news aggregator

November 2, 2014

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent

November 1, 2014

23:21

—_000_B0E9B0B8C734754AAEA5CD5B2B4C181A62922173turismoonlineul_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Researchers at the University of Lethbridge are seeking outstanding students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in evolutionary biology. The University of Lethbridge has a strong research program in evolutionary biology and a diverse group of researchers that are interested in recruiting outstanding MSc and PhD students for 2015. We offer MSc degrees in several fields as well as a specific PhD program in Ecology, Evolution and Behaviour. Graduate students are eligible for full funding packages through a combination of TA-ships and competitive internal scholarships (including tuition awards), and are encouraged to apply for external fellowships from a variety of Provincial and Federal sources. Opportunities also exist for collaborative projects among our researchers and with other institutions. Faculty members that are currently accepting graduate students include: Theresa Burg, Department of Biology (http://bit.ly/1vxcKKZ) Topics: Evolution, evolutionary ecology, population genetics, landscape genetics, speciation Methods: PCR, genotyping, sequencing. Field work is an important aspect of our research and preference will be given to applicants who have banding/ringing experience. Andrew Iwaniuk, Department of Neuroscience (http://bit.ly/1tubhZk) Topics: evolutionary neurobiology, ornithology, comparative anatomy, animal behaviour Methods: immunohistochemistry, histology, stereology, micro-CT, behavioural analysis, fieldwork, comparative methods Drew Rendall, Department of Psychology (http://bit.ly/1tubhZq) Topics: animal communication, social evolution, comparative cognition Methods: fieldwork, behavioral and acoustic analysis, psycho-acoustic experimentation, comparative methods Located in southern Alberta and very close to the Rocky Mountains, Lethbridge offers a sunny, dry climate, which is surprisingly mild for the prairies, excellent recreational amenities, especially for outdoor enthusiasts, and a reasonable cost of living. The University of Lethbridge is a top-ranked Canadian university that is home to several major research centres, including the Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience and the Water Institute for Sustainable Environments as well as a field station in the Crown of the Continent region of the Rocky Mountains. For more information or to apply, please contact one of the researchers listed above. Admissions criteria and deadlines for application can be found on the School of Graduate Studies website (http://bit.ly/1tubhZu). List of internal funding opportunities: http://bit.ly/1vxcKL7 http://bit.ly/1vxcITC —_000_B0E9B0B8C734754AAEA5CD5B2B4C181A62922173turismoonlineul_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}

Researchers at the University of Lethbridge are seeking outstanding students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in evolutionary biology.  The University of Lethbridge has a strong research program in evolutionary biology and a diverse group of researchers that are interested in recruiting outstanding MSc and PhD students for 2015.  We offer MSc degrees in several fields as well as a specific PhD program in Ecology, Evolution and Behaviour.  Graduate students are eligible for full funding packages through a combination of TA-ships and competitive internal scholarships (including tuition awards), and are encouraged to apply for external fellowships from a variety of Provincial and Federal sources.  Opportunities also exist for collaborative projects among our researchers and with other institutions.  Faculty members that are currently accepting graduate students include:

Theresa Burg, Department of Biology (http://bit.ly/1vxcKKZ)

Topics: Evolution, evolutionary ecology, population genetics, landscape genetics, speciation

Methods: PCR, genotyping, sequencing.  Field work is an important aspect of our research and preference will be given to applicants who have banding/ringing experience.

Andrew Iwaniuk, Department of Neuroscience (http://bit.ly/1tubhZk)

Topics: evolutionary neurobiology, ornithology, comparative anatomy, animal behaviour

Methods: immunohistochemistry, histology, stereology, micro-CT, behavioural analysis, fieldwork, comparative methods

Drew Rendall, Department of Psychology (http://bit.ly/1tubhZq)

Topics: animal communication, social evolution, comparative cognition

Methods: fieldwork, behavioral and acoustic analysis, psycho-acoustic experimentation, comparative methods

Located in southern Alberta and very close to the Rocky Mountains, Lethbridge offers a sunny, dry climate, which is surprisingly mild for the prairies, excellent recreational amenities, especially for outdoor enthusiasts, and a reasonable cost of living. The University of Lethbridge is a top-ranked Canadian university that is home to several major research centres, including the Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience and the Water Institute for Sustainable Environments as well as a field station in the Crown of the Continent region of the Rocky Mountains.

For more information or to apply, please contact one of the researchers listed above.

Admissions criteria and deadlines for application can be found on the School of Graduate Studies website (http://bit.ly/1tubhZu).  List of internal funding opportunities:

http://bit.ly/1vxcKL7

http://bit.ly/1vxcITC

 

 

—_000_B0E9B0B8C734754AAEA5CD5B2B4C181A62922173turismoonlineul via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:30

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN CONIFERS EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS A postdoctoral position is available in the Casola Lab at Texas A&M University. We are mainly interested in studying the evolution of genome size and gene content in conifers and other gymnosperms using a blend of bioinformatics and wet lab approaches. One of our primary goals is to understand the evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in conifers, with a particular emphasis on horizontal transfer events, TE-mediated gene regulation, and host silencing of TEs. We are also investigating the origin of conifer-specific genes by analyzing patterns and mechanisms of gene duplication. At the population level, we are interested in using next-gen data sets to identify gene duplication and gene loss events in loblolly pine, a conifer of major economic and ecological value. The postdoc will be expected to present and publish results of his/her research. More details on active projects in the lab are available online at http://bit.ly/1qe2cyS Candidates must hold a Ph.D. in computational biology, bioinformatics, evolutionary genomics, molecular evolution or a related field. Experience in comparative genome-wide analyses, next-gen sequencing data, and bioinformatics programming are preferred. Programming skills in perl, python, C or R are required. This is a one-year position renewable depending on performance and external funding. A starting salary will be commensurate with experience and benefits are included. The position is open immediately and the start date is negotiable. All applications must be made online at: http://bit.ly/1qe2cyU NOV Number: 08096 Only electronic applications will be considered. Please send any questions about the position to Claudio Casola (ccasola@tamu.edu). Texas A&M AgriLife is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Veterans/Disability Employer Claudio Casola, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Ecosystem Science & Management 495 Horticulture Rd. College Station, TX 77843 Phone: (979) 845-8803 email: ccasola@tamu.edu http://bit.ly/1qe2cyS via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:14

*Quantitative Ecology Postdoctoral Scholar Position: *The Marine Science Institute at the University of California Santa Barbara seeks a quantitative ecologist for a post-doctoral research position with a focus on biodiversity. The candidate will work closely with UCSB PIs on estimating, monitoring, and modeling biodiversity across multiple spatial scales. Key research questions will include: 1) How can data from diverse sources can be combined to estimate biodiversity? 2) How does uncertainty in estimates of biodiversity depend on the types of sampling chosen? 3) How can local observations be combined with physical covariates and remote sensing data to obtain regional inferences about biodiversity? The position will be part of the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network project, funded by NASA, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The MBON is an interdisciplinary project involving scientists from UCSB, the United States Geological Survey, NOAA, the National Marine Fisheries Service and UC San Diegos Scripps Institution of Oceanography. This five-year project aims to track the diversity of a broad range of marine organisms in the Santa Barbara Channel. The project benefits from extensive existing data about the biological and physical conditions in the region which will be integrated over large spatial scales using geostatistical models and remote sensing. This integration will be supported by new genetic and imaging techniques for observing marine biodiversity, also being developed by the project. In addition, mathematical models will be developed to examine the value of information on biodiversity in making management decisions, and to explore optimal allocation of resources across different methods of sampling. The candidate should have training in the fields of quantitative ecology and expertise in spatial statistics or geostatistics (a PhD in quantitative ecology, statistics or related field is required) and strong skills in advanced statistical modeling, computational analysis, and scientific programming. An ideal candidate will have experience with quantification of multivariate spatial heterogeneity, change of support, spatial regression models, geostatistical prediction and simulation, and spatial sampling design. The ability to handle large amounts of data in a GIS environment is also an important qualification. The candidate will be expected to lead a portion of the research, in collaboration with the MBON team, including UCSB PIs Phaedon Kyriakidis, Bob Miller, Andrew Rassweiler and David Siegel. Excellent verbal and written communication skills, and proven capacity to publish in peer-reviewed journals are requirements. Initial appointment will be for one year, with anticipated funding for three or more years, conditional upon performance, and UCSB offers competitive salary and benefits packages. Screening of applications will begin December 1, 2014 with an anticipated start in winter or spring of 2015, but the position will be open until filled. For further information, please contact Dr. Phaedon Kyriakidis at phaedon@geog.ucsb.edu or Dr. Andrew Rassweiler at andrew.rassweiler@lifesci.ucsb.edu. Send applications including cover letter, Curriculum Vitae, and contact information for three references to: http://bit.ly/1nZKinH The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or any other characteristic protected by law including protected Veterans and individuals with disabilities. Robert J. Miller Marine Science Institute University of California Santa Barbara Santa Barbara CA 93109-6150 rjmiller1@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:14

The Gibbons lab (http://bit.ly/1vrXRcV) in the Department of Biology at Clark University is accepting applications for PhD students to start in August 2015. The overarching research theme of our lab is to understand how evolutionary forces shape the genome and how these changes influence phenotype. More specifically, our lab studies (i) how selection alters the structure and function of fungal genomes and, (ii) how copy number variation influences genome architecture, and gene expression. To gain a comprehensive understanding of these topics, we heavily utilize whole genome Next Generation Sequencing data to characterize patterns of genomic variation. Additionally, we pair these computational analyses with functional experiments spanning the realms of transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Applicants interested in fungal biology will also have opportunities to interact and collaborate with the Hibbett lab (http://bit.ly/1nZKinC).=0A Clark University is a vibrant and supportive small liberal arts research university located in Worcester, MA. The Biology Department at Clark has particular strengths in Evolutionary Biology, Genomics, and Molecular Biology. PhD students are guaranteed funding for five years, with a possible extension through teaching and research assistantships. For more information please visit our departmental web page (http://bit.ly/14FRBVO). Please email a brief description of why you are interested in the position and a current resume or CV to jgibbons@clarku.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:14
University of Memphis Department of Biological Sciences Tenure Track Assistant Professor The University of Memphis, Department of Biological Sciences and the Bioinformatics Program invite applications for a tenure track position at the Assistant Professor level beginning August 2015, pending funding availability. The successful candidate is expected to develop a research program that builds upon and complements the existing strengths in genomics and bioinformatics at the University of Memphis and its partner institutions (including University of Tennessee Health Science Center and St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital) in the Memphis Research Consortium (http://bit.ly/1vrXTlg). Candidates are sought with a Ph.D. in computational biology and a strong research track record. The successful applicant is expected to develop an externally funded research program, mentor Ph.D and M.S. students, and contribute to teaching activities in the Department of Biological Sciences and the Bioinformatics Program. Teaching responsibilities would include some combination of undergraduate and graduate level courses. The ability to teach computer programming, data structures, and algorithms for biologists is a plus. Research areas of interest include, but are not limited to genomics/metagenomics, microbiology/environmental microbiology, and genetics. Candidates developing innovative bioinformatic approaches for addressing current issues in genome biology are encouraged to apply. The University of Memphis is a leading metropolitan research institution with over 30 faculty members specializing in diverse subdisciplines of the biological sciences. The Department serves approximately 500 majors and over 40 M.S. and Ph.D. students. The W. Harry Feinstone Center for Genomic Research (http://bit.ly/1aaQdda ), the interdepartmental Program in Bioinformatics (http://bit.ly/1d1G5Yv ), the Ecological Research Center (www.memphis.edu/erc/ ), the Integrated Microscopy Center (www.memphis.edu/imc/ ), and the Meeman Biological Field Station (http://bit.ly/1aaQayc ), are all administered through the department and offer outstanding opportunities for research, teaching, and collaboration. Applications must be submitted online at http://bit.ly/1e4i00N and include a cover letter, CV, statements of research and teaching interests, and contact information for at least three professional references. Application deadline is November 30, 2014. Review of applications will begin December 1 and may continue until the position is filled. Inquiries should be directed to Dr. Ramin Homayouni, Chair, Bioinformatics Faculty Position, Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA (or email rhomayon@memphis.edu) The University of Memphis is a Tennessee Board of Regents Institution and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. We urge all qualified applicants www.memphis.edu/erc/ ), the Integrated Microscopy Center (www.memphis.edu/imc/ ), and the Meeman Biological Field Station (http://bit.ly/1aaQayc ), are all administered through the department and offer outstanding opportunities for research, teaching, and collaboration. Applications must be submitted online at http://bit.ly/1e4i00N and include a cover letter, CV, statements of research and teaching interests, and contact information for at least three professional references. Application deadline is November 30, 2014. Review of applications will begin December 1 and may continue until the position is filled. Inquiries should be directed to Dr. Ramin Homayouni, Chair, Bioinformatics Faculty Position, Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA (or email rhomayon@memphis.edu) The University of Memphis is a Tennessee Board of Regents Institution and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. We urge all qualified applicants to apply for this position. Appointment will be based on qualifications as they relate to position requirements without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, age, sex, disability or veteran status. Successful candidates must meet guidelines of the immigration and Reform Control Act of 1986. “Duane McKenna (dmckenna)” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:14
POST-DOCTORAL POSITION in Evolutionary Morphology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst The Dumont Lab at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst) seeks a Postdoctoral Research Associate to work collaboratively on projects that focus on the form, function and evolution of the skulls and jaw of vertebrates. This is a fully benefited, full-time Postdoctoral Research Associate position. Initial appointment for one year; reappointment beyond first year is contingent upon availability of funding and job performance. Salary is subject to bargaining unit contract. The postdoctoral associates primary responsibilities will be to contribute to a Collaborative NSF Dimensions of Biodiversity grant that focuses the evolution of sensory systems in bats (http://1.usa.gov/1nZKiEd), by collecting and analyzing data and contributing to co-authored manuscripts for peer-reviewed publication and to mentor undergraduate and graduate students. Independent projects related the labs mission and participation in mentored undergraduate teaching experiences are encouraged. For more information on the Dumont Lab visit http://bit.ly/1nZKiEf www.biomesh.org. *Minimum requirements*include a completed PhD in a related field (e.g., evolutionary biology, zoology, paleontology). Ability to make regular day trips to Cambridge, MA to use ct-scanning facilities. *Preferred requirements*include training in some combination of comparative anatomy, comparative methods, geometric morphometrics staining specimens for ct-scanning, 3D visualization of ct-scans, manipulation of 3D images, and mentoring or teaching experience. Postdoctoral Research Associates at the University of Massachusetts are unionized and receive standard salary and benefits, depending on experience. Please apply online by submitting a cover letter, CV, summary of research interests, summary of mentoring/teaching experiences, and the contact details of three references to: URLhttp://umass.interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=54381 For information email: bdumont@bio.umass.edu. Review of applications will begin November 17th.Applications received by November 17th will be given priority consideration. /The University of Massachusetts Amherst is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities and encourages applications from these and other protected group members. / Lisa Barry Biology Department Morrill Science Center South, Room 348 611 North Pleasant Street University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 Phone: 413-545-2602 Fax: 413-545-3243 Lisa Barry via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:56
We are recruiting an evolutionary-minded person with strong population genomics and bioinformatics skills for a 3 year postdoc position analysing large pollinator genomics and transcriptomics datasets to examine pollinator health and impact of pesticides using novel molecular approaches. This is a NERC-funded position in collaboration with Richard Gill, Nigel Raine and Lars Chittka. Full ad is on QMUL’s HR website: http://bit.ly/1wQuULX Apply by November 15th. Potential applicants are encouraged to submit an informal application (CV and covering letter outlining your suitability for the position) to Yannick Wurm (y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk) before the formal deadline. Yannick Wurm - http://bit.ly/1kK1Z9l Ants, Genomes & Evolution ⋅ y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk ⋅ skype:yannickwurm ⋅ +44 207 882 3049 5.03A Fogg ⋅ School of Biological & Chemical Sciences ⋅ Queen Mary, University of London ⋅ Mile End Road ⋅ E1 4NS London ⋅ UK Yannick Wurm via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:27

The monthly review of the EvolDir is available from the EvolDir website - http://bit.ly/17VdShI. For more information or for help send mail to Golding@McMaster.CA. Please see the above website for instructions for the EvolDir. This includes ways to limit/reduce the messages you receive from the EvolDir. A reminder: The userid for the web site user list is `evoldir’ and the password is `2EvolBulletins’. [ This was done to limit the access of spammers (e.g. SpeakOut.Com and others). ] Brian Golding via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:53
Request for tissue or blood samples from shorebirds (Charadriiformes) I am seeking tissue or blood samples from shorebird species (sandpipers, plovers and allies), and would appreciate if anyone having such samples will contact me. My PhD project focuses on genetic diversity and differentiation in shorebirds, and using microsatellite markers, I am planning to compare various estimates of diversity and gene flow between different shorebird populations throughout the world. I already have an excellent set of samples from 15 species collated by my supervisors, however, I wish to top up these samples with others. To quantify genetic diversity and gene flow, I require samples from a minimum of 20 breeding individuals (males and female) from three+ breeding populations which are approx. 100 km apart. With these samples we will test whether geographic latitude, population size and distribution may influence the extent of genetic diversity and gene flow. Since collecting these samples often requires substantial effort, we are offering co-authorship to anyone willing to contribute 20+ individual samples. Please note that we only need breeding individuals, so all samples should be gathered on the breeding ground. For statistical analyses, we will need the date and geographic coordinate of the sample, and sex and/or age (adult/juvenile) of the individual. However, if necessary, we can use molecular techniques to sex the individual. Please contact Josie D’Urban Jackson (jduj20@bath.ac.uk) if you have samples (feather, blood, tissue) from any shorebird species, and are willing to share them and please send samples to Prof. Mike Bruford, OnE Division, C5.15, The Sir Martin Evans Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3AX, UK. We would be happy to create a formal agreement specifying the use of the samples and will only deal with samples that were taken under permit. For blood samples, we require a letter which includes a vet’s certificate from the region where the samples are found and confirmation if they have had 30 minutes treatment at 56⁰C or not. Best wishes, Josie D’Urban Jackson, PhD student, University of Bath & Cardiff University (UK) Ph.D student Department of Biology & Biochemistry University of Bath Claverton Down Bath BA2 7AY United Kingdom Cardiff University School of Biosciences, The Sir Martin Evans Building Museum Avenue Cardiff CF103AX United Kingdom Josie Jackson via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:06
Tenure-track Assistant/Associate Professor in Biology Education, beginning in August 2015 (pending funding availability). The Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Memphis ( http://bit.ly/1trNVSD) invites applications for a tenure-track position in Biology Education at the Assistant or Associate Professor level. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in a Biological Science discipline with evidence of excellence in post-secondary Biology Teaching (preferably in a large classroom environment) and scholarship. The successful candidate must have a demonstrated interest in developing innovative instructional approaches to teaching undergraduate biology courses, and knowledge of assessment strategies. Experience in the development and delivery of online courses is a plus. Responsibilities of the position include teaching and curriculum development for introductory biology and departmental core courses as well as departmental service courses. Candidates applying at the Assistant Professor level will be expected to garner extramural funding in STEM education. Candidates at the Associate Professor level should have current funding or a history of funding in STEM education. In addition, the successful candidate will be expected to develop and implement course changes to improve student success and collaborate with STEM colleagues to improve science teaching. Startup funds are available and salary will be commensurate with experience. The University of Memphis is a leading metropolitan research institution with over 30 faculty members specializing in diverse subdisciplines of the biological sciences. The Department serves approximately 500 majors and over 40 M.S. and Ph.D. students. The W. Harry Feinstone Center for Genomic Research (http://bit.ly/1aaQdda ), the interdepartmental Program in Bioinformatics (http://bit.ly/1d1G5Yv ), the Ecological Research Center (www.memphis.edu/erc/ ), the Integrated Microscopy Center (www.memphis.edu/imc/ ), and the Meeman Biological Field Station (http://bit.ly/1aaQayc), are all administered through the department and offer outstanding opportunities for research, teaching, and collaboration. Candidates should submit a letter of application, statements of research interests and teaching philosophy, and a cv online at http://bit.ly/1trNVSH Applicants should also provide contact information for three references willing to write letters of recommendation, if requested. Review of applications will begin December 1, 2014 and may continue until www.memphis.edu/erc/ ), the Integrated Microscopy Center (www.memphis.edu/imc/ ), and the Meeman Biological Field Station (http://bit.ly/1aaQayc), are all administered through the department and offer outstanding opportunities for research, teaching, and collaboration. Candidates should submit a letter of application, statements of research interests and teaching philosophy, and a cv online at http://bit.ly/1trNVSH Applicants should also provide contact information for three references willing to write letters of recommendation, if requested. Review of applications will begin December 1, 2014 and may continue until position is filled. Inquiries should be directed to Dr. Judith Cole, Chair, STEM Faculty Position, Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA (or email jcole2@memphis.edu ). Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Memphis is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer that accommodates individuals with disabilities. “Duane McKenna (dmckenna)” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:06

Brain evolution symposium at ESEB 2015 We would like to invite abstract submissions for the following symposium at next years European Society for Evolutionary Biology: Emerging models in evolutionary and ecological neurobiology Despite their fundamental importance in animal biology and diversification, we know little about the proximate basis of ecologically relevant behaviour in wild populations. Understanding the genetic and neural basis of behavioural evolution is of primary interest, but also reveals mechanistic principles governing the evolution of complex phenotypes. Recent developments in sequencing technology, methods to quantify complex behaviour, and the application of neurological techniques to more diverse organisms, have led to accelerated progress in this field. A number of organisms have attracted particular attention and are emerging as promising model systems. Notable insights include the identification of distinct genetic and neural modules underpinning behaviour, the effects of gene expression and patterning on the evolution of brain size/structure, the extent of plasticity or divergence in brain structure between closely related species, and the nature of developmental and functional constraints acting on the brain. We are interested in abstracts covering a wide range of approaches including intraspecific/experimental studies and interspecific/comparative studies, ranging from molecular/developmental approaches through to behaviour, anatomy and ecology. Details of ESEB 2015 are available here: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbW Abstract submission and registration should open in early November. Please feel free to get in touch if you have any questions. Stephen Montgomery (stephen.montgomery@cantab.net) Alison Wright (alison.e.wright@ucl.ac.uk) via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:04

—089e0122971c2be2f80506b7e74a Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Dear Evoldir members, We have just released a new version of the Bio++ Libraries, available at http://bit.ly/1u4WCoG. Bio++ is a set of C++ libraries for Bioinformatics, including sequence analysis, phylogenetics, molecular evolution and population genetics. Recent additions include tools for analyzing next generation sequencing data. Bio++ is Object Oriented and is designed to be both easy to use and computer efficient. Bio++ intends to help programmers to write computer expensive programs, by providing them a set of re-usable tools. The Bio++ project was started in 2005 and comes now in its version 2.2.0. Source code and packages for various Linux distributions are available. The Bio++ Development Team. —089e0122971c2be2f80506b7e74a Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Dear Evoldir members,We have just released a new version of the Bio++ Libraries, available at http://bit.ly/1u4WCoG.Bio++ is a set of C++ libraries for Bioinformatics, including sequence analysis, phylogenetics, molecular evolution and population genetics. Recent additions include tools for analyzing next generation sequencing data. Bio++ is Object Oriented and is designed to be both easy to use and computer efficient. Bio++ intends to help programmers to write computer expensive programs, by providing them a set of re-usable tools.The Bio++ project was started in 2005 and comes now in its version 2.2.0. Source code and packages for various Linux distributions are available.The Bio++ Development Team. —089e0122971c2be2f80506b7e74 via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

October 31, 2014

18:00
Background: African wildlife experienced a reduction in population size and geographical distribution over the last millennium, particularly since the 19th century as a result of human demographic expansion, wildlife overexploitation, habitat degradation and cattle-borne diseases. In many areas, ungulate populations are now largely confined within a network of loosely connected protected areas. These metapopulations face gene flow restriction and run the risk of genetic diversity erosion. In this context, we assessed the “genetic health” of free ranging southern African Cape buffalo populations (S.c. caffer) and investigated the origins of their current genetic structure. The analyses were based on 264 samples from 6 southern African countries that were genotyped for 14 autosomal and 3 Y-chromosomal microsatellites. Results: The analyses differentiated three significant genetic clusters, hereafter referred to as Northern (N), Central (C) and Southern (S) clusters. The results suggest that splitting of the N and C clusters occurred around 6000 to 8400 years ago. Both N and C clusters displayed high genetic diversity (mean allelic richness (A r ) of 7.217, average genetic diversity over loci of 0.594, mean private alleles (P a ) of 11), low differentiation, and an absence of an inbreeding depression signal (mean F IS = 0.037). The third (S) cluster, a tiny population enclosed within a small isolated protected area, likely originated from a more recent isolation and experienced genetic drift (F IS = 0.062, mean A r = 6.160, P a = 2). This study also highlighted the impact of translocations between clusters on the genetic structure of several African buffalo populations. Lower differentiation estimates were observed between C and N sampling localities that experienced translocation over the last century. Conclusions: We showed that the current genetic structure of southern African Cape buffalo populations results from both ancient and recent processes. The splitting time of N and C clusters suggests that the current pattern results from human-induced factors and/or from the aridification process that occurred during the Holocene period. The more recent S cluster genetic drift probably results of processes that occurred over the last centuries (habitat fragmentation, diseases). Management practices of African buffalo populations should consider the micro-evolutionary changes highlighted in the present study.
01:23
Position for one PhD student in Plant Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics at Stockholm University, Sweden We seek a PhD candidate to join a project examining how adaptive genetic variation and demographic processes influence evolutionary response and population dynamics in a changing environment. The research uses the perennial herb Primula farinosa as a model system, and focuses on the importance of variation in floral traits and life history in relation to differences in abiotic conditions, the intensity of biotic interactions, and climate. The project will combine demographic studies, field experiments, and population modeling, to address three main questions: (1) How is population viability influenced by local environmental conditions, grazing intensity and climatic variation?, (2) How does variation in abiotic environmental factors and grazing influence the genetic structure of plant populations?, and (3) How does the presence of genetic variation in traits of adaptive significance and evolutionary responses influence population viability in a changing environment? Specific subprojects can be tailored to the skills and interests of the successful candidate. The project is a collaboration between the labs of prof Johan Ehrln at the Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University and prof Jon gren at the Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University. We are currently recruiting one PhD student to be placed at Stockholm University and a postdoc to be placed at Uppsala University. We are looking for a candidate with a keen interest in population biology and eco-evolutionary dynamics. Previous experience of modelling, and field or experimental work is desirable. Proficiency in English is a requirement. The successful PhD student candidate should have a degree in Biology at the advanced level (e.g. Masters) of at least 240 credits, and will receive a postgraduate position for four years of full-time studies. Deadline for application is 20 November 2014 Please find the announcement, with all information about how to apply, at: http://bit.ly/1sOUECj For informal enquiries, please contact Johan Ehrln johan.ehrlen@su.se, +46-8-16 12 02, or Jon gren, jon.agren@ebc.uu.se, +46-18-471 2860. Jon gren Plant Ecology and Evolution Department of Ecology and Genetics, EBC Uppsala University Norbyvgen 18 D SE-752 36 Uppsala Sweden Jon gren via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:23
Our lab is looking for a postdoc to spearhead the genomics portion of a five-year UNC-Duke collaborative project that aims to understand the physiological basis of magnetoreception in sea turtles and spiny lobsters. The candidate must have proven (ideally published) experience with assembling genomes and transcriptomes and then analyzing them for the presence and expression levels of particular genes, in this case those associated with the transportation and sequestration of iron and iron oxides. Additional experience with orientation and navigation, marine ecology, and biophysics is also desirable. Funding is available starting as early as January 1st, 2015, with the project lasting until September 30th, 2019. Pay will be based on experience and NIH guidelines. If interested, please send a CV and letter of intent to sjohnsen@duke.edu and arrange to have two reference letters sent to the same address. Snke Johnsen Professor of Biology Duke University “Sonke Johnsen, Ph.D.” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:50
Position for one Postdoc in Plant Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics at Uppsala University, Sweden We seek a Postdoc to join a project examining how adaptive genetic variation and demographic processes influence evolutionary response and population dynamics in a changing environment. The research uses the perennial herb Primula farinosa as a model system, and focuses on the importance of variation in floral traits and life history in relation to differences in abiotic conditions, the intensity of biotic interactions, and climate. The project will combine demographic studies, field experiments, and population modeling, to address three main questions: (1) How is population viability influenced by local environmental conditions, grazing intensity and climatic variation?, (2) How does variation in abiotic environmental factors and grazing influence the genetic structure of plant populations?, and (3) How does the presence of genetic variation in traits of adaptive significance and evolutionary responses influence population viability in a changing environment? Specific subprojects can be tailored to the skills and interests of the successful candidate. The project is a collaboration between the labs of prof Jon gren at the Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, and prof Johan Ehrln at the Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University. We are currently recruiting one postdoc to be placed at Uppsala University, and one PhD student to be placed at Stockholm University. We are looking for a candidate with a keen interest in population biology and eco-evolutionary dynamics. Previous experience of modelling, and field or experimental work is desirable. Proficiency in English is a requirement. The successful postdoc candidate should have a PhD completed within 3 years of the application deadline (reasons such as prolonged periods of illness and parental leave can motivate a longer period). The postdoc position lasts for two years. Deadline for application is 27 November 2014 Please find the announcement, with all information about how to apply, at: http://bit.ly/1ubmeAV For informal enquiries, please contact Jon gren, jon.agren@ebc.uu.se, +46-18-471 2860, or Johan Ehrln johan.ehrlen@su.se, +46-8-16 12 02. Jon gren Plant Ecology and Evolution Department of Ecology and Genetics, EBC Uppsala University Norbyvgen 18 D SE-752 36 Uppsala Sweden Jon gren via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:19
Integrative Arthropod Biologist University of Kentucky Department of Entomology http://bit.ly/1q6PQsf Position: Assistant Professor of Entomology, Integrative Arthropod Biology, twelve- month, tenure track appointment, research (80%), teaching (20%) Description: The Department of Entomology at the University of Kentucky is seeking a broadly trained entomologist or biologist who will develop an internationally recognized, externally funded research program that integrates evolutionary, ecological, physiological, molecular and/or genomic approaches to study arthropod biology. The Department is particularly interested in an integrative biologist in one of the following areas: pollinator biology and their role in ecosystem functioning, arthropod vectors of pathogens affecting human health, or invasion biology. The individual is expected to develop a program that complements and enhances existing research programs at the University of Kentucky. Additionally, the individual is expected to expand the integrated graduate research program within the Department. This position includes a 20% teaching responsibility. The individual will be expected to participate in undergraduate and graduate education, including developing a course in their area of expertise and mentoring graduate students. Qualified candidates will participate in the graduate training of students, whose interests vary from population management and organismal insect biology to molecular biology and genomics. Qualifications: The successful applicant must have a PhD in Entomology or related discipline with demonstrated experience and publications in integrative arthropod research. Post-doctoral research, potential as both an independent researcher and as a member of a multidisciplinary team, and teaching experience are highly desirable. Applicants should be familiar with integrated research techniques, including ecological, molecular, genomic, and statistical methods. Salary and Benefits: Salary commensurate with background and experience; overview of benefits: http://bit.ly/1zPNJTl Application Procedure: Applicants should submit a CV, list of publications with up to (5) selected reprints, names and addresses of four individuals who may be contacted for letters of reference, copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and an application letter describing background and expertise specifically related to this research/teaching position at the University of Kentucky. Applications must be submitted electronically to the Integrated Employment System at the University of Kentucky (copy and paste into browser) http://bit.ly/1q6PQsg Application Deadline: January 15, 2015 or until a suitable candidate is identified Date Position is Available: July 1, 2015 or as mutually agreed upon The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is an equal opportunity organization and welcomes applications from women and minorities. Dr. Charles W. Fox Professor and Director of Graduate Studies Department of Entomology University of Kentucky Lexington, KY 40546-0091 phone: 859-904-9404 e-mail: cfox@uky.edu web: www.uky.edu/~cfox Charles Fox via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:19
We encourage those with expertise in the evolution of plant-pollinator interactions, bee evolutionary biology, pollinator behavior, and the evolutionary ecology of native bee populations to apply for this position. *Assistant Professor, Pollinator Ecology* Position: Full-time, nine-month tenure-track faculty position with responsibilities for Research and Teaching, including advising graduate students, with a focus on pollinator-plant interactions, especially involving native bees. The successful applicant’s main responsibility will be to establish a prominent, externally-funded research program. In addition, the successful applicant will teach undergraduate and graduate courses, and participate in departmental, college, and university service activities. The position is jointly supported by the Department of Entomology, College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS), and the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, College of Biological Sciences (CBS), with tenure home negotiable. The position is located on the St. Paul Campus of the University of Minnesota. Responsibilities – Research: In response to national concern about declining bee pollinator populations, the successful candidate will develop an internationally recognized research program supported by external funding in pollinator ecology with an emphasis on the habitat, nesting, and foraging requirements, and surveys of native bee populations, in areas including Minnesota and the Upper Midwestern United States. Possible research topics include but are not limited to: enhancement of native bee populations and habitat in natural, agricultural and urban landscapes, integrated pollinator management, pollinator community ecology, impact of parasites and pathogens on native bee populations, pollination efficiency, floral specificity, and the ecology, evolution, and behavior of bee pollinators. Responsibilities – Teaching: The appointee is required to teach a course in pollinator ecology and a graduate-level course in their area of specialization. The use of innovative experiential learning and pedagogy is encouraged. Supervision of graduate students including those from culturally diverse backgrounds, student advising, and performance of University service are expected Inherent in faculty responsibilities is service to the department, college, and University, which may include serving on and/or chairing faculty committees, task forces, or development and implementation of university policies or programs. Qualifications - Required: • Ph.D. or equivalent degree in Entomology, Ecology, or related field by date of appointment. • Excellence in written and oral communication. • Research experience relevant to pollinator ecology, biology, and/or behavior. • Experience mentoring graduate or undergraduate students. • Research publication(s) in peer-reviewed journals. Qualifications – Desired: • Cross-disciplinary strengths in areas such as insect taxonomy, landscape ecology, behavioral ecology, conservation biology • Experience working in interdisciplinary teams including individuals from diverse backgrounds • Capacity and willingness to collaborate with state and federal agencies on issues related to pollinator protection - Evidence of success in obtaining extramural funding - Post-doctoral experience in pollinator biology and ecology - Demonstrated commitment to diversity and inclusion Salary and benefits: The tenure-track position will be filled at the rank of Assistant Professor with a full-time, nine-month (B-term) appointment in the Department of Entomology and/or the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior. Salary will be competitive and commensurate with professional experience and qualifications. Benefits include a competitive faculty retirement program, and group life, medical and dental insurance plans, disability benefits, sick leave, and sabbatical opportunities. Two months of summer salary for the first three (3) years will be covered. A competitive start-up package will be provided. Date Available: August 31, 2015 Application: Apply online to requisition number 194884 at http://bit.ly/1zPNLup, and attach CV, college-level transcripts, a statement of research and teaching interests, and future goals, along with the names and addresses of three references. Screening of applicant files will begin December 15, 2014. Any offer of employment is contingent upon the successful completion of a background check. Direct questions about the application process to: Felicia Christy Department of Entomology 218 Hodson Hall 1980 Folwell Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108 christy@umn.edu 612-624-3278 Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota: http://bit.ly/1q6PQs6 College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences: www.cfans.umn.edu For more information: Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior: http://bit.ly/1zPNJTf College of Biological Sciences: www.cbs.umn.edu As an institution committed to demonstrating excellence through diversity, the University of Minnesota is committed to hiring a diverse faculty and staff, and strongly encourage candidates from historically underrepresented groups to apply. Finalists will be expected to address their commitment and experience in working with diverse populations during the interview process. We welcome you to visit the CFANS Diversity and Inclusion web page at: http://bit.ly/1q6PRwhwww.cfans.umn.edu For more information: Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior: http://bit.ly/1zPNJTf College of Biological Sciences: www.cbs.umn.edu As an institution committed to demonstrating excellence through diversity, the University of Minnesota is committed to hiring a diverse faculty and staff, and strongly encourage candidates from historically underrepresented groups to apply. Finalists will be expected to address their commitment and experience in working with diverse populations during the interview process. We welcome you to visit the CFANS Diversity and Inclusion web page at: http://bit.ly/1q6PRwh David Moeller via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:03

Dear EvolDir, For a project on the population genetics of Dactylorhizamajalis, we are looking for samples of D. incarnata and D. maculata to use as references. Does anybody have samples of DNA or leaf material that he or she would be willing to share? Best regards, Ludo. Dr. Ludo A.H. Muller Freie Universitt Berlin Institut fr Biologie - Botanik Altensteinstrae 6 14195 Berlin Germany Tel. +49 (0)30 838 56539 Fax +49 (0)30 838 4 56539 E-mail: ludo.muller@fu-berlin.de Homepage: http://bit.ly/1to9qDS ludo_muller@yahoo.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR