news aggregator

February 20, 2015

04:32
Quantitative Genomics 2015 Friday 29 May 2015 Wellcome Trust Headquarters, London We are excited to announce Quantitative Genomics 2015 (QG15), a conference for students in quantitative genomics that will take place on Friday 29th of May at the Wellcome Trust Headquarters at Euston square in the very heart of London. The conference will focus on giving early-career researchers (Masters and PhD students) working at the forefront of mathematical and quantitative genomics a chance to present their work and learn from their peers. The conference will feature talks by Professor Brian Charlesworth from the University of Edinburgh and Nicole Soranzo from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Our renowned speakers represent the two sides of the spectrum of topics QG15 aims for: from evolutionary theory and mathematical models to new omics tools applied in biomedical research. It will provide an ideal opportunity to build international networks with current and future leaders in the field in an informal and relaxed environment. Registration costs have been kept to a minimum to ensure that QG15 is accessible to all interested students. Please refer to the QG15 website for more information and do not hesitate to contact us for further information ( quantgen@damtp.cam.ac.uk). We encourage you to pre-register (open now ) so we can keep you updated regarding deadlines and steps for abstract submission and registration. We hope to see you in London, QG15 Organising Committee Kaur Alasoo - PhD in Computational Biology, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute/University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK- Rajbir Batra - Wellcome Trust PhD in Mathematical Genomics and Medicine, Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute/University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK- Moises Exposito-Alonso -PhD in Evolutionary Genomics; Max Planck Institute,Tbingen Germany- Tiphaine Martin - DPhil in Genetics and Molecular Medicine; Kings College London, London, UK- Hannah Meyer - PhD in Bioinformatics, EBI/University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK- Sarah Morgan - PhD in Genetics of Neurodegeneration using Next-Generation Sequencing, University College London, London, UK- Matthias Thurner - DPhil in Genomic Medicine and Statistics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK- via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:57

Independent Group Leader Computational Biosciences 6-8 years, 1.6 Mio Euros. The position (see below) should fit perfectly for a theoretical evolutionist at advanced postdoc stage. Application is highly competitive. More information: http://bit.ly/19Ik7vJ Vienna is a great place for evolution, and in particular theory. Evolutionists in Vienna: see www.evolvienna.at Interested candidates should not hesitate to get in tough with one of us. Joachim Hermisson. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:25
http://bit.ly/1cwLiKE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF EVOLUTION Dear SSE Colleagues: Just a reminder that applications for the Hamilton Award are due Friday, February 20. The W.D. Hamilton Award (http://bit.ly/1CRHOc9) for Outstanding Student Presentation will be given to a student who has presented an outstanding talk at the annual meeting. You must submit a 400-word abstract and talk title. Finalists will be notified by March 13. Finalists will present their papers during a day-long symposium of Hamilton award candidate talks. This year, finalists will receive a registration waiver and a $500 travel stipend from the SSE. Learn more and find the link to apply HERE (http://bit.ly/1CRHOc9) Please make note of another award deadline that is upcoming. Rosemary Grant Research Award (http://bit.ly/1CRHMkA) - April 1 SSE Business Office PO Box 299 | St. Louis Missouri, 63166 314-577-9566 http://bit.ly/1cwLiKE Society for the Study of Evolution via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:11
The Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) is an internationally known research center located at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. IGS offers five different workshops as part of a professional development program organized by Dr. Michelle Giglio, a faculty member at IGS with over 17 years of experience in genomics and bioinformatics. Dr. Giglio has recruited IGS faculty and staff to form a highly experienced instruction team to provide workshop participants with the knowledge and skills needed to engage in numerous `omics applications. All IGS workshops are hands-on, providing attendees with real-world challenges and experience. Please see our workshop dates listed below. IMPORTANT DATES: Metagenome Analysis * March 3rd - 6th, 2015 (Open Enrollment Ends February, 27, 2015) * October 13th - 16th, 2015 Introduction to Programming for Bioinformatics * March 16th - 20th, 2015 Transcriptome Analysis * May 18th - 20th, 2015 Prokaryotic Comparative Genomics * September 29th - October 1st, 2015 Introduction to Genomics and Bioinformatics * November 2nd - 6th, 2015 FOR MORE INFORMATION & REGISTRATION: http://bit.ly/1BtNBtc EMAIL: Rene Nathaniel Workshop Administrative Coordinator rnathaniel@som.umaryland.edu “Nathaniel, Renee” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:40

—_000_37B90BBDF0BDA94498714B859271C92E24AEA42BREXMFintranetep_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable We are organizing a workshop in the Swiss Alps in June 2015 on the theme “Theoretical and empirical evidence of adaptation”. The format of the symposium is pretty informal and the plan is to have it in a remote (but beautiful) location in the Swiss Alps called La Fouly. The aim is to allow Swiss and international PhD students and postdocs to gather, present their work, and have close interactions with internationally renowned scientists in the field, all in a relaxed atmosphere. For further information on the workshop, including registration details, please see: http://bit.ly/19HYpYN via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:40
NC State University Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in Biological Complexity North Carolina State University is embarking on a new university-wide interdisciplinary initiative in biological complexity encompassing systems genetics, behavioral neurogenetics and neurogenomics, genome-environment interactions, ecological genetics, systems ecology, climate change, and computational biology and bioinformatics. Associated with the new initiative in biological complexity is a distinguished postdoctoral fellowship program. Applicants are expected to be near completion of a terminal doctorate degree, have a strong research record with evidence of exceptional scholarship, and embrace interdisciplinary research. Fellows will receive competitive stipends and independent research funds to initiate an innovative research program with guidance from a multidisciplinary mentoring committee in areas covered by the initiative in biological complexity. To apply for a fellowship, go to http://bit.ly/1AqXpRr. Provide a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a three-sentence statement of the most significant scientific problem(s) to be addressed in the near future, and statements of research interests. Three letters of recommendation should be sent to trudy_mackay@ncsu.edu. Review of applications will begin immediately, and continue until the position is filled. The start date can be as soon as June 1, 2015. NCSU is an AA/EO employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, veteran status or disability. In its commitment to diversity and equity, NC State University seeks applications from women, minorities, and persons with disabilities. NC State welcomes all persons without regard to sexual orientation. ADA Accommodations: please call 919-515-3148. Melissa Robbins via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:40
Cross-Disciplinary Visits and Training Grant The microMORPH RCN promotes and fosters cross-disciplinary training and interaction through a series of small grants that allow graduate students, post-doctoral researchers, and early career faculty to visit labs and botanical gardens. Being listed on the microMORPH community web page is required of all successful applicants (and encouraged for everyone else!). Award Amount: Each Year, microMORPH is able to fund five graduate student, post-doctoral, or early career faculty cross-training research opportunities for up to $3,500 to cover travel, lodging, and pier diem. Submission Deadline: The next microMORPH Cross Disciplinary Training Grant deadline is 11:30 pm March 1st, 2015. Eligibility: To be eligible for a microMORPH training grant you must fulfill one or more of the following requirements: 1) you must be a U.S. citizen or, 2) you must be affiliated with a U.S. university or institution (in a graduate program or working as a post-doc or faculty member), or 3) the lab you plan to visit for your training experience must be at a U.S. university of institution. How to Apply: For full application instructions (including list of required documents) and to submit applications, please visit the microMORPH website(http://bit.ly/1JFtnxo). Proposal Evaluation: Two members of the steering committee (one organismic and one molecular) and a third individual from outside the core participants (chosen by the steering committee) are charged with evaluating applications. Questions or Comments?: Contact Becky Povilus at RCNmicromorph@gmail.com ***** Undergraduate Summer Internships/Training Grants The microMORPH RCN promotes and fosters cross-disciplinary training and interaction through a series of small grants that allow undergraduates to visit labs and botanical gardens as well as gain invaluable laboratory experience while contributing to scientific discovery. Award Amount: Each year, microMORPH is able to fund ten 10-week research internships/training grants for undergraduates. $5,000 is available per grant, which can be used for travel and housing for the period of the internship. Submission Deadline: Undergraduate training grant proposals are due on 11:30 pm on March 1st, 2015 Eligibility: To be eligible for a microMORPH undergraduate training grant you must fulfill one or more of the following requirements: 1) you must be a U.S. citizen or, 2) you must be affiliated with a U.S. college, university, or institution (in an undergraduate program), or 3) the lab you plan to visit for your training experience must be at a U.S. university of institution. How to Apply: For full application instructions (including list of required documents) and to submit applications, please visit the microMORPH website(http://bit.ly/1JFtnxo). Proposal Evaluation: Two members of the steering committee (one organismic and one molecular) and a third individual from outside the core participants (chosen by the steering committee) are charged with evaluating applications. Questions or Comments?: Contact Becky Povilus at RCNmicromorph@gmail.com Pamela Diggle Professor Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology University of Connecticut 860-486-4788 “Diggle, Pamela” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:23
Short Course in Organismic Plant Biology 2015 Plant Anatomy: Development, Function, and Evolution At the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University June 22 July 3, 2015 The NSF-sponsored Research Coordination Network (RCN) microMORPH and the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University are pleased to announce our third summer short course, Plant Anatomy (with an emphasis on woody plants), June 22 July 3, 2015. This short course will be taught by experts from around the world as an intense, two-week lecture, laboratory, and living collections learning experience. The course will be based at the Weld Hill Research Building at the Arnold Arboretum, which offers a state-of-the-art microscopy laboratory for teaching and sits amid the 15,000+ living specimens of more than 2,200 species at the Arnold Arboretum. We invite applications from graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who wish to gain a solid foundation in plant anatomy from an organismic perspective, with a special focus on wood anatomy. COURSE INSTRUCTORS: Pieter Baas (Naturalis Biodiversity Center) William (Ned) Friedman (Harvard University) Peter Gasson (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew) Elisabeth Wheeler (North Carolina State University) COURSE SYLLABUS: Week 1: Basics of Plant Anatomy, Primary Tissues Week 2: Anatomy of Woody Plants APPLICATION INFORMATION: Applications from graduate students and postdoctoral researchers must be received by March 31, 2015 at 11:30 pm. Undergraduates in their final year of study, who have been admitted to a graduate or professional program for the fall of 2015, may also apply. Twelve participants will be chosen to attend. Funding for travel, accommodations, and meals will be provided by the microMORPH RCN and the Arnold Arboretum. Non-US participants are welcome! HOW TO APPLY: Please visit the microMORPH website (http://bit.ly/1Dzm5uW) for full instructions on how to submit an online application. Applicants will need to submit a short essay detailing their interest in the course and in plant biology, and two letters of recommendation. microMORPH is an NSF funded Research Coordination Network (RCN). The goal of this RCN is to promote interdisciplinary interactions in evolutionary developmental biology at the emerging interface between developmental biology and the study of intraspecific and interspecific variation. For additional information, contact Becky Povilus at (RCNmicromorph@gmail.com) Pamela Diggle Professor Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology University of Connecticut 860-486-4788 “Diggle, Pamela” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:54
Dear Colleagues, microMORPH is pleased to announce our second interdisciplinary workshop, “Phenotypic Plasticity: evolution at the intersection of ecology, genetics, and development” to be held at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University in Boston, MA on May 1st - 3rd, 2015. We are soliciting participation of graduate students and post docs interested in exploring plant phenotypic plasticity from the perspective of development and microevolution. microMOPRH is an NSF funded Research Coordination Network (RCN). The goal of the RCN is to promote interdisciplinary interactions in evolutionary developmental biology at the emerging interface between developmental biology and the study of natural intraspecific and interspecific variation. microMORPH INTERDISCIPLINARY WORKSHOPS bring together small groups of graduate students, post docs, and faculty with very different interests and expertise to interact and discuss critical concepts, intellectual objectives, emerging technologies, and analytical approaches that have the potential to advance our understanding of the evolution of plant form. All participants give presentations on their research and there is extensive discussion following each presentation. These workshops provide students and faculty with unique opportunities to explore new and challenging frontiers of knowledge. SPEAKERS AND FACULTY PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE: Sally Assmann (Pennsylvania State University), Ben Blackman (University of Virginia), David Des Marais (Harvard University, Arnold Arboretum), Michael Donoghue (Yale University), Lisa Donovan (University of Georgia), Andrew Doust (Oklahoma State University), Cynthia Jones (University of Connecticut), Neelima Sinha (Univeristy of California, Davis), Mark van Kleunen (Universität Konstanz), John Stinchcombe (University of Toronto), Sonia Sultan (Wesleyan University), William (Ned) Friedman (Harvard University, Arnold Arboretum), and Pamela Diggle (Univeristy of Connecticut). APPLICANT INFORMATION: We encourage applications from graduate students (at all stages of their dissertation research) and post doctoral researchers now through February 28th, 2015. Eight student or post doctoral participants will be chosen to attend and give presentations on their research. microMORPH will fund travel, accommodations, and meals for selected participants who are US-citizens or currently at US institutions (although non-US citizens not currently associated with US institutions are encouraged to apply, we cannot supply funding for them). HOW TO APPLY: Please visit the microMORPH website (http://bit.ly/1JFtnxo) for full instructions on how to submit applications. Applicants are asked to submit a CV, research statement that includes a description of the proposed talk, and letter of endorsement from their major advisor or supervising principle investigator. For additional information, contact Becky Povilus at (RCNmicromorph@gmail.com) Sincerely, Pamela Diggle (University of Connecticut) (microMORPH CO-PI) William (Ned) Friedman (Harvard University, Arnold Arboretum) (microMORPH CO-PI) Becky Povilus (Ph.D. Candidate, Harvard University) (microMORPH RA) microMORPH Contact information: email: RCNmicromorph@gmail.com website: http://bit.ly/1JFtnxo Pamela Diggle Professor Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology University of Connecticut 860-486-4788 “Diggle, Pamela” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:54

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Source: EVOLDIR
01:01

13 Graudate positions in Europe for Biocontrol — via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:45

Dear colleagues, We invite applications for research exchanges as part of an NSF-funded Research Coordination Network (http://bit.ly/1FuF1Hm ). Our research exchanges are intended to allow researchers the opportunity to spend ~3 weeks working intensively away from their home institution, within a group with complementary expertise, to investigate the evolutionary biology of infectious diseases. Two examples of possible research exchanges: 1) a theoretician visiting an empiricists lab to learn more about how data are collected, integrate that knowledge into models they have already developed, run in silico experiments to test competing hypotheses, and jointly design the next experiment to be undertaken by the empiricist. 2) two empiricists bringing new datasets from different systems to a theoreticians lab to provide a reality check for models, jointly test the fit between model and data and answer new questions about biology across systems. We request a concise application to include: your proposed research, with whom you propose collaboration and why, where the work will take place and an estimated budget (travel/subsistence). Eligibility: Anyone is eligible, however exchanges will be awarded preferentially to meritorious PhD students and postdocs. International participants are welcome, though the host institution must then be in the US. Quarterly application deadlines for 2015: 15 March, 15 June, 15 Sept and 15 Dec Where to submit an application: Please visit our website in order to submit an application electronically or for further information: http://bit.ly/1FuF1Hq Thanks and all best wishes, Andrea via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:45

A PhD studentship opportunity is available with Professor Mark Ragan and Dr Cheong Xin Chan in the Australian Research Council funded project “Symbiodinium: the evolutionary transition to coral reef symbiont”, at The University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience. Enthusiastic, qualified Masters or Honours graduates are encouraged to apply. The successful candidate is likely to have advanced skills in molecular or evolutionary bioscience, bioinformatics and/or computational biology. Knowledge and interest in coral reef biology would be an advantage. This position is created within a Discovery Projects grant funded by the Australian Research Council to understand the evolutionary transition of the dinoflagellate algae Symbiodinium to coral reef symbiont. Coral reefs are sustained by symbiosis between Symbiodinium and the coral host, and breakdown of this symbiosis under environmental stress results in coral bleaching and eventual death. Through genome sequencing of eight Symbiodinium isolates from reef corals plus two free-living relatives, the Project aims to identify genes that have been gained, lost or shared, or are under adaptive selection, along the trajectory from free-living forms to symbionts. The University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience is a leading global research institute. IMB was established in 2000 as UQ’s first research institute and is the cornerstone of one of the largest bioscience research precincts in Australia. Acceptance is contingent on the candidate (a) being exempt from registration fees, or securing a full fee waiver from the University of Queensland; and (b) securing at least 50% scholarship support for living stipend. Please email enquiry to: Professor Mark Ragan (m.ragan@uq.edu.au) The University of Queensland Institute for Molecular Bioscience More info about Ragan group: http://bit.ly/1BtrcMq More info about postgraduate studies at the IMB: http://bit.ly/1CRQ8el via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

February 19, 2015

23:41

** Research Officer / Senior Research Officer ** A postdoctoral research-focused position is available at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. The University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience is a leading global research institute. IMB was established in 2000 as UQ’s first research institute and is the cornerstone of one of the largest bioscience research precincts in Australia. This position is created within a Discovery Projects grant funded by the Australian Research Council to understand the evolutionary transition of the dinoflagellate algae Symbiodinium to coral reef symbiont. Coral reefs are sustained by symbiosis between Symbiodinium and the coral host, and breakdown of this symbiosis under environmental stress results in coral bleaching and eventual death. Through genome sequencing of eight Symbiodinium isolates from reef corals plus two free-living relatives, the Project aims to identify genes that have been gained, lost or shared, or are under adaptive selection, along the trajectory from free-living forms to symbionts. The person appointed to this position will be responsible for assembly, analysis and interpretation of genome-scale sequence data from Symbiodinium and related species within the Discovery Project. The successful applicant will collaborate as appropriate in the identification of potential genomic signatures of symbiosis and adaptive selection. There are opportunities to address individually-developed and collaboratively-generated research questions, and to supervise honours, masters and/or doctoral students. This is a full-time, fixed term appointment for 2 years (with the possibility of renewal pending funding) at Academic Research Level A or B. The level of appointment will be commensurate with the successful applicant’s qualifications and experience. For Level A, the remuneration package will be in the range AUD 76864 - 82510 per annum, plus employer superannuation contributions of up to 17% (total package AUD 89930 - 96536 per annum). For Level B, the remuneration package will be in the range AUD 86853 - 103138 per annum, plus employer superannuation contributions of up to 17% (total package AUD 101618 - 120671 per annum). Applicants should possess a PhD in molecular biology, microbiology, marine biology, genomics, bioinformatics or a related discipline, with significant data-management, computational and statistical components. He or she should have at least three years’ full-time experience (during the PhD and/or otherwise), or its equivalent, in a relevant area of molecular biology, microbiology, genomics, bioinformatics or a related field. Experience in scientific programming and/or scripting and familiarity with working under UNIX environment are essential. Applicants should also have excellent knowledge of a modern scripting language and Bayesian and frequentist statistics, and of the R package or similar. A demonstrated high-level ability to write scientific papers in clear, grammatically correct English is also essential. Contact Information Professor Mark Ragan (m.ragan@uq.edu.au) The University of Queensland Institute for Molecular Bioscience More info: http://bit.ly/1EvXTqv via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
14:23

PubPeer is a web site where people can discuss published articles, anonymously if they prefer. I finally got a chance to play with it a few days, it it was a fascinating experience. You simply type in the DOI or PMID for an article and see if anyone has said anything about that article. It also automatically pulls comments from PubMed Commons, for example the article Putting GenBank data on the map has a comment that was originally published as a guest post on this blog. PubPeer knows about this blog post via Altmetric, which is another nice feature. PubPeer also has browser extensions which, if you install one, automatically flags DOIs on web pages that have comments on PubPeer. Also nice.

So, I took PubPeer for a spin. While browsing GenBank and GBIF, as you do, I came across the following paper: "Conservation genetics of Australasian sailfin lizards: Flagship species threatened by coastal development and insufficient protected area coverage" doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2013.10.014. Some of the sequences from this paper, such as KF874877 are flagged as "UNVERIFIED". Puzzled by this, I raised the issue on PubPeer (see https://pubpeer.com/publications/D1090D7AF8178B1A10C4C45AC1006E ). A little further digging led to the suggestion that they were numts. After raising the issue on Twitter, one of the authors (Cameron Siler) got in touch and reported that there had been an accidental deletion of a single nucleotide in an alignment. Cameron is updating the Dryad data (http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1fs7c ) and GenBank sequences.

I like the idea that there is a place we can go to discuss the contents of a paper. It's not controlled by the journal, and you can either identify yourself or remain anonymous if you prefer. Not everyone is a fan of this mode of commentary, especially it is possible for people to make all sorts of accusations while remaining anonymous. But it's a fascinating project, and well worth spending some time browsing around (what IS it with physicists?). For anyone interested in annotating data, it's also a nice example of one possible approach.

Source: iPhylo

February 18, 2015

23:36
Other: volunteer field assistance on plant insect interactions in eastern USA, summer 2015 Volunteer field assistance needed for research in eastern USA from June 15 V September 15, 2015, potential bachelor/master thesis. Within my PhD project I am quantifying the interaction between the native plant species Silene stellata (Caryophyllaceae) and its specialized pollinating seed predator Hadena ectypa (Noctuidae) along a north-south gradient of their range and the implications of climate change on this interaction. I am offering a bachelor or master student to accompany my field work in summer 2015 with the potential to conduct his/her bachelor or master thesis within the project. Details can be found under the following link: http://bit.ly/1FwA4Cy For further information or any questions please contact: Nicola Seitz, seitz@umd.edu, phone: +49-157-52114695  Nicola Seitz via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:38
POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH AND TEACHING ASSOCIATE IN VERTEBRATE MORPHOLOGY The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Brown University is seeking a Postdoctoral Associate to join the teaching staff of a highly collaborative, team-taught medical school human anatomy course, and to conduct research in vertebrate morphology. The primary teaching responsibility is in the Human Anatomy course for first-year medical students, with additional duties teaching advanced medical students and preparing anatomical teaching materials. Brown offers many opportunities for research collaborations with faculty in evolutionary morphology and excellent facilities for research. Applicants should contact a morphology faculty member to discuss potential research collaborations (Professors Elizabeth Brainerd, Stephen Gatesy, Thomas Roberts, and Sharon Swartz). This position is available for the 2015-2016 academic year (anticipated start date is July 1, 2015) with a possibility for annual renewal for a maximum of three years total. Applicants must have potential for excellence in teaching and research, and all requirements for a doctoral degree completed before start of the position. Prior experience in a cadaver-based gross anatomy course preferred, but not required. Salary is NIH scale. Applicants should submit a CV, statements of teaching philosophy and research interests, up to three representative publications, and names of three references. Application materials should be sent by e-mail to Ms. Kimberly Abbott (Kimberly_Abbott@Brown.edu). General questions about the position may be addressed to the course director, Dr. Dale Ritter (Dale_Ritter@Brown.edu). Application review will begin March 16, 2015. Brown University is an Equal Opportunity Employer Elizabeth Brainerd Professor, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Brown University, Box G-B210 Providence RI 02912 o: 401-863-9261 Beth Brainerd via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:35
Ruth Shaw’s Research Group in the Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior at the University of Minnesota is seeking applicants for an NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position in summer 2015 to study the process of ongoing adaptation in experimental populations of partridge pea (*Chamaecrista fasciculata*) in prairie habitat. The student will work closely with Dr. Ruth Shaw and Dr. Seema Sheth to develop an independent project in the area of plant evolutionary genetics, with possibilities ranging from estimating heritability and phenotypic selection on various plant traits to conducting studies of pollination ecology. The student will gain invaluable experience in performing field work and in conducting an independent research project, from hypothesis formulation through oral and written dissemination of results, thereby preparing the student for a career in inquiry-based scientific research. The student must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident and should be enrolled as an undergraduate in Fall 2015. The ideal candidate should enjoy working outdoors and have an interest in learning about the evolution and ecology of plants in the Midwest prairies, and candidates planning to pursue a graduate career in evolution, ecology, or conservation biology are particularly well-suited for this position. The REU intern will receive a stipend of $5,000 and room and board in the Twin Cities (with occasional overnight travel to field sites). Costs of travel to and from the Twin Cities will also be provided. The deadline to apply for this position is March 9, 2015, and the 10-week internship will begin on Monday, June 8 and end on Friday, August 14. Please contact Seema Sheth (snsheth@umn.edu) for more information. The University of Minnesota provides equal access to and opportunity in its programs, facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. Individuals of underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to apply. Please spread the word to any interested and qualified undergraduates. To apply, please e-mail the following application materials to Seema Sheth (snsheth@umn.edu) with the subject line “REU” no later than March 9, 2015: 1) a statement explaining the following: - Why you are interested in this position? - What previous experience do you have that is relevant for this position? - What are your future plans? - What dates are you available to start and end this position? - confirm eligibility for the REU program - the name of the person who will serve as your reference - your e-mail address and phone number 2) resume 3) transcript (unofficial is acceptable) 4) 1 letter of recommendation (sent by your reference) For more information about Ruth Shaw’s research group, visit: ruthgshaw.wordpress.com Seema N. Sheth Postdoctoral Associate Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior University of Minnesota E-mail: snsheth@umn.edu Phone: (612) 625-5709 seemasheth.weebly.com Seema Sheth via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:53

Hello, Please find below the description of a PhD position to ‘Search for unknown environmental sequences of medical/biological interest using large sequence similarity networks’** Our knowledge on the evolution of important gene families etc. have so far largely relied on the comparative analysis of sequences from cultured microbial organisms and their MGE, both from a medical and from a more fundamental perspective. For example,the drug resistance genes we know, or the DNA and RNA polymerases, or ribosomal subunits we know, were mostly studied in organisms with cultured genomes, which represent a fraction of Life on Earth. The conservation, rate of transfer, mutation or recombination rates, and Ka/Ks ratio of these sequences have notably been investigated, suggesting which gene families are more conserved, and which ones are more evolvable. Importantly, the growing amount of molecular data from environmental samples or single cells (with the current development of single cell metagenomics) is now providing important additional data to test whether genetic diversity in environmental sequences is significantly larger than genetic diversity in the gene families of cultured organisms (and their MGE). A positive answer, indicating a potential greater evolvability of environmental gene families than currently known, would thus challenge much of our current biological inferences, because it would show to which extent the complexity of genes and genomes evolutionary history had been underestimated. Sequence similarity networks offer a promising complementary approach to phylogenetics to analyze metagenomic and genomic data and to investigate highly divergent gene forms and relationships of distant homology. These graphs allow for mathematical analyses of genetic diversity and similarities over dozens of millions of sequences, providing a powerful framework to address the evolution of composite genes and genomes. Our lab is now looking for a PhD student in evolutionary bio-informatics, who will be funded for three years by an ERC grant (for a salary of 35,000 euros/year; approximately 1753 euros/ month after taxes). The candidate will take advantage of graph properties and algorithms from the graph theory, inspired from the study of social, regulatory, and interaction networks, and apply them on publically available and original environmental data toaddress questions such as: - Can we detect new forms of polymerases/restriction enzymes in temperate or cold environments ? - Can we detect highly divergent drug resistance genes in the environment? - Can we identify divergent environmental homologs of usually strongly conserved gene families in each/all domain(s) of life (such as ribosomal protein coding genes)? The observation of conserved divergent groups of environmental sequences may suggest the existence of still undetected deep-branching microbial lineages in nature He/she will also identify environments rich in divergent gene forms and design original primers to look for microbes with highly unusual genes through single cell genomic studies. The PhD candidate will work within a consortium of friendly bioinformaticians (Philippe Lopez), evolutionary biologists (Eric Bapteste), and graph theorists (Michel Habib, Laurent Viennot), and be hosted in the University Pierre and Marie Curie in the center of Paris, France. The current team description and publications can be found at:http://bit.ly/1eWCsAs The candidate should have a good background in bio-informatics, and/or a strong interest for evolutionary biology.The position will start as soon as possible, ideally as early as June 2015. Applicants are requested to send a detailed resume, a motivation letter, a pdf copy of their masters thesis, and the names of two scientific referees to: eric.bapteste@snv.jussieu.fr A first round of applications will be closed by May 15, 2015. Eventually, a second round of applications will be considered for a start in September/October 2015. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:53
Dear All We have recently identified a need to rationalise the amount/volume of ethanol preserved specimens in the laboratory. In addition to regular housekeeping, rationalisation and outsourcing, one solution could be draining the existing ethanol, air drying and then replacing with either a DMSO (EDTA, NaCl), or RNAlater style solutions. Therefore, I would be really keen to find out from the community if any laboratories had been through this process and road tested the samples long term following the downstream preservation approaches. Alternatively, if anyone could identify the molecular biological reasons why this would not be a good idea, it would be good to find out. As always, I will collate and repost emerging solutions for the benefit of the community. Many thanks to EvolDir and hope to hear from you regarding identifying solutions to what could be a developing issue for many of us. Cheers and best wishes Si Simon Creer Senior Lecturer Molecular Ecology and Fisheries Genetics Lab Environment Centre Wales Building School of Biological Sciences Bangor University Bangor Gwynedd LL57 2UW UK e-mail: s.creer@bangor.ac.uk Tel: +1248 382302 Fax: +1248 382569 Home Page: http://bit.ly/1AuWXn1 Skype: spideycreer Twitter: @spideycreer Simon Creer via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR