-scale genomic data sets. Position will be 70% Research & 30% Teaching. Areas of specialization might include, but are not limited to: • Functional associations, quantitative genetic, and/or population genetic analyses of large-scale resequencing and phenotyping data sets of humans and/or model organisms. • Systems-level integration of diverse genomic data sets. • Functional predictions and/or evolutionary inferences from comparative genomic data. Qualifications: Individuals seeking a creative integration of experimental and computational approaches will find Cornell a rich environment in which to work (see http://bit.ly/1D38M3H). An advanced degree (Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent) is required and postgraduate training is highly desirable. ANTICIPATED START DATE: July 1, 2015 SALARY AND BENEFITS: Competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience. An attractive fringe benefit package is included. APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Electronically submit online to http://bit.ly/1D38M3L CV, a two to four page research statement, which indicates how your program could synergize with existing Cornell faculty, a one page teaching statement, and pdfs of two of your most significant papers. Application review begins on October 15, 2014. Administrative questions can be addressed by Robin Lampman at RLL2@cornell.edu . The Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell embrace diversity and seek candidates who will help create a climate that attracts students of all races, nationalities, religions, genders, and sexual orientations. We strongly encourage women and members of underrepresented minorities to apply. Cornell University is an innovative Ivy League university and a great place to work. Our inclusive community of scholars, students and staff impart an uncommon sense of larger purpose and contribute creative ideas to further the university’s mission of teaching, discovery and engagement. Located in Ithaca, NY, Cornell’s far-flung global presence includes the medical college’s campuses on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and in Doha, Qatar, as well as the new CornellNYC Tech campus to be built on Roosevelt Island in the heart of New York City. Diversity and Inclusion are a part of Cornell University’s heritage. We’re an employer and educator recognized for valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities. Linda Reed via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:11

Postdoctoral Research Associate/Fellow School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK £25,513 to £31,342 (minimum with PhD £28,695) per annum depending on skills and experience. We are seeking a motivated and creative post-doctoral researcher to work on an ambitious project using comparative genomics to understand the evolution of eukaryotes. All extant eukaryotes descended from a single common ancestor ~1-2 billion years ago, and have since diversified into a great variety of forms, including the major multicellular lineages of animals, plants, seaweeds and fungi. This project will use the availability of recent complete genome sequences to reconstruct the protein repertoire encoded in the last common eukaryotic ancestor to understand the biology of this ancient cell and identify how this repertoire was augmented, reduced or modified during the diversification into the main eukaryotic lineages. The work is part of an award made by the Leverhulme Trust for a collaborative project between two groups with a proven track record in evolutionary cell biology. The appointee will join the research group of Dr Bill Wickstead in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Nottingham, but will also be required to work in collaboration with a post-doctoral researcher in the group of Dr Tom Richards at the University of Exeter. Candidates must hold, or be near to completion of, a PhD (or equivalent) in comparative genomics, evolutionary biology or another area of biology with a strong computational or bioinformatic component. It is essential that they can demonstrate outstanding skills in analysis of genomic data, but also have an excellent understanding of cell biology. Applications from strong candidates with a track-record including publications in either or both of these areas are particularly encouraged. This full-time post is available from 1 November 2014 for a period of up to 2.5 years. Informal enquiries may be addressed to Bill Wickstead, email: bill.wickstead@nottingham.ac.uk. For information or to apply, see: http://bit.ly/1qLKqq5. Additional information regarding the labs’ research activities can be found at http://bit.ly/Xbayz3 and http://bit.ly/1qLKpm2. This message and any attachment are intended solely for the addressee and may contain confidential information. If you have received this message in error, please send it back to me, and immediately delete it. Please do not use, copy or disclose the information contained in this message or in any attachment. Any views or opinions expressed by the author of this email do not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Nottingham. This message has been checked for viruses but the contents of an attachment may still contain software viruses which could damage your computer system, you are advised to perform your own checks. Email communications with the University of Nottingham may be monitored as permitted by UK legislation. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:11

TWO ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POSITIONS IN PLANT BIOLOGY. The Department of Biology at the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) invites applications for two tenure-track Assistant Professor positions beginning August 2015. We seek candidates with expertise in one or more of the following areas: plant cell/molecular biology, plant physiology, and plant or fungal diversity. The positions are part of a broader initiative to build a strong program in plant sciences in the UMD Biology Department. Depending on the candidates’ particular research experience in the above areas, they may instruct lecture and laboratory courses in cell biology, physiology, or taxonomy and diversity, and will also be expected to develop at least one advanced course in their area of specialization. The area of specialization within the above areas is open. The successful candidates will establish independent, externally funded research programs involving undergraduate and graduate students. Service to the depa rtment, college and University is also expected. Opportunities exist for collaboration with researchers at UMD’s Natural Resources Research Institute, Large Lakes Observatory, College of Pharmacy, School of Medicine and the EPA Mid-Continent Ecology Division. State-of-the-art research and instruction facilities and competitive startup funding are available. Required Qualifications (must be mentioned on application/curriculum vita) include: Ph.D. or terminal degree in the biological sciences from a regionally accredited institution, evidence of potential for achievement in teaching appropriate for appointment at the Assistant Professor level, peer-reviewed publication record, and excellent written communication skills. The University of Minnesota requires that you apply online for this position. For a complete description of the positions and information on how to apply online, visit http://bit.ly/Xbayix, and search for Job Requisition 192180. Complete applications wil l be reviewed beginning October 20, 2014 and continue until the positions are filled. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:55
The University of Oulu is an international scientific community, with 16 000 students and approximately 3 000 employees. The strengths of the University are wide multidisciplinary study/research interests and modern research and study environment and good cooperation with international educational and research institutes. More information http://bit.ly/1wp2Xfi. The following job is open in the University of Oulu: Postdoctoral Researcher in Molecular Taxonomy A full-time post-doctoral position is open in the field of Molecular Systematics in a research group led by Ph.D. Marko Mutanen in the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Oulu, Finland. This project applies state-of-the-art high-throughput sequencing technology (next-generation sequencing) and genome-wide analyses to seek answers to poorly understood but repeatedly reported phenomena in mitochondrial DNA, particularly the DNA barcode region (COI). The research will focus on examining e.g. evolutionary causes of DNA barcode sharing between species, deep intraspecific splits in mtDNA and species-level para- and polyphyly in mtDNA gene trees using Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) as a model group. Moreover, the project also concentrates on a large-scale and difficult taxonomic challenge of delimitation of allopatric populations. The results are anticipated to provide new insights into problems related to species delimitation, DNA taxonomy and other fundamental questions of taxonomy. The project will be conducted in collaboration with a broad international team of leading experts of Lepidoptera systematics. A successful applicant must have a Ph.D. degree and should have previous research experience in the field of molecular taxonomy and/or phylogenetics. Expertize and practical skills in DNA barcoding, genetics, genomic data analyses, next-generation sequencing techniques and bioinformatics are highly appreciated, though a successful applicant does not need to be an expert in all these fields. An applicant should be highly motivated, ready to commit themselves to the project, and have good skills in English language. The position will be filled November 1, 2014, but negotiable (however, latest January 1, 2015). Duration of the position is three years with an option to additional 10 months. The salary will consist of basic work demand level (5 – 6) and personal performance level (up to 46.3 % supplement to the basic level). In practice, the salary will be about 3,200 € per month (equals to about 4,276 US Dollars, 4,659 Canadian Dollars and 2,562 British Pounds as based on currencies in 15 August, 2014) at the start. Health insurance and other benefits are included. A moderate amount of teaching in courses may be required. Application, including attachments (brief letter of motivation, CV and publication list required, contact details of two references recommended), should be submitted using the electronic application form by 6.10.2014 at the following address: in Finnish: http://bit.ly/Xb7iDz in English: http://bit.ly/1wp2Xfl For further details, please contact: Project leader Marko Mutanen (e-mail: marko.mutanen(at)oulu.fi, telephone: +358 294 481256) Head of Administration Tiina Pääkkönen (e-mail: tiina.paakkonen(at)oulu.fi, telephone +358 294 481051) Marko Mutanen via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:23

PhD Positions in the Wolfe lab @ Tufts University, Medford, MA (Boston Area), USA Ecology and evolution of microbes in food systems The Wolfe lab in the Department of Biology at Tufts University is seeking several Ph.D. students to join the lab in the Fall of 2015. Our lab studies the ecology and evolution of microbial communities, using tractable microbial communities isolated from food (cheese, salami, and other fermented foods) as model systems. Our work spans taxonomic boundaries (we study both prokaryotes and eukaryotes) and integrates a wide variety of techniques including experimental evolution, metagenomics, comparative genomics/transcriptomics, genome engineering, and in situ community reconstructions. Our research questions are strongly anchored in basic biology, but our work will help address emerging issues in human health and food security. Current research in the lab is aimed at linking ecological and evolutionary patterns in microbial communities with the molecular mechanisms that generate these patterns. What are the molecular mechanisms that govern species distributions or community-level traits? How do these mechanisms evolve within a community and what are the consequences of trait evolution within microbial communities? We are particularly interested in exploring these questions with a focus on bacterial-fungal interactions. The Wolfe lab is based in a brand new open lab space associated with the Tufts University Medford Campus. In addition to diverse research being conducted in the Department of Biology that spans the entire breadth of biology (http://bit.ly/1600Zpa), the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at the Tufts Medical School has an outstanding group of microbiologists (http://bit.ly/WDvgqA). There are also numerous potential collaborators and resources at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition and the Cummings School of Vet Medicine. A new university-wide initiative, the Tufts Institute for Innovation, is providing resources to support interdisciplinary research projects that explore how microbes can improve the environment and the human condition (http://bit.ly/1niy6Ix). The academic community in the Greater Boston Area has an unprecedented collective wealth of resources in microbiology, ecology, and evolution. Applicants should have a background in ecology, evolution, molecular biology, mycology, and/or microbiology. Ideal candidates would also have a strong interest in the biology of food systems. Our work has incredible potential for science outreach and education, and members of my lab will be encouraged to communicate their science through social media, writing, and public outreach events. Students will be provided ample training for postgraduate work in academia, but I will strongly support professional development to help graduate students become leaders in industry, agriculture, and other non-academic career paths. A formal lab website is in production. In the meantime, candidates should check out my personal website (http://bit.ly/1xWMGQz) for an overview of my past and current research and teaching activities. Interested candidates should contact Benjamin Wolfe via email (benjamin.wolfe@tufts.edu) to explain their past research experience/interests and why they might be a good fit for the lab. Information on the Tufts Department of Biology Graduate Program, including graduate admissions deadlines, can be found here: http://bit.ly/1xWMH6M bewolfe@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

September 12, 2014

23:35

Please note corrected date (1 week earlier) 16th YOUNG SYSTEMATISTS’ FORUM Friday, 21 November 2014, 9:30 am Venue: Flett Lecture Theatre, Natural History Museum, London, UK The annual Young Systematists’ Forum represents an exciting setting for Masters, PhD and young postdoctoral researchers to present their data, often for the first time, to a scientific audience interested in taxonomy, systematics and phylogenetics. This well-established event provides an important opportunity for budding systematists to discuss their research in front of their peers within a supportive environment. Supervisors and other established systematists are also encouraged to attend. Prizes will be awarded for the most promising oral and poster presentation as judged by a small panel on the day. Registration is FREE. Send applications by e-mail to (YSF.SystematicsAssociation@gmail.com), supplying your name, contact address and stating whether or not you wish to give an oral or poster presentation. Space will be allocated subject to availability and for a balanced programme of animal, plant, algal, microbial, molecular and other research. Non-participating attendees are also very welcome - please register as above. Abstracts must be submitted by e-mail in English no later than Friday 24 October 2014. The body text should not exceed 150 words in length. If the presentation is co-authored, the actual speaker (oral) or presenter (poster) must be clearly indicated in BOLD text. All registered attendants will receive further information about the meeting, including abstracts, by e-mail one week in advance. This information will also be displayed on the Systematics Association website (www.systass.org). *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* Dr Ellinor MICHEL Department of Life Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road SW7 5BD London UK tel: +44-207-942-5516 -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* http://bit.ly/YjDjuAwww.systass.org). *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* Dr Ellinor MICHEL Department of Life Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road SW7 5BD London UK tel: +44-207-942-5516 -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* http://bit.ly/YjDjuA -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
18:00
Background: Stripes and other high contrast patterns found on animals have been hypothesised to cause “motion dazzle”, a type of defensive coloration that operates when in motion, causing predators to misjudge the speed and direction of object movement. Several recent studies have found some support for this idea, but little is currently understood about the mechanisms underlying this effect. Using humans as model ‘predators’ in a touch screen experiment we investigated further the effectiveness of striped targets in preventing capture, and considered how stripes compare to other types of patterning in order to understand what aspects of target patterning are important in making a target difficult to capture. Results: We find that striped targets are among the most difficult to capture, but that other patterning types are also highly effective at preventing capture in this task. Several target types, including background sampled targets and targets with a ‘spot’ on were significantly easier to capture than striped targets. We also show differences in capture attempt rates between different target types, but we find no differences in learning rates between target types. Conclusions: We conclude that striped targets are effective in preventing capture, but are not uniquely difficult to catch, with luminance matched grey targets also showing a similar capture rate. We show that key factors in making capture easier are a lack of average background luminance matching and having trackable ‘features’ on the target body. We also find that striped patterns are attempted relatively quickly, despite being difficult to catch. We discuss these findings in relation to the motion dazzle hypothesis and how capture rates may be affected more generally by pattern type.
18:00
Background: Human bitter taste receptors are encoded by a gene family consisting of 25 functional TAS2R loci. In addition, humans carry 11 TAS2R pseudogenes, some of which display evidence for substantial diversification among species, showing lineage-specific loss of function. Since bitter taste is thought to help prevent the intake of toxic substances, diversity at TAS2R genes could reflect the action of natural selection on the ability to recognize some bitter compounds rather than others. Whether species-specific variation in TAS2R pseudogenes is solely the result of genetic drift or whether it may have been influenced by selection due to different feeding behaviors has been an open question. Results: In this study, we analyzed patterns of variation at human TAS2R pseudogenes in both African and non-African populations, and compared them to those observable in nonhuman primates and archaic human species. Our results showed a similar worldwide distribution of allelic variation for most of the pseudogenes, with the exception of the TAS2R6P and TAS2R18P loci, both of which presented an unexpected higher frequency of derived alleles outside Africa. At the TAS2R6P locus, two SNPs were found in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2 > 0.9) with variants in the functional TAS2R5 gene, which showed signatures of selection. The human TAS2R18P carried a species-specific stop-codon upstream of four polymorphic insertions in the reading frame. SNPs at this locus showed significant positive values in a number of neutrality statistics, and age estimates indicated that they arose after the homo-chimp divergence. Conclusions: The similar distribution of variation of many human bitter receptor pseudogenes among human populations suggests that they arose from the ancestral forms by a unidirectional loss of function. However we explain the higher frequency of TAS2R6P derived alleles outside Africa as the effect of the balancing selection acting on the closely linked TAS2R5 gene. In contrast, TAS2R18P displayed a more complex history, suggesting an acquired function followed by a recent pseudogenization that predated the divergence of human modern and archaic species, which we hypothesize was associated with adaptions to dietary changes.
03:56
Travel Fellowship Deadline FAST approaching!! Travel Fellowships for the 12th Annual Ecological Genomics Symposium The Ecological Genomics Institute (ecogen.ksu.edu) at Kansas State University has funds to support student and postdoc travel fellowships to attend the 12th Annual Ecological Genomics Symposium (http://bit.ly/1ktZBTN) in Kansas City from October 31st to November 2nd 2014. International students are eligible for these fellowships. TRAVEL FELLOWSHIPS. The fellowships are supported by the American Genetics Association with the goal of increasing the cultural and scientific diversity of the young scientists at the symposium. AGA-sponsored students and post-docs will receive a free 3-year student membership in the AGA. Membership provides eligibility to compete for awards and participate in Council elections, a Journal of Heredity subscription and access to the entire 100-year Journal archive. Your application packet must include each of the following: 1. A title and abstract for a poster to be presented by the applicant. 2. A short CV/resume. Please include your gender and race and ethnicity for AGA reporting. 3. A paragraph on why you are interested in attending the symposium. 4. A brief letter of recommendation from your advisor submitted under separate cover. The letter should be sent to jenniferrhodes@ksu.edu by Monday, September 15, 2014. Complete application (items 1 to 4) should be submitted as a single pdf document to jenniferrhodes@ksu.edu. The deadline for submission is Monday, September 15, 2014 For questions about the application contact Michael Herman at mherman@ksu.edu or 785-532-6741 The 12th Ecological Genomics Symposium will feature an outstanding lineup of speakers that will discuss their latest research results: Zach Cheviron, University of Illinois, Evolutionary and functional genomics of high-altitude adaptation in deer mice Cassandra Extavour, Harvard University, Using Drosophilid flies to understand how the development of reproductive capacity may be influenced by ecological niche Felicity Jones, Max Planck Institute, Tbingen, Germany, Molecular mechanisms of adaptive divergence and speciation in threespine sticklebacks. Catherine Linnen, University of Kentucky, From mice to mutations: Genetic basis of adaptive coloration in Peromyscus Michael Lynch, Indiana University, Moving population-genomics forward: 5000 Daphnia pulex genomes Sean Place, Sonoma State University, Comparative transcriptomics: An alternative approach to conservation in the Southern Ocean Jesse Poland, Kansas State University, High-throughput genotype and phenotype analysis of agriculture ecosystems John Stinchcombe, University of Toronto, Ecology and genomics of life history adaptation in introduced Arabidopsis populations Alex Wilson, University of Miami, Metabolic and developmental integration of the obligate intracellular symbionts of sap feeding insects POSTER SESSIONS: A poster sessions will be held on Friday evening and Saturday afternoon. Poster topics should be related to the field of Ecological Genomics. A LIMITED NUMBER OF SUBMITTED POSTER ABSTRACTS WILL BE SELECTED FOR ORAL PRESENTATIONS. Jennifer Rhodes via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:56
Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is offering a field based plant survey and identification course in Belize, Central America entitled $B!H(BFieldwork skills in the tropics: vegetation surveys, monitoring, and plant identification.$B!I(B The course is part of the Advanced Short Training Courses by NERC, and 10 fully funded places are available. The course is aimed for PhD students and early career scientists. Priority will be given to UK based applicants, but all applicants with strong interest are encouraged to apply. DEADLINE for applications is 10th OCTOBER 2015. For more details on how to apply, see course website: http://bit.ly/1CZfLdT, or contact Tiina Sarkinen t.sarkinen@rbge.ac.uk and David Harris d.harris@rbge.org.uk Dr Tiina Sarkinen Biodiversity Scientist Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh Tiina Sarkinen via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:07
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), North Atlantic Area is seeking highly qualified candidate for a temporary full-time Postdoctoral Research Associate (Research Molecular Biologist/ Geneticist), for the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture Research Facility in Leetown, West Virginia. Salary range of $63,091 to $82,019. This position affords the opportunity tobe a team member in the research project entitled $B!H(BIntegrated Research Approaches for Improving Production Efficiency in Salmonids$B!I(B, located within the USDA-ARS National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture (NCCCWA), Leetown, WV, and will conduct genome mapping and molecular genetics studies to identify DNA sequence variation in positional candidate genes and regulatory elements affecting bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance in rainbow trout. The specific research assignment will utilize QTL mapping and functional genomics data from previous studies at the NCCCWA and will involve gene discovery through the implementation of next generation DNA and RNA sequencing technologies combined with Genome-Wide-Association-Studies (GWAS). The successful candidate will participate as a multi-disciplinary team member in the selection and development of appropriate methodologies and experimental procedures. Qualification Requirements: A Ph.D. in molecular biology, physiology, genetics, life science or a related field is required. Knowledge and experience in DNA sequencing, gene cloning, PCR, and gene expression is desirable as well as professional knowledge in Fish Biology, Fish Genetics, Molecular Biology, Genomics, Immunology and/or Aquaculture. Experience with aquaculture or animal production would be an asset. Strong computer programming and analytical skills are valuable. You must meet all requirements for the position including completion of the Ph.D. prior to entrance on duty. Citizenship Restrictions Apply. Please send resume/CV to: Dr. Yniv Palti. I can be reached by email or phone at yniv.palti@ars.usda.gov, 1-304-724-8340 ext. 2134. This position is open until filled. USDA/ARS is an equal opportunity employer and provider. Yaniv Palti via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:24
The Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Davis invites applicants for a Tenure-track Assistant Professor of Tropical Conservation Science position. The successful candidate must have an active research program focusing on human dimensions of tropical conservation. Candidates whose research addresses anthropogenic change in tropical ecosystems from an explicitly ecological and/or evolutionary perspective, and who take a scientific approach to finding ways to engage multiple stakeholder groups as stewards of biodiversity in the tropics will be preferred. Ph.D. in Anthropology, Ecology or related field must be completed by the first day of courses (September 24, 2015). Applicants must demonstrate exceptional promise as scholars and teachers. To apply, please submit a cover letter, a CV, a Statement of Research, a Statement of Teaching, and up to three (3) representative publications via http://bit.ly/1CZ1u0P. Apply by November 10th, 2014 to ensure full consideration by the committee. “Crofoot, Margaret” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:21
Biological Oceanographer The College of Marine Science at the University of South Florida invites applications for a tenure-track, nine-month academic appointment in Biological Oceanography at the Assistant, Associate, or Professor level. Rank is dependent on qualifications and experience. Qualified candidates will employ modern tools of multi-disciplinary science to understand the and a history and vision of active involvement in field research in a variety of environments are required. Candidates must demonstrate an ability to communicate complex oceanographic concepts and explain an education strategy that contributes to our mission of graduate education in oceanography. Applicant Requirements: Qualified candidates will employ modern tools of multi-disciplinary science to understand the ocean ecosystem, areas such as, but not limited to, coastal and marine ecology; biodiversity; trophic structure and function; biological-physical interactions; connections between molecular biology, genetics, taxonomy and ecology; conservation biology; fisheries; aquatic animal tracking; the role of biota in biogeochemistry; and ecological and biogeochemical forecasting. A deep understanding of oceanography and the role of biota in Earth processes, and a history and vision of active involvement in field research in a variety of environments are required. Candidates must demonstrate an ability to communicate complex oceanographic concepts and explain an education strategy that contributes to our mission of graduate education in oceanography. Must have a PhD in a relevant scientific discipline at the time of hire with research experience in the field of Marine Science and/or Biological Oceanography. Preferred qualifications: Applicants should be capable of interacting with colleagues in multi-disciplinary oceanographic research.  For the Assistant Professor rank, candidates should have a record of scholarly products and demonstrate potential for a career of creative work and scholarly publications, demonstrate potential for acquisition of extramural research funding, exhibit a commitment to exemplary instruction and mentoring of graduate students, be compelled to engage in transformative work through the co-design and co-creation of solutions, and demonstrate a culture of high ethics and service to their professional community and to the public. For the Associate Professor / Professor rank, candidates should have an outstanding record in research, including a substantive publication and other scholarly product record, evidence of success in attracting extramural research funding, and a commitment to exemplary instruction and mentoring of graduate students, be compelled to engage in transformative work through the co-design and co-creation of solutions, and demonstrate a culture of high ethics and service to their professional community and to the public. Application procedures: Please submit a cover letter stating qualifications. Please append research and teaching statements, curriculum vitae, and contact information for three referees. Position is open until filled.  Review of applications will begin after November 1, 2014. Appointment is expected to commence prior to August 2015. To submit your application please click on the APPLY through Website button. The College of Marine Science has 26 ranked faculty covering biological, chemical, geological, and physical oceanography and marine resource assessment, ~110 graduate students, ~$15 million in annual research, a total endowment of ~$18 million, ~80 full-time support personnel (including engineers, technical, and College administrative staff). The College of Marine Science is a member of the C.W. Bill Young Marine Science Complex, made up of six Federal and State environmental research and operational agencies in close proximity, including the USGS Coastal Geology division, the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Regional Office, the US Coastguard, the Florida Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI) of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the Florida Institute for Oceanography (FIO), and the Tampa Bay National Estuary Program. Several private research groups including SRI International are co-located in this research cluster. Together with the College, these agencies and institutions employ ~800 researchers, engineers, technicians and support staff, making St. Petersburg one of the largest marine-science research complexes in the southeastern US.  The University of South Florida is a high-impact, global research university located in beautiful Tampa Bay on Florida's spectacular west coast. It is one of the largest public universities in the nation, and among the top 50 universities, public or private, for federal research expenditures. The university is one of only four Florida public universities classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in the top tier of research universities, a distinction attained by only 2.3 percent of all universities. At the heart of USF is a vibrant, diverse and engaged student body. More than 47,000 students are enrolled in the USF System, a system of three separately accredited institutions – USF Tampa, USF St. Petersburg and USF Sarasota-Manatee – with an annual budget of $1.5 billion and an annual economic impact of $3.7 billion.
02:07
The student award “Appreciation for the Natural History of Insect Pests” is in its third year! Selection criteria and conditions: The selection committee will award $500 to the student who in the given year publishes the most interesting and inspiring research paper on insects which are usually regarded as pests. For details, please see: http://bit.ly/1tOO6d6 The award: $500 awarded annually to one recipient. Sponsored by the Forest Entomology lab at the University of Florida and by the TREE Foundation in Sarasota, FL. Who is eligible: University students regardless of their geographic location. Due date: Each year on December 31st Jiri Hulcr, Assistant Professor University of Florida | School of Forest Resources and Conservation 352-273-0299 | http://bit.ly/1hMunCS “Hulcr,Jiri” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR