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November 9, 2014

16:30

Trees can be many things: objects, symbols, art, or information.

As objects, they act as homes and shelter, they provide food and oxygen, and they bind soil to hold topography in place. They even provide somewhere to sit while you are waiting to discover gravity. Their most famous use as symbols is the Tree of Life, which recurs in many cultures throughout the world. This was later extended to the Tree of Knowledge, a potent intellectual symbol throughout Western history. In the modern world this latter use has been expanded, so that trees are mathematical representations of the relationships among information.

Trees have also long played a role in art, which continues in the modern works of, for example, Vincent van Gogh and Gustav Klimt.

My first introduction to this was the book The Tree (1979, Aurum Press, UK / Little, Brown and Co, USA) by John Fowles (text) and Frank Horvat (photographs). This is a meditation on the connection between the natural world and human creativity. Horvat provides moody views of trees with (almost) no human objects in sight, and Fowles (the novelist) provides a provocative essay on trees as representations of art, revealing in his usual erudite manner that he particularly dislikes the "taming the wild" aspects of horticulture and science.


More recently, there has been the hand-lithographed book The Night Life of Trees (2006, Tara Books, Chennai, India). This contains a series of tribal-art images from three Gond people of central India (Bhajju Shyam, Durga Bai and Ramsingh Urveti). (And yes, the land of the Gond is Gondwanaland, which was the source of our name for the southern land masses.)

The Gond people have previously decorated their house walls and floors with traditional tattoos and motifs; and these motifs have made their way onto paper as modern representations of the tribal art form. Other tribal art forms that have followed a similar transfomation include the Aboriginal art of Australia, which bears a strong stylistic resemblance to some of the Gond art.

The Gonds are traditionally forest dwellers, and so the lives of humans and trees have been seen as closely entwined. Their lore suggests that trees are hard at work during the day providing shelter and nourishment, but at night they finally rest and their spirits are revealed. It is these spirits that the artists have tried to capture in their book.

I have reproduced two of the images here, because it is clear that the inter-twining reveals a very network-like aspect of the trees. The accompanying text is taken from the book.

Snakes and Earth

The earth is held in the coils of the snake goddess. And the roots of trees coil around the earth too, holding it in place. If you want to depict the earth, you can show it in the form of a snake. It is the same thing.



The Binding Tree

Mahalain trees are found deep inside the thickest jungles, holding each other in a tight embrace. Because it clings and binds so well, Mahalain bark is known for its strength. Our ancestors from earliest times searched for it in the deep jungles and used it to build houses. A house built well with Mahalain bark is said to last a hundred years.


Both books are worth seeking out if you value art as well as science. The Gond book is now in its 9th hardback edition, and is widely available in bookstores. The Fowles book (without the photographs) is currently available as a 30th anniversary paperback edition; but you are better off finding a second-hand hardback with the pictures.

Finally, just by way of contrast, here is the Albero Trinità from Joachim of Fiore's Liber Figurarum (published in 1202), a book that uses many different visualizations to display human knowledge.


My daughter was the inspiration for writing this blog post.

07:48

Erick Matsen wrote:

Using species-tree aware gene trees for ancestral reconstruction is a good thing!

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Towards more accurate ancestral protein genotype-phenotype reconstructions with the use of species tree-aware gene trees. M Groussin, JK Hobbs, GJ Szöllősi, S Gribaldo, VL Arcus and M Gouy, Molecular biology and evolution, Nov 4 2014

The resurrection of ancestral proteins provides direct insight into how natural selection has shaped proteins found in nature. By tracing substitutions along a gene phylogeny, ancestral proteins can be reconstructed in silico and subsequently synthesized in vitro. This elegant strategy reveals the complex mechanisms responsible for the evolution of protein functions and structures. However, to date, all protein resurrection studies have used simplistic approaches for ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR), including the assumption that a single sequence alignment alone is sufficient to accurately reconstruct the history of the gene family. The impact of such shortcuts on conclusions about ancestral functions has not been investigated. Here, we show with simulations that utilizing information on species history using a model that accounts for the duplication, horizontal transfer and loss (DTL) of genes statistically increases ASR accuracy. This underscores the importance of the tree topology in the inference of putative ancestors. We validate our in silico predictions using in vitro resurrection of the LeuB enzyme for the ancestor of the Firmicutes, a major and ancient bacterial phylum. With this particular protein, our experimental results demonstrate that information on the species phylogeny results in a biochemically more realistic and kinetically more stable ancestral protein. Additional resurrection experiments with different proteins are necessary to statistically quantify the impact of using species tree-aware gene trees on ancestral protein phenotypes. Nonetheless, our results suggest the need for incorporating both sequence and DTL information in future studies of protein resurrections to accurately define the genotype-phenotype space in which proteins diversify.

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01:12

Technological advances in the last decade strongly suggest that bringing the fields of Cell Biology and Evolutionary Biology together into an integrated field of Evolutionary Cell Biology (ECB) will dramatically increase our understanding of cell biological structures, functions, and processes, while also providing deep insights into the mechanisms of evolutionary change. This meeting brings together experts in evolutionary biology, cell biology, and a range of other disciplines to address 1) the application of evolutionary perspectives and methodology to aid in elucidating the structure, function and mechanisms of cellular processes, and 2) the study of cell biological diversity to gain insight into the mechanisms of evolution and the history of life on earth. For more information about Janelia conferences: http://bit.ly/1tsFa7f Apply for participation: http://bit.ly/1uQ0xXD Organizers Frances Brodsky, University of California, San Francisco Nicole King, HHMI/University of California, Berkeley Harmit Malik, HHMI/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Dyche Mullins, HHMI/University of California, San Francisco Invited Participants Ginger Armbrust, University of Washington Monica Bettencourt-Dias, Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia Joel Dacks, University of Alberta Scott Dawson, University of California, Davis Damien Devos, Universidad Pablo de Olavide Allan Drummond, University of Chicago Michael Eisen, HHMI/University of California, Berkeley Nels Elde, University of Utah Mark Field, University of Dundee Holly Goodson, University of Notre Dame Rebecca Heald, University of California, Berkeley Eric Karsenti, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Richard Lenski, Michigan State University Michael Lynch, Indiana University Bloomington Wallace Marshall, University of California, San Francisco Andrew Murray, Harvard University Daniel Needleman, Harvard University James Nelson, Stanford University Jos Pereira Leal, Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia Joseph Pogliano, University of California, San Diego Natasha Raikhel, University of California, Riverside Margaret Robinson, University of Cambridge David Roos, University of Pennsylvania Michael Rout, Rockefeller University Shelley Sazer, Baylor College of Medicine Pamela Silver, Harvard Medical School Mukund Thattai, National Centre for Biological Sciences Joseph Thornton, University of Chicago Aaron Turkewitz, University of Chicago Ajit Varki, University of California, San Diego John Wallingford, HHMI/University of Texas at Austin nicoleking.ucb@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:54
—Apple-Mail=_F3ECC286-4966-425A-9003-81C78A55CDA9 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Assistant Professor Position Department of Scientific Computing Florida State University The Department of Scientific Computing seeks to fill a tenure-track Assistant Professor position with a Fall 2015 starting date. Review of applications will begin on January 22, 2015 so that to guarantee consideration of an application, it must be submitted by that date. The Department of Scientific Computing (http://sc.fsu.edu ) was established in 2008 and offers B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Computational Science. The Department is a highly innovative unit whose goals are to improve the way computational scientists and engineers are trained and to do cutting-edge research on the development and application of algorithms for solving science and engineering problems using computers. The faculty of the Department work in several science and applications areas. Training and research within the Department is naturally of a highly interdisciplinary nature, with many faculty and students collaborating with researchers in other units of the University along with a diverse group of researchers at other institutions in the US and abroad. A doctoral degree in computational science, computer science, mathematics, statistics or a related field is required. Postdoctoral experience is highly desired as is experience and commitment to interdisciplinary research. Interested applicants should send a single PDF file containing their CV, research statement, and teaching statement to hiring15@sc.fsu.edu and also have 4 letters of reference, one of which addresses teaching experience and ability, submitted to the same email address. Florida State University if a Public Records Agency and an Equal Opportunity/Access/Affirmative Action Employer. ===================================== If you need more information about our department you may contact Peter Beerli (beerli@fsu.edu ). Dr. Peter Beerli Professor Scientific Computing Dirac Building Florida State University Tallahassee FL 32306-4120 email: beerli@fsu.edu web: http://fla.st/1tsCpmz skype: pitbeerli —Apple-Mail=_F3ECC286-4966-425A-9003-81C78A55CDA9 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Assistant Professor PositionDepartment of Scientific Computing
Florida State University

The Department of Scientific Computing seeks to fill a tenure-track Assistant Professor position with a Fall 2015 starting date. Review of applications will begin on January 22, 2015 so that to guarantee consideration of an application, it must be submitted by that date.

The Department of Scientific Computing (http://sc.fsu.edu) was established in 2008 and offers B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Computational Science. The Department is a highly innovative unit whose goals are to improve the way computational scientists and engineers are trained and to do cutting-edge research on the development and application of algorithms for solving science and engineering problems using computers. The faculty of the Department work in several science and applications areas. Training and research within the Department is naturally of a highly interdisciplinary nature, with many faculty and students collaborating with researchers in other units of the University along with a diverse group of researchers at other institutions in the US and abroad. 

A doctoral degree in computational science, computer science, mathematics, statistics or a related field is required. Postdoctoral experience is highly desired as is experience and commitment to interdisciplinary research.

Interested applicants should send a single PDF file containing their CV, research statement, and teaching statement to hiring15@sc.fsu.edu and also have 4 letters of reference, one of which addresses teaching experience and ability, submitted to the same email address.

Florida State University if a Public Records Agency and an Equal Opportunity/Access/Affirmative Action Employer.


======================================

If you need more information about our department you may contact Peter Beerli (beerli@fsu.edu).

Dr. Peter BeerliProfessorScientific ComputingDirac Bu ildingFlorida State UniversityTallahassee FL 32306-4120email: beerli@fsu.eduweb: http://fla.st/1tsCpmzskype: pitbeerli




—Apple-Mail=_F3ECC286-4966-425A-9003-81C78A55CDA via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:54

3 PhD POSITIONS IN BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Switzerland Organisation The Institute of Ecology & Evolution at the University of Bern offers excellent opportunities and infrastructure for theoretical and experimental research in the field of ecology and evolution. It hosts six chairs, several associated professors and junior group leaders with complementary, yet overlapping and linked areas of scholarship. It is home to a large number of post-doctoral researchers, PhD and MSc students from different countries worldwide. Research at the chair of Behavioural Ecology focuses on the evolution of sociality and cooperation, within-population individual variation of behaviour and life history pathways, and the influence of early experience on life-long and transgenerational traits and decisions. In addition to theoretical modelling, our research uses cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika, ambrosia beetles and Norway rats as model systems. We combine sophisticated behavioural experiments in the laboratory and field with long-term monitoring of individual life histories in nature, develop theoretical models of evolutionary mechanisms underlying behaviour, and study molecular mechanisms by transcriptome profiling and hormone manipulations. Currently the division comprises roughly 30 staff and student members. Job descriptions 1st project: Integration of early environmental information within and across generations in a cooperative breeder Early life conditions can have life-long effects on the phenotypic development of animals. Most research in developmental plasticity focuses only on a single environmental trigger or ontogenetic stage. However, natural environments are usually complex. If we aim to understand the development of well-integrated adult phenotypes, we must consider effects of multiple ecological factors during multiple ontogenetic stages. The highly social cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher is a unique model system to study the development of integrated phenotypes, because it uses environmental cues to specialize on one of two life history strategies during ontogeny, namely early own reproduction or delayed dispersal to help rearing offspring of dominant breeders. N. pulcher is a well-studied model system of social evolution that is exceptionally suited to experiments in the field and laboratory. Within this project, two PhD positions are currently available: Position 1: “Environmental influences on development during different ontogenetic stages” The aim of this PhD-project is to investigate the relative significance of four important environmental influences for the development of helping and dispersal propensities of N. pulcher: prenatal maternal effects, brood care, early juvenile and late juvenile environments. Position 2: “Long-term effects of early environment within and across generations” This PhD project investigates whether the early environment influences adult life histories and reproductive performance, and whether it affects the phenotypes of successive generations through epigenetic inheritance. Both PhD projects will pursue a multidisciplinary approach involving behavioural experiments in the laboratory, field work, ecological genomics and/or quantitative meta-analysis. Eligible candidates will have a master$B!G(Bs degree (or equivalent) in Biology and research experience in animal behaviour and a genuine understanding of evolutionary theory. Practical skills in molecular genetics techniques, the application of statistical models and empirical work with fish would be beneficial, but they are not a precondition. The project will be mostly based in Bern, but will involve collaboration with Nadia Aubin-Horth (University Laval, Canada) for the molecular analyses and with Shinishi Nakagawa (University of Otago, New Zealand) for meta-analysis. Supervisor: Barbara Taborsky. 2nd project: The use of information in social decisions Position 3: $B!H(BConditional decisions to stay or disperse in fungus tending ambrosia beetles$B!I(B When deciding to stay or disperse from the natal territory, information about the quality of potential dispersal areas may be limited and costly to obtain. Modelling results imply that the stage before dispersal decisions are made is of particular interest to understand social evolution. Ambrosia beetles are cooperative breeders cultivating fungi for food. Individual dispersal is timed in dependence of the need for cooperative care in the natal colony. Here we ask whether and how dispersal decisions depend on (i) the body condition of beetles, (ii) the microbial condition in the natal gallery, and (iii) the sustainability of the substrate in which they live. Experiments will show how beetles respond to the microbial composition of their gallery, including hygienic behaviour, allogrooming and fungal care, and their timing of dispersal. The utility of galleries will be manipulated to test effects on the beetles$B!G(B condition, dispersal and reproductive decisions. In addition, the degree of sociality will be determined in scolytid ambrosia beetles colonizing living trees, to test whether the ephemeral nature of freshly dead trees, the resource used by most species, prevents this group from being eusocial. This PhD project will pursue a multidisciplinary approach involving behavioural experiments in the laboratory, field work in temperate and tropical regions, and the assessment and manipulation of the chemical ecology of the beetles$B!G(B fungus gardens. Eligible candidates will have a master$B!G(Bs degree (or equivalent) in Biology, research experience in animal behaviour, and a genuine understanding of evolutionary theory. Practical skills in the application of statistical models, in chemical ecology and in empirical work with arthropods are beneficial. Supervisor: Michael Taborsky. All three positions are funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. They last for three years and may start as early as January 2015. Salaries will follow the schemes of the Swiss National Science Foundation. Closing date: Open until filled, but all application materials, including the CV and a motivation letter, a summary of research experience, copies of any published or in-press papers, and two letters of recommendation should be received by 8th December 2014 to ensure full consideration. Candidates should indicate in the cover letter for which of the three positions they apply and when they could take up the position. Please send all application material to the secretary$B!G(Bs office, c/o Claudia Leiser, Behavioural Ecology, University of Bern, Wohlenstrasse 50A, CH-3032 Bern, Switzerland; or, preferably, as e-mail attachments to claudia.leiser@iee.unibe.ch. For information on our research please consult our web-page: http://bit.ly/1gxG13K For inquiries please contact barbara.taborsky@iee.unibe.ch or michael.taborsky@iee.unibe.ch. barbara.taborsky@iee.unibe.ch via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

November 8, 2014

23:51
Assistant/Associate Professor applications due by December 1 Arizona State University is making a major commitment to developing the field of Evolutionary Medicine. There are plans to recruit up to eight faculty members for a new Center for Evolution & Medicine headed by Dr. Randolph Nesse. http://bit.ly/1mP32pF The Center and the School of Human Evolution and Social Change invite applications for two open rank faculty positions. Anticipated start date is August 16, 2015 or later. Candidates for all ranks must have: 1) a MD or a Ph.D. in anthropology, psychology, evolutionary biology, or a related field or equivalent terminal degree, 2) a strong publication record that displays expertise in evolutionary biology and 3) experience or an explicit interest in developing the field of evolutionary medicine. Additional requirements for associate/full rank include: 1) a record of funding for a research program that applies evolutionary principles to better understand and treat diseases, 2) demonstrated evidence of strong teaching and mentoring. Topic and approach are open, however areas of special interest include diseases of modern environments, behavioral disorders, physiology, and the candidate’s program of research may be focused on human biocultural evolution in deep or more recent times, including contemporary societies. Additional desired qualifications include evidence of success in obtaining external funding, teaching experience in anthropology or related fields, experience mentoring and supporting students, and collaborative experiences with an interdisciplinary research team. Application deadline is December 1, 2014. If not filled, reviews will occur on the first of the month thereafter until the search is closed. Applicants must apply online at http://bit.ly/1qQ0k2v and include a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and the names and email addresses of three references. Please make sure your last name appears in each uploaded file name. You may address your cover letter to Professor Robert Boyd, Evolutionary Anthropology Search Committee Chair. Information about the School can be found at http://shesc.asu.edu. The School collaborates extensively with ASU’s Institute for Human Origins (http://iho.asu.edu). Arizona State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. See http://bit.ly/1kjwAbJ. A background check is required for employment. ASU job ID #10202. Successful candidates will be expected to transfer, or develop (if assistant professor rank), an extramurally funded research program; teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels; mentor undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral fellows; develop collaborative research and education projects for the Center; engage in University service; and conduct research publishable in top tier journals. A competitive start-up package will be provided and the amount of teaching required will be compatible with high research productivity. The Center for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health joins a vibrant, interdisciplinary community at ASU. Examples of existing centers and institutes are: Bioenergy and Photosynthesis (bioenergy.asu.edu), Biodesign (biodesign.asu.edu) and Astrobiology (astrobiology.asu.edu). To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, three representative publications, contact information for three references, and separate statements of future research plans and teaching philosophy interests in a single pdf file to solsfacultysearch3@asu.edu. The initial closing date for receipt of applications is March 19, 2014; applications will be reviewed weekly thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment. Arizona State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to excellence through diversity. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. For additional information on the School of Life Sciences, please visit sols.asu.edu. Randolph M. Nesse The ASU Center for Evolution & Medicine Register for the ISEMPH meeting now! rmnesse@gmail.com via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
23:35

*ASSISTANT OR ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, FISH CONSERVATION GENOMICS* *University of Montana, Missoula* The University of Montana College of Forestry and Conservation (CFC) and Wildlife Biology Program seek applications for a nine-month, tenure-track assistant or associate professor position in fish conservation genomics beginning Fall 2015. We are interested in candidates who use genomic approaches to address ecological questions in fisheries, aquatic ecology, and population biology associated with the conservation and management of aquatic systems. Wildlife Biology is a broad interdisciplinary program between the CFC, the Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences (DECS), the Division of Biological Sciences, and the Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit (www.cfc.umt.edu/wbio). One of the top-ranked Wildlife Biology Programs in the nation, we comprise highly interactive and collaborative faculty with outstanding records of scholarship and training in basic and applied wildlife biology. The successful candidate will complement existing programmatic strengths in wildlife ecology, conservation, and genetics, including on-campus integration of state and federal geneticists working on aquatic and terrestrial systems and a new state-of-the-art genomics core facility. Specific responsibilities of this position include: • Develop a vigorous, externally-funded research program; • Teach an upper-division undergraduate wildlife conservation genetics course and other undergraduate or graduate courses that contribute to the Aquatic option of the Wildlife Biology Program, linking the expertise of the candidate and needs of the program; • Advise undergraduate students in the Aquatic option of the Wildlife Biology Program and direct graduate student research in Wildlife Biology at the M.S. and Ph.D. level; and • Participate in Wildlife Biology, CFC, DECS, and University committees and develop collaborations with state, federal, and private conservation organizations. Required Experience: • A Ph.D. in a relevant biological field of study (e.g., aquatic and/or fisheries biology or ecology, genomics) at the time of appointment. • A strong record of research and scholarship in the field of aquatic and fisheries ecology and genomics, including publications in peer-reviewed journals and successful development of competitive externally-funded grants; • Experience and strong commitment to excellence in teaching; and • A proven ability to communicate effectively with students, professionals, and the general public. Candidates with post-doctoral experience as well as experience working with natural resource agencies are especially encouraged to apply. The University of Montana is one of the nation’s outstanding public universities, committed to liberal arts education, research, and strong professional programs. UM is located in Missoula, a northern Rocky Mountain city located between Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks. Missoula boasts abundant recreational opportunities with a blend of small-town charm and urban sophistication. TO APPLY: Screening of applications will begin December 1, 2014 and will continue until position is filled. Visit http://bit.ly/1065fcg to submit online application for full consideration. Complete applications include: • A current CV. • Statements of research and teaching interests. • Three representative examples of publications (in one of the following formats: doc, xls, txt, rtf, pdf, gif, jpg, htm, html). • Names and contact information for three professional references. Inquiries pertaining to the announcement can be directed to Mark Hebblewhite, Search Committee Chair, Ph: 1-406-243-6675 or E-mail: mark .hebblewhite@umontana.edu The College of Forestry and Conservation has additional faculty openings expected to begin fall semester 2015. All positions may be found on the UM Jobs website at http://bit.ly/1xhAaaF.www.cfc.umt.edu/wbio). One of the top-ranked Wildlife Biology Programs in the nation, we comprise highly interactive and collaborative faculty with outstanding records of scholarship and training in basic and applied wildlife biology. The successful candidate will complement existing programmatic strengths in wildlife ecology, conservation, and genetics, including on-campus integration of state and federal geneticists working on aquatic and terrestrial systems and a new state-of-the-art genomics core facility. Specific responsibilities of this position include: • Develop a vigorous, externally-funded research program; • Teach an upper-division undergraduate wildlife conservation genetics course and other undergraduate or graduate courses that contribute to the Aquatic option of the Wildlife Biology Program, linking the expertise of the candidate and needs of the program; • Advise undergraduate students in the Aquatic option of the Wildlife Biology Program and direct graduate student research in Wildlife Biology at the M.S. and Ph.D. level; and • Participate in Wildlife Biology, CFC, DECS, and University committees and develop collaborations with state, federal, and private conservation organizations. Required Experience: • A Ph.D. in a relevant biological field of study (e.g., aquatic and/or fisheries biology or ecology, genomics) at the time of appointment. • A strong record of research and scholarship in the field of aquatic and fisheries ecology and genomics, including publications in peer-reviewed journals and successful development of competitive externally-funded grants; • Experience and strong commitment to excellence in teaching; and • A proven ability to communicate effectively with students, professionals, and the general public. Candidates with post-doctoral experience as well as experience working with natural resource agencies are especially encouraged to apply. The University of Montana is one of the nation’s outstanding public universities, committed to liberal arts education, research, and strong professional programs. UM is located in Missoula, a northern Rocky Mountain city located between Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks. Missoula boasts abundant recreational opportunities with a blend of small-town charm and urban sophistication. TO APPLY: Screening of applications will begin December 1, 2014 and will continue until position is filled. Visit http://bit.ly/1065fcg to submit online application for full consideration. Complete applications include: • A current CV. • Statements of research and teaching interests. • Three representative examples of publications (in one of the following formats: doc, xls, txt, rtf, pdf, gif, jpg, htm, html). • Names and contact information for three professional references. Inquiries pertaining to the announcement can be directed to Mark Hebblewhite, Search Committee Chair, Ph: 1-406-243-6675 or E-mail: mark .hebblewhite@umontana.edu The College of Forestry and Conservation has additional faculty openings expected to begin fall semester 2015. All positions may be found on the UM Jobs website at http://bit.ly/1xhAaaF. ADA/EOE/AA/Veteran’s Preference Employer. jeffrey.m.good@gmail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:54
"The new version phybase_1.4.tar.gz for R (>3.0) is available at http://bit.ly/1xf9x6r ” Phybase is an R package for phylogenetic analysis, especially for species tree estimation. The old version phybase is not compatible with the latest version of R >3.0. I have updated phybase and the new version phybase 1.4 for R>3.0 is available at http://bit.ly/1xf9x6r. Liang Liang Liu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:39
—============_-796749693==_ma===========Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” ; format=”flowed” GRADUATE POSITIONS AT UC BERKELEY A PhD position is available at UC Berkeley as part of a project that seeks to merge two disparate areas of research to understand patterns of biodiversity, (1) a broad ecological approach which provides insights into how species assemble and interact in a community; (2) a lineage based approach which focuses on how arthropod species adapt, diversity, or decline over time. We integrate these two approaches by using a system of age-structured biological communities on the youngest of the Hawaiian Islands (Hawaii), and comparing these to communities on the next older island of Maui. Within Hawaii Island, lineages of organisms are actively diversifying, while the community and food web contexts in which they are embedded are changing with the development of their habitats. The system is relatively simple ecologically, but importantly it represents an environmental chronosequence, allowing for a “space-for-time” substitution. The project (part of NSF’s “Dimensions in Biodiversity” http://1.usa.gov/1AEtt7z ) will look at priority, sequence, and associated interaction strengths among members of a community as it develops, and hence how biodiversity is generated, assembled, and lost. Students interested in any one of the following are encouraged to apply: (1) macroecological metrics of diversity and abundance of species and how these might change over time; (2) dynamics of predator-prey or other interactions between species; (3) evolutionary adaptation and speciation. Data to be analyzed will include molecular, morphological, ecological, and/or behavioral characters, and will involve macroecological, macroevolutionary, and population genetic and phylogenetic analyses. A single student will focus on one aspect of the project, though interest in the integration between ecological and evolutionary approaches is encouraged. Project PIs and contributors at UC Berkeley are: Rosemary Gillespie, Patrick O’Grady, George Roderick & Kari Goodman in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management (ESPM); John Harte, Neo Martinez in the Energy and Resources Group, and Rasmus Nielsen in the Department of Integrative Biology (IB). Other PIs and constirbutors are Dan Gruner (U Maryland) Don Price (U. Hawaii Hilo,), Kerry Shaw (Cornell), and Diana Percy (Natural History Museum, London) Interested students should email Rosemary Gillespie Applications to UC Berkeley for Fall 2015 must be received by Dec 1, 2014. For details see: http://bit.ly/1tLcfyS via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:39

We’re inviting applications for the 2015 Quantitative Genetics & Genomics Gordon Research Seminar (February 21-22 in Tuscany, Italy), followed by the Quantitative Genetics & Genomics Gordon Research Conference (February 22-27). http://bit.ly/1AEtt7r The seminar will feature 10 talks by outstanding PhD students and post-docs, selected from abstracts submitted by 21 November. The talks at the conference are given by world-renowned scientists - the topics and speakers are listed below. Both the seminar and conference provide a unique forum for young researchers to interact with each other and with leaders in genetics of human, animal, plant, model organism, and natural populations. To this end, attendance at the conference is capped at 180 participants. This means you really get a chance to talk to everyone from breakfast to the drinks after dinner - interaction is key at this meeting. Apply to the Gordon Research Seminar before 21 November to give a talk. The best talk will be awarded a prize in recognition. We hope to see you at the seminar! 2015 Quantitative Genetics & Genomics Gordon Research Seminar Chairs Julia Steinberg (University of Oxford) Frank Albert (UCLA) via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:24
Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Bioinformatics at the Faculty of Engineering and Science. Ref 108/14 The University of Agder (UiA) invites applications for a full-time fixed-term appointment as Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Bioinformatics at the Faculty of Engineering and Science, Department of Natural Sciences for a period of two years. The position will mainly be located in Kristiansand, Norway. However, the appointee may be required to stay for a period at the Institute of Marine Research, Fldevigen (IMR). The preferred start date is 1 May 2015 (negotiable with the department). The marine group at the Department of Natural Sciences includes 4 professors, 4 associate professors one Post-doc and currently three PhD fellows are associated. The post-doctoral fellow will also benefit from the Center for Coastal Research (CCR), recently established in cooperation with University of Oslo, Institute of Marine Research, GRID-Arendal, NIVA, Telemark University College (http://on.fb.me/1uL21Cm). The postdoctoral-fellow will primarily work in an ongoing international project entitled Adaptation or plasticity as response to large scale translocations and harvesting over a climatic gradient in the marine ecosystem? funded by the Research Council of Norway (RCN) under the Havkyst programme. This project aims at improving our understanding of adaptive process in marine fish in response to human and climatic stressors. During its development, large datasets will be generated by means of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) approaches, focusing the analysis on Rads and transcriptomics data. The candidate will also have the opportunity to get involved in other ongoing projects at CCR as well as to develop own initiatives. The post-doctoral fellow will be expected to take part in a binding cooperation with the research group and contribute to an active research environment that will give opportunities for personal and professional development. The appointee must have the ability to work in a goal-oriented, organised, focused, and independent manner. During the assessment process emphasis will be placed on the applicants PhD work, examination results as well as any other previous research and development work. Relevant practical experience, personal suitability and good teamwork skills will also be emphasised. The successful candidate should hold a PhD in bioinformatics, computer science or a closely related field. Applicants with a PhD in marine genomics and strong computational skills or a PhD in medical science and experience in NGS data analysis are also welcome. The qualified candidate should have experience with the major techniques in Bioinformatics. In addition, he/she will be familiar with Linux/Unix systems as well as programming in script-based language, e.g. Python and/or Perl. Teaching experience from college or university level is an advantage as some teaching tasks may be expected. Information about the appointment criteria for a Post-doctoral Research Fellow can be found in the Regulations Concerning Terms and Conditions of Employment for the Post of Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Research Fellow, Research Assistant and Resident, available for downloadhere . The Norwegian public service is committed to reflect the diversity of society and the personnel policy of the University of Agder aims to achieve a balanced workforce. All qualified persons are therefore encouraged to apply for the position irrespective of cultural background, gender, age or disability. Short-listed applicants will be invited for interviews and with permission from the applicant the University will also conduct a reference check before appointment. Appointment is made by the University of Agders Appointments Committee for Teaching and Research Positions. The successful applicant will have rights and obligations in accordance with the current regulations for the public service. The position is remunerated according to the State salary scale, salary plan 17.510, code 1352, scale 24, salary grade 57 -72 (NOK 482.800-639.500). A 2 % compulsory pension contribution to the Norwegian Public Service Pension Fund is deducted from the pay according to current statutory provisions. For information on salary grades, see here. Applicants are asked to submit their application and CV online. Please use the link Send application. The following documentation should be submitted online. * Diplomas, transcripts and letters of reference * Complete list of scientific publications * A description of research interests, background for the problem that the applicant wishes to study and its relevance for the above mentioned project In addition, the following documents in three hard copies should be submitted to University of Agder, c/o HR Department, att. HR-adviser Richard Lislevand, Post Box 422, NO-4604 Kristiansand, Norway, quoting Ref. no. 108/14: * Doctoral dissertation * A maximum of ten (10) scholarly and other relevant publications which the applicant wishes to include for assessment The applicant is fully responsible for submitting complete documentation in a sufficient number of copies within the closing date. Without complete documentation we cannot, unfortunately, include you in the assessment process. The application and all other information must be submitted, preferably in English, but even Norwegian, Danish or Swedish will be accepted. Closing date: 20.12.14. Further information about the position may be obtained by contacting Associate Professor Enrique Blanco Gonzalez, phone +47 454 96 531, e-mail: enrique.blanco@uia.no, or Personell Adviser Anne Bergit Jrgensen, +47 38 14 11 40, e-mail: anne.b.jorgensen@uia.no. For more information on working at UiA, see here . In accordance with 25(2) of the Freedom of Information Act, applicants may request that they are not identified in the open list of applicants. The University, however, reserves the right to publish the name of applicants. Applicants will be advised of the intention to exercise this right. Enrique Blanco Gonzales via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:08
Job announcement: CISAB Lab Director The Center for Integrative Study of Animal Behavior (CISAB) is seeking a Research Associate to serve as the director of a common research laboratory housed in the Department of Biology that serves animal behaviorists studying the genetic and neuroendocrine basis of behavior. The successful candidate will be expected to perform a range of molecular, genetic and endocrine techniques (e.g., PCR, genotyping, sequencing, steroid and protein hormone assays, western blots, microsatellite analysis with GeneMapper software), train students in these procedures, and supervise the general operations of the laboratory (safety, supplies, personnel, regulatory compliance). A Masters degree or equivalent required, prior experience in at least some of the needed techniques is expected. The successful candidate must be able to work with a diverse group of people; a three-year commitment is expected. A competitive salary plus benefits provided. December 1, 2014 start date possible. To apply, submit a letter of application & CV that lists the names and contact information for three references to http://bit.ly/1xkbpM5 or Attn: Dee Verostko, 1001 E. Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-3700. Applications will be considered until the position is filled, but for best consideration, apply by November 15, 2014. Indiana University is an equal employment and affirmative action employer and a provider of ADA services. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, ethnicity, color, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation or identity, national origin, disability status or protected veteran status. Kimberly Rosvall via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:07
—Apple-Mail=_0C37D857-6481-46F7-A2C6-50787330B95D Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8 Dear all, We have a phD position in our lab (MarECon, University of Groningen, NL) to work on ecological and evolutionary genomics of marine mammals. The full description of the the PhD position can be found using this URL: http://bit.ly/1xsz5fj Complete applications should be submitted using the online application link “Apply” (at the bottom of the advertise) before 14 November 2014. Information on the PhD can be found in the advertise (http://bit.ly/1xsz5fj ) and by emailing to me (m.c.fontaine@rug.nl , DO NOT use for applications) Groningen, Netherlands: http://bit.ly/1qZlSFB The University of Groningen (RuG): http://bit.ly/1rKZ4ym CEES: http://bit.ly/1qZlSVO MarECon: http://bit.ly/1rKZ1Te Best regards, Michael C Fontaine via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:35

ESEB SYMPOSIUM ON GENES AND ALLELES UNDERLYING ADAPTATION Dear Colleagues: We would like to invite you to attend and/or contribute to the ESEB symposium HOW TO IDENTIFY AND TEST THE LOCI AND ALLELES UNDERLYING ADAPTATION? which will take place at the 15th Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB), in Lausanne, Switzerland, 10 - 14 August 2015. INVITED SPEAKERS: Felicity Jones (FML, Max Planck Institute, Tbingen, Germany) Alistair McGregor (Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK) ORGANIZERS: Paul Schmidt (University of Pennsylvania) Thomas Flatt (University of Lausanne) SYMPOSIUM DESCRIPTION: To understand the mechanisms underlying adaptation, causal molecular variants, genes and pathways must be identified, characterized and ultimately experimentally verified. To this end, various methods for outlier detection, QTL mapping, and association studies have provided a wealth of candidates for phenotypes of interest, the response to artificial and natural selection, and adaptive differentiation within and among taxa. Recent advances in whole-genome sequencing allow an unprecedented, comprehensive evaluation of genotype-phenotype associations. However, one major issue with whole-genome screens is whether any given candidate actually represents a true positive: population structure and demography, the number of independent chromosomes, statistical power, and other complications are known to generate false positives. Thus, one of the emerging challenges in evolutionary genomics is to unambiguously identify and empirically validate candidates identified in omics-level screens. The goal of our symposium is to discuss and showcase how to best identify and validate candidate variants, genes, and pathways. Specifically, the symposium aims to (1) evaluate methods by which candidates are identified and investigated; (2) generate discussion regarding the significance of functional validation of identified candidates in quantitative, ecological and evolutionary genetics; and (3) present some of the best current research related to functional identification and validation. WEBSITE (see symposium no. 18): http://bit.ly/1AEbj5O The site for registration for the ESEB meeting and for abstract submission for this symposium is now open at: http://bit.ly/1rIZnbW DEADLINE for abstract submission for contributed talks and posters: 10 January 2015. We are interested in receiving abstract submissions reporting studies that seek to identify AND validate ecologically and evolutionarily relevant phenotypic effects of candidate genes and alleles in the wild or the laboratory. Abstracts will be evaluated by the symposium organizers and will be selected for either oral or poster presentation by early March. When submitting your abstract please state your preference (talk, poster) during the submission process. Submitted talks will be 17 min each, including discussion, plus 3 min to change rooms. The overall time window allotted to each symposium will be decided by the congress committee, depending on the number and quality of submissions. We are looking forward to seeing you in beautiful Lausanne! Paul & Thomas. - via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:35
Please note that there was a typo in the application deadline in the previous posting. The deadline is Dec. 5, 2014. The corrected version is below. ***** Full Professorship of Evolutionary Biology: Munich, Germany As one of Europe’s leading research universities, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich is committed to the highest international standards of excellence in research and teaching. Building on its more than 500-year-long tradition, it offers a broad spectrum that covers all areas of knowledge within its 18 Faculties, ranging from the humanities, law, economics and social studies, to medicine and the natural sciences. The LMU Faculty of Biology http://bio.lmu.de/ invites applications for a Full Professorship (W3) of Evolutionary Biology (Chair) commencing on October 01, 2015. The successful applicant is expected to carry out internationally recognized research that uses state-of-the-art approaches and techniques (e.g. genomics/transcriptomics) to study evolutionary processes, such as speciation, evolutionary adaptation, or ecological interactions, at the population level. The research program should allow close collaborations with established research groups in the LMU Faculty of Biology and the HighTech-Campus Grosshadern-Martinsried. The LMU Faculty of Biology provides a scientifically strong environment and excellent facilities for experiments. The professor is expected to contribute to the teaching of existing courses, as well as develop new modules in evolutionary biology for our bachelor and master programs. Prerequisites for this position are a university and a doctoral degree, teaching skills at university level, excellent academic achievements and a productive and promising research program. LMU Munich makes a point of providing newly appointed professors with various types of support, such as welcoming services and assistance for dual career couples. LMU Munich is an equal opportunity employer. The University continues to be very successful in increasing the number of female faculty members and strongly encourages applications from female candidates. LMU Munich intends to enhance the diversity of its faculty members. Furthermore, disabled candidates with essentially equal qualifications will be given preference. Further information concerning the LMU’s equal opportunity policy can be obtained from Prof. B. Neuhaus (birgit.neuhaus@lrz.uni-muenchen.de), concerning teaching from Prof. H. Jung (hjung@lmu.de), concerning the structure of the Faculty from Prof. Leonhardt (dekanat19@lmu.de). Please submit your application comprising a curriculum vitae, list of publications, a brief summary of present and future research interests, proof of teaching experience, five selected reprints and copies of relevant documents as an electronic file, together with the completed submission form (Vorlage fur Bewerber) available on the website: http://bit.ly/1unvBNp before Dec. 5, 2014 to the email-address: dekanat19@lmu.de (addressed to the Dean of the Faculty of Biology, Prof. Dr. Heinrich Leonhardt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Großhaderner Str. 2, 82152 Planegg-Martinsried, Germany. A German version of the job ad can be found at: http://bit.ly/1sbdQLp John Parsch via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:35
*COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT * *Tropical Behavioural Ecology and Evolution*, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (Panama) and University of Copenhagen (Denmark) We invite applications for a course focusing on evolutionary processes that shape the ecology and behavior of key invertebrate model systems in a diverse tropical forest with a special emphasis on symbioses. The course is designed for graduate students interested in field biology and includes a proposal writing phase (completed in Copenhagen or online) that allows the student to be trained in research design with guidance from course instructors. The project will be implemented at the world renowned Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama (May 2015). In addition, the students will work on a small group project, review and discuss the work of their peers, and attend lectures, tutorials and trips throughout the 26 day stay in Panama. A final project report will be submitted two weeks following the field component. This intense course provides unique opportunities to interact with a global community of scientists and learn successful research strategies while working in a Neotropical rainforest! *Course Instructors**: *Dr. Jacobus Boomsma (Director of the Centre for Social Evolution at the University of Copenhagen & STRI Senior Research Associate), Dr. Rachelle Adams (Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Copenhagen), Dr. Jonathan Shik (Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Copenhagen) *Important Dates**: *March 8 2014 (Course applications and 400 deposit due) April 6 (Start preparation), April 29 (Proposal due), May 3-28 (STRI field course), June 12 (Research paper due) *Tuition fees**: *1,200.00 (covers course expenses, room and board) *Web Sites**: *http://bit.ly/1tL2il9 or http://bit.ly/1tL2gK3. To see quotes from past students ( http://bit.ly/1AEbiyK) *How to Apply**: *Contact Rachelle Adams at rmmadams@gmail.com or Jonathan Shik at jonathan.shik@gmail.com for a formal course application and further details. Up to 16 students will be chosen based on applications. J Shik via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:14
Dear colleagues, The registration and abstract submission to the next ESEB meeting (August 10-14 2015, Lausanne) are now open. You will find all necessary information on our website: www.unil.ch/eseb2015 We look forward welcoming you in Lausanne! Nicolas Perrin Dept. Ecology & Evolution University of Lausanne (Switzerland) http://bit.ly/1z8OqCQ Tel (0041) 21 692 41 84 New book (published 12 June 2014): The Evolution of Sex Determination Leo W Beukeboom & Nicolas Perrin Oxford University Press 978-0-19-965714-8 http://bit.ly/1z8OqCSwww.unil.ch/eseb2015 We look forward welcoming you in Lausanne! Nicolas Perrin Dept. Ecology & Evolution University of Lausanne (Switzerland) http://bit.ly/1z8OqCQ Tel (0041) 21 692 41 84 New book (published 12 June 2014): The Evolution of Sex Determination Leo W Beukeboom & Nicolas Perrin Oxford University Press 978-0-19-965714-8 http://bit.ly/1z8OqCS Nicolas Perrin via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:55
—089e0149bc06d9c1a20507457452 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable I am currently recruiting motivated graduate students ​to join my lab in the Biology Department at Temple University. ​Our research addresses a broad range of questions in plant reproductive ecology and evolution, exploring how ecological, demographic, and genetic factors influence plant mating patterns and shape the evolution of reproductive traits. Current foci in the lab are (1) the effects of habitat fragmentation on plant-pollinator interactions, mating system dynamics, and floral trait evolution and (2) the evolution of mixed-mating and of the selfing syndrome. Additional interests include the evolution of plant sexual systems such as dioecy. We use a variety of approaches including observational and experimental field studies, population and quantitative genetics, demographic modeling, and greenhouse studies. I am looking for a PhD student to join the lab who is broadly interested in plant ecology and evolution and looking to develop independent research questions that complement my own. If interested, please send a cover letter describing your research interests and background, a CV including GPA, GRE scores (if known), and contact information for three references to Rachel Spigler at rachel.spigler@temple.edu. Applicants must have a Bachelor’s degree in ecology or a related field, prior research experience, and meet Temple’s requirements for admission. A Master’s degree is preferred. Interested applicants should contact me as soon as possible; Temple’s deadline for admission is January 15, 2015. For additional information about my research and the Biology Department at Temple University please visit: http://bit.ly/1izBHiU http://bit.ly/YVV0Q1 *About the Biology Department at Temple University* Temple University is a large, comprehensive public research university in Philadelphia, PA, with more than 37,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students enrolled in over 400 academic degrees. The Biology Department at Temple University represents an active research community with strengths in ecology, genomics, conservation, and evolutionary biology. The Biology Department is also home to the newly formed Center for Biodiversity ( http://bit.ly/10Z0cVa), Center for Computational Genetics and Genomics ( http://bit.ly/17Di5rI), and Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine (http://bit.ly/YVV0zL). Philadelphia is the fifth largest city in the US, rich in history, known for its arts and culture, and is brimming with a vibrant science community. There are approximately 90 colleges and universities in the Greater Philadelphia region, with plenty of opportunities for collaboration. Recreational science activities abound, including ‘Science on Tap’, a monthly science café that features a brief, informal presentation by a scientist or other expert followed by lively conversation, the Academy of Natural Sciences, the Wagner Free Institute of Science, and the annual Philadelphia Science Festival. Philadelphia is also home to Fairmount Park, one of the world’s largest city park systems. —089e0149bc06d9c1a20507457452 Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I am currently recruiting motivated graduate students

​to join my lab in the Biology Department at Temple University. ​Our research addresses a broad range of questions in plant reproductive ecology and evolution, exploring how ecological, demographic, and genetic factors influence plant mating patterns and shape the evolution of reproductive traits. Current foci in the lab are (1) the effects of habitat fragmentation on plant-pollinator interactions, mating system dynamics, and floral trait evolution and (2) the evolution of mixed-mating and of the selfing syndrome. Additional interests include the evolution of plant sexual systems such as dioecy. We use a variety of approaches including observational and experimental field studies, population and quantitative genetics, demographic modeling, and greenhouse studies.

 

I am looking for a PhD student to join the lab who is broadly interested in plant ecology and evolution and looking to develop independent research questions that complement my own. If interested, please send a cover letter describing your research interests and background, a CV including GPA, GRE scores (if known), and contact information for three references to Rachel Spigler at rachel.spigler@temple.edu. Applicants must have a Bachelor’s degree in ecology or a related field, prior research experience, and meet Temple’s requirements for admission. A Master’s degree is preferred. Interested applicants should contact me as soon as possible; Temple’s deadline for admission is January 15, 2015.

For additional information about my research and the Biology Department at Temple University please visit:

http://bit.ly/1izBHiU

http://bit.ly/YVV0Q1

About the Biology Department at Temple University

Temple University is a large, comprehensive public research university in Philadelphia, PA, with more than 37,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students enrolled in over 400 academic degrees. The Biology Department at Temple University represents an active research community with strengths in ecology, genomics, conservation, and evolutionary biology. The Biology Department is also home to the newly formed Center for Biodiversity (http://bit.ly/10Z0cVa), Center for Computational Genetics and Genomics (http://bit.ly/17Di5rI), and Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine (http://bit.ly/YVV0zL).

Philadelphia is the fifth largest city in the US, rich in history, known for its arts and culture, and is brimming with a vibrant science community. There are approximately 90 colleges and universities in the Greater Philadelphia region, with plenty of opportunities for collaboration. Recreational science activities abound, including ‘Science on Tap’, a monthly science café that features a brief, informal presentation by a scientist or other expert followed by lively conversation, the Academy of Natural Sciences, the Wagner Free Institute of Science, and the annual Philadelphia Science Festival. Philadelphia is also home to Fairmount Park, one of the world’s largest city park systems.

—089e0149bc06d9c1a2050745745 via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:09

We seek a motivated PhD student to work on the evolution of personality differences in a biparental cichlid. The 3-year position is funded by the German Science Foundation and will be based within the Animal Behaviour group of the University of Hamburg. Salary level is TV-L 13 (65%, ca. 1400-1600 EURO/m after deductions). The full ad can be found on: http://bit.ly/1vXZ9MZ Please apply by 20.11.2014. For further information please contact Wiebke Schuett ( wiebke.schuett@uni-hamburg.de). Dr. Wiebke Schuett (PhD) Zoological Institute University of Hamburg Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3 20146 Hamburg Germany http://bit.ly/1tSEdKE wiebkesch@googlemail.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

November 7, 2014

23:39

The Graduate School at IST Austria invites applicants from all countries to its PhD program. The program covers a wide range of fields, with a strong component from evolutionary biology. Current faculty include Nick Barton (evolutionary theory/hybrid zones), Sylvia Cremer (disease in social insects), Jon Bollback (experimental evolution/statistical genomics), and Beatriz Vicoso (sex-chromosome evolution). For details, see www.ist.ac.at The PhD program includes a first year of cross-disciplinary coursework and rotations, followed by 3-4 years of research. The language of the Graduate School is English. IST Austria offers internationally competitive PhD salaries. Applicants must hold either a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree or equivalent. For students wishing to enter the program in the fall of 2015, the deadline for application is January 15, 2015. Nick Barton http://bit.ly/IhoxMfwww.ist.ac.at The PhD program includes a first year of cross-disciplinary coursework and rotations, followed by 3-4 years of research. The language of the Graduate School is English. IST Austria offers internationally competitive PhD salaries. Applicants must hold either a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree or equivalent. For students wishing to enter the program in the fall of 2015, the deadline for application is January 15, 2015. Nick Barton http://bit.ly/IhoxMf Nick.Barton@ist.ac.at via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR