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April 3, 2015

01:53
*Postdoctoral Scientist in Analysis of pathogen interactions and pathogen communities* A 24 months Postdoctoral Scientist position is available in September 2015 at the Institute of Research for Development (IRD), in Montpellier, France. The work will be performed in the research group headed by Dr. Benjamin Roche. The project is funded by a grant from the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR). Scientific context: The proposed project will study how pathogen interactions, through immunological, ecological or social mechanisms, can take place in space and time to shape pathogen communities in human populations. In addition of the intriguing knowledge produced in fundamental ecology by this project, major public health perspectives are also expected. To answer these questions, two unique datasets are available in this project. The first one, focusing at a population scale, includes weekly notifications of more than 30 pathogens within an homogeneous area. The second dataset, targeting an individual scale, relies on a human cohort involving more than 4,000 individuals who have been screened for about 15 pathogens. Position description: The candidate will combine theoretical modeling of multi-pathogen systems with cutting-edge statistical analysis of the available dataset in order to: (i) characterizing robustly the different kind of pathogen interactions, (ii) understanding the ecological pressures shaping pathogen communities and (iii) predicting the outcomes of the different public health strategies on the structure of pathogen communities. The candidate will have a PhD in Biological Sciences and a demonstrated experience in ecological/epidemiological modeling of infectious diseases. Interested candidates should apply by June 1st by sending (1) a letter of motivation, (2) a CV with publication list, and (3) the names, institutions and email addresses of three references to Dr. Benjamin Roche at benjamin.roche@ird.fr . Living at Montpellier:http://bit.ly/1rsnOrN via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:22
–_000_2B0B68B37515B9468BC274F705F374B958013BFFTIS102uopnetply_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Plymouth University, Devon, UK Lecturer/Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer/Reader) in Animal Behaviour and Welfare The School of Biological Sciences at Plymouth University is looking to appoint dynamic and enthusiastic academics to contribute to its ongoing success and growth. The School has existing research and teaching strengths in areas of ecology, animal behaviour, microbiology, food security, ecotoxicology, and environmental risk assessment. You will have experience of research in animal behaviour and /or animal welfare to complement our existing research and teaching profile. We particularly encourage applications from those whose research focuses on the mechanistic underpinning of animal behaviour and animal welfare (e.g. physiology, neurobiology). Although there is some flexibility the post holder will be required to deliver teaching in animal physiology and/or health within the general wider context of behaviour and welfare. For informal discussion on this post please contact Dr Sarah Collins, Associate Professor in Animal Behaviour, tel: 01752584616 email: sarah.collins@plymouth.ac.uk Full details: http://bit.ly/1Ciu09C via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:50

We are pleased to announce that general registration for AGA2015: Chromosome Evolution: Molecular Mechanisms and Evolutionary Consequences is now open. This meeting will be held on Bainbridge Island near Seattle, starting the evening of August 17 and concluding the morning of August 20. For more information, poster abstract submission, and registration, go to: http://bit.ly/1NLTkNP Space is limited for what promises to be a very popular small meeting. Registration will close on June 30, or as soon as space is filled, so register early! Anjanette Baker
 Managing Editor, Journal of Heredity http://bit.ly/18QeuEM Manager,
 American Genetic Association http://bit.ly/15HcX0C 2030 SE Marine Science Dr Newport, OR 97366 http://on.fb.me/18Qex3p AGAJOH@oregonstate.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:50
Computational and Statistical Genomics Branch National Human Genome Research Institute National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship in Bioinformatics and Evolutionary Genomics A postdoctoral training position is currently available in the Computational and Statistical Genomics Branch (CSGB) of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The position is located in the laboratory of Andy Baxevanis, Ph.D., whose research group uses comparative genomics approaches to better-understand the molecular innovations that drove the surge of diversity in early animal evolution. The overarching theme of Dr. Baxevanis’ research program is focused on how non-traditional animal models convey critical insights into human disease research. With this translational context in mind, Dr. Baxevanis’ group is currently leading an international effort to sequence two cnidarian species: Hydractinia echinata and Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus. The regenerative abilities of these colonial hydrozoans make them excellent models for the study of key questions related to pluripotency, allorecognition, and stem cell biology, work that will be significantly advanced by the availability of high-quality whole-genome sequencing data from these organisms. In addition, and in collaboration with colleagues at the Whitney Marine Laboratory of the University of Florida, the group has now begun sequencing Chaetopterus, a polychaete worm that exhibits exceptional regenerative abilities; this organism also shows particular promise for advancing our understanding of early developmental processes and bioluminescence. The successful applicant will have the opportunity to develop and apply bioinformatics approaches to these and other large-sc ale genomic data sets, focusing on the evolution of specific protein families, with an emphasis on examining their putative roles in disease causation. Candidates should have or be close to obtaining a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in bioinformatics, computational biology, computer science, molecular biology, or a closely related field. Candidates with a background in evolutionary biology are particularly encouraged to apply. Programming skills and experience in the application of computational methods to genomic data are highly desirable. Applicants must possess good communication skills and be fluent in both spoken and written English. The ability to learn how to use new software and quickly become expert in its use, critical thinking, problem-solving abilities, and the ability to work semi-independently are required. The NIH Intramural Research Program is on the Bethesda, Maryland campus and offers a wide array of training opportunities for scientists early in their careers. The funding for this position is stable and offers the trainee wide latitude in the design and pursuit of their research project. The successful candidate will have access to NHGRI’s established and robust bioinformatics infrastructure, as well as resources made available through NIH’s Center for Information Technology (CIT) and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Interested applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, a detailed letter of interest, and the names of three potential referees to Dr. Baxevanis at andy@mail.nih.gov. For more information on CSGB and NHGRI’s Intramural Research Program, please see http://1.usa.gov/1GmS7di. DHHS and NIH are Equal Opportunity Employers and encourage applications from women and minorities. via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:38

Volunteer @ Evolution 2015 - June 26-30 Casa Grande Resort - Guaruj, Brazil Volunteer positions are available to graduate student members of the ASN, SSE, and SSB. Volunteers will work for one full day during the meeting in return for a reimbursement of their registration fee (early rate for graduate student members). To apply, please send an email to evolmeetingvolunteer@gmail.com (in English) stating your interest in volunteering and indicating whether you have any other means of financial support for attending. Applications will be accepted until Apr. 6, after which volunteers will be selected and the chosen individuals will be informed by Apr. 12 (a few days before the early registration deadline). If you do not hear by this date it means that you were unfortunately not selected. Closer to the meeting, volunteers will be offered the opportunity to indicate their job preferences (on a first-come first-served basis). There is no guarantee that you will get your top choice however. Typical jobs include being a session monitor (helping with computer/AV equipment) or working at the registration desk. Reimbursements will be processes after the meeting, subject to confirmation that the work assignments was successfully completed. An ability to communicate effectively in English is required. howard.rundle@uottawa.ca via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:03

Dear Colleagues, The Society of Molecular Biology and Evolution Satellite Meeting on Mutation, Repair and Evolution, will take place May 11-14th at Indiana University, Bloomington Campus. This meeting will explore the biochemical processes involved in mutation and repair and their relevant impact on genome evolution. Topics will focus on genomic and environmental features that drive mutation processes, as well as the contributions of mutation, selection, and drift on genome evolution. Registration, abstract submission, and further details are available at our website: http://bit.ly/1EOLdPc. Travel grants are available for underrepresented minorities. Costs for registration are $150 SMBE and IU affiliates; $190 for other attendees. Registration includes access to all talks, morning breakfast, lunch and coffee breaks (Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday). Keynote speakers for this meeting are : Patricia Foster (Indiana University) and Peter Keightley (University of Edinburgh, UK) Invited Speakers : Vaughn Cooper – Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire, USA. Laurent Duret – Director of Research, University Lyon 1 Claude Bernard / CNRS, France. Thomas W. Glover – Professor of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School. Matthew Hahn - Professor of Biology and Informatics, Indiana University, USA. Ruth Hershberg – Assistant Professor, Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Israel. Sue Jinks-Robertson – Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University, USA. Vaishali Katju – Associate Professor, University of New Mexico, USA. Thomas Kunkel – NIH Distinguished Investigator, NIEHS, USA. Lawrence Loeb – Principal Investigator, University of Washington, USA. Michael Lynch – Professor of Biology, Indiana University, USA. Kateryna Makova – Director of Center for Medical Genomics, Penn State University, USA. Anna Malkova – Professor of Biology, University of Iowa, USA. Polina Shcherbakova – Research Faculty, University of Nebraska, USA. Graham Walker – Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA. Wei Yang – Principal Investigator, NIDDK, USA. Jianzhi Zhang – Principal Investigator, University of Michigan, USA. Rebecca Zufall – Associate Professor, University of Houston, USA. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

April 2, 2015

02:22
–_000_B35826A8D24B4519965AC1C092EDEA84wsuedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable POSTDOC: Genomic ecology/evolution of insect-induced phenotypes A postdoctoral position is available in the Nabity Lab (www.nabitylab.org) at Washington State University in Pullman, WA, where we focus on understanding insect-induced plant phenotypes using eco-physiological and genomic assessment of both plants and insects. The ideal candidate must have earned a PhD in plant biology, entomology, or related subjects in the past 5 years. The candidate should also possess a strong interest in evolutionary ecology or genetics and computational/bioinformatic experience with sequence data. The successful candidate will be expected to perform field and lab-based experiments, conduct/learn bioinformatics analyses, and work well with students. The position is available for up to 2 years, depending on performance, with a preferred start date of August/September 2015 (actual start date is flexible). Research will focus on aphid-like phylloxerids, their modes of plant manipulation, and the evolution of gall induction, but independent research in line with the lab goals will be encouraged. Please send a CV, a description of research interests, and contact information for 3 references by email to Dr. Paul Nabity (paul.nabity@wsu.edu) by June 1, 2015. Dr Paul D. Nabity, Assistant Professor Dept. of Entomology Washington State University http://bit.ly/1DqVYak paul.nabity@wsu.edu –_000_B35826A8D24B4519965AC1C092EDEA84wsuedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=“us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable POSTDOC: Genomic ecology/evolution of insect-induced phenotypes A postdoctoral position is available in the Nabity Lab (www.nabitylab.org) at Washington State  University in Pullman, WA, where we focus on understanding insect-induced plant phenotypes using eco-physiological  and genomic assessment of both plants and insects. The ideal candidate must have earned a PhD in  plant biology, entomology, or related subjects in the past 5 years. The candidate should also possess  a strong interest in evolutionary ecology or genetics and computational/bioinformatic experience with  sequence data. The successful candidate will be expected to perform field and lab-based  experiments, conduct/learn bioinformatics analyses, and work well with students. The position is  available for up to 2 years, depending on performance, with a preferred start date of  August/September 2015 (actual start date is flexible). Research will focus on aphid-like phylloxerids,  their modes of plant manipulation, and the evolution of gall induction, but independent research in  line with the lab goals will be encouraged. Please send a CV, a description of research interests, and  contact information for 3 references by email to Dr. Paul Nabity (paul.nabity@wsu.edu) by June 1,  2015. Dr Paul D. Nabity, Assistant Professor Dept. of Entomology Washington State University http://bit.ly/1DqVYak paul.nabity@wsu.edu

–_000_B35826A8D24B4519965AC1C092EDEA84wsuedu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:35

The grassland ecology group at Bern University of Applied Sciences, in collaboration with the Plant Ecology Section of the Institute of Plant Sciences at the University of Bern, is offering the following vacancy starting on June 1, 2015 limited to 3 years PhD position in plant ecology (Switzerland) Effects of drought and land use on invasibility and biotic filters including soil biota in semi-natural grassland Your duties: - Collect plant community data from a multi-site multi-factorial experiment across Switzerland including manipulations of precipitation, competition for light and soil biota and additions of plant species of contrasting traits and origins - Conduct supplementary field and greenhouse experiments to test hypotheses on how drought impacts biotic interactions between seedlings, mycorrhizal fungi, and soil-borne pathogens and herbivores - Collaborate in the Swiss NSF project Drought legacy effects on grassland invasibility Your profile: - Enthusiastic and independent student with a strong interest in conceptual issues of ecology - Excellent Masters degree in a relevant field of research, e.g. - Experience in experimental ecology and in the design and statistical analysis of ecological experiments - Good command of English and ambition to publish in international journals - Good knowledge of species in grassland and interest in working in the field We offer: - Collaboration and support in a team with plant community ecologists at HAFL - Support and general training with the plant ecology group at University of Bern - Salary in accordance with the Swiss National Science Foundation The position is with PD Dr Andreas Stampfli (http://bit.ly/1alKbxo) and Prof. Dr Markus Fischer (http://bit.ly/1alK9FN) Please use our online application system: www.bfh.ch/jobs Evaluation of applications starts on 4 May 2015 Your contact for any questions you may have about this job: Michaela Zeiter (michaela.zeiter@ips.unibe.ch) michaela.zeiter@ips.unibe.ch via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:19
A PhD or PostDoc position in a 3-year project funded by the FWF (Austrian Science Fund) is available at the Institute of Zoology at the University of Graz, Austria, in the group of Prof. Kristina Sefc. The project investigates cuckoldry in a cichlid fish with biparental brood care. The study species (Variabilichromis moorii, from Lake Tanganyika in Africa) has high levels of extra-pair paternity (Sefc et al. 2008, Mol. Ecol. 17, 2531-2543), and we now aim to understand why nest-holding males failed to evolve more efficient defenses against cuckoldry. The PhD/postdoc candidate will carry out field work, genetic analysis and behavioral experiments to answer questions about paternity, brood care, offspring recognition, mate choice and relatedness structure within the population. We are looking for a highly motivated person with an MSc or PhD in a related discipline (e.g., zoology, behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology). Field work at Lake Tanganyika is an important part of the project (up to four trips are required); therefore, candidates experienced with aquatic field work are particularly encouraged to apply. Field work will require SCUBA diving in shallow ( via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:03

Graduate position for the completion of a PhD in theoretical evolution and development 1.Job/ project description: The main objectives of the PhD project is to: a) Develop mathematical models of the relationship between genetic and phenotypic variation (or genotype-phenotype map) b) Understand how this relationship affects morphological evolution. c) Develop models about the evolution of gene networks and embryonic development in general. A core concept of current evolutionary biology is the genotype-phenotype (GP) map, which connects genetic variation to phenotypic variation and to potential for evolutionary change. The aim of the project is to develop or investigate models of the GP map that can be related to specific biological study systems or specific evolutionary questions investigated by the group. There is considerable flexibility as to the exact topics, and the interests of the candidate will be important in defining the study objects. These models can be abstract or linked to specific biological systems. The biotechnology institute includes a range of experimental biologitst working on several systems. The supervisor of the theoretical aspects will be Dr. Salazar-Ciudad but the PhD would include close collaboration with Jukka Jernvall group and would include collaboration with developmental biologists, bioinformaticians, paleontologists and other evolutionary and systems biologists. The work may also include, optionally, collaboration, and spending some time, in Barcelona. The modeling can focus on gene network regulation, cell-cell communication, cell mechanical interactions and developmental mechanisms in general and, optionally, artifical in silico evolution. 2. Requirements: The applicant must be a biologists, preferably with a strong background in either evolutionary biology, developmental biology, systems biology or theoretical biology. Some knowledge of ecology, zoology, cell and molecular biology are also desirable. Bioinformaticians, systems biologists or computer biologists that do not have a degree in biology (e.g. Computer scientists, physicists or engineers) would not be considered (not replied). Programming skills or a willingness to acquire them is required. The most important requirement is a strong interest and motivation on science, gene networks and evolution. A capacity for creative and critical thinking is also desirable. Prior experience in evolutionary or developmental biology is an advantage, and the candidate may be required to do some programming (although how much may depend on the exact project). 3. Description of the position: The fellowship will be for a period of up to 4 years (100% research work: no teaching involved). The purpose of the fellowship is research training leading to the successful completion of a PhD degree. Salary according to Finnish PhD student salaries. 4. The application must include: -Application letter including a statement of interests -CV (summarizing degrees obtained, subjects included in degree and grades, average grade) -Application should be send to Isaac Salazar-Ciudad by email: isaac.salazar@helsinki.fi Foreign applicants are advised to attach an explanation of their University’s grading system. Please remember that all documents should be in English. 5. Examples of recent publications by Isaac Salazar-Ciudad group. -Salazar-Ciudad I1, Marn-Riera M. Adaptive dynamics under development-based genotype-phenotype maps. Nature. 2013 May 16;497(7449):361-4. -Salazar-Ciudad I, Jernvall J. A computational model of teeth and the developmental origins of morphological variation. Nature. 2010 Mar 25;464(7288):583-6. 6. Interested candidates should check our group webpage: http://bit.ly/1mGzzYo The deadline is 15 of June (although candidates may be selected as they come). Isaac Salazar-Ciudad: isaac.salazar@helsinki.fi isalazar@mappi.helsinki.fi via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:03
Dear colleagues, Registration is open for the workshop “Exploratory Methods for Population Genetics Using R”, October 5-9, 2015. Instructors: Dr . Emmanuel Paradis [ (Institut de Recherche pour le Dveloppement, France) and Dr. Thibaut Jombart (Imperial College London, UK). PLACE: Facilities of the Centre de Restauraci i Interpretaci Paleontologic, Els Hostalets de Pierola, Barcelona (Spain). COURSE WEBPAGE: http://bit.ly/1I6I4LL This course is for post-graduate students and researchers who want to acquire knowledge on the analysis of population genetic data using R. The topics covered will include basic concepts in population genetics (descriptive statistics, allele frequencies, graphical exploration of data, linkage disequilibrium), the classical analysis of temporal and spatial structure (Fst and its variants -Gst, D, …-, AMOVA, haplotype networks, mismatch distribution), and some advanced topics such as multivariate analyses and the coalescent. How to handle and manipulate variant calling format (VCF) files, which are becoming the standard for storing large-scale population genetic data from NGS technologies, will also be covered. The objectives of the course are: (i) to learn the theoretical and practical bases of population genetics, (ii) to know how to choose a strategy of population genetic analysis, (iii) to be able to handle the appropriate tools for analysis of population genetic data, from the simplest to the most advanced ones. This course is co-organized by Transmitting Science, the Institut Catal de Paleontologia M. Crusafont and the Centre de Restauraci i Interpretaci Paleontologic. Places are limited and will be covered by strict registration order. Please feel free to distribute this information between your colleagues if you consider it appropriate. With best regards Soledad De Esteban-Trivigno, Ph.D. Course Director courses@transmittingscience.org Transmitting Science soledad.esteban@transmittingscience.org via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:47

Please find below an updated version of the previous announcement, this time including a functional link to the registration webpage. Workshop announcement - registration deadline approaching (15 April 2015) A few places are still available in our workshop on “Theoretical and empirical evidence of adaptations” to be held in La Fouly (Valais, Switzerland) on June 17-20, 2015. The aim of the proposed symposium is to bring together experimental, empirical and theoretical evolutionary biologists, all working to resolve fundamental questions at the center of a century-old debate. For example: What is the distribution of fitness effects of new, segregating, and fixed mutations? What is the relative importance of adaptation vs. genetic drift in the evolution of natural populations? What are the genetic and genomic bases of adaptations and speciation(s)? By combining expertise across wet and dry lab biology, and due to the progress of new genomic technologies, it is becoming increasing possible to gain traction on these questions which are fundamental to any basic understanding of the very mode and tempo of the evolutionary process. The workshop will bring together top researchers in the field with graduate students and junior researchers in La Fouly, a remote and beautiful location in the Swiss Alps (see www.lafouly.net), allowing for close interactions and vivid exchanges due to the very limited number of participants (max. 35). The scientific program will consist in 2 ½ days of a mixture of talks by invited speakers and students, and poster sessions. The workshop will end with a hike to some nearby magnificent view points over the Mont Dolent and Mont-Blanc region. Confirmed invited speakers: Prof. Peter Andolfatto, Princeton University (US) Prof. Joachim Hermisson, University of Vienna (AT) Dr. Felicity Jones, Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, Tübigen (DE) Prof. Hanna Kokko, University of Zurich (CH) Prof. Bret Payseur, University of Wisconsin (US) Prof. Ole Seehausen, University of Bern & EAWAG (CH) Prof. Olivier Tenaillon, Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale, Paris (FR) Cost: 400 CHF, including conference fees, all meals and accommodation (with sleeping bags). Free attendance for CUSO students. Web site and registration: http://bit.ly/1OTRLPy (If this link does not work, you can access the workshop page via the newsfeed entry on the Jensen lab webpage: http://bit.ly/1kpTAqIwww.lafouly.net), allowing for close interactions and vivid exchanges due to the very limited number of participants (max. 35). The scientific program will consist in 2 ½ days of a mixture of talks by invited speakers and students, and poster sessions. The workshop will end with a hike to some nearby magnificent view points over the Mont Dolent and Mont-Blanc region. Confirmed invited speakers: Prof. Peter Andolfatto, Princeton University (US) Prof. Joachim Hermisson, University of Vienna (AT) Dr. Felicity Jones, Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, Tübigen (DE) Prof. Hanna Kokko, University of Zurich (CH) Prof. Bret Payseur, University of Wisconsin (US) Prof. Ole Seehausen, University of Bern & EAWAG (CH) Prof. Olivier Tenaillon, Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale, Paris (FR) Cost: 400 CHF, including conference fees, all meals and accommodation (with sleeping bags). Free attendance for CUSO students. Web site and registration: http://bit.ly/1OTRLPy (If this link does not work, you can access the workshop page via the newsfeed entry on the Jensen lab webpage: http://bit.ly/1kpTAqI) The organizers: Laurent Excoffier Jeff Jensen Stephan Peischl Claudia Bank via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:16
Postdoc: UBath.Genomics.Molecular.Evolution We are recruiting a postdoc to work on a project focused on understanding the evolutionary processes shaping natural variation. The project integrates genome sequences from a large collection of naturally occurring strains of a social amoeba with high throughput phenotyping, with the ultimate goals of understanding the molecular basis of natural variation and the patterns of selection shaping underlying sequence variation. The postdoc will contribute primarily to genome reconstruction, association analyses (including both GWAS and candidate gene based approaches) and application of molecular evolution models to sequence data, but will also contribute to the generation of data in the initial phase of the project. Candidates should have an appropriate background in evolutionary or statistical genetics (including bioinformatics). Skills related to the handling of large scale sequence data are essential. Some skills in molecular quantitative genetics and the analysis of molecular evolution are preferred but not required. The successful candidate will be based in Prof Jason Wolf’s Lab at the University of Bath, working in close collaboration with Prof Laurence Hurst (also in Bath), Prof Chris Thompson (Univ. of Manchester). The candidate will also work with collaborators at the Federal University of São Carlos (Brazil). The position is fixed-term of 36 months at £31,342 and is set to start at the end of May 2015, with later start dates subject to approval by the funding agency. For further information and to apply please see http://bit.ly/1Nog1sl Note that there are additional positions associated with this project: A Research Technician (also based in Bath) who will support all aspects of the project, including culturing of strains, performing phenotyping assays, the preparation of genomic DNA samples and the processing of data sets. This position is fixed-term of at least 24 months (possibly up to 30 months) and available to start as early as the end of May 2015, but later start dates are not a problem (as long as the start date is no later than October 2015) For further information and to apply please see: http://bit.ly/1GLwiFU A postdoc based in Manchester, who will focus on experimental validatation of the causal roles of natural genetic variants using cutting edge molecular and gene replacement techniques. This position is fixed-term of 36 months at £30,434 and is set to start at the end of May 2015, with later start dates subject to approval by the funding agency. Application forms and further particulars can be obtained at: http://bit.ly/1Blq47O Laurence D. Hurst Professor of Evolutionary Genetics Department of Biology and Biochemistry University of Bath Bath Somerset, UK BA2 7AY Tel: +44 (0)1225 386424 Fax: +44 (0)1225 386779 Email: l.d.hurst@bath.ac.uk Website: http://bit.ly/1IpYMSY Laurence Hurst via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

April 1, 2015

23:59

Hi folks, I would like to draw your attention to this year’s edition of our Bioinformatics and Phylogenetics Summer School, which will take place from May 11th-16th, inclusive. The details are here: http://bit.ly/1CcIk3q Please pass this email on to anybody you think might be interested. Regards, James. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
17:22
Molossidae is a large (roughly 100 species) pantropically distributed clade of swift aerially insectivorous bats for which the phylogeny remains relatively unknown and little studied compared with other speciose groups of bats. We investigated phylogenetic relationships among 62 species, representing all extant molossid genera and most of the subgenera, using 102 morphological characters from the skull, dentition, postcrania, external morphology, tongue, and penis, based on direct observation and literature reports. Both parsimony and Bayesian analyses were used in phylogenetic reconstruction. Our analysis supports two main clades of molossids, both of which mingle Old World and New World taxa. One clade is comprised of Mormopterus,Platymops, Sauromys, Neoplatymops, Molossops, Cynomops, Cheiromeles, Molossus, and Promops. The other clade includes Tadarida, Otomops, Nyctinomops, Eumops, Chaerephon, and Mops. The position of Myopterus with respect to these two groups is unclear. As in other recent analyses, we find that several genera do not appear to be monophyletic (e.g. Tadarida, Chaerephon, and Molossops sensu lato). We recommend that the subgenera of Molossops sensu lato and Austronomus be recognized at the generic level. We conclude that much more data are needed to investigate lower level problems (generic monophyly and relationships within genera) and to resolve the higher-level branching pattern of the family.
Source: Cladistics
00:43
*BSPB Spring meeting 15-17th April, Huddersfield* Early bird registration extended until Monday 6th April, contributed talk submissions encouraged, student bursaries and talk slots still available. For more info go to *www.protist.org.uk * Registration forms and abstracts should be sent to Martin Carr ( martcarr74@gmail.com) *Wednesday 15th* 15:00 Registration 17:00 Welcome reception 18:30 *Will Ratcliff* - Exploring the origin of multicellularity through experimental evolution *Thursday 16th* 08:45 Experimental evolution symposium *Mike Brockhurst* - The experimental evolution approach *Ville Friman* - Experimental evolution with protozoa - where are we now? *Chris Lowe, Jo Marrison, & Duncan Cameron* - Genotypes to phenotypes in protists *Oliver Kaltz* - Adaptation to varying speeds of environmental change in experimental microcosm populations of the ciliate *Paramecium caudatum* *Kai Lohbeck* - The adaptive potential of marine phytoplankton to climate change 13:00 Contributed talks 15:00 Student talks *Friday 17th* 09:00 Multicellularity symposium *Iaki Ruiz-Trillo* - What protists are telling us about the origin of metazoan multicellularity *Daniel Richter* - The gene content of diverse choanoflagellates illuminates animal origins *Frank Nitsche* - Everything you always wanted to know about choanoflagellates (but never dared to ask) * Pauline Schaap - *Evolution of multicellularity in the Amoebozoan lineage * J. Mark Cock* - Molecular factors underlying the emergence of complex multicellularity in the brown algae Ewan Minter Post-Doctoral Research Associate in Evolutionary Biology Department of Biology University of York Wentworth Way York YO10 5DD Email: ewan.minter@york.ac.uk Tel: +447525062408 http://bit.ly/1F1ktG0 Ewan Minter via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:27
Hi all, I am trying to use SPAGEDI v 1.5 to compare Rst and Fst statistics by pRst. However the manual is not helpful on how to compute these calculations. Would someone know what steps to follow? Thanks and best regards Michael J. Jowers michael jowers via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:11

The monthly review of the EvolDir is available from the EvolDir website - http://bit.ly/17VdShI. For more information or for help send mail to Golding@McMaster.CA. Please see the above website for instructions for the EvolDir. This includes ways to limit/reduce the messages you receive from the EvolDir. A reminder: The userid for the web site user list is `evoldir’ and the password is `2EvolBulletins’. [ This was done to limit the access of spammers (e.g. SpeakOut.Com and others). ] Brian Golding via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

March 31, 2015

18:00
Background: Transgenerational plasticity provides phenotypic variation that contributes to adaptation. For plants, the timing of seed germination is critical for offspring survival in stressful environments, as germination timing can alter the environmental conditions a seedling experiences. Stored seed transcripts are important determinants of seed germination, but have not previously been linked with transgenerational plasticity of germination behavior. In this study we used RNAseq and growth chamber experiments of the model legume M. trucantula to test whether parental exposure to salinity stress influences the expression of stored seed transcripts and early offspring traits and test for genetic variation. Results: We detected genotype-dependent parental environmental effects (transgenerational plasticity) on the expression levels of stored seed transcripts, seed size, and germination behavior of four M. truncatula genotypes. More than 50% of the transcripts detected in the mature, ungerminated seed transcriptome were annotated as regulating seed germination, some of which are involved in abiotic stress response and post-embryonic development. Some genotypes showed increased seed size in response to parental exposure to salinity stress, but no parental environmental influence on germination timing. In contrast, other genotypes showed no seed size differences across contrasting parental conditions but displayed transgenerational plasticity for germimation timing, with significantly delayed germination in saline conditions when parental plants were exposed to salinity. In genotypes that show significant transgenerational plastic germination response, we found significant coexpression networks derived from salt responsive transcripts involved in post-transcriptional regulation of the germination pathway. Consistent with the delayed germination response to saline conditions in these genotypes, we found genes associated with dormancy and up-regulation of abscisic acid (ABA). Conclusions: Our results demonstrate genetic variation in transgenerational plasticity within M. truncatula and show that parental exposure to salinity stress influences the expression of stored seed transcripts, seed weight, and germination behavior. Furthermore, we show that the parental environment influences gene expression to modulate biological pathways that are likely responsible for offspring germination responses to salinity stress.
16:30

It is tolerably well known that Alfred Russel Wallace developed the idea of evolution via natural selection quite independently of Charles Darwin, and that, indeed, it was Wallace's revelation of this fact that prompted Darwin to finally publish his ideas (Bannister et al. 2014).

Some people are even aware that Wallace developed the Tree of Life metaphor independently, as well (Wallace 1855), a fact of which Darwin himself was perfectly well aware (eg. Bradman and Bartlett 1998):
"the analogy of a branching tree [is] the best mode of representing the natural arrangement of species ... a complicated branching of the lines of affinity, as intricate as the twigs of a gnarled oak ... we have only fragments of this vast system, the stem and main branches being represented by extinct species of which we have no knowledge, while a vast mass of limbs and boughs and minute twigs and scattered leaves is what we have to place in order, and determine the true position each originally occupied with regard to the others."What is less well known is Wallace's contribution to phylogenetic imagery.

The Darwinian version of a phylogenetic tree is, of course, something usually considered to post-date 1859, when Darwin published his best-known book. However, producing such a tree was apparently a rather slow process. For example, in 1863, Franz Hilgendorf wrote a PhD thesis for which he produced a hand-drawn phylogeny, but he did not actually include this in the thesis; and he significantly modified it for its publication in 1866. In 1864 Fritz Müller published a couple of three-taxon trees. Also in 1864, Ernst Haeckel claimed to have started work on his series of phylogenetic trees, but the resulting book was not published until 1866. This means that the first substantial tree to appear in print was that of Mivart (1865).

However, long before this, Wallace was already moving ahead. In 1856 Wallace took the tree imagery from his 1855 publication and applied it to the relationships among bird groups. This publication was his first clearly evolutionary empirical contribution. He adapted the unrooted diagram of Strickland (1841), which represented "the natural system" of bird relationships, and gave it a clearly evolutionary interpretation. So, while Strickland's work was strictly atemporal and non-evolutionary, Wallace produced an evolutionary view of the world, with his two trees representing the end-product of change through time.

Wallace was in South-East Asia at the time of this work, collecting specimens among the islands of what is now Indonesia. He returned to England in 1862, thus having been absent during Darwin's rise to fame. However, he did return before anyone else had tackled Darwin's ideas empirically, and he was in an ideal position to do so himself (Beckenbauer et al. 2010). It would therefore be surprising if he had not done so.

Recently, it has become clear, as a result of the work done for the Wallace Correspondence Project, that Wallace did, indeed, produce a post-Darwinian phylogenetic diagram before any of his contemporaries, although it remained unpublished (Becker and Borg 2014). Not unexpectedly, it also refers to the relationships among birds. What is most interesting for us, however, is that it was a phylogenetic network, not a tree.


You will note that it is an unrooted network, in the same manner as his unrooted bird trees from 1856. In this, his presentation differed from that of Müller, Hilgendorf, Mivart and Haeckel, who all indicated a common ancestor. On the other hand, the branch lengths represent the "relative amount of affinity" between the named taxa, unlike the diagrams of his contemporaries. This means that the diagram can, indeed, be interpreted (in modern terms) as an unrooted phylogenetic network.

In his bird paper, Wallace (1856) had noted that producing the tree diagrams is not easy, as "you will most likely find that you have set down some conflicting affinities, or that you have mistaken some mere analogies for affinities". This seems to be the origin of his interest in the alternative model of a network, rather than a tree (Brabham and Berger 2014), thus making him the first person the use a data-display network to represent conflicting character data.

This post was inspired by the work of Torvill and Dean (1996). Happy April 1.

References

Bannister RG, Ballesteros-Sota S, Bjørndalen OE (2014) Running, swinging and skiing — the private life of Alfred Russel Wallace. Studia Wallaceana 6: 82-96.

Becker BF, Borg BR (2014) The phylogenetics of A.R. Wallace, and its relation to the science of tennis. Journal of Phylogenetic Inference 13: 101-110.

Beckenbauer FA, Best G, Bruyneel J (2010) Association football as a metaphor for phylogenetics. Is it a sport or a science? Phyloinformatics 7:1.

Brabham JA, Berger G (2014) The speed required to achieve the publication rate of A.R. Wallace. Philosophy and History of Biology 102: 89-92.

Bradman DG, Bartlett KC (1998) Wallace Down Under: the work of Alfred Russel Wallace in the southern hemisphere. Systematic Zoology 47: 767-780.

Haeckel E (1866) Generelle Morphologie der Organismen. Verlag von Georg Reimer, Berlin.

Hilgendorf F (1866) Planorbis multiformis im Steinheimer Süßwasserkalk: ein beispiel von gestaltveränderung im laufe der zeit. Buchhandlung von W. Weber, Berlin.

Mivart, StG (1865) Contributions towards a more complete knowledge of the axial skeleton in the primates. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 33: 545-592.

Müller F (1864) Für Darwin. Verlag von Wilhelm Engelman, Leipzig.

Strickland HE (1841) On the true method of discovering the natural system in zoology and botany. Annals and Magazine of Natural History 6: 184-194.

Torvill J, Dean CC (1996) Skating on thin ice. Systematic Biology 45: 641-650.

Wallace AR (1855) On the law which has regulated the introduction of new species. Annals and Magazine of Natural History 16 (2nd series): 184-196.

Wallace AR (1856) Attempts at a natural arrangement of birds. Annals and Magazine of Natural History 18 (2nd series): 193-216.