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October 19, 2014

22:00
We are puzzled by a recent comment that suggested that historical hypotheses can be tested but are unfalsifiable. We argue that phylogenetic hypotheses are falsifiable without the aid of a time machine and that they are like any other hypothesis: they are tentative knowledge propositions capable of falsification with character evidence.
Source: Cladistics
22:00
Bees have evolved durable relationships with a diverse set of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. These microbial communities comprise beneficial and detrimental symbionts and their composition is likely a key determinant for the health status of the host. Furthermore, based on existing data, social bee species seem to harbor more consistent and specific communities than non-social ones, indicating that bees could represent suitable models to study the evolution of host-microbe interactions given different degrees of host sociality. High-throughput sequencing technologies allow us to acquire vast amounts of sequencing data (metagenomics) from the microbial communities of different bee populations, synthesize the results and obtain comprehensive patterns of microbe-host webs. To make this possible, metagenomic sequence data produced by different laboratories need to be consistently analyzed and archived allowing integration and subsequent exploitation by scientists from different research areas, such as bee pathology, microbial ecology, and evolution. The aim of the proposed meeting will be to gather an interdisciplinary group of scientists working on different aspects of bee science, including microbiologists, epidemiologists, evolutionists and computer scientists. This group will (i) define the most burning questions regarding bee microbiome interactions and the effect of the environment on its composition, (ii) identify an appropriate strategy to address these questions, including the design of tools such as a dedicated database, (iii) discuss future collaborative efforts to fund the proposed research.
Source: NESCent
16:30

Some time ago I wrote a blog post about The bourbon family forest, which contained a collection of trees that, rather than being genealogical trees, instead showed the corporate ownership of American whiskey.

Here is a similar arrangement for "the six companies that make 50% of the world's beer", produced by David Yanofsky at the Quartz blog. As before, the vertical axis is actually a time scale, but the trees are only marginally family trees in the genealogical sense. Note that there is a reticulation between two of the trees for the "Scottish & Newcastle" entry, although this was apparently followed immediately by a subsequent divergence.


Nevertheless, roughly the same sort of information could actually be presented as proper genealogies. Here is an example form Philip Howard's blog, restricted to American beer. Note that the genealogies refer to the joining of branches through time, rather than their splitting. There are two reticulation events, one of which also refers to the "Scottish & Newcastle" entry.


It is also worth noting the use of other types of network by Philip Howard, to look at:

October 18, 2014

23:26
Postdoctoral position on Phenotypic Plasticity, Dept. Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore A postdoctoral position is available in the lab of Antnia Monteiro to study the origin and evolution of phenotypic plasticity in butterfly wing patterns. The project will involve comparative hormone titer quantification and gene expression quantification (transcriptomics) across butterfly species, followed by functional validation of candidate genes/hormones in a subset of species. The position is for three years and can start immediately. Salary will be competitive and commensurate with experience. Candidates with demonstrated interests in phenotypic plasticity, and with experience in comparative transcriptomics and in handling NGS data, are especially welcome to apply. Experience in the use of phylogenies for hypothesis testing is also valued. The Department of Biological Sciences (http://bit.ly/1yObB8r) offers world-class research labs and infrastructure and a convivial and collaborative environment. Singapore is a lush, green city offering tropical weather year around, a diversity of food, and nearby exotic locations. Interested applicants should contact Antnia Monteiro (antonia.monteiro@nus.edu.sg) with a CV, a statement of research interests, and the names of three references. Relevant publications: Oliver JC , X Tong, LF Gall, WH Piel, and A Monteiro (2012). A single origin for butterfly eyespots followed by widespread loss of associated gene expression. PloS Genetics 8:8 e1002893. Prudic KL, C Jeon, H Cao, and A Monteiro (2011) Developmental plasticity in sexual roles drives mutual sexual ornamentation. Science 331:73-75. Brakefield PM, J Gates, D Keys, F Kesbeke, P and S Carroll (1996) Development, plasticity, and evolution of butterfly eyespot patterns. Nature 384: 236-242. Antnia Monteiro Associate Professor Department of Biological Sciences National University of Singapore 14 Science Drive 4 Singapore 117543 and, Associate Professor Yale-NUS-College 6 College Avenue East Singapore 138614 web-page: http://bit.ly/1pg0RIr Antnia Monteiro via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
18:00
Background: Duplication and subsequent neofunctionalization of the teleostean hatching enzyme gene occurred in the common ancestor of Euteleostei and Otocephala, producing two genes belonging to different phylogenetic clades (clades I and II). In euteleosts, the clade I enzyme inherited the activity of the ancestral enzyme of swelling the egg envelope by cleavage of the N-terminal region of egg envelope proteins. The clade II enzyme gained two specific cleavage sites, N-ZPd and mid-ZPd but lost the ancestral activity. Thus, euteleostean clade II enzymes assumed a new function; solubilization of the egg envelope by the cooperative action with clade I enzyme. However, in Otocephala, the clade II gene was lost during evolution. Consequently, in a late group of Otocephala, only the clade I enzyme is present to swell the egg envelope. We evaluated the egg envelope digestion properties of clade I and II enzymes in Gonorynchiformes, an early diverging group of Otocephala, using milkfish, and compared their digestion with those of other fishes. Finally, we propose a hypothesis the neofunctionalization process. Results: The milkfish clade II enzyme cleaved N-ZPd but not mid-ZPd, and did not cause solubilization of the egg envelope. We conclude that neofunctionalization is incomplete in the otocephalan clade II enzymes. Comparison of clade I and clade II enzyme characteristics implies that the specificity of the clade II enzymes gradually changed during evolution after the duplication event, and that a change in substrate was required for the addition of the mid-ZPd site and loss of activity at the N-terminal region. Conclusions: We infer the process of neofunctionalization of the clade II enzyme after duplication of the gene. The ancestral clade II gene gained N-ZPd cleavage activity in the common ancestral lineage of the Euteleostei and Otocephala. Subsequently, acquisition of cleavage activity at the mid-ZPd site and loss of cleavage activity in the N-terminal region occurred during the evolution of Euteleostei, but not of Otocephala. The clade II enzyme provides an example of the development of a neofunctional gene for which the substrate, the egg envelope protein, has adapted to a gradual change in the specificity of the corresponding enzyme.
02:35

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:35
Postdoctoral position at the University of São Paulo (USP) A 2-year postdoctoral fellowship is available starting in November 2014 as part of a FAPESP grant (http://bit.ly/1rMiYEi) to study systematics and biogeography of Hydrozoa from Patagonia and Antarctica. The position is open to Brazilians and foreigners. The opportunity is inserted in the thematic project with the aim to investigate the dimensions of marine life, transversally, through the search of patterns and processes in many biological levels, and in questions related to time and space in different scales. Specifically to this position, the fellow should develop the work in the subproject “Systematics and biogeography of Hydrozoa from Patagonia and Antarctica”. The specific postdoctoral project focuses on the “Areas of endemism of benthic hydroids from the subantarctic and Antarctic regions, and the influence of their mechanisms of dispersal in marine biogeographic patterns”. The aim is to survey hypotheses of areas of endemism for subantarctic and Antarctic benthic hydroids through the use of parsimony and optimization methods in biogeography, contrasting the patterns found with different strategies of life cycle in Hydrozoa. 1. Applications The application is exclusively via e-mail, with documentation sent in pdf format addressed to Antonio Carlos Marques (marques@ib.usp.br), lead of the FAPESP grant, up to November 20th 2014, 24:00, Brasília time. 2. Qualifications a) PhD in Zoology, or equivalent area; b) PhD completed in the previous 2 years, maximum; c) To have the PhD diploma, certification of the PhD dissertation defense, or equivalent document; d) Curriculum vitae demonstrating that the candidate is able to develop the project based on previous experiences; e) Applicants should have a track record of peer-reviewed publications, or articles in press, in the area or in the taxonomic main group of the project; f) Applicants should have a track experience in marine biogeography, areas of endemism, morphology and taxonomy of the group to be studied (benthic hydrozoans, particularly the subclasses Leptothecata and “Anthoathecata”), and in biogeographic methods (ecological and historical) of recognition of areas of endemism (since the constitution of the dataset until the interpretation of the analyses results); g) It is necessary to be fluent in English and knowledge of Spanish is a plus; h) Applicants should have experience in the use of software of construction and edition of data matrices (NEXUS, Mesquite, Winclada, MacClade), cladistic analyses by parsimony (PAUP, TNT), construction and edition of trees (Figtree, Mesquite, WinClada, MacClade, TreeView) and maps (ArcGis e Diva-GIS), besides the optimization software NDM-VNDM. h) Applicants should have experience in performing and interpret analyses of search of areas of endemism through the methods of Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity (PAE) and optimization through the Endemicity Analysis (EA), besides the comparison on the differences between the results and performances of both methods; i) The approved candidate should dedicate himself/herself entirely and exclusively to the project activities; j) The approved candidate should not maintain employment or statutory relationship during the project validity; k) The approved candidate should not be retired; l) The approved candidate should have experience of internship abroad of minimum 9 (nine) months; m) The approved candidate should be available to initiate activities related to the project as soon as your application is approved by FAPESP; n) The approved candidate must have the ability to organize research tasks independently; o) The approved candidate must have the ability to coordinate classes and discussions at the level of postgraduate in the field of marine biogeography or systematics, and to help in the supervision of undergraduate and graduate students. 3. Documentation For application, the applicant should submit by e-mail in PDF document: (a) an updated Curriculum vitae, (b) two letters of recommendation of professionals from the area, (c) a brief statement (maximum 2 pages) of work experience and motivations concerning the postdoctoral position. 4. Selective process The selection of the applicants will be held in two stages: (a) analysis of the documentation received by e-mail, (b) evaluation of the CV of the qualified candidates. 5. Results The result will be e-mailed from November 21th 2014. 6. Fellowship The approved candidate will receive a FAPESP postdoctoral fellowship in the value of R$ 6,143.40/month (approx. US$2,528.00/month) for 24 months, plus a technical reserve and an installation aid. The technical reserve of the postdoctoral fellowship is of 15% of the annual value of the fellowship, and has the aim to cover the unexpected expenses directly related to the research activity. In case the postdoctoral fellow student lives in a different place from the institution location, and needs to move to the city where the institution is located, he/she might be right to an installation aid. Additional information on the FAPESP postdoctoral fellowship is available at http://bit.ly/1vIyAQW. 7. The beginning of the activities The approved candidate should initiate his/her activities as soon as your application is approved by FAPESP. 8. General provisions Omissions in this announcement will be decided by the lead of the FAPESP grant, safeguarding the rules established by FAPESP. Thank you for your attention. Best wishes, Antonio C. Marques Professor of Zoology Curriculum Vitae Director, Centro de Biologia Marinha (CEBIMar) Universidade de Sao Paulo www.usp.br/cbm Phone (CEBIMar): (55 12) 3862 8422 E-mail: cebimar@usp.br Editor of Zootaxa for Cnidaria Hydrozoa http://bit.ly/1rMiYEn Mail address: Depto Zoologia, Instituto de Biociencias Universidade de Sao Paulo Rwww.usp.br/cbm Phone (CEBIMar): (55 12) 3862 8422 E-mail: cebimar@usp.br Editor of Zootaxa for Cnidaria Hydrozoa http://bit.ly/1rMiYEn Mail address: Depto Zoologia, Instituto de Biociencias Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua Matao, Trav. 14, 101, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, Brazil Phone (Zoologia): (55 11) 30917530 Fax: (55 11) 30917802 Antonio Carlos Marques via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:19
BSPB 2015 Early Announcement The 2015 British Society For Protist Biology Spring Meeting will be held between 15-17th April 2015 at the University of Huddersfield. The conference will host two mini-symposia – Experimental Evolution in Protists and The Evolution of Multicellularity – as well as sessions for posters, student talks and contributed talks. A limited number of student bursaries will be allocated to Society members who are presenting at the conference and will be offered on a first come-first served basis. Registration will open on the 15th January 2015. The following speakers will be presenting in the symposia: Experimental Evolution In Protists Will Ratcliff (Georgia Tech) - Plenary Mike Brockhurst (York) Duncan Cameron (Sheffield) Ville Friman (Imperial) Oliver Kaltz (Montpellier) Kai Lohbeck (Kiel) Chris Lowe (Exeter) Peter O’Toole (York) Evolution of Multicellularity Iñaki Ruiz-Trillo (Barcelona) - Plenary Mark Cock (Roscoff) Frank Nitsche (Cologne) Daniel Richter (Roscoff) Pauline Schaap (Dundee) BSPB Meeting Webpage: http://bit.ly/1uk6m9n Martin Carr MartCarr74@gmail.com Martin Carr via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:04
WSU$B!G(Bs School of Biological Sciences has a strong research group in evolutionary biology; Microbial ecology applicants with an evolutionary emphasis are welcome. FACULTY POSITION IN MICROBIAL ECOLOGY The School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University invites applications for a nine-month, full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professorship in Microbial Ecology at WSU$B!G(Bs Vancouver Campus. We especially encourage applications from scientists who employ modern bioinformatic or genomic approaches to understand the ecology of microorganisms that mediate ecosystem services or interact with various anthropogenic stressors such as global change, contaminant loading, land use change, resource exploitation, or biological invasions. Washington State University is a multi-campus, Tier I research institution with a commitment to research, graduate, and undergraduate training, instruction, and extension. The School of Biological Sciences is comprised of 51 faculty distributed over three WSU campuses with routine interaction across campuses. WSU Vancouver offers competitive salaries and start-up packages, and research expectations and teaching loads are consistent across the four WSU campuses. WSU Vancouver is a rapidly growing campus (currently ~3,200), with science and engineering as areas of emphasis. WSU Vancouver is located on a beautiful 351-acre campus across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon, offering numerous opportunities for research and collaboration with a variety of nearby institutions (e.g. the USGS Cascades Volcanoes Observatory, USFS Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland State University, Oregon Health Sciences University), and an excellent quality of life. For additional information on WSU Vancouver see http://bit.ly/11IPYsi. For additional information on WSU Vancouver-based faculty and research programs see http://bit.ly/1y1OdRx. Requirements: 1) PhD in microbiology, ecology, or a related discipline by Dec. 31, 2014, 2) Successful, externally-funded research program in microbial ecology or demonstrated potential to develop such a program, 3) Strong publication record relative to career stage, 4) Demonstrated ability or potential to mentor graduate students and direct graduate research, 5) Demonstrated ability to develop and teach undergraduate and graduate courses that complement the existing curriculum, 6) Ability to serve under-represented groups and to contribute to WSU$B!G(Bs diversity goals in research, teaching, mentoring, and/or service (http://bit.ly/11IQ17x). Preferred candidates will also 1) apply modern bioinformatic or genomic approaches to elucidate microbial ecology, 2) ability to complement existing research strengths and collaborate in the College of Arts and Sciences on the Vancouver Campus and across the WSU system. Duties: Establish and maintain an externally-funded research program and a strong publication record, teach undergraduate and graduate courses in microbial ecology and other areas of expertise, mentor undergraduate and graduate students, provide academic service, and contribute to WSU diversity goals. Application: Upload electronic copies of the following to position 109061 at http://bit.ly/1y1Od45: 1) A cover letter discussing training and experience as related to each of the 6 required and 2 preferred qualifications, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) a statement of teaching philosophy and interests, 4) A summary of research accomplishments and plans for future research, 5) A statement of ability or potential to contribute to WSU$B!G(Bs diversity goals, 6) Copies of 2 publications, and 6) three letters of reference. For full consideration applications must be complete (including required letters of recommendation) by Nov. 17, 2014. Direct inquiries about the search via email to Dr. John Bishop, search committee chair, bishopj@vancouver.wsu.edu (include subject $B!H(BMicrobial Ecology Search$B!I(B. Washington State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action educator and employer. Members of ethnic minorities, women, special disabled veterans, veterans of the Vietnam-era, recently separated veterans, and other protected veterans, persons of disability and/or persons age 40 and over are encouraged to apply. WSU is committed to excellence through diversity, has faculty friendly policies including a partner accommodation program, and a NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant (http://bit.ly/11IPYsr). John Bishop, PhD Professor, School of Biological Sciences Program Leader, Vancouver Biological Sciences Washington State University 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave. Vancouver, Washington 98686 360 546-9612 bishopj@vancouver.wsu.edu Website: http://bit.ly/1y1OdRy “Bishop, John” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:48
MS position in the Gross Lab: I am seeking a Master’s student who is interested in plant evolutionary genetics. My lab is located in the University of Minnesota-Duluth Biology Department, and potential students are eligible for TA funding. Research in my lab focuses on the evolution of wild, weedy, and especially domesticated plants (both annual and perennial) using a variety of genetic and genomic techniques. A graduate student would be expected to develop a research project focused on the genetics of apple, rice, or lingonberry, but other systems will be considered. Strong training in evolutionary biology is preferred, and molecular and/or bioinformatics skills are also useful. Note that the UMD Biology Department (http://bit.ly/1065pKC) has a group of evolutionary biologists with diverse interests and skills, including Dr. Julie Etterson, Dr. Tim Craig, and Dr. Jared Strasburg. This position is administered through the Integrated BioSciences (IBS) graduate program of the University of Minnesota (http://bit.ly/1wffOgT). Applications are due by January 15 for priority consideration (or January 1 for potential DOVE fellowship applicants; see IBS page for details). Before applying, please send an email describing your interest and you CV to Briana (blgross@d.umn.edu). Briana Gross via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:33
A *PhD position*in Human Molecular Population Genetics is open at the Laboratory of Anthropology, Genetics and Peopling history (AGP Lab) of the University of Geneva (Professor Alicia Sanchez-Mazas). We are seeking a highly motivated student to analyse /in silico/multiple sets of DNA sequences for human MHC genes (HLA) in different populations worldwide. This research is integrated to a wider research project aiming at analysing the relationships between HLA molecular variation and both human populations’ expansions and their immune adaptation to different environments (_http://ua.unige.ch/en/agp/recherche/fns/31003A-144180/_). *Requirements* Master degree in biology or equivalent; Deep interest for human evolution, population genetics, evolutionary genetics and anthropology as a whole; Strong skills in biostatistics; Strong skills in bioinformatics, previous experience in this domain being an advantage. *Terms of employment* The position starts with a 2-year appointment given that the 1rst year (trial period) is successful, and is extendable 2 years. The position is available from 1 January 2015 or to be agreed. Salary: corresponds to a position of assistant DIP (class 8/4, 70%). *Other conditions:* The PhD student is hired as an assistant, he/she will thus participate to the teaching and other activities of the AGP Lab. *About the AGP lab* The Lab is hosted by the Department of Genetics and Evolution - Anthropology Unit at the University of Geneva, Switzerland. It offers a very stimulating environment with excellent computer resources and several independent researchers. The Anthropology Unit is located in the heart of Geneva (Acacias) at walking distance from the other buildings of the Faculty of science. Both English and French are the working languages in the Lab. More details about the Lab can be found at http://bit.ly/11IHWzA *How to apply* Applications should be sent as _*a single pdf file*_by email to Professor Alicia Sanchez-Mazas (alicia.sanchez-mazas@unige.ch) _*by 31 October 2014*_. These should include a motivation letter, a detailed CV, and statements of past (Master Thesis and others) research in the domain. Alicia Sanchez-Mazas Full Professor Alicia Sanchez-Mazas via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:59

Deadline reminder - Friday 24th. Its a great event, but filling up fast! 16th YOUNG SYSTEMATISTS’ FORUM Friday, 21 November 2014, 9:30 am Please note date change from earlier announcement Venue: Flett Lecture Theatre, Natural History Museum, London, UK The annual Young Systematists’ Forum represents an exciting setting for Masters, PhD and young postdoctoral researchers to present their data, often for the first time, to a scientific audience interested in taxonomy, systematics and phylogenetics. This well-established event provides an important opportunity for budding systematists to discuss their research in front of their peers within a supportive environment. Supervisors and other established systematists are also encouraged to attend. Prizes will be awarded for the most promising oral and poster presentation as judged by a small panel on the day. Again the YSF will be held the day after the Molluscan Forum (http://bit.ly/1yM3Fo7 ) also at the NHM, so that you can attned both meetings. If you are attending both you will need to register for each meeting separately. Since talk slots are limited, we ask that you register for a talk in one meeting and poster in the other, so everyone gets time in the limelight! Registration is FREE. Send applications by e-mail to (YSF.SystematicsAssociation@gmail.com), supplying your name, contact and academic address, academic level (MSc student, PhD student or postdoc), and stating whether or not you wish to give an oral or poster presentation. Space will be allocated subject to availability and for a balanced programme of animal, plant, algal, microbial, molecular and other research. Non-presenting attendees are also very welcome - please register as above. Abstracts must be submitted by e-mail in English no later than Friday 24 October 2014. The body text should not exceed 150 words in length. If the presentation is co-authored, the actual speaker (oral) or presenter (poster) must be clearly indicated in BOLD text. All registered attendants will receive further information about the meeting, including abstracts, by e-mail one week in advance. This information will also be displayed on the Systematics Association website (www.systass.org). *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* Dr Ellinor MICHEL Department of Life Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road SW7 5BD London UK tel: +44-207-942-5516 -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* http://bit.ly/YjDjuAwww.systass.org). *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* Dr Ellinor MICHEL Department of Life Sciences The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road SW7 5BD London UK tel: +44-207-942-5516 -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* http://bit.ly/YjDjuA -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-* via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:28

—_000_FBE5B4773C60E147B791856BB8B128C9FF81DABELLATRIXuniversi_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Hello EvolDirers, I want to let you all know about a short (5 minute) survey about the International Network of Next-Generation Ecologists (INNGE). We hope you would like to take the survey if you would like to be involved with the INNGE open network or already are (e.g. via the INNGE mailing list, Twitter account: @INNGEcologist, or Facebook group). Take the survey via this link: http://bit.ly/1qMQ4or The survey is aimed to give a better characterization of the international network in terms of interests and demographics. It is also your chance to point out what you would like to see INNGE do in the future. The survey collects anonymous information (no personal ID or contact is requested). The collected data will be used to inform INNGE’s governing board and working group, and in turn ensure that INNGE is reaching and representing the needs of early-career ecologists worldwide. The survey contains 22 short questions, and it will take you approximately 5 minutes, should you decide to take it. Help with spreading the word about this survey would also be greatly appreciated. Many thanks! Rachel White Membership coordinator and governing board member of INNGE via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

October 17, 2014

23:40

Postdoc position in Switzerland on phenology of alpine plants The ?Mountain Ecosystems? and ?Climate Research? teams at the Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL in Switzerland are looking for a Postdoctoral Researcher in the project: ?Warmer temperatures, less snow, earlier plant development? Using a long-term meteorological network to unravel temperature and snow effects on mountain vegetation?. We take advantage of a unique and extensive set of climate monitoring stations in the Swiss Alps that provides c. 20 years of climate, snow and plant growth data. We plan to extend the approach to other regions of the Alps or world. You will investigate how temperatures and snow cover influence plant phenology along geographical gradients within the network of climate stations to determine how changed climate conditions such as accelerated snowmelt control phenology and the distribution of plants. You will publish your results in international journals. The position is funded for the duration of 2 years and should start in January 2015. The work location is Davos, Switzerland. A PhD in the field of biology, ecology or botany is required and you must have experience in field work and statistical analyses particularly in R. You are able to handle and analyze large and long-term data sets and you are fluent in English. You are a team player, possess good oral and written communication skills, good organizational ability and can work efficiently. The WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF in Davos is part of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL and thus part of the ETH Domain. WSL focuses on the sustainable use and protection of landscapes and habitats, and a responsible approach to natural hazards. WSL employs approximately 500 people, of whom 130 work at SLF in Davos. Please apply online (see link below) by sending your complete application to Jasmine Zimmermann, Human Resources WSL/SLF. Christian Rixen, phone +41 (0)81 417 02 14, e-mail rixen@slf.ch, and Martine Rebetez, phone Tel. +41 (0)32 718 18 12, will be happy to answer any questions or offer further information. To be assured of full consideration, please apply by November 5, 2014. To apply online, press the ?apply now? button at the end of the job ad at http://bit.ly/1y1suJk Dr. Christian Rixen Community Ecology WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF Flelastrasse 11 CH- 7260 Davos tel ++41 81 417 02 14 fax ++41 81 417 01 10 e-mail: rixen@slf.ch http://bit.ly/14Eh3gD http://www.slf.ch rixen@slf.ch via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
23:24

Postdoctoral Research Assistant in Evolutionary Genomics of Animal Domestication and Migration University of Oxford Salary: 30,434 to 37,394 Closing date: 12.00 midday on Monday, 24 November, 2014 This PDRA position will work on the Unifying Evolution and Domestication using Ancient DNA (UnDEAD) project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the leadership of Dr Greger Larson. You will join a multi-disciplinary team of archaeologists and geneticists to explore the origins of animal domestication, and the use of domestic animals as a proxy to understand human migration. For more information see this website: http://bit.ly/1ujEDpg You will focus primarily on the amplification and analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from ancient domestic animal bones and teeth using shotgun and capture techniques. The two major research questions you will explore will be: 1) the admixture between Near Eastern pigs and European wild boar during the Neolithic, and 2) the use of domestic animals to assess the resilience and survival of early North Atlantic settlements. though there is scope to persue your own research interests within the theme of the larger project. You will have a PhD in bioinformatics, population genomics, evolutionary genetics, animal genomics, or a related discipline. You will have research experience with ancient or degraded DNA and familiarity with library preparation and handling next generation sequencing results. This post is full-time and fixed-term for 3 years. For informal enquiries, please contact Dr Greger Larson, email:greger.larson@arch.ox.ac.uk. Applications for this vacancy are to be made online using this link: http://bit.ly/1yLVl7L via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
23:19
Arecaceae tribe Cocoseae is the most economically important tribe of palms, including both coconut and African oil palm. It is mostly represented in the Neotropics, with one and two genera endemic to South Africa and Madagascar, respectively. Using primers for six single copy WRKY gene family loci, we amplified DNA from 96 samples representing all genera of the palm tribe Cocoseae as well as outgroup tribes Reinhardtieae and Roystoneae. We compared parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML), and Bayesian (B) analysis of the supermatrix with three species-tree estimation approaches. Subtribe Elaeidinae is sister to the Bactridinae in all analyses. Within subtribe Attaleinae, Lytocaryum, previously nested in Syagrus, is now positioned by MP and ML as sister to the former, with high support; B maintains Lytocaryum embedded within Syagrus. Both MP and ML resolve Cocos as sister to Syagrus; B positions Cocos as sister to Attalea. Bactridineae is composed of two sister clades, Bactris and Desmoncus in one, for which there is morphological support, and a second comprising Acrocomia, Astrocaryum, and Aiphanes. Two B and one ML gene tree-species estimation approaches are incongruent with the supermatrix in a few critical intergeneric clades, but resolve the same infrageneric relationships. The biogeographic history of the Cocoseae is dominated by dispersal events. The tribe originated in the late Cretaceous in South America. Evaluated together, the supermatrix and species tree analyses presented in this paper provide the most accurate picture of the evolutionary history of the tribe to date, with more congruence than incongruence among the various methodologies.
Source: Cladistics
02:18
Calling all early-stage career scientists! The New Phytologist Tansley Medal is awarded annually in recognition of an outstanding contribution to research in plant science by an individual in the early stages of their career (student and post-doctoral researchers with up to five years’ experience since gaining/defending their PhD are eligible). The winner will receive a prize of 2000 (GBP) and will author a short review that will be published in New Phytologist accompanied by a comment from the Editor-in-Chief and Tansley reviews Editor. The application deadline for this year’s Medal is *1 December 2014*. New Phytologist highlights the importance of plant evolution by dedicating one of its four key sections to this research area, covering studies from the molecular to ecological level. One of last year’s co-winners, Dr Jing-Ke Weng, is a plant evolutionary biologist from the Whitehead Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA whose research focuses on plant metabolic evolution. Read Jing-Ke’s winning Minireview ‘The evolutionary paths towards complexity: a metabolic perspective’ here: http://bit.ly/1F9NzGp. (The other co-winner of the 2013 Tansley Medal was Dr Li-Qing Chen of the Carnegie Institution for Science, USA whose winning Minireview is entitled ‘SWEET sugar carriers for phloem transport and pathogen nutrition’.) The Tansley Medal is an opportunity to award recognition to an outstanding scientist in the early stages of his or her career and supporting and nurturing the next generation of plant scientists is a core aspect of the activities of the New Phytologist Trust. I would be very grateful if you would support us in this endeavour by spreading the word to anyone you know who might be eligible to apply for the 2015 Tansley Medal. If you have any queries regarding the medal or the submission process please do not hesitate to get in touch. More details on the Medal can be found at: http://bit.ly/1c0TZah. Many thanks, Michael Dr MICHAEL PANAGOPULOS Development Coordinator, New Phytologist New Phytologist Central Office, Bailrigg House, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YE, UK Tel: + 44 1524 592839 Fax: + 44 1524 594696 Email: m.panagopulos@lancaster.ac.uk Website: http://bit.ly/1fol1vD Twitter: @NewPhyt Facebook: http://bit.ly/LvfmcO The New Phytologist Trust, registered charity number 1154867 New! 2013 Impact factor 6.545 Special Issue: Plants interacting with other organisms http://bit.ly/1ueU95U 2015 Tansley Medal application deadline 1st Dec 2014 http://bit.ly/1c0TZah New Phytologist Symposia 2015 Genomes of forest trees (Boston, USA) // Plant-microbe interactions (Munich, Germany) http://bit.ly/1fDLmnd m.panagopulos@lancaster.ac.uk via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:59
A funded, full-time postdoctoral position is currently available in the Extavour lab at Harvard University (Departments of Organismic & Evolutionary Biology/Molecular and Cellular Biology). The project aims to understand how growth and patterning of distinct cell types are coordinated during organ development, using the Drosophila melanogaster ovary as a model. The successful candidate will participate in and extend ongoing work on this problem using genetic, molecular genetic, and next-generation sequencing approaches. If interested, the candidate may have the opportunity to perform comparative analysis of analogous processes in additional species, including the possibility of fieldwork in Hawaii. Qualifications: The ideal candidate should be highly motivated with a PhD or equivalent, with demonstrated expertise in Drosophila developmental genetics and a strong track record. Expertise in at least one of molecular biology, cell biology or confocal imaging is essential. Previous experience in signalling pathways, hormonal signaling pathways, reproductive biology, ovarian development, molecular mechanisms of proliferation, ecology, niche construction or morphogenesis is also highly desirable. Application Procedure: Submit your updated CV, brief description of scientific accomplishments and research interests, and have three references on your behalf sent to Cassandra Extavour at extavour@oeb.harvard.edu. Please see the attached advertisement for additional details. Dr. Cassandra Extavour extavour@oeb.harvard.edu Associate Professor Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Harvard University 16 Divinity Avenue, BioLabs 4103 Cambridge, MA 02138, USA http://bit.ly/1f5zYlG Office Tel. 1 617 496 1935 Lab Tel. 1 617 496 1949/1200 Fax. 1 617 496 9507 Extavour Lab Administration: Mimi Velazquez Tel. 1 617 496 2132 nvelazquez@oeb.harvard.edu EDEN: Evo-Devo-Eco Network http://bit.ly/1aqhQ7f edenrcn@fas.harvard.edu EDEN Administration: Barbara Perlo perlo@fas.harvard.edu “Extavour, Cassandra” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:44
Dear all, We are happy to announce a Theo Murphy discussion meeting entitled, “Elements, genomes and ecosystems: cascading nitrogen and phosphorus impacts across levels of biological organization” funded by the Royal Society of London to be held in Buckinghamshire, U.K. June 1-2 2015. The meeting is open to everyone, but space is limited. Please visit the following website to request an invitation to register:http://bit.ly/11AB7jJ. This meeting will explore how environmental nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) impact the evolution and use of nucleic acids and how these effects, in turn, cascade through natural and agricultural ecosystems. It unites expertise in N and P metabolism, plant and animal genome evolution, ecology (including those interested in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning), and agriculture. The reason for this early message is to advertise funds from the U.S. National Science Foundation to help support the travel expenses of U.S. graduate students and postdocs. Applicants from underrepresented groups are specifically encouraged to apply. We will begin review of applications on December 15th 2014 to identify suitable candidates for receiving these limited awards. Please go here for information on applying: http://bit.ly/1rhPjTC Please do not hesitate to contact us with questions, and kindly forward to suitable candidates. Best wishes, Puni Jeyasingh - puni.jeyasingh@okstate.edu Maurine Neiman - maurine-neiman@uiowa.edu Lawrence J. Weider - ljweider@ou.edu Dag Hessen Ilia Letich Andrew Leitch Puni Jeyasingh 501 Life Sciences West, Department of Zoology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-3052. Phone: (405) 744-9634. Fax: (405) 744-7824. http://bit.ly/11AB7A3 Twitter: @elementalbio Puni Jeyasingh via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:28
2nd Young Natural History scientists’ Meeting First Circular 4th – 6th February 2015 Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Paris, France) The Bureau des Doctorants et Étudiants du Muséum (association for students and young researchers working at the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris), Doc’up (association for PhD students working at Université Pierre et Marie Curie) and Timarcha (association for young naturalists) are pleased to announce the opening of the registration and abstract submissions for the 2nd Young Natural History scientists’ Meeting hosted at the MNHN (Paris, France) on February 4th and 5th, 2014. The meeting will be followed by excursions on the 6th during the morning to visit some of the numerous exhibitions of the Muséum and in the afternoon we will host scientific debates. We invite contributions from non permanent researchers (PhD students, postdoctorants, master students) in English (either oral or poster communications) on all aspects of natural history represented in these four sessions: - *Biodiversity Dynamics and Conservation*: any subject linked to ecology and conservation of the Earth’s biological diversity, including studies of Earth’s ecosystems, molecular diversity, the distribution, abundance and dynamics of micro- to macroscopic organisms, their interactions with both other lifeforms and/or physical environment, and conservation biology. - *Earth and Planetary Sciences*: any topic related to atmospheric science, biogeochemistry, cosmochemistry and cosmology, climate science, geochemistry, geology, geomorphology, glaciology, hydrology and limnology, mineralogy, oceanography, paleoecology, biostratigraphy, paleobiogeography, palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, taphonomy, petrology, tectonics, volcanology. - *Mankind, Prehistory, Nature and Societies*: any work on biological anthropology, genetics, prehistory, social and cultural anthropology, ethnology, ethnobiology, ethnomusicology, geography, and history and philosophy of sciences and techniques. - *Systematics, Evolution and Comparative Anatomy*: any aspects of comparative anatomy and morphology, evodevo, evolutionary ecology and behavior, experimental evolution, palaeobiology, taxonomy, phylogenetics and phylogeography, theories and models. A keynote speaker will open each of these multidisciplinary themes with a lecture on a relevant topic. *Registration and abstract submission* We propose free registration fees, including full package and tea/coffee breaks. *Deadline for abstract submission and registration is November 30th 2014 (23:59 GMT+1).* The submission process takes place on the following website: http://bit.ly/1vD5t1g A scientific committee has been appointed and will review all the abstracts. If we receive too many abstracts for oral communications only the successful abstracts will be given as talks, the other abstracts will be accepted for poster presentations. Guidelines on presentation formats will be given in the Second Circular, which will be available in early november. *Venue and travel* The conference will take place at the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, in the Grand Amphithéatre du Muséum 4th and 5th February 2014. We have some travel grants available for young researchers coming from far away who can not afford to pay for the trip to Paris. Information about the application to the grants will be available in the next circular. GETTING THERE: Address: Jardin des Plantes 36, rue Geoffroy Saint Hilaire 75005 Paris - Bus: Lines 24, 57, 61, 63, 67, 89 et 91 - Metro, RER: M5: Austerlitz, M7: Censier Daubenton, M10: Jussieu or Austerlitz, RER C: Austerlitz. - SNCF Railway Stations: Austerlitz or Gare de Lyon (but all the railway stations are connected to metro and bus lines) - Getting to Paris by plane: Paris has two major international airports: RoissyCharles de Gaulle (north of Paris) and Orly (south of Paris). There is frequent connecting city trains (RER) or buses leading to the center of Paris (and therefore connection to the metro). The transfer takes between 30 and 45 minutes. *For those interested in taking advantage of their stay in Paris to access the collections* The Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle stands as a fantastic memory of life forms and minerals, holding one of the most important international reference collections. Inert objects displaying palaeontology, geology, mineralogy, meteorites, botany, zoology, prehistory, anthropology, ethnobiology and chemistry are estimated to total over 60 million specimens. Visits to our collections are welcomed, but access is dependent on the availability of curatorial staff. Delegates are strongly encouraged to contact the curators well in advance of the meeting through the colhelper interface (http://bit.ly/1dWjA5S). All the details about the Meeting can be found at: http://bit.ly/1vD5uT8 Please feel free to circulate this to colleagues who may be interested in attending, and do not hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions about the meeting (assobdem@mnhn.fr). We look forward to seeing you in Paris! The BDEM, Doc’up and Timarcha Christie Le Coeur via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR