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July 9, 2014

02:09

The upcoming Intersociety Meeting in Comparative and Evolutionary Physiology, organized by the American Physiological Society and several sponsoring societies (Society for Experimental Biology, SICB, TCS) will be held in San Diego, CA, October 5-8, 2014. The Meeting Website is available at: http://bit.ly/1pAjIxn Funds are available to support student and postdoc travel. Several Special Symposia will cover a variety of topics regarding physiological adaptation. Abstract submissions are due July 9, 2014. In particular, Professor Guy Charmantier from Universit Montpellier, France has organized a special symposium on Physiological Adaptation from Marine to Freshwater Environments. Invited speakers are listed below. Abstract submissions are encouraged to be included in this session: Invasions of freshwater habitats by marine and brackish organisms have been successfully performed by only a few animal taxa over evolutionary time, and constitute one of the major transitions in the history of life. In addition, recent and rapid colonizations of freshwater areas have resulted from human activities, such as transportation. Invading low salinity environments confronts the animals with serious challenges for maintaining hydromineral balance, mainly in retaining and acquiring ions against adverse gradients, and excreting excess water. Freshwater environments can also be affected by contaminations, either natural or anthropogenic. As natural selection acts on all developmental stages, each must adapt to new conditions before invasion of a novel environment, such as freshwater, can become successful. This symposium addresses various physiological adaptations that have enabled colonizations of fresh water from marine environments over different time scales. Speakers will describe physiological adaptations at multiple hierarchical levels of biological organization, from molecules to organisms and populations, and will discuss several model species or taxa, mainly crustaceans and fish, at different stages of development, from embryos to adults. The talks will explore adaptive responses to challenges imposed by freshwater environments, including the presence of contaminants. List of Invited Speakers: Patricia Schulte, University of British Columbia, Canada Jonathon Stillman, RTC, SFSU, UC-Berkeley, USA Carol Eunmi Lee, University of Wisconsin, USA Guy Charmantier, Universit Montpellier, France This session will also include other talks selected from submitted abstracts. Carol Eunmi Lee, Ph.D. Professor Center of Rapid Evolution (CORE) 430 Lincoln Drive, Birge Hall University of Wisconsin Madison, WI 53706 carollee@wisc.edu http://bit.ly/1xKJvHU carollee@wisc.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:39

The Proulx/Hespanha group at UC Santa Barbara is searching for a postdoctoral scientist to work on modeling the evolution and dynamics of dynamical networks. The proposed work may involve modeling gene transcriptional networks that respond to external stimulus, signal transduction networks, or the combination of cellular control and cell physiology. The goal is to understand both the mechanistic basis of dynamic cellular responses and the evolution of control networks. We take a joint approach drawing from expertise on engineering principles and optimal control theory based in the Hespanha lab (http://bit.ly/1jouSY8) and on principles of evolutionary theory based in the Proulx lab (http://bit.ly/1jouSYa). Opportunities also exist for the postdoc to study gene network evolution in yeast. Applicants should have a strong quantitative background and either experience with evolutionary theory or with control theory (including optimal control). The appointment is for 1 year with a start date by September, 2014. Submit applications including a cover letter, CV, description of research experience and interests, brief description of background computational or mathematical modeling, and names and addresses of three references to stephen.proulx@gmail.com with the words $B!H(Bnetwork evolution$B!I(B in the subject. Stephen Proulx Associate Professor Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology UC Santa Barbara proulx@lifesci.ucsb.edu stephen.proulx@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:39

Please note the following DEADLINES: Registration and abstract submission: 4 August, 2014 Accommodation: booking service link ends 28 July, 2014 ******************** The United Kingdom is home to exceptional evolutionarybiologists. However, compared to the number of evolutionaryzoologists, the number of their botanical counterparts is few. In many cases, U.K. plant evolutionary biologists are in small numbers at any one institution, and such isolation hinders progress. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh will host a conference on 8, 9 September, 2014 to help address this situation. The conference will showcase evolutionary research on plants by UK researchers to foster new collaborations. The conference will also hold a workshop, where discussion will identify challenges faced and suggest strategies to overcome them. We see this as a first step towards developing a longer-terms strategy for strengthening the UK community of plant evolutionary biologists. The conference will include a poster and networking session, open speaking slots (both standard and “lightning” talks), as well as an exciting lineup of invited speakers. For more information and to register, please visit the website at: http://bit.ly/1h7xbNN Invited speakers: Mating system: Dr. Mario Vallejo-Marin Speciation: Dr. Richard Buggs Ecological Speciation: Dr. Patrik Nosil Evo-Devo: Dr. Beverley Glover Phylogeny: Dr. Toby Pennington Polyploidy: Dr. Barbara Mable Biogeography: Dr. Bill Baker Population Genetics ? (Molecular ecology): Dr. Simon Hiscock Population Genetics (Genomics): Dr. Rob Ness International Speaker: Dr. Spencer Barrett (University of Toronto) via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:39

Dear Colleagues, Registration is open for the course “MODELLING DINAMICS IN BIOLOGY. FROM HISTORY TO PRACTICAL EXAMPLES”, January 19-22, 2015. 28 hours on-site. Instructors: Dr. Andreea Munteanu (CGR, Spain) and Dr. Carlos Rodrguez-Caso (Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Spain) Place: Premises of Sabadell of the Institut Catal de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain) The current course will present an overview of systems biology with emphasis on the necessity, uses and pitfalls of dynamical modelling in biology. It introduces the required language and philosophy for a smooth and fruitful collaboration between life scientists and theoreticians (i.e. mathematicians, physicists, computer scientists). The main goal of the course is not a detailed description of the modelling tools in systems biology, but a thorough overview of the terminology and applicability range of these methodologies. The time dedication throughout the course will be one third for theoretical introduction, and two thirds for modelling applications for very diverse biological systems. The participants will acquire the necessary skills to understand and interpret models and modelling results from scientific articles, and will take the first steps into building their own mathematical models. Organized by: Transmitting Science and the Institut Catal de Paleontologia More info: http://bit.ly/1f4sZvA or writing to courses@transmittingscience.org Course poster: http://bit.ly/1xQF4vk With best regards Soledad De Esteban Trivigno, PhD. Course Director Transmitting Science http://bit.ly/1gdSpYn soledad.esteban@transmittingscience.org via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:10

Postdoctoral Research Scientist - Molecular Population Genetics/Ecology Location: A new, collaborative, state-of-the-art facility established for molecular-genetic studies of exploited marine organisms, located at the Harte Research Institute at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412-5869. Responsibilities: Position responsibilities involve assay and analysis of nuclear-encoded single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for projects involving population genetics and molecular ecology, primarily of exploited marine fishes. Central responsibilities include data acquisition and analysis, preparation of reports and publications, and positive interaction with other members of the laboratory. Qualifications: Dissertation or postdoctoral work in molecular population genetics and/or molecular ecology is required, as is documented experience with microsatellite and mtDNA data acquisition and analysis. Documented experience with major software programs used in analysis of molecular (DNA) data for population genetics/molecular ecology also is required. Individuals with documented experience in analysis of next-generation-sequencing data, primarily RADseq, RNAseq, or genome assembly, will be given highest priority. Applicants should be ambitious, able to work collaboratively with other group members, and capable of taking initiative and assuming responsibility. Salary: Salary range is from $40,000/year and will depend on experience. Benefits include health care and retirement. Position is for 12-24 months. Closing date: Position will remain open until filled. Contact: Send curriculum vitae, description of research experience/interests, and names, addresses, phone numbers, and e-mail address of three references to Dr. John R. Gold and Dr. David S. Portnoy at goldfish@tamucc.edu and David.Portnoy@tamucc.edu, respectively. International applicants will be considered if they hold the correct visa(s). The Harte Research Institute and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi are Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Equal Access Employers. John.Gold@tamucc.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:10
Dear members I am a PhD student working on population genomics of freshwater shrimp, Paratya australiensis. I am trying to extract high quality, high molecular weight DNA (~3ug, >50kb); from Paratya for RAD-sequencing. I have tried different extraction methods on fresh and frozen samples so far, e.g. Spin-Column extraction, CTAB extraction and Salt extraction. Besides, I have also tried an extended gDNA extraction procedure by incorporating a salting out step prior to phenol/chloroform cleanup. But unfortunately these methods have all produced what appears to be a smear of degraded DNA rather than high molecular weight band on agarose gels. Can anyone suggest me any other procedures that might help? Thanks. Sharmeen Rahman PhD student, Australian Rivers Institute Environment 2 Building N13, 2.02A, Nathan Campus Griffith University, 170 Kessels Road, Nathan QLD 4111 Tel: +61 7 3735 57711, Fax: +61 7 37357459 email:sharmeen.rahman@griffithuni.edu.au Sharmeen Rahman via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:39
UMuenster.GraduateSchoolofEvolution_BiologyMedicineorPhilosophy 2 PhD positions for international (non-German) students within the interdisciplinary “Muenster Graduate School of Evolution”: PhD projects in Biology, Medicine, or Philosophy The “Muenster Graduate School of Evolution” (MGSE) offers 2 PhD positions funded by DAAD- stipends for international (non-German) students within the stimulating environment of the University of Muenster, Germany. As an interdisciplinary graduate school, the MGSE uses the unifying concept of evolution to bridge the faculties of biology, medicine, geosciences, mathematics, and philosophy. PhD students work on their diverse disciplinary projects in one of the involved institutes and benefit from interdisciplinary curricular activities as well as a structured supervision and support throughout their PhD. The MGSE is based in the stimulating city of Muenster in a historical building opposite the Muenster castle and offers a family friendly and international atmosphere. Location: Muenster, Germany Working Language: English Start of the PhD: 2015 Duration: 3 years (4 years for students from developing and emerging countries) You can apply for one or several of the following six projects. Each project involves high-quality research and state-of-the-art techniques and is supervised by excellent researchers. 1) The genetic origin of novel protein coding genes in populations and their evolutionary constraints Prof. Erich Bornberg-Bauer (Research Group Evolutionary Bioinformatics), Prof. Matthias Loewe (Institute of Mathematical Statistics), Prof. Juergen Gadau (School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University) 2) Immunogenic males: where sex and immunity meet Dr. Claudia Fricke (Research Group Evolution and Sexual Conflict), Dr. Sophie Armitage (Research Group Animal Evolutionary Ecology) 3) The Concept of Disease in Individualized Medicine Prof. Ulrich Krohs (Research Group Philosophy of Science and of Nature) 4) Interactions of animal personality, social environment and immunity Prof. Joachim Kurtz (Research Group Animal Evolutionary Ecology), Dr. Joern Scharsack (Research Group Animal Evolutionary Ecology), Prof. Norbert Sachser (Department of Behavioural Biology) 5) Functional consequences of evolutionary conservation vs. variability in the influenza virus genome Prof. Stephan Ludwig (Institute of Molecular Virology) 6) Reconstruction of the ancient transcriptome of species Dr. Juergen Schmitz (Institute of Experimental Pathology), Dr. Francesco Catania (Research Group Evolutionary Cell Biology) More information on the projects can be found here: http://bit.ly/1zowANF Highly qualified and motivated candidates all over the world are invited to submit their application. Requirements: - MSc (or an equivalent degree) relevant for the respective project (biology, medicine, mathematics, or philosophy). At the time of application, generally no more than six years should have passed since you gained the last degree. - Excellent academic record, interest to work interdisciplinary, and motivation to actively participate in the structured PhD program of the MGSE. - Fluency in spoken and written English (or willingness to take part in a respective course). - Only international (non-German) applicants can be accepted. At the time of application you should not be living in Germany for more than 15 months. - Applications from women are particularly encouraged. Handicapped candidates with equivalent qualifications will be given preference. Application procedure: You can apply for one or several of the listed projects via the DAAD platform by 1.8.2014: http://bit.ly/1kCDrZW Please indicate which project(s) you are interested in! >From among the applicants, we will shortlist candidates for (Skype) interviews and subsequently nominate 4-8 applicants. From among the nominees, a DAAD committee will select the two scholarship recipients. In case of questions please contact: (Please don’t send your applications here, instead use the DAAD online application (see above)!) Dr. Rebecca Schreiber (MGSE Coordinator) Email: rebeccaschreiber@uni-muenster.de Telephone: +49-(0)251 / 83-21252 Dr. Rebecca Schreiber (nee Heiming) Coordinator of the Muenster Graduate School of Evolution Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster Schlossplatz 6, D-48149 Muenster, Germany Phone: +49 251 83-21252 E-Mail: rebeccaschreiber@uni-muenster.de Website: http://bit.ly/1zowANH “Schreiber, Rebecca” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:08
The University of Queensland is looking for a Science Leader for the Animal Genetics Laboratory. The Animal Genetics Laboratory (AGL) operates within the School of Veterinary Science and is located at the Gatton campus. AGL is a commercial and research laboratory that provides genotyping services to cattle and alpaca producers and their organisations, mostly for parentage verification. The AGL is also a provider of genotyping, sequencing and quantitative PCR services to researchers within the School, as well as to research groups from other Faculties in the University. The role This position will manage and lead the Animal Genetics Laboratory in the provision of genetic diagnostic services, development of new genetic diagnostic tests and high quality research in animal genetics The Person Applicants should have a Bachelors degree in animal or veterinary science and PhD in the area of animal genetics or molecular biology Remuneration This is a full-time, fixed term appointment of 5 years at Academic Level B or C. The base remuneration package will be in the range: Academic Level B - $84,323.66 to $100,134.07 p.a, plus employer superannuation contributions of 17% (total package will be in the range ($98,658.68 to $117,156.86 p.a.). Academic Level C - $103,296.12 to $119,106.52 p.a., plus employer superannuation contributions of up to 17 % (total package will be in the range $120,856.46 to $139,354.63 p.a.). Enquiries To discuss this role, please contact Associate Professor Jennifer Seddon ,Deputy Head of School on+61-7 5460 1838 or email j.seddon1@uq.edu.au. Further details available at www.uq.edu.au, job position number 496158. Jennifer Seddon via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

July 8, 2014

18:00
Background: Hybrid zones formed by the secondary contact of divergent lineages represent natural laboratories for studying the genetic basis of speciation. Here we tested for patterns of differential introgression among three X-linked and 11 autosomal regions to identify candidate loci related to either reproductive isolation or adaptive introgression across a hybrid zone between two Chinese mainland subspecies of the intermediate horseshoe bat Rhinolophus affinis: R. a. himalayanus and R. a. macrurus. Results: Our results support the previous suggestion that macrurus formed when a third subspecies (R. a. hainanus) recolonized the mainland from Hainan Island, and that himalayanus is the ancestral taxon. However, this overall evolutionary history was not reflected in all loci examined, with considerable locus-wise heterogeneity seen in gene tree topologies, levels of polymorphism, genetic differentiation and rates of introgression. Coalescent simulations suggested levels of lineage mixing seen at some nuclear loci might result from incomplete lineage sorting. Isolation with migration models supported evidence of gene flow across the hybrid zone at one intronic marker of the hearing gene Prestin. Conclusions: We suggest that phylogenetic discordance with respect to the species tree seen here is likely to arise via a combination of incomplete lineage sorting and a low incidence of introgression although we cannot rule out other explanations such as selection and recombination. Two X-linked loci and one autosomal locus were identified as candidate regions related to reproductive isolation across the hybrid zone. Our work highlights the importance of including multiple genomic regions in characterizing patterns of divergence and gene flow across a hybrid zone.
18:00
Background: Skipper butterflies (Hesperiidae) are a relatively well-studied family of Lepidoptera. However, a combination of DNA barcodes, morphology, and natural history data has revealed several cryptic species complexes within them. Here, we investigate three DNA barcode lineages of what has been identified as Urbanus belli (Hesperiidae, Eudaminae) in Area de Conservacion Guanacaste (ACG), northwestern Costa Rica. Results: Although no morphological traits appear to distinguish among the three, congruent nuclear and mitochondrial lineage patterns show that "Urbanus belli" in ACG is a complex of three sympatric species. A single strain of Wolbachia present in two of the three cryptic species indicates that Urbanus segnestami Burns (formerly Urbanus belliDHJ01), Urbanus bernikerni Burns (formerly Urbanus belliDHJ02), and Urbanus ehakernae Burns (formerly Urbanus belliDHJ03) may be biologically separated by Wolbachia, as well as by their genetics. Use of parallel sequencing through 454-pyrosequencing improved the utility of ITS2 as a phylogenetic marker and permitted examination of the intra- and interlineage relationships of ITS2 variants within the species complex. Interlineage, intralineage and intragenomic compensatory base pair changes were discovered in the secondary structure of ITS2. Conclusion: These findings corroborate the existence of three cryptic species. Our confirmation of a novel cryptic species complex, initially suggested by DNA barcode lineages, argues for using a multi-marker approach coupled with next-generation sequencing for exploration of other suspected species complexes.
13:15

We have now completed two days of the workshop. We have had a relaxed approach to progress, and are thus currently running behind the nominal schedule. Nevertheless, we are progressing splendidly.

We had three talks on the first day and one today. I tried to kick things off by asking a series of what I consider to be unanswered questions from observing practitioners and computationalists in action, although apparently several members of the audience already had their own answers to some of these. The bottom line is that phylogenetic analysis focuses on data patterns while interpretation focuses on processes / mechanisms, and this constitutes a large part of the apparent separation of practitioners and computationalists.

Steven Kelk and Luay Nakhleh introduced the diversity of computational approaches that we already have. These presentations neatly complemented each other, providing a valuable summary of the field as well as an overview of current limitations and future prospects. This topic was taken up later by various members of the audience, as one of the inherent problems for practitioners is how to navigate through the methods to choose a suitable one -- there are methods based on parsimony, likelihood and bayesian analysis, and methods that tackle de novo network construction, gene tree / species tree reconciliation, gene tree scoring, and network presentation.

This topic was followed up today by presentations introducing some of the currently available software. Some of these have progressed significantly in recent years, notably PhyloNet and Dendroscope, and there are some relatively new ones, as well as even newer ones in the pipeline. Based on the literature, these programs are being dramatically under-used compared to their actual usefulness.

This morning Scot Kelchner introduced us to the application of Zen Buddhism to science in general and phylogenetics in particular. This went down much better than he seemed to be expecting -- there were apparently a lot of  "Zen" people in the room. The basic idea is not to get trapped by preconceived expectations, especially arbitrary categorical notions, when interpreting the output of a phylogenetic analysis. You can consult The Nine-Headed Dragon River, by Peter Matthiessen, if you would like further information.

Finally, we got to the topic implied by the workshop's title: Touching the Data. We had a brief run-through of the pre-existing datasets stored with this blog (see the upper right-hand corner), which cover some of the diversity of what practitioners have provided to date in the way of usable datasets with "known" phylogenetic patterns.

By far the most interesting, however, was the presentation of some recent datasets made available by members of the workshop, notably Axel Janke (bear species), Scot Kelcher (bamboo species) and Mattis List (Indo-European languages) (Jim Whitfield will present his datasets tomorrow morning). These datasets generated much interest, as they provide a diversity of different possible applications for phylogenetic networks. The idea from here on in the workshop is to address what can currently be done with these datasets and what we might like to do with them if the tools were available. This will help focus the participants on specific practical issues, which should lead to the progress that we hope to achieve.

It has rained most of the day, which is actually unusual -- intermittent rain is more common in this climate. We are currently waiting for the football to start: Germany versus Brazil. Tomorrow will be the Netherlands versus Argentina. It is risky being in this country this week! The current local betting is for an all-European final,an assessment that involves no cultural bias whatsoever.

09:59

Brian Foley wrote:

This paper is rather specific to HIV-1 with its very large population size within each infected individual, and rapid evolution rate. It would be interesting to see similar work with other organisms. Human Influenza A virus, for example, has an evolution rate very similar to HIV-1 but a very different transmission rate between infected individuals.

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01:52

SISRS is a new tool for extracting phylogenetically informative data directly from whole-genome or whole-transcriptome paired-end shotgun reads without a reference genome. Input for SISRS are FastQ files separated into folders by OTU (e.g. species). The output nexus file includes sites that are invariable within taxa and variable among taxa. The amount of missing data allowed can be included as input. A reference genome can be included to identify the location of the sites in the output alignment. SISRS is free and open source distributed under a GPL v3.0 license. SISRS can be dowloaded from http://bit.ly/1rLbl6x and the manuscript describing the SISRS method and successful simulations and case studies can be found at http://bit.ly/1k1mCYJ . Slides from my Evolution 2014 talk can be found at http://bit.ly/1rLbl6D . If you have trouble or results using SISRS please email me at Rachel.Schwartz@asu.edu . Rachel Schwartz, PhD Assistant Research Scientist Cartwright Lab Center for Evolutionary Medicine and Informatics The Biodesign Institute Arizona State University Tempe, AZ via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:52
Population Genetics, Conservation Genetics & Phylogeography One Postdoctoral Fellowship is available at CIBIO (http://cibio.up.pt), University of Porto, Portugal, in the field of population genetics and phylogeography, under the Program ON2. Candidates should have a solid research background in the interface between population genetics/genomics, phylogeography and conservation biology, as well as experience in fieldwork. They should master molecular biology techniques including genotyping (microsatellites) and sequencing, preferably using both Sanger and Next Generation Sequencing procedures, and be familiar with multiple and commonly used population genetics software tools. Topics to be developed during the Post-doc include but are not limited to i) analysis of population structure and relevance for conservation, ii) analysis of hybrid zones using multiple types of molecular markers in spatially explicit contexts, iii) genetic differentiation of populations and description of hidden biodiversity, particularly possible new species or subspecies, iv) identifying genes or genomic regions associated with incipient speciation processes, v) understanding of the domestication process and the genes/genomic regions underlying it. Projects can include a variety of species, both model and non-model organisms. Candidates should have a PhD in biology, preferably a minimum of 3 years of Post-doc and solid background in the field. They should have a good publication record in SCI journals in this area. Candidates should be good communicators, and speak and write fluently in English. The ranking of candidates will result from a global appreciation of the Curriculum vitae, possibly followed by an interview. The Fellowship will correspond to 1450€ per month (free of taxes). The contract will end on the 30th of June 2015. Applications are open between the 15th and the 31st of July 2014. Applications should be sent to bolsas.cibio@cibio.up.pt and will include a motivation letter, a detailed CV and the email contact of three referees. The jury is composed by: Dr. Raquel Godinho, Dr. Paulo Célio Alves and Prof. Nuno Ferrand de Almeida. Dr. Natália Dias is a substitute member. The selected candidate is expected to start immediately after selection. Candidates will be informed about the result of their application by email. Job Reference: ON2 _ CIBIO_FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-000030 Natália Dias Executive Coordinator CIBIO Natalia Dias via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:28
A special symposium on Copepod Evolution will be held at Hanyang University, Seoul Korea, at the Copepoda Conference organized by Professor Wonchoel Lee. Special Symposium on Copepod Evolution Tuesday, July 15, 9:00 am - 12:30 pm HIT building, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea Invited Speakers (30 minute talks) A. Evolutionary Adaptation to Environmental Change Carol Eunmi Lee, University of Wisconsin, USA Without Gills: Rapid evolution of osmoregulatory function in the copepod Eurytemora affinis during habitat invasions Hans G. Dam, University of Connecticut, USA Phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary thermal adaptation in the copepod genus Acartia B. Evolution of Parasitic Copepods Geoff Boxshall, The Natural History Museum The evolution of host specificity in parasitic copepods Frank Nilsen, University of Bergen, Norway The salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) genome: Some evolutionary implications based on the annotated gene-set. C. Genomic Regulation Grace Wyngaard, James Madison University, USA Can the “yolk genome” hypothesis explain the elimination of billions of basepairs during chromatin diminution of Cyclops in nutrient poor lakes? D. Zooplankton Metagenomics Ryuji Machida, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Community-based zooplankton genetic analyses: lessons from microbial studies Carol Eunmi Lee, Ph.D. Professor Center of Rapid Evolution (CORE) 430 Lincoln Drive, Birge Hall University of Wisconsin Madison, WI 53706 carollee@wisc.edu http://bit.ly/1xKJvHU Carol Eunmi Lee via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:00
Drs. Derek Hogan and Chris Bird at Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi are seeking a post-doc to help lead quantitative analyses of climate change impact, data gap analysis, and management prioritization for the Marianas Trench, Rose Atoll (Samoa), Pacific Remote Islands (Line Islands) Marine National Monuments. The position is part of an NOAA-funded project on assessing the impact of climate change on select Marine National Monuments and involves a close collaboration with Dr. Kim Selkoe at UC Santa Barbara. The post-doc will help lead spatial analyses to model the vulnerability of marine ecosystems and the intensity of climate change threats in order to compute and map impacts. In addition, the project will involve using expert elicitation surveys to quantify professional opinion about the relative importance of many categories of climate change stressors in relation to different ecosystems and species of particular concern. This work will be conducted in close collaboration with NOAA, NGOs, local stakeholders, and will help to define near- and long-term agendas for climate change remediation efforts in the tropics. The position will offer considerable latitude to devise and pursue additional analyses to address the underlying causes, future prospects, and prioritization of data gaps and management actions Desired qualifications include: - expertise in marine biodiversity and biogeography - experience conducting large-scale spatial analysis and conservation prioritization models - strong communication skills to coordinate efforts with project partners - a strong record of publication based on independent thinking - a collaborative approach to science but ability to work on tasks independently The position will begin ASAP, and funding is available for at least 1 year, pending performance. A competitive post-doc salary will be offered, including retirement plan and health benefits. The position will be based at Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi and will involve some travel to UC Santa Barbara. To apply, please email (subject line: MNM Climate Change PostDoc) a curriculum vitae, PhD transcripts (unofficial is fine), three reprints, and contact information for three references to chris.bird@tamucc.edu and james.hogan@tamucc.edu Review of applications will begin immediately, and will continue until the position is filled. “Bird, Chris” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:13
This survey study concerns evolution of cognitive reactions to music. Below, you will find general information about the study. After reading the information, you can decide whether you would like to participate in the survey. The link to the survey is: http://bit.ly/1ofIFw1 The purpose of this study is to explore how people experiences of music hace evolved across human populations and cultures. The study is part of a large project conducted by the Music Psychology Group at Uppsala University in Sweden. As a participant, you will be asked to complete an electronic survey on the internet. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.Your participation is voluntary. You are free to withdraw your participation from the study at any time. All responses in the survey will be recorded anonymously.The study is funded by the Swedish Research Council, and involves no commercial interests. Data collected will be used only for scientific purposes. We are not able to provide any monetary compensation, but your participation would make an important contribution to the scientific and evolutionary study of music, and would be much appreciated. A summary of the results will be available in early 2015 at this website: http://bit.ly/1ofIFw3 If you decide to participate in the study, please answer all questions as carefully as possible. The link to the survey is: http://bit.ly/1ofIFw1 “Andres J. Cortes” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:13
—_000_57D32D16924D4AB0B45EA043EBFA32C6ugaedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Burke lab in the Entomology department at the University of Georgia is recruiting PhD students for the Spring semester of 2015. Research in the lab focuses upon symbiotic relationships between microbes and animals, and uses functional and evolutionary genetics and genomics to examine how these kinds of relationships can occur and are maintained. In particular, we study the fascinating beneficial viruses that are harbored by parasitic wasps. Graduate students in the lab will generally work on the molecular genetics and genomics of microbial symbionts of animals and are encouraged to consider projects involving viral associations with parasitic wasps or other insects. Graduate students accepted into the Entomology program are guaranteed financial support for their 5-year program through Teaching Assistantships (TAs) or Research Assistantships (RAs), which includes an out-of-state tuition waiver. Additional funding exists for graduate student research and travel to scientific meetings. Interested students are also strongly encouraged to apply for graduate research fellowships, such as the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Importantly, students are eligible to apply for this and other fellowships in their final year as undergraduates. Please refer to the Burke lab website for detailed information about financial support and the University of Georgia graduate program in Entomology. The University of Georgia is a Tier I research university located in Athens, Georgia. The University of Georgia Entomology department has strong representation of faculty studying host/parasite relationships and vector biology, creating a collaborative environment in which students can benefit from interaction with other faculty and students. The Burke lab has been recently renovated and is well-equipped for molecular biology and genomics research. Athens is a city of 100,000 located in the Piedmont basin south of the Appalachian mountains in a green and leafy environment. The city not only has a terrific music scene, great restaurants, nearby mountains for hiking, art, cultural and sports events, etc., but it also has a very low cost of living index compared to many other places in the United States. Athens is conveniently located 90 minutes to the east of Atlanta, a major city with the largest airport in the US. Interested candidates should contact Gaelen Burke at grburke@uga.edu with a description of your 1) academic background, 2) research experience, 3) your general and specific interests in research in the Burke lab at the University of Georgia and 4) contact information for three references. Please also attach your current resume or Curriculum Vitae. Students must have a greater than 3.0 GPA (on a 4.0 scale) and must have taken the general GRE exam. Gaelen Burke Assistant Professor Department of Entomology University of Georgia Phone (706) 542-1863 Website: http://bit.ly/1ofIFfy —_000_57D32D16924D4AB0B45EA043EBFA32C6ugaedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Burke lab in the Entomology department at the University of Georgia is recruiting PhD students for the Spring semester of 2015.  Research in the lab focuses upon symbiotic relationships between microbes and animals, and uses functional and evolutionary genetics and genomics to examine how these kinds of relationships can occur and are maintained. In particular, we study the fascinating beneficial viruses that are harbored by parasitic wasps. Graduate students in the lab will generally work on the molecular genetics and genomics of microbial symbionts of animals and are encouraged to consider projects involving viral associations with parasitic wasps or other insects. Graduate students accepted into the Entomology program are guaranteed financial support for their 5-year program through Teaching Assistantships (TAs) or Research Assistantships (RAs), which includes an out-of-state tuition waiver. Additional funding exists for graduate student research and travel to scientific meetings. Interested students are also strongly encouraged to apply for graduate research fellowships, such as the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Importantly, students are eligible to apply for this and other fellowships in their final year as undergraduates. Please refer to the Burke lab website for detailed information about financial support and the University of Georgia graduate program in Entomology. The University of Georgia is a Tier I research university located in Athens, Georgia. The University of Georgia Entomology department has strong representation of faculty studying host/parasite relationships and vector biology, creating a collaborative environment in which students can benefit from interaction with other faculty and students. The Burke lab has been recently renovated and is well-equipped for molecular biology and genomics research. Athens is a city of 100,000 located in the Piedmont basin south of the Appalachian mountains in a green and leafy environment. The city not only has a terrific music scene, great restaurants, nearby mountains for hiking, art, cultural and sports events, etc., but it also has a very low cost of living index compared to many other places in the United States. Athens is conveniently located 90 minutes to the east of Atlanta, a major city with the largest airport in the US. Interested candidates should contact Gaelen Burke at grburke@uga.edu with a description of your 1) academic background, 2) research experience, 3) your general and specific interests in research in the Burke lab at the University of Georgia and 4) contact information for three references. Please also attach your current resume or Curriculum Vitae. Students must have a greater than 3.0 GPA (on a 4.0 scale) and must have taken the general GRE exam. Gaelen Burke Assistant Professor Department of Entomology University of Georgia Phone (706) 542-1863 Website: http://bit.ly/1ofIFfy —_000_57D32D16924D4AB0B45EA043EBFA32C6ugaedu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

July 7, 2014

23:50

CEBA 2nd Thematic school : ‘Advanced methods and applications in Ecology, Evolution and Control of Infectious Diseases (CEBA-EECID), with a focus on Neotropical infections’, 17 - 21 November 2014, Autonomous University of Yucatan, Merida, Mexico As part of its training programme, the LabEx CEBA organizes its second Thematic school on the field of ecology, evolution and control of infectious diseases (EECID). During one week, a dozen lectures and researchers will interact with up to 18 PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, originating from all around the world, on major recent advances in disease control and optimization of public health strategies in the fight against infections. CV and letters of motivation should be sent as two pdf files before September 7th, 2014 to jean-francois.guegan@ird.fr with the header ‘Application CEBA EECID’. On September 7th, 2014 registration will be closed. For more details, please check the Summer school website: http://bit.ly/1maOgad Best regards, On behalf of the organizing committee, Benjamin Roche International Research Unit UMMISCO Center for Mathematical and Computational Modeling of Complex Systems Research Institute for Development (IRD) 32, avenue Henri Varagnat 93143 Bondy Cedex, France Phone:+33629585460 e-mail:roche.ben@gmail.com web:http://bit.ly/1maOgaf roche.ben@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
18:00
Background: Recent molecular hypotheses suggest that some traditional suprageneric taxa of Characiformes require revision, as they may not constitute monophyletic groups. This is the case for the Bryconidae. Various studies have proposed that this family (considered a subfamily by some authors) may be composed of different genera. However, until now, no phylogenetic study of all putative genera has been conducted. Results: In the present study, we analyzed 27 species (46 specimens) of all currently recognized genera of the Bryconidae (ingroup) and 208 species representing all other families and most genera of the Characiformes (outgroup). Five genes were sequenced: 16SrRNA, Cytochrome b, recombination activating gene 1 and 2 and myosin heavy chain 6 cardiac muscle. The final matrix contained 4699 bp and was analyzed by maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses. The results show that the Bryconidae, composed of Brycon, Chilobrycon, Henochilus and Salminus, is monophyletic and is the sister group of Gasteropelecidae + Triportheidae. However, the genus Brycon is polyphyletic. Fossil studies suggest that the family originated approximately 47 million years ago (Ma) and that one of the two main lineages persisted only in trans-Andean rivers, including Central American rivers, suggesting a much older origin of Mesoamerican ichthyofauna than previously accepted. Conclusion: Bryconidae is composed by five main clades, including the genera Brycon, Chilobrycon, Henochilus and Salminus, but a taxonomic review of these groups is needed. Our results point to a possible ancient invasion of Central America, dating about 20.3 ± 5.0 Ma (late Oligocene - early Miocene), to explain the occurrence of Brycon in Central America.