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October 7, 2014

02:13

**PhD position: evolutionary ecology and physiology** A PhD position is available in the group of Matthew Hall at Monash University. We are looking for a highly motivated candidate with broad interests in evolutionary ecology and physiology. The successful application will be familiar with basic evolutionary concepts and have the capacity to develop their own interests using water fleas of the genus Daphnia as a study system. Projects related to the following areas will be particularly encourage: - The role of metabolic function in shaping organismal health - The evolutionary ecology of ageing and life-history - Local adaptation of ecological relevant traits **Scholarship details** The deadline for the current round of scholarships is 31st October 2014, but alternative funding is available for be outstanding candidate at anytime. Each PhD stipend is fully funded for a period of 3.5 years and is open to both Australian/NZ domestic and international students. **Monash and the School of Biological Sciences** Monash is a member of the Group of Eight, a coalition of top Australian universities recognized for their excellence in teaching and research. The School of Biological Sciences is a dynamic unit with key strengths in evolutionary ecology, physiology and genomics (http://bit.ly/1vLGYLS). The University is located in Melbourne, one of the most liveable cities in the world and a cultural and recreational hub. **Application process** Interested candidates should send an email outlining their research interests and motivation, together with a CV and academic transcript to matthew.hall@monash.edu. Applicants must possess a Bachelor’s or equivalent degree with first-class Honours, Master of Science or MPhil. Short-listed candidates will be asked for further information. For further information on the research group of Matthew Hall visit mattdhall.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:26
Curatorial/Research Associate Ornithology and Mammalogy Collections Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Cornell University The Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates (CUMV) is seeking an ornithologist or mammalogist to curate and grow the collections through an organized program of accession in-volving Cornell students in all aspects of museum-based activities. We are interested in a leader for all aspects of the program, from field collections through specimen preparation and curation, to use of the collections in modern specimen-based research. The successful candidate will curate the Ornithology and Mammalogy Collections (including co-supervision of a full-time collections manager) and maintain an active research program in collections-based research. The CUMV is a unit of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and is housed in the modern Imogene Powers Johnson Center for Birds and Biodiversity, along with the Lab of Ornithology and its 200 plus faculty and staff. The CUMV holdings include over 1.25 million specimens, including over 60,000 bird and 38,000 mammal specimens and a substantial tissue collection. The CUMV includes space for teaching, specimen preparation and molecular work; a walk-in freezer; X-ray lab; dermestarium; etc. Cornell supports a diverse community of faculty, staff and students pursuing an uncommonly large number of programs and projects in vertebrate biology, ecology and evolution. Qualifications: Applicants should have a Ph.D. in ornithology, mammalogy, or related area, have broad knowledge of birds and/or mammals, have experience working with natural history collections, and display an interest in interacting with students and the broader scientific communities at the Lab, Cornell and beyond. Inquiries are encouraged to either of the co-chairs of the search committee: Prof. David W. Winkler (dww4@cornell.edu) or Prof. Jeremy B. Searle (jbs295@cornell.edu). Please submit (as a single pdf file) a CV, a letter describing your vision for future collections-based research and education, and the names, phone numbers, and email addresses of three individuals who can serve as references to: curator_search@cornell.edu. Review of applications will begin 27 October 2014 and continue until the position is filled. Cornell University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Applications from women and minorities are encouraged. [Cornell University] John P. Friel, Ph.D. , Curator of Fishes, Amphibians & Reptiles Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, NY 14850-1923 USA Phone: +607.254.2162 | Fax: +607.254.2415 [email] [facebook] [Skype] [twitter] John Patrick Friel via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:09
Using long-term citizen science data to evaluate effects of wetland restorations on bird population dynamics We are looking for a postdoc who will model long-term data on bird population dynamics in Swedish wetlands using voluntarily reported data in the Swedish Species Gateway (i.e. citizen science data: http://bit.ly/1xZrVTk). You will investigate(i) the effects of different wetland restoration measures on wetland bird communities in different landscape types and wetland networks and (ii) spatio-temporal dynamics of wetland birds. Furthermore, you will organise and analyse an inventory study in 2015 to validate the citizen science data. You will be working in a group of researchers focused on using citizen science data for statistical modelling and testing general questions about biodiversity. Qualifications: Skills and experience in handling and analysing large data sets (such as citizen science data), hierarchical statistical modelling, and in scientific writing in English will be considered when assessing the applicant. Knowledge of wetland bird dynamics and conservation will be also be considered. Competence: A PhD in Ecology or Statistics (or equivalent). The degree has ideally been awarded at most three years before the application deadline. Place of work: Uppsala, Sweden Form of employment: Temporary employment 6 months or longer. The position is a one year employment with a possibility of extension for one more year. Extent: 100% Starting date: As soon as possible Application: We welcome your application marked with Ref no. SLU ua 3724/2014. Please submit your application to the Registrar of SLU, P.O. Box 7070, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden or registrator@slu.se no later than October 29, 2014. Specific documents attached: Specific documents to attach: Applications must contain (1) CV with full publication list, (2) a description of previous and present research including requested qualifications, (3) a statement of scientific interests as well as (4) contact information of three reference persons. The complete ad: http://bit.ly/1xZrYP5 Further information: Jonas Knape PhD +46(0) 18 673423 jonas.knape@slu.se Tomas Prt Professor +46(0) 18 672704 tomas.part@slu.se Tomas Prt via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:06

A 22-month post-doctoral position is available in the Institute for Ecology and Environmental Sciences and in the Center for Ecology and Conservation Sciences in Paris, France. The successful applicant will be part of a research project funded by the French Science Foundation (http://bit.ly/1s6o4BB, in French), which aims at assessing the role of within-crop genetic diversity to reinforce the resilience of cropping systems under global change. This project focuses on bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) and examines interactions among wheat varieties to optimize the performance of variety blends in terms of yield, grain quality, ecosystem services (biodiversity, nutrient cycling) and acceptability by stakeholders. The postdoctoral researcher will be part of Work Package 2 Impact of wheat variety blends on the functioning of agroecosystems and baskets of ecosystem services. He/she will coordinate a survey of soil invertebrates during the two main field experiments, planned for the spring and summer of 2015 and 2016. This includes sampling of soil fauna (above and below-ground, macrofauna and springtails), sample sorting and identification, as well as data analysis to study the relationship between wheat diversity and the structure of field invertebrate communities. Depending on his/her interests and expertise, he/she may also contribute to other parts of the project, such as the study of the relationship between wheat diversity and plant communities, or rate of biocontrol in the fields. The proposed start date is between January and February, 2015. The project is funded by the French Science Foundation (ANR) and funds are currently available to support this position for up to 22 months. An extension to 24 months and beyond is possible, depending on fund availability. The successful applicant will have a PhD and extensive experience with community ecology (concepts and data analysis), sampling and identification of soil invertebrates (earthworms, springtails, ground beetles, spiders), as well as good English writing skills. Applicants must first submit a curriculum vitae to Sbastien Barot (Sebastien.Barot@ird.fr) and Emmanuelle Porcher (porcher@mnhn.fr) by e-mail. Application review will begin October 15, 2014, and will continue until the position is filled. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:06

Citizen science project to do population genomics on an invasive butterfly needs help with crowd-funding http://bit.ly/1s6o4Bo Sean Ryan PhD Candidate Hellmann Lab 299A Galvin Life Sciences Center University of Notre Dame PH: (408) 391-5960 http://bit.ly/1rTpSLG sryan6@nd.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

October 6, 2014

22:41

Rob Lanfear wrote:

Hi All,

I'm wondering what software folks use for automatically aligning sequences and then manually editing those alignments on macs?

I know there's lots of software out there, but I'm wondering if there's something I've missed. In principle I like the offerings in Geneious (it includes various plug-ins for automated alignment, and a very serviceable manual editor), but the pricetag is a bit steep if that's all you want it for...

Cheers,

Rob

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22:00
Evolutionary and ecological immunology is a multi-disciplinary topic in evolutionary biology. Considerable empirical attention has been paid to identifying the costs of mounting an immune response, determining whether immunity is sexually dimorphic, and elucidating how immunity is related to the expression of sexually selected traits across a variety of taxa. There is, however, little consensus on whether current hypotheses and predictions are supported. It is unclear if general patterns exist within and differ across taxa. Our NESCent working group intends to address these issues in three ways: (1) perform taxonomically-broad, phylogenetic meta-analyses to assess the support for hypotheses and predictions and to identify alternative explanations and new hypothese; (2) modify existing life history models to derive quantitative predictions about the relationship between immune function and key life history traits; (3) construct an open-access, updatable online database to facilitate further analyses relevant to evolutionary immunology.
Source: NESCent
12:27

argriffing wrote:

I know some ways to compute this, but I wonder who has the best current implementation? This would just be a tool for methods development testing rather than for doing anything practical, for example it wouldn't estimate anything and it wouldn't need to know anything about biology.

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00:12

> This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible. —B_3495396793_14882824 Content-type: text/plain; charset=”US-ASCII” Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit The Veeramah Lab at Stony Brook (http://bit.ly/1vGcJX0) has an opening for a postdoctoral researcher to begin in January 2015 (earlier or later start dates may be negotiable). The position will primarily involve the analysis of 2nd generation sequencing data from primates using model-based quantitative frameworks within two specific research themes. The first will be using whole genome data from small pedigrees to examine mutation and recombination rate variation amongst different primate lineages. The second will be using ancient DNA from early Medieval European skeletons to infer the population demographic dynamics of the European migration period, with a particular emphasis on the Lombards. As well as primary research duties applicants will be expected to write papers, help in grant writing and train/mentor graduate students. The successful applicant should have or will shortly obtain a PhD in the areas of population, evolutionary or anthropological genetics, while at least some computer programming experience (particularly in python, equivalent or lower level languages) is required. Prior experience analyzing 2nd generation sequencing data, analyzing ancient DNA and/or modeling demographic scenarios with genetic data is desirable. Applications will be accepted until November 3rd 2014. Applicants should a submit a State employment application, cover letter, resume, two references and a one page research statement to: Dr. Krishna R. Veeramah Department of Ecology & Evolution Life Sciences Building, Room 650 Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY 11754-5245 The official posting and online application can be found at http://bit.ly/1vGcKKy 236e/32986ef9d10c3a9a85257d65004eaa31?OpenDocument. The official REF# is: WC-S-9227-14-10-S Queries regarding this position can be made by email to: krishna.veeramah@stonybrook.edu —B_3495396793_14882824 Content-type: text/html; charset=”US-ASCII” Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable

The Veeramah Lab at Stony Brook (http://bit.ly/1vGcJX0) has an opening for a postdoctoral researcher to begin in January 2015 (earlier or later start dates may be negotiable). The position will primarily involve the analysis of 2nd generation sequencing data from primates using model-based quantitative frameworks within two specific research themes. The first will be using whole genome data from small pedigrees to examine mutation and recombination rate variation amongst different primate lineages. The second will be using ancient DNA from early Medieval European skeletons to infer the population demographic dynamics of the European migration period, with a particular emphasis on the Lombards. As well as primary research duties applicants will be expected to write papers, help in grant writing and train/mentor graduate students.The successful applicant should have or will shortly obtain a PhD in the areas of population, evolutionary or anthropological genetics, while at least some computer programming experience (particularly in python, equivalent or lower level languages) is required. Prior experience analyzing 2nd generation sequencing data, analyzing ancient DNA and/or modeling demographic scenarios with genetic data is desirable. Applications will be accepted until November 3rd 2014. Applicants should a submit a State employment application, cover letter, resume, two references and a one page research statement to:Dr. Krishna R. VeeramahDepartment of Ecology & EvolutionLife Sciences Building, Room 650Stony Brook UniversityStony Brook, NY 11754-5245The official posting and online application can be found at http://bit.ly/1xUHgEy. The official REF# is: WC-S-9227-14-10-SQueries regarding this position can be made by email to: krishna.veeramah@stonybrook.edu —B_3495396793_1488282 via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:12
PhD position: Disentangling the drivers of invasive alien trees in East Africa An exciting PhD position is available at Stellenbosch University’s Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology (C*I*B, http://bit.ly/1vGcJWR). The C*I*B is a world-leading research centre in the field of biological invasions. The proposed project forms part of a multi-national research initiative between European and African partners. The overarching goal of the research project is to help to mitigate the effects of invasive alien trees on biodiversity, ecosystem services and human well-being in East Africa. We are seeking a creative and motivated student who wishes to carry out original research in the field of invasion biology, with a strong evolutionary focus. The PhD project is specifically aimed at understanding the drivers of alien tree invaders (Prosopis species) in East Africa and to relate species traits and habitat characteristics to invasions in East African biodiversity hotspots. The PhD candidate will determine the incidence and extent of hybridization between Prosopis species in various East African countries, assess genotype X environment interactions in these areas, assess how genotypic identity and/or incidence of hybridization links with habitat suitability, map Prosopis invasions in East African forest reserves to determine the effects of reserve isolation, proximity to propagule sources, and edge effects on invasion extent. The student will be based at Stellenbosch University (http://bit.ly/1vGcKKs) but will spent substantial periods of time in East Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania) to conduct field research and interact with other consortium members at various host institutions. The project is suitable for students interested in environmental management, GIS, and population ecology, population genetics and/or evolutionary biology. Applicants should hold an MSc degree in one or more of the following fields: Ecology, Botany, Evolutionary biology or Population genetics. Preference will be given to individuals with demonstrated skills in one or more of these fields and an excellent academic track record (grades, publications in international journals, etc.). Successful candidates will be fully funded for 3.5 years, for full time research, with no teaching requirements. An attractive annual stipend will be offered, along with additional expenses for research, international travel and subsistence and conference attendance. Individuals of all nationalities are eligible. To apply, please send a CV, academic transcript, contact details for at least two academic references, and a brief outline of research interests to Dr. Jaco Le Roux (jleroux@sun.ac.za) and Prof. Brian van Wilgen (bvanwilgen@sun.ac.za) by 30 November 2014. Informal inquiries are welcome. Review of applications will begin immediately, and short-listed candidates will be contacted to set up phone/Skype interviews. The envisaged start date for the project would be March/April 2015. The integrity and confidentiality of this email is governed by these terms / Hierdie terme bepaal die integriteit en vertroulikheid van hierdie epos. http://bit.ly/1xUHgoc “Le Roux, JJ, Dr " via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:12

The Kawahara Lab at the University of Florida, Florida Museum of Natural History is accepting one graduate student (M.S. or Ph.D.) for the fall of 2015. Research in the Kawahara Lab focuses on integrating many approaches, including phylogenomics, behavior, functional genomics, and biodiversity informatics to test hypotheses pertaining to the evolution of insects, especially Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths). Recent projects have focused on utilizing genome scale data to resolve phylogenetic relationships of Lepidoptera, study evolution of hawkmoth bat ultrasound interactions, and the diversification and evolution of Hawaiian leaf miners. The team regularly travels to conduct fieldwork in remote areas of Hawaii, Borneo, Central Africa, and the Amazon. The lab is seeking a highly motivated candidate with interests in bioinformatics, evolution, genomics, and systematics. Applicants should be proficient at writing and speaking English and enjoy working with a team of researchers. A master’s degree is desired but not required. We are located in the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity on the University of Florida (UF) campus. University of Florida is one of the nation’s leading research institutions with 35,000 undergraduates, 15,000 graduate students, and over 4,500 faculty and academic staff. UF offers all resources of a top research university to study insect evolution, behavior, and genomics. In addition to the Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH), Florida State Collection of Arthropods (FSCA), and collections and molecular sequencing lab of the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, UF is equipped with the High-Performance Computing Center (HPC) and a state-of-the-art next-generation genome sequencing facility at the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research (ICBR). Students can be co-advised through many departments at UF, such as the Department of Biology, Department of Entomology and Nematology, School of Natural Resources and Environment, Department of W ildlife Ecology and Conservation, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, among others. The selected candidate will join a team of 3 postdocs, 5 graduate students (1 M.S., 4 Ph.D.), a lab manager, technician, undergraduate and high school students. The candidate will also have the opportunity to work and interact closely with students in other lab groups at the McGuire Center. Further information can be found on the lab website: http://bit.ly/1vGcKKi Interested candidates should contact Akito Kawahara at kawahara at flmnh.ufl.edu with a C.V. and a short paragraph explaining his or her research interests and why they would like to join the group. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

October 5, 2014

22:00
Studies characterizing the composition of host-associated (mostly human) microbiota under different conditions, such as healthy or diseased state, age progression, contrasting diets, etc. have skyrocketed in the past 5 years. There is a growing recognition that host-associated, especially the gut-associated microbiota influences host metabolism, immune responses and overall wellbeing. Understanding how the community of gut microbes evolved and functions requires applying ecological and evolutionary principles. We propose to bring together evolutionary biologists, community ecologists, microbial ecologists and medical microbiologists to develop a synthesis of the existing studies and a roadmap to move the field forward. In particular, we aim to determine what evolutionary and ecological principles can be applied to the existing data and what new data need to be gathered to increase our understanding of the biotic interactions among the gut microbes and the host. To move from describing patterns to understanding the processes, we need to develop novel mechanistic frameworks. Eco-evolutionary trait-based approaches can be a useful framework to understand the role of competitive, mutualistic and other interactions in structuring microbiota and regulating functioning. So far, there has been little interaction across relevant disciplines and this may hinder our progress in understanding the microbiota-host interactions. This meeting will help break the disciplinary barriers, establish new collaborations and achieve synergy in the analysis and synthesis of the ecology and evolution of the host-associated microbiota.
Source: NESCent
16:30

There is a tolerably well-known exercise for illustrating the graphical superiority of a Non-Metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) ordination over a Principal Components Analysis (PCS) ordination. The latter is often subject to distortions, so that the relative positions in the scatter-plot of points do not represent the original measured distances between those points (see the post Distortions and artifacts in Principal Components Analysis analysis of genome data). The exercise consists of using the geographical distances between locations on a map as the input distances to the analyses. The NMDS ordination will re-create the map quite accurately while the PCA ordination will usually not do so.

Some time ago I had the idea of doing this same exercise using a data-display network. Unfortunately, I was beaten to it by Barbara Holland (2013. The rise of statistical phylogenetics. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Statistics 55: 205-220). I will go ahead, anyway, disappointed though I am.

I have chosen the Ukraine as my map. The road distances between 25 of the cities were taken from Ukraine Connections (the same data occur on several other sites, as well).


The geographical data were processed in SplitsTree to produce both a Neighbor-Joining tree and a NeighborNet network.



If these techniques are to be effective as data displays, then the positions of the cities in the line graphs should be approximately the same as those in the map. This is, indeed, roughly so, although I had to spend some time manually adjusting the branch angles in the tree (for the best match). The two graphs are more rectangular in overall shape than is the Ukraine, which is somewhat closer to a square, but the relative locations of the points in the graphs do tell you where to look for the cities on the map.

However, the network is the better of the two representations on two grounds. First, the points are constrained to certain locations, and do not need manual adjustment. Second, the network more accurately gives a sense that these are road distances, and there are multiple roads from one city to another — the tree incorrectly implies that there is only one way to get between the cities.

00:03
—_000_FF1D4D841D5E47DDBDADDF65403757ADcornelledu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Curatorial/Research Associate Ornithology and Mammalogy Collections Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Cornell University The Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates (CUMV) is seeking an ornithologist or mammalogist to curate and grow the collections through an organized program of accession involving Cornell students in all aspects of museum-based activities. We are interested in a leader for all aspects of the program, from field collections through specimen preparation and curation, to use of the collections in modern specimen-based research. The successful candidate will curate the Ornithology and Mammalogy Collections (including co-supervision of a full-time collections manager) and maintain an active research program in collections-based research. The CUMV is a unit of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and is housed in the modern Imogene Powers Johnson Center for Birds and Biodiversity, along with the Lab of Ornithology and its 200 plus faculty and staff. The CUMV holdings include over 1.25 million specimens, including over 60,000 bird and 38,000 mammal specimens and a substantial tissue collection. The CUMV includes space for teaching, specimen preparation and molecular work; a walk-in freezer, X-ray lab, dermestarium, etc. Cornell supports a diverse community of faculty, staff and students pursuing an uncommonly large number of programs and projects in vertebrate biology, ecology and evolution. Qualifications: Applicants should have a Ph.D. in ornithology, mammalogy, or related area, have broad knowledge of birds and/or mammals, have experience working with natural history collections, and display an interest in interacting with students and the broader scientific communities at the Lab, Cornell and beyond. Inquiries are encouraged to either of the co-chairs of the search committee: Prof. David W. Winkler (dww4@cornell.edu) or Prof. Jeremy B. Searle (jbs295@cornell.edu). Please send a CV, three letters of reference and a letter describing your vision for future collections-based research and education to: Curator Search, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. Review of applications will begin 20 October 2014 and continue until the position is filled. Cornell University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Applications from women and minorities are encouraged. —_000_FF1D4D841D5E47DDBDADDF65403757ADcornelledu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Curatorial/Research Associate
Ornithology and Mammalogy Collections
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Cornell University

The Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates (CUMV) is seeking an ornithologist or mammalogist to curate and grow the collections through an organized program of accession involving Cornell students in all aspects of museum-based activities. We are interested in a leader for all aspects of the program, from field collections through specimen preparation and curation, to use of the collections in modern specimen-based research. The successful candidate will curate the Ornithology and Mammalogy Collections (including co-supervision of a full-time collections manager) and maintain an active research program in collections-based research.

The CUMV is a unit of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and is housed in the modern Imogene Powers Johnson Center for Birds and Biodiversity, along with the Lab of Ornithology and its 200 plus faculty and staff. The CUMV holdings include over 1.25 million specimens, including over 60,000 bird and 38,000 mammal specimens and a substantial tissue collection. The CUMV includes space for teaching, specimen preparation and molecular work; a walk-in freezer, X-ray lab, dermestarium, etc. Cornell supports a diverse community of faculty, staff and students pursuing an uncommonly large number of programs and projects in vertebrate biology, ecology and evolution.

Qualifications: Applicants should have a Ph.D. in ornithology, mammalogy, or related area, have broad knowledge of birds and/or mammals, have experience working with natural history collections, and display an interest in interacting with students and the broader scientific communities at the Lab, Cornell and beyond.

Inquiries are encouraged to either of the co-chairs of the search committee: Prof. David W. Winkler (dww4@cornell.edu) or Prof. Jeremy B. Searle (jbs295@cornell.edu). Please send a CV, three letters of reference and a letter describing your vision for future collections-based research and education to: Curator Search, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. Review of applications will begin 20 October 2014 and continue until the position is filled.

Cornell University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.
Applications from women and minorities are encouraged.
—_000_FF1D4D841D5E47DDBDADDF65403757ADcornelledu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:03

PhD opportunity - *Microbial diversity and its role in the resilience of large brown seaweeds* A PhD position focusing on interactions between brown seaweeds (Cystoseira, Fucus) in the Mediterranean Sea and associated microbial communities is currently being advertised. The grant concerns a joint PhD position between the University of Bologna (Laura Airoldi) and Ghent University (Olivier De Clerck) in the framework of the Mares programme. More information on the subject and application procedure can be found at: http://bit.ly/1nV5Thp Feel free to contact Laura Airoldi (laura.airoldi@unibo.it) or myself (olivier.declerck@ugent.be) for additional information. Kind regards, Olivier De Clerck Laura Airoldi Olivier De Clerck Onderzoeksgroep Algologie, UGent. Krijgslaan 281, S8, 9000 Gent; Belgium [lokaal 130.046] Tel -32-9-2648500 http://bit.ly/19FFqfP http://on.fb.me/19FFqfQ odclerck@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

October 4, 2014

04:29
Reminder - two weeks left before the deadline! A link to the add and the online application forms can be found here: http://bit.ly/1rKc0Dr Postdoctoral research fellow in ancient DNA and evolutionary genomics of Viking Age plants and animals Applications are invited for a two-year position as a postdoctoral research fellow in the field of ancient DNA and evolutionary genomics of Viking Age plants and animals at the Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Oslo. The Postdoctoral fellow will be part of the team working on the project $B!H(BTracking Viking-assisted dispersal of biodiversity using ancient DNA$B!I(B funded by the Norwegian Research Council. Project description The primary objective of this project is to investigate how Viking trade and agriculture have shaped the genomic composition of plants and animals, and increase our understanding of the evolutionary heritage left in contemporary varieties. We focus on species of profound agricultural, cultural and industrial importance (horse, flax and barley) for which excellent genomic tools have recently been developed. In this project we have access to unique samples from different countries that will be analyzed using whole genome, high-throughput sequencing approaches. The successful applicant will join a multi-disciplinary, international team that brings together experts from the fields of biology, archaeology and palaeontology. Furthermore, this project forms a close collaboration between the CEES, the Natural History Museum (NHM) and the Museum of Cultural History (KHM) at the University of Oslo. Requirements Applicants must hold a PhD-degree (or other corresponding education equivalent to a Norwegian doctoral degree) with a background within population genomics, evolutionary genomics and/or ancient DNA research. The candidate should be able to document strong analytical skills and experience in the laboratory. Experience with ancient DNA, analytical or experimental, will be an advantage. The candidate will work in close collaboration with the rest of the team at CEES, NHM and KHM, as well as our national and international partners (Denmark and Great Britain) within this project. Some time will be spent visiting the collaborating partners overseas. We seek a highly motivated, enthusiastic person with the ambition to gain insight and publish papers in leading, international journals, and in possession of good interpersonal skills and willing to work in close collaboration with others. The Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences has a strategic ambition of being a leading research faculty. Candidates for these fellowships will be selected in accordance with this, and expected to be in the upper segment of their class with respect to academic credentials. Please also refer to the regulations pertaining to the conditions of employment for post-doctoral fellowship positions. Language A good command of English is required. Salary (applicable for the University of Oslo) Pay Grade: 57-65 (NOK 482 800 -559 600 per year, depending on qualifications) The application must include: Application letter including a statement of interest, briefly summarizing your scientific work and interests, and a personal assessment focusing on how you fit the description of the person we seek A brief (1 A4) project plan for the research to be undertaken CV (summarizing education, positions, pedagogical experience, administrative experience and other qualifying activities) Copies of educational certificates and transcript of records A complete list of publications and unpublished works, and up to 5 academic work that applicant wishes to be considered by the evaluation committee Names and contact details of 2-3 references (name, relation to candidate, e-mail and telephone number) Foreign applicants are advised to attach an explanation of their University$B!G(Bs grading system. Please remember that all documents should be in English or a Scandinavian language. The University of Oslo has an agreement for all employees aiming to secure rights to research results a.o.: In accordance with the University of Oslo$B!G(Bs equal opportunities policy, we invite applications from all interested individuals regardless of gender or ethnicity. Application deadline: 17 October 2014 Expected Start Date: 1 April 2015 Reference number: 2014/10577 Contacts: Dr Sanne Boessenkool (sanne.boessenkool@ibv.uio.no), Dr Anneleen Kool (anneleen.kool@nhm.uio.no) Sanne Boessenkool via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
04:29
Dear friends of NESCent, I wanted to bring your attention to additional calls for proposals. Please help us spread the word among your societies, lists, and newsletters. Cheers Craig CATALYSIS MEETINGS Proposals for Catalysis Meetings in Evolutionary Medicine are now being accepted at The National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). We are looking to support innovative approaches to outstanding problems, specifically in areas realted to evolutionary medicine. Appropriate areas of inquiry include any field of evolutionary science that is relevant to medicine, or to human or animal health. Examples include, but are not limited to, evolution of infectious or zoonotic disease, evolutionary issues in global health, evolution of aging, evolution of fertility, autoimmune disease and allergy, evolutionary perspectives on cancer, and evolution of disease-relevant micro-organisms. Proposals that have a clear interdisciplinary focus, and involve evolutionary concepts in any health- or disease-related area, are strongly encouraged, as are proposals that demonstrate international participation and a mix of senior and emerging researchers, including graduate students. Deadline for proposals is Nov 1, 2014. All meetings must be completed by Sep 30, 2015. For more information, please see our website at http://bit.ly/1rKc0Dd GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS for NC GRADUATE STUDENTS Proposals for 1-semester Graduate Fellowships in fields related to Evolutionary Medicine are now being accepted at The National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). We are looking to support innovative approaches to outstanding problems in any field of evolutionary science that is relevant to medicine, or to human or animal health. Examples include, but are not limited to, evolution of infectious or zoonotic disease, evolutionary issues in global health, evolution of aging, evolution of fertility, autoimmune disease and allergy, evolutionary perspectives on cancer, and evolution of disease-relevant micro-organisms. Eligible students are those at any North Carolina academic institution with an accredited graduate program in a relevant field; students may remain resident at their home institution during the fellowship, or travel to another institution. Evidence of engagement, during the fellowship, with other activities relevant to evolutionary or comparative medicine in NC will be viewed positively. The deadlines is Nov 1 (for the spring semester 2015 fellowship), Feb 1 (for the summer semester 2015 fellowship) and Apr 1 (for the fall semester 2015fellowship). For more information, please see our website http://bit.ly/1rKc0De Craig R. McClain, Ph.D. Assistant Director of Science National Evolutionary Synthesis Center 2024 W. Main St. Suite A200, Box 104403 Durham, NC 27705 919-668-4590, cmcclain@nescent.org Assoc. Editor for Proceedings of the Royal Society, B http://bit.ly/1rKc0Df Chief Editor for Deep-Sea News: http://bit.ly/1ovcnTI National Evolutionary Synthesis Center: http://bit.ly/1epDrIk Research Homepage: http://bit.ly/1qTxNHt McClain Craig via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:54

The Edinburgh Alliance for Complex Trait Genetics, E-ACTG will run its seventh meeting, sponsored by the Genetics Society, on Friday 31st October 2014 at the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 22-26 George Street, EH2 2PQ. Programme below. The event is free. Anyone wanting to attend should sign up at http://bit.ly/1vw3A2G by 24th October (or earlier if the meeting room reaches capacity). Josephine Pemberton & Chris Haley, University of Edinburgh *** 13.00 Arrival, registration, coffee and biscuits 13.30 Gail Davies (Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh) General cognitive function: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE Consortium (N = 53 949) 14.00 Doug Speed (UCL Genetics Institute, London) Gene-based association testing and other fun things to do with heritability analysis. 14.30 Eileen Wall (SRUC, Edinburgh) Genetic improvement options for reducing of greenhouse gas emissions from ruminant production systems. 15.00 Santosh Atanur (Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Edinburgh) Genome sequencing reveals loci under artificial selection in laboratory rats. 15.30 Tea 16.00 Jacob Moorad (Institute of Evolutionary Biology, Edinburgh) Indirect genetic effects on post-reproductive lifespan in humans. 16.30 Heather Cordell (Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University) Comparison of family-based association tests in complex genetic diseases: Application to a Brazilian family study of visceral leishmaniasis. 17.00 Peter Joshi (Centre for Population Health Sciences, Edinburgh) Inbreeding depression for complex traits in humans. 17.30 Discussion and refreshments *** Prof. J.M. Pemberton Institute of Evolutionary Biology University of Edinburgh West Mains Road EH9 3JT Tel: 0131 650 5505 Fax: 0131 650 6564 Web: http://bit.ly/1goFwKR via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:54
Research Scientist/Engineer III Position in STEM Education Research at University of Washington The Department of Biology has an exciting opportunity for a Research Scientist/Engineer 3, working on issues in STEM education research. This is a full-time, 11-month per year position, to begin as early as November 2014 and continuing for up to five years, working on a Howard Hughes Medical Institute-funded initiative to design and implement authentic research experiences in UW Biologys introductory course sequence, based on experimental evolution in E. coli. The research scientist will develop, test, and assess the experimental evolution systems use in the introductory biology series (Biology 180, 200, 220), including setting up training protocols to build student expertise in reading the primary literature, lab safety, proper use of equipment, maintenance of lab notebooks, data acquisition and analysis, and scientific communication. The research scientist will work closely with course staff and with upper-division undergraduates who will serve as mentors for the introductory students. Requirements Candidates should have1) completed a PhD in evolutionary biology in the last three years, 2) proficiency with bioinformatics and an array of molecular biology techniques, 3) excellent organizational, interpersonal, and communication skills, and 4) a demonstrated interest in innovative teaching and discipline-based education research. English fluency is required. Post-doctoral research experience and expertise in project management and course design will be considered an asset. To apply Applicants must apply through the University of Washingtons Hiring System (http://bit.ly/1vw3x6Z) in response to Requisition #111509. In addition to your resume or curriculum vita (entered directly into the system), please also submit an application letter, statement of research interests, statement of teaching philosophy, and contact information for three references when prompted to complete the assessments. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled. Dr. Scott Freeman, Principal Lecturer Department of Biology, Box 355320 University of Washington Seattle WA 98115 USA Scott Freeman via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:38

Postdoc in Evolutionary Genomics UC Berkeley An evolutionary genomics postdoc position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Erica Bree Rosenblum at UC Berkeley. The postdoc will join a dynamic research group and will be affiliated with the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, the UC Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, and the Berkeley Initiative for Global Change Biology. The postdoc will contribute to several funded projects in the lab that use genomic tools to address fundamental questions about the processes that generate and threaten biological diversity. The specific research focus will be finalized in collaboration with the successful applicant, but the core projects will relate to the genomics of rapid adaptive evolution and the genomics of wildlife disease. From a methodological standpoint, the postdoc will be involved in the analysis and synthesis of genome-scale datasets, with a particular emphasis on analysis of RAD, RNAseq, and exon capture datasets. The postdoc will also share res ponsibility for day-to-day lab operations including laboratory administration, regulatory compliance, and mentoring undergraduate researchers. Ideal start-date would be January 2015, but there may be enough flexibility to accommodate an earlier or later start-date. Salary will be commensurate with current NIH guidelines. More information about research activities in the Rosenblum Lab is available at http://bit.ly/YZSubD. Minimum qualifications include a Ph.D. in Biology, Computer Science, Molecular Biology or a related field. Demonstrated experience in computational or ecological genomics is essential including a track record of successful project coordination, data analysis, and manuscript preparation. A strong background in bioinformatics, proficiency coding, and basic molecular wet-lab skills are desired. Ability to communicate clearly, work independently, and interact collaboratively is essential. If interested, please send a CV, a letter of interest, and the contact information for three references to rosenblum@berkeley.edu by October 24, 2014. The letter of interest should be no more than 2 pages and address prior experience, current interests, career goals, and fit for the position. Please also indicate your ideal start-date. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR