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July 4, 2014

03:06

PhD studentship Topic: Comparative life history and plant demography. Supervisors: Owen Jones and Johan Dahlgren We are seeking a PhD candidate to work on plant population biology, life history, and the demography of aging. These are fundamental topics in theoretical evolutionary biology and ecology but also have broad applications in population management and conservation biology. The project will involve comparative analyses of population matrix models, field data collection and analysis within ongoing long-term individual-based demographic studies, and laboratory work to collect anatomical and herb-chronological data. The successful candidate will have an interest in life history evolution and plant population biology, and an excellent academic record with an undergraduate and/or master’s degree in biological sciences, ecology, or related field. An interest in quantitative methods, including statistical modelling or population matrix modelling is essential. Experience of biological fieldwork and lab work, and knowledge of plant anatomy, is desirable. The position will ideally start on 1st September 2014. It will provide experience and training in cutting edge quantitative methods (including matrix and integral projection modelling and phylogenetic comparative methods), field and laboratory methods, and evolutionary demography. This fully-funded position is based at the Max-Planck Odense Center on the Biodemography of Aging (MaxO) and Department of Biology at the University of Southern Denmark in the vibrant city of Odense in Denmark. To apply, send a CV and cover letter in PDF format to both Owen Jones (jones@biology.sdu.dk) and Johan Dahlgren (dahlgren@biology.sdu.dk). We encourage interested parties to contact us informally if they require more information. Application deadline August 1st 2014. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:42
PhD contract, Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona, Spain), Evolutionary Genomics and Systems Biology. The group of Evolutionary Biology in the Experimental Sciences and Health Department of the Pompeu Fabra University offers one PhD scholarship in the field of Evolutionary Genomics. Selected candidate will have the opportunity to develop novel research lines that will contribute to the understanding of the biology of genomes at evolutionary, molecular and biomedical level. The successful candidate would work on integrating different bioinformatic tools for the identification of network structures of genes and metabolic pathways under selective forces. Our group offers an unusual and highly formative research frame, in which leading edge computational resources and experimental laboratory facilities are combined to achieve our research goals (www.prbb.org). Required are a strong motivation to pursue a PhD in evolutionary biology, particular priority will be given to candidates with background on bioinformatics. Programming and general computational skills are highly desirable, but all candidates will be considered. More information about our group and projects can be found here: http://bit.ly/1rstPIT If you are interestwww.prbb.org). Required are a strong motivation to pursue a PhD in evolutionary biology, particular priority will be given to candidates with background on bioinformatics. Programming and general computational skills are highly desirable, but all candidates will be considered. More information about our group and projects can be found here: http://bit.ly/1rstPIT If you are interested, please send your CV, a letter detailing your interests and the contact details of two referees to Jaume.bertranpetit@upf.edu or Hafid.laayouni@upf.edu Hafid Laayouni Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (UPF-CSIC) Parc de Recerca Biomdica de Barcelona (PRBB) Carrer del Doctor Aigader, 88. 08003 Barcelona Spain Tel. (34) 93-316-0845. “LAAYOUNI EL ALAOUI, HAFID” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:57
—7ZAtKRhVyVSsbBD2 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Disposition: inline Wanted: Master’s Students Location: Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi http://bit.ly/1mZ4dk2 Project Subject: Developing Tools to Analyze and Simulate Population Genomic Data Details: I’m looking for students that are quantitatively and computationally focused and interested in population genetics and evolution. Ongoing projects in our lab are focused on the effects of natural and anthropogenic selection on the evolution and adaptability of marine populations. Our study subjects are primarily marine invertebrates and fish, and we have a mountain of RADseq data from the Hawaiian Archipelago and the Gulf of Mexico. Required Qualifications: Students must have a 3.0 GPA and must have taken the general GRE exam. Support: Students would be supported by a TAship that currently pays $1200/mo. Out of state tuition can be waived, but in state tuition cannot and amounts to ~$3000 per semester. The HoBi Lab http://on.fb.me/1xq3oUw Our laboratory has two co-PIs, myself (Chris Bird) and Derek Hogan and is located in the Harte Research Institute http://bit.ly/1xq3oUz . We advocate and facilitate a collaborative and collegial lab atmosphere, and by combining our labs, we increase the level of intellectual capital and expertise on-hand. The HoBi Lab presently has one PostDoc, four PhD students and three Masters students. We share a large genetic laboratory and manage the Core Genomics Lab at Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi. Our lab is equipped with several Linux workstations (2 x Xeon Processors, 128-256gb of ram, etc), we have a small High Performance Computing Cluster on campus (48 nodes), and we have access to several off campus super computers through the Texas A&M system. If you are interested, please send me a CV, a copy of your undergraduate transcripts (unofficial is fine), and your GRE scores. Dr. Chris Bird Assistant Professor chris.bird@tamucc.edu “Bird, Chris” —7ZAtKRhVyVSsbBD2 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Disposition: inline Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Source: EVOLDIR
01:57
Final Call to Apply for the Tree-for-All: A hackathon to access OpenTree$B!G(Bs global phylogeny resources. A global $B!H(Btree of life$B!I(B will transform biological research in a broad range of disciplines from ecology to bioengineering. To help facilitate that transformation, the OpenTree project [1] now provides online access to >4000 published phylogenies, and a newly generated tree covering more than 2.5 million species. The next step is to build tools to enable the community to use these resources. To meet this aim, OpenTree , Arbor [2] and NESCent$B!G(Bs HIP working groups [3] are staging a week-long hackathon September 15 to 19 at U. Michigan, Ann Arbor. Participants in this $B!H(BTree-for-all$B!I(B will work in small teams to develop tools that use OpenTree$B!G(Bs web services to extract, annotate, or add data in ways useful to the community. Teams also may focus on testing, expanding and documenting the web services. How could a global phylogeny be useful in your research or teaching? What other data from OpenTree would be valuable? How could OpenTree web services be integrated into familiar workflows and analysis tools? How could we add to the database of published trees, or enrich it with annotations? If you can imagine using these resources, and you have the skills to work collaboratively to turn those ideas into products (as a coder, or working side-by-side with coders), we invite you to apply for the hackathon. The full call for participation (http://bit.ly/1ioPPMc) provides instructions for how to apply, and how to share your ideas with potential teammates (strongly encouraged prior to applying). Applications are due July 8th. Travel support is provided. Women and underrepresented minorities are especially encouraged to apply. If you have questions, contact Karen Cranston (karen.cranston@nescent.org, @kcranstn, OpenTree), Arlin Stoltzfus (arlin@umd.edu, HIP), Julie Allen ( juliema@illinois.edu, HIP), or Luke Harmon (lukeh@uidaho.edu, Arbor). [1] http://bit.ly/1kl5xbg [2] http://bit.ly/1piGFbR [3] http://bit.ly/1kl5wDY (Hackathons, Interoperability, Phylogenies) Julie Allen Postdoctoral Researcher Illinois Natural History Survey University of Illinois www.juliamallen.com julieallen34@gmail.com via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:36

iEOS2014 to be held in Liverpool, UK in week starting 15th September 2014 Deadline for registration and abstracts 28th July http://bit.ly/1otHQCy Conference Organiser: Professor F. Falciani (Chair in Integrative Systems Biology) The aim of this conference is to bring together researchers and organisations from a range of disciplines with shared interests in the development of new approaches for data handling, generation and analysis in environmental omics. Science areas of interest include bioinformatics, DNA-barcoding, genomics, metagenomics, metabarcoding, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, epigenetics, evolutionary and ecological omics, phylogenetics, study of ancient DNA and anthropology, new tools, resources and training, and beyond as applied to the study of the natural environmental and environmentally relevant organisms and systems. It is our hope is that the resulting interaction and exchange of ideas will lead to novel approaches, new collaborations and the establishment of a wider integrated Omic community. EOS and this conference is supported by Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) through its Mathematics and Informatics for Environmental Omics Data Synthesis program and the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) Global Challenges programme. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:36

As series of workshops in the area of environmental omics, including applications to population genomics, will be held at the University of Liverpool in September. NERC Biomolecular Analysis Facility (NBAF) technology workshops (Metagenomics, population genomics, metabolomics and RNAseq) Application of the Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework in Environmental Risk Assessment Biological Mechanisms and Time Series Analyses http://bit.ly/1otHQmg A series of hands-on informatics workshops have been organised that are linked to iEOS2014 and targeted at Environmental Omics users of different levels of experience. Draft outlines of these workshops can be found at the address above. To apply for a place on any of the workshops, please select the relevant workshop when registering. Places will be confirmed when registration closes and payment will be required only once your place is confirmed. There will be minimal additional costs associated with trainer fees and catering (teas/coffees/lunches) during the workshops, which are payable in addition to your registration cost. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:28

Research Assistant/Associate in Genomic Microbiology at Imperial College London This position has become available within the MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling at Imperial College London. The MRC Centre has built upon a world-leading research group in the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at Imperial College London to undertake applied collaborative work with national and international agencies in support of policy planning for emerging and endemic infectious diseases. The successful candidate will be a member of both the Centre and the Department, and will be based at the St Mary’s Campus, Paddington. The purpose of this post is to develop statistical and computational methods to perform genome-wide association mapping in bacteria. Important biomedical properties often vary within a bacterial species, for example antibiotic resistance, virulence, host-specificity or tissue-specificity. The genetic basis for these variations is not often fully understood by microbiologists, but this question can be approached computationally by comparing the genome sequences of bacteria with different properties. Working closely with Dr Xavier Didelot, the post-holder will develop the methodology required to perform such analysis and create a new software tool which will be applicable by microbial researchers around the world. To be valid, the new methods will need to account for the specificity of bacterial evolutionary process, especially in terms of recombination, genetic content and population structure. Thorough testing of the software will be performed using simulated datasets, as well as real existing collections of several hundreds of genomes of two major enteric pathogens, Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni. The successful applicant must have an MSc (for appointment to Research Assistant) or a PhD (for appointment to Research Associate) or equivalent in one of the following areas: mathematics, statistics, computer science, infectious disease epidemiology or population biology. They will also have research experience of programming in at least one high level language and experience of working with genetic sequence data. The post is full time for a fixed term from 1st September 2014 to 31st August 2016. For informal enquiries please contact Dr Xavier Didelot (x.didelot@imperial.ac.uk). For the full job description, person specification and application process, see http://bit.ly/VHiR5k via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

July 3, 2014

23:20

POSTDOC POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS / COMPARATIVE GENOMICS (Lyon, France) A 18 months post-doc position is available in the Department of Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics of the Biometry and Evolutionary Biology laboratory (LBBE, CNRS/University Lyon I), France. Research themes in the lab are focused on multiscale evolutionary questions (from molecules to communities), with strong emphasis on modeling and computer science (http://bit.ly/1p55kOZ). This double angle results in a synergy between methodological developments and biological questions. The post-doc will work with Pr Cline Brochier-Armanet (http://bit.ly/1p55lCH) in the Bioinformatics and Evolutionary Genomics team. The proposed project is part of a large study combining in silico and wet experimental work focused on the biosynthesis of atypical lipids in Bacteria. The candidate will play a key role in this project in conducting comparative genomics and molecular phylogenetic investigations aiming at deciphering the biosynthesis pathways of these atypical lipids, as well as their origin and evolution in Bacteria. The post-doc position will start on November 1st, 2014, for a 18 months period. The position is funded by the French Research National Agency. Candidates should have: - a PhD in biology/biochemistry or in bioinformatics - a good knowledge in bioinformatics and genomics - programming skills - a real interest/knowledge in evolutionary biology To apply, please send to Pr Cline Brochier-Armanet (celine.brochier-armanet@univ-lyon1.fr): 1. An application letter including research interests and goals, and suitability for the proposed research project. 2. A full CV. 3. Names and contact information of two potential academic contacts. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
13:38

Trevor Bedford wrote:

Andreas Wagner has a new paper on analyzing influenza sequence data using a super simple Hamming-distance network-based approach.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov A genotype network reveals homoplastic cycles of convergent evolution in influenza A (H3N2) haemagglutinin. A Wagner, Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, Jul 7 2014

Networks of evolving genotypes can be constructed from the worldwide time-resolved genotyping of pathogens like influenza viruses. Such genotype networks are graphs where neighbouring vertices (viral strains) differ in a single nucleotide or amino acid. A rich trove of network analysis methods can help understand the evolutionary dynamics reflected in the structure of these networks. Here, I analyse a genotype network comprising hundreds of influenza A (H3N2) haemagglutinin genes. The network is rife with cycles that reflect non-random parallel or convergent (homoplastic) evolution. These cycles also show patterns of sequence change characteristic for strong and local evolutionary constraints, positive selection and mutation-limited evolution. Such cycles would not be visible on a phylogenetic tree, illustrating that genotype network analysis can complement phylogenetic analyses. The network also shows a distinct modular or community structure that reflects temporal more than spatial proximity of viral strains, where lowly connected bridge strains connect different modules. These and other organizational patterns illustrate that genotype networks can help us study evolution in action at an unprecedented level of resolution.

He ends up with plots like:

network.png2096x1348 425 KB

Fundamentally non-phylogenetic, this approach doesn't try to reconstruct evolutionary history, but instead shows a simple overview of genetic relationships. Andreas suggests that these graphs make it easy to detect convergent evolution that would not be apparent in the strictly branching tree.

I don't have a good intuition for how these sorts of graphs translate to trees and vice versa. Does this seem like it's a useful addition to constructing a tree or more of a distraction?

Posts: 3

Participants: 2

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01:37
We are looking for candidates to apply for an FCT (Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology) doctoral fellowship to join us at the Centre for Functional Ecology (cfe.uc.pt) of the Department of Life Sciences of the University of Coimbra (Portugal). The successful candidate will be expected to develop his/her research within the framework of the European project ReproWeed, which will investigate evolution and adaptation of the invasive weed *Centaurea solstitialis* across broad biogeographical ranges. The research involves laboratory and field-based work and involves the interaction with an international network of collaborators from California, Chile, Argentina, Australia, Turkey and Spain. The candidate should have a good scientific background, with an interest into reproductive and evolutionary ecology of invasive weeds. A good knowledge of the English language and of ecological statistics is highly desirable. Candidates should be Portuguese, European, or permanent residents, and comply with the conditions to be a candidate for the FCT Doctoral Grants (BD; see previous year conditions at: http://bit.ly/VgqMGv). The doctoral fellowship includes a monthly payment of 980 euros (tax-free), plus an accident insurance and a monthly contribution to the Portuguese Social Security system (full healthcare and retirement, but no unemployment benefits). The scholarship is renewable for up to four years, at the end of which the candidate is expected to defend his or her PhD. dissertation thesis. A call for fellowship applications will open during July and be open until the end of September 2014 (http://bit.ly/VgqPC8), but *contacts should be made before July 18, at 6pm *Greenwich time. Interested candidates should send a one page cover letter describing their research interests and experience, a CV (explicitly including average scores for B.Sc. and/or M.Sc.), and the contact information for up to two referees to Daniel Montesinos (daniel.montesinos@uc.pt). Informal inquiries are welcome. More information about the group and the project can be found here: http://bit.ly/1s1mddK http://bit.ly/VgqMWI http://bit.ly/1s1mb5x Daniel Montesinos Centre for Functional Ecology DCV - FCTUC - Universidade de Coimbra Calada Martim de Freitas 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal T: (+351) 239 855 238 (ext. 139) http://bit.ly/VgqMWK Daniel Montesinos via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:13
The David Starr Jordan Prize For Innovative Contributions to the Study of Evolution, Ecology, Population and Organismal Biology In 1986, Cornell, Indiana and Stanford Universities established a joint endowment to fund a prize in honor of David Starr Jordan, a scientist, educator and institution builder, who had enormous influence on higher education in the United States and important ties to each of these universities. The prize is international in scope and presented approximately every three years to a young scientist (not over the age of 40 at the deadline for nomination, or if over 40, less than 10 years since receiving the Ph.D.). The intent of this prize is to recognize young scientists who are making novel innovative contributions in one or more areas of Jordan’s interest: evolution, ecology, population and organismal biology, and who are likely to redirect the principal foci of their fields. In addition to a $20,000 cash award, the recipient will receive a commemorative medal, will attend an awards ceremony, visit each of the sponsoring institutions and give scholarly presentations of his/her work. The selection of the prize winner will be made by a committee composed of representatives from each of the three institutions. This year the award ceremony will be held at Indiana University. Nominations forms are posted on the David Starr Jordan Prize Website (http://bit.ly/1mVZX4z). Nomination forms with supporting materials should be submitted electronically. Questions should be directed to: Dee Verostko Indiana University Department of Biology 1001 E. Third Street, JH 127 Bloomington, IN 47405 (812-855-6283 - FAX 812-855-6705 - email dverostk@indiana.edu All nomination materials must be received prior to September 15, 2014. For more information including a list of previous prize winners and their accomplishments, visit: http://bit.ly/1mVZX4z “Tarter, Jennifer A” via Gmail
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01:13
Postdoctoral Positions Available: Research Associate Arizona Research Laboratories, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ NIH-Training Program: Postdoctoral Excellence in Research and Teaching (PERT) The Postdoctoral Excellence in Research and Teaching (PERT) Program is a comprehensive program which offers up to three years of support to outstanding candidates seeking advanced postdoctoral research training, teacher training and student mentorship opportunities in preparation for an academic career in biomedical and life sciences. Funded by NIGMS through an IRACDA (Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Award) training grant, the PERT program also fosters ties between research-intensive institutions and minority-serving institutions. PERT trainees may select from over thirty-six faculty research mentors at the University of Arizona, representing a broad range of disciplines in biomedicine, bioengineering, genetics, biochemistry, neurobiology, evolutionary biology, molecular/cellular biology, physiology and behavior. The program stresses the use of model organisms for biomedical and life sciences research. The program is administered through the Arizona Research Laboratories Center for Insect Science and is partnered with a Minority Serving Institution, Pima Community College, (http://bit.ly/1xkzrFs. Starting salary is based on the NIH NRSA scale. An annual allowance for research supplies and travel is also included. Positions are dependent upon continued funding. Additional information about the Center for Insect Science and the PERT program is available at http://bit.ly/1xkztgy. Qualifications: Applicants must have, as of the beginning date of the appointment, a Ph.D. in a related field from an accredited institution and must be U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or non-citizen nationals. Applicants should have no more than two previous years of postdoctoral experience at the time of application. Application: All applicants must apply electronically through the University of Arizona’s Career Track website at: http://bit.ly/1mVZX4x. The job number is 55765. Deadline for receipt of applications is 8:00am, Tuesday, September 2, 2014. All applications are to include: - a letter of interest with a statement explaining how the PERT program will assist the applicant in his/her research and career goals. - a CV - a three to six page research proposal developed with the intended PERT faculty research mentor describing the project to be undertaken during the training period - three letters of reference - a letter of support from the intended faculty research mentor Potential applicants are encouraged to contact relevant Program Faculty as soon as possible to discuss research projects and the application process. Original letters of reference and the letter from the proposed faculty research mentor should be mailed to: PERT, Center for Insect Science, 1007 E. Lowell Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0106. Emailed letters will be accepted only if accompanied by an electronic signature. The letter of interest, CV and research proposal must be submitted online through the UA Career Track website listed above. As an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer, the University of Arizona recognizes the power of a diverse community and encourages applications from individuals with varied experiences and backgrounds. Please contact Teresa Kudrna for more information, tkudrna@email.arizona.edu, 520-621-9310. Teresa A. Kudrna Program Coordinator, Sr. Center for Insect Science & PERT Program University of Arizona 1007 E. Lowell Street, Room 227 Tucson, AZ 85721 520-621-9310 Fax: 520-621-2590 http://bit.ly/1xkztgB “Kudrna, Teresa A - (tkudrna)” via Gmail
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00:49
Dear colleagues, Id be grateful if you could please help me spread the call for a short survey below, as well as take it yourself. Kind regards, rob Moving countries early on in the academic career of ecologists and evolutionary biologists seems to have become a common practice but at what costs? and for what benefits? To address these questions, a survey has been created for ecologists and evolutionary biologists. The survey contains 24 short questions, and it will take you approx. 4 mins, should you decide to take it. http://bit.ly/1kgRRPh This project aims to quantify the frequency with which early-career ecologists and evolutionary biologist move countries compared to more senior individuals, as well as the perceived benefits and costs of doing so. This is a completely voluntary survey, and no personal information (e.g. email, ID) will be collected. The information collected will be used to provide summary statistics on early career moves for a short note to be submitted to a peer-review journal. Many thanks for considering and disseminating it! Rob Salguero-Gomez, PhD ARC DECRA fellow r.salguero@uq.edu.au University of Queensland, Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science Goddard (Building #8), St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia Office phone: +61 7 3365 1376 This study adheres to the Guidelines of the ethical review process of The University of Queensland and the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. Whilst you are free to discuss your participation in this study with project staff (contactable on +61 7 3365 1376 or r.salguero@uq.edu.au), if you would like to speak to an officer of the University not involved in the study, you may contact the Ethics Coordinator on +61 7 3365 3924. Q: Why is the text above (likely) 5 sentences?A: http://bit.ly/Vgjh2d “Aliud iter ad prosperitatem nos est: id est omnibus rebus vincere” Rob Salguero-Gmez, PhD Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow; Research Fellow of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Contact info and more: http://bit.ly/1kgRUL0 Roberto Salguero-Gomez via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:05
Position in population genomics We seek a postdoctoral researcher or a PhD student to fill a position in the Department of Evolutionary Genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig. The researcher will work on a collaborative project focusing on the analysis of genome-wide diversity data to assess the patterns of local adaptation in populations of humans and other primates. The project will take advantage of several new genome-wide datasets from primate populations and species. We are seeking a creative and highly motivated individual with prime interest in population genomics. Candidates should have a background in evolutionary genetics, population genetics, genomics, bioinformatics, computational biology, statistics, or related disciplines. The ideal candidate will have experience in at least one of the areas above, and a strong interest in the others. Previous work in population genetics/genomics (theoretical or analytical), experience with large-scale databases, and strong programming skills are a plus but not required. The Department of Evolutionary Genetics in the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology is a lively, stimulating, and highly collaborative place at the front of primate evolutionary genomics. The Institute is very international and English speaking. It is located in Leipzig, a nice and affordable city of 500,000 habitants that is the capital and major cultural center of German Saxony (two hours away from Berlin and three from Prague). To apply send, in PDF format, a cover letter, your CV, and the contact information of at least 2 potential referees to Aida Andrs at aida_andres@eva.mpg.de or to Sergi Castellano sergi_castellano@eva.mpg.de. Informal inquiries can be sent to the same addresses. For further information visit the webpages of our groups: http://bit.ly/VGXBNl http://bit.ly/1lBfbXL aida Aida Andrs, PhD Group Leader, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Deutscher Platz 6 04103 Leipzig, Germany Phone: +49 341 3550 507 Fax: +49 341 3550 555 aida.andres@eva.mpg.de http://bit.ly/VGXBNl Aida Andres via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:05

Collection Manager, Insects - Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, USA APPLICATIONS DUE: JULY 15, 2014 (you must use the online application system for the “Collection Manager, Insects” to apply: http://bit.ly/1ocG1Nr) The Collection Manager is involved in all aspects of care and maintenance of the Field Museum insect collection and collaborates with Curators in management of the collection. This position will also interact with the FMNH Action and Integrative Research Centers, as well as Education and Exhibits. This position will have the opportunity to conduct research to a very limited extent. Responsibilities - Preparation, identification, care and organization of specimens (and associated material) - Training and supervision of staff and volunteers in their collection related duties - Provide assistance to visitors in their use of collection, and processing recently collected material, as well as outgoing and incoming specimen loans, loan recalls and loan returns - Maintain records relevant to the collection (KE EMu catalog, loan invoices, accession files, field notes) - Provide the public and professional contacts with information they need from the collection (including digitizing specimens) - Develop grant proposals for collections improvements and liaise with Federal and State authorities and other Entomology collectors and researchers - Monitor and maintain collection supplies and equipment - Incorporate new material into collection including sorting and ID-ing, preparing specimens, cataloguing, labeling and installation Qualifications - Masters in Biology (with an emphasis in Entomology) with at least 3 year’s collection experience; PhD. (with an emphasis in Entomology) desirable - A well versed background in Entomology is required, including familiarity with other Entomology collections and researchers - Knowledge of taxonomic principles, and Entomology collection management - Strong organizational skills necessary to keep collection accessible - Familiarity with personal computers, and collection databases - Knowledge of international and domestic regulations for shipment of alcohol-preserved specimens - Supervisory skills necessary for directing collection personnel - Digitization skills highly desirable Apply online for the “Collection Manager, Insects” position: http://bit.ly/1ocG1Nr Corrie Saux Moreau, Ph.D. MacArthur Associate Curator - Insects Integrative Research Center Department of Science and Education Field Museum of Natural History 1400 South Lake Shore Drive Chicago, IL 60605 USA Office: (312) 665-7743 Fax: (312) 665-7754 Email: cmoreau@fieldmuseum.org Moreau Lab website: www.moreaulab.org FMNH website: http://bit.ly/1dLvYse Field Museum Women in Science: http://bit.ly/1oxWQ1Kwww.moreaulab.org FMNH website: http://bit.ly/1dLvYse Field Museum Women in Science: http://bit.ly/1oxWQ1K cmoreau@fieldmuseum.org via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:05
We seek to appoint a highly-motivated Post-Doctoral Research Associate to work on ERC and MRC funded research projects relating to the genetics & genomics of mosquito vectors of human disease, within the Department of Life Sciences at the South Kensington Campus of Imperial College London You will join the laboratories of Dr Nikolai Windbichler and Dr Mara Lawniczak. Our research involves the use of cutting-edge molecular genetics and genomics to understand and ultimately control the mosquito vectors of human disease. Projects in our groups include trait mapping using genome wide association studies, developing synthetic gene networks, and the design and the development of selfish genetic elements. The successful candidate will design and conduct experiments to investigate the role of candidate genes involved in vector-parasite interactions and in the genetic basis of hybrid incompatibilities between different mosquito species. You will be responsible for producing independent and original research, analysing results and submitting publications to refereed journals. You might also assist with some teaching and administration within the research group. You must have a PhD (or equivalent) in Biology or be in the process of being awarded your PhD. Expertise in functional genetics and interest in vector genetics, a strong background in molecular biology and genetics, excellent laboratory practice, strong technical skills and a proven track record in the publication of research articles are essential. You must also have a good knowledge of computational methods for gene design and manipulation as well as biological databases. Prior experience working with flies or mosquitos would be advantageous. You must have excellent verbal and written communication skills and be able to write clearly and succinctly for publication. You must be also have a creative approach to resolve and overcome scientific problems, the ability to develop and apply new concepts and prioritise your work in response to deadlines. The ability to conduct a detailed review of recent literature and to organise your work with minimal supervision are essential. This is a full time post available for up to two years in the first instance. Salary 32,750 - 41,540 per annum For informal enquiries please contact us at n.windbichler@imperial.ac.uk m.lawniczak@imperial.ac.uk “Lawniczak, Mara K N” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:05
SMBE 2015 will be held in Vienna (July 12th-16): reserve the date to enjoy the unique combination of exciting science and a spectacular venue-a former royal residence in the heart of Vienna. Stay tuned at: http://smbe2015.at Preview: September 2014 call for symposia December 2014 call for abstracts Christian Schltterer Institut fr Populationsgenetik Vetmeduni Vienna Veterinrplatz 1 1210 Wien Austria/Europe phone: +43-1-25077-4300 fax: +43-1-25077-4390 http://bit.ly/QNzHfP Vienna Graduate School of Population Genetics http://bit.ly/1eUheEt SMBE 2015 in Vienna http://smbe2015.at schlotc@gmail.com via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

July 2, 2014

18:00
Background: To understand the processes that generate biodiversity, it is important to account for large-scale processes that affect the evolutionary history of groups of co-distributed populations of organisms. Such events predict temporally clustered divergences times, a pattern that can be estimated using genetic data from co-distributed species. I introduce a new approximate-Bayesian method for comparative phylogeographical model-choice that estimates the temporal distribution of divergences across taxa from multi-locus DNA sequence data. The model is an extension of that implemented in msBayes. Results: By reparameterizing the model, introducing more flexible priors on demographic and divergence-time parameters, and implementing a non-parametric Dirichlet-process prior over divergence models, I improved the robustness, accuracy, and power of the method for estimating shared evolutionary history across taxa. Conclusions: The results demonstrate the improved performance of the new method is due to (1) more appropriate priors on divergence-time and demographic parameters that avoid prohibitively small marginal likelihoods for models with more divergence events, and (2) the Dirichlet-process providing a flexible prior on divergence histories that does not strongly disfavor models with intermediate numbers of divergence events. The new method yields more robust estimates of posterior uncertainty, and thus greatly reduces the tendency of the model to incorrectly estimate models of shared evolutionary history with strong support.
18:00
Background: The relationship between allopolyploidy and plant virus resistance is poorly understood. To determine the relationship of plant evolutionary history and basal virus resistance, a panel of Nicotiana species from diverse geographic regions and ploidy levels was assessed for resistance to non-coevolved viruses from the genus Nepovirus, family Secoviridae. The heritability of resistance was tested in a panel of synthetic allopolyploids. Leaves of different positions on each inoculated plant were tested for virus presence and a subset of plants was re-inoculated and assessed for systemic recovery. Results: Depending on the host-virus combination, plants displayed immunity, susceptibility or intermediate levels of resistance. Synthetic allopolyploids showed an incompletely dominant resistance phenotype and manifested systemic recovery. Plant ploidy was weakly negatively correlated with virus resistance in Nicotiana species, but this trend did not hold when synthetic allopolyploids were taken into account. Furthermore, a relationship between resistance and geographical origin was observed. Conclusion: The gradients of resistance and virulence corresponded to a modified matching allele model of resistance. Intermediate resistance responses of allopolyploids corresponded with a model of multi-allelic additive resistance. The variable virus resistance of extant allopolyploids suggested that selection-based mechanisms surpass ploidy with respect to evolution of basal resistance to viruses.
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I recently wrote a manuscript comparing the tree-likeness of phylogenetic data in biology and anthropology (see Are phylogenetic patterns the same in anthropology and biology?). While doing so, I also made a comparison of genotype and phenotype data within biology.

The comparison is based on maximum-parsimony analyses of the data, using the (ensemble) Retention Index (RI) as the measure of tree-likeness. If RI = 1 then all of the characters are compatible with the same tree, whereas if RI = 0 then none of them are pairwise compatible. As the graph shows, the genotype data are considerably less tree-like than are the phenotype data (mean RI ≈ 0.5 versus 0.7, respectively).

It would be interesting to know whether other people have observed this pattern. If it is general, then what causes it? Are the phenotype characters being chosen (subconsciously or not) because they show nested grouping patterns (which lend themselves automatically to a tree representation)? Or do the genotype data inherently have more stochastic variation? Does this mean that we should always be using phylogenetic networks for the representation of genotype data?


You can read the manuscript if you want the details of the analyses. Briefly, the initial collections of datasets were taken from Collard et al. (Evolution and Human Behavior 27: 169-184; 2006) — the graphed data are taken from the paper as I never managed to get the original datasets from the authors. I then supplemented this information with phenotype datasets from TreeBase (total of n=31) and miscellaneous genotype datasets from the literature (n=15). All of the datasets refer to vertebrates and insects (with one phenotype dataset from spiders). My parsimony analyses used the parsimony ratchet and PAUP*.