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June 7, 2015

06:00
Background: Long term selection experiments bring unique insights on the genetic architecture of quantitative traits and their evolvability. Indeed, they are utilized to (i) monitor changes in allele frequencies and assess the effects of genomic regions involved traits determinism; (ii) evaluate the role of standing variation versus new mutations during adaptation; (iii) investigate the contribution of non allelic interactions. Here we describe genetic and phenotypic evolution of two independent Divergent Selection Experiments (DSEs) for flowering time conducted during 16 years from two early maize inbred lines. Results: Our experimental design uses selfing as the mating system and small population sizes, so that two independent families evolved within each population, Late and Early. Observed patterns are strikingly similar between the two DSEs. We observed a significant response to selection in both directions during the first 7 generations of selection. Within Early families, the response is linear through 16 generations, consistent with the maintenance of genetic variance. Within Late families and despite maintenance of significant genetic variation across 17 generations, the response to selection reached a plateau after 7 generations. This plateau is likely caused by physiological limits. Residual heterozygosity in the initial inbreds can partly explain the observed responses as evidenced by 42 markers derived from both Methyl-Sensitive Amplification- and Amplified Fragment Length- Polymorphisms. Among the 42, a subset of 13 markers most of which are in high linkage disequilibrium, display a strong association with flowering time variation. Their fast fixation throughout DSEs’ pedigrees results in strong genetic differentiation between populations and families. Conclusions: Our results reveal a paradox between the sustainability of the response to selection and the associated dearth of polymorphisms. Among other hypotheses, we discuss the maintenance of heritable variation by few mutations with strong epistatic interactions whose effects are modified by continuous changes of the genetic background through time.

June 6, 2015

23:19

REGISTRATION CLOSING JUNE 30TH The AGA Presidents Symposium, Chromosome Evolution: Molecular Mechanisms and Evolutionary Consequences, will be held at the beautiful IslandWood retreat on Bainbridge Island, outside Seattle, Washington. This will be a small meeting, 100-125 people, in an idyllic setting, providing an opportunity to interact with top researchers and dedicated students at talks, meals, and after-hour get-togethers. Registration with shared lodging is only $400, and includes all meals from a reception the evening of Monday, Aug 17 through breakfast on Thu, Aug 20. The food is fabulous, and weve even thrown in a couple of drinks every evening. For more information, poster abstract submission, and registration, go to: http://bit.ly/1NLTkNP We still have a few spaces, but theyre filling up fast, so register soon! SPEAKERS: Mark Kirkpatrick (University of Texas) Wilhelmine Key Lecture Doris Bachtrog (UC Berkeley) Chromatin and the evolution of dosage compensation Dan Barbash (Cornell University) Repetitive DNA dynamics and hybrid incompatibilities Winston Bellott (Whitehead Institute/MIT) Gene survival and gene amplification on vertebrate sex chromosomes Jim Birchler (University of Missouri) Using the B chromosome of maize to study the remarkable fluidity of centromere function Heath Blackmon (University of Texas at Arlington) The fragile Y hypothesis V variation in Y chromosome turnover Justin Blumenstiel (University of Kansas) Caught in the crossfire: Evolution of transposon silencing in the context of off-target effects Kirsten Bomblies (Harvard University) Evolution of meiosis after whole genome duplication in Arabidopsis arenosa Anna Drinnenberg (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Holocentric chromosomes Lila Fishman (University of Montana) Female meiotic drive Jeff Good (University of Montana) Neo-sex chromosome evolution and speciation in beetles Jun Kitano (National Institute of Genetics) Drivers of sex chromosome-autosome fusions and their roles in speciation Michael Lampson (University of Pennsylvania) Violation of Mendels first law: biased chromosome segregation in meiosis Mia Levine (University of Pennsylvania) Evolution of heterochromatin binding proteins Harmit Malik (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Centromere drive Karen Miga (UC Santa Cruz) A genomic and epigenomic study of human centromeres Rachel ONeill (University of Connecticut) Centromere function and evolution Galina Petukhova (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences) Mechanisms controlling initiation of genetic recombination in mammals Daven Presgraves (University of Rochester) Sex chromosomes in the Drosophila male germline: speciation and regulation Jeremy Searle (Cornell University) Chromosomal hybrid zones and speciation in mice and shrews Beatriz Vicoso (Institute of Science and Technology Austria) Testing evolutionary hypotheses on the surprisingly diverse sex-chromosomes of flies Anjanette Baker Managing Editor, Journal of Heredity http://bit.ly/18QeuEM Manager, American Genetic Association http://bit.ly/15HcX0C 2030 SE Marine Science Dr Newport, OR 97366 http://on.fb.me/18Qex3p AGAJOH@oregonstate.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

June 5, 2015

23:48
Postdoc Position: Bioinformatics and Evolutionary Genomics at Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico We have an opening for a postdoctoral position at the Instituto de Ecologa, UNAM, Mxico, which is granted based on academic merits and Curriculum vitae among a pool of candidates. We are seeking for a candidate with knowledge and skills in Bioinformatics and, specifically, should have proven experience with bioinformatic analyses of genomic SNPs data; also, should have the knowledge of the molecular laboratory techniques and processes needed to prepare DNA samples for SNPs development. The candidate will work in the lab of Dra. Ella Vzquez- Domnguez. In general, we work with population and landscape genetics, phylogeography and conservation of vertebrate species. The specific projects we are now developing that include SNPs data analyses involve reptile species (e.g. crocodiles and turtles) but will grow to more species. Projects include landscape genetics and adaptation questions, to be evaluated within a genomics framework. The successful candidate will play a key role in the generation and analysis SNPs, but also: 1) participate in field work within Mexico; 2) help graduate students with software and analyses; 3) give a seminar for the Institutes community, 4) help organize and participate in Bioinformatics courses or workshops for genetic data analyses. The postdoctoral scholarship is a UNAM grant, with a salary of approximately $1,300 US dlls per month. Candidates need fulfill the following: 1. The postdoctoral position would start between September-October 2015, for a year with possibility of renewal for a second year pending on results. 2. The candidate must have obtained his/her PhD degree no more than five years before the starting date (i.e. if starting on 1 September, PhD must have been obtained on 1 September 2010 the earliest). 3. Should have proof of experience with published work in scientific journals 4. Communication skills in Spanish Applications must include a complete CV, a pdf of the PhD grade, pdf of the front page of passport (if not of Mexican nationality), pdf of birth certificate, a cover letter briefly outlining the candidate’s fit to the position and contact information for three references. All information should be sent directly to Dra. Ella Vzquez-Domnguez, at evazquez@ecologia.unam.mx (deadline 30 July 2015). Ella Vzquez Domnguez Instituto de Ecologa, UNAM Ap. Postal 70-275 Ciudad Universitaria Mxico DF 04510 Mxico Tel +5255 5622 9015 Fax +5255 5616 1976 Email: evazquez@ecologia.unam.mx http://bit.ly/1iuNVL9 Ella Vazquez via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
23:32

The primary responsibilities of this role, as a Grad Scholar, are to: - Participating in a multi-disciplinary team of scientists at the Biologics Bayer CropScience West Sacramento, CA R&D Facility to offer bioinformatics, genomics, transcriptomics and metagenomics for controlling pests and diseases in plant and promoting plant health using microbes; - Proactively identifying and incorporating new algorithms and technology to automate the analysis of microbial genomes and to extend the features of existing analysis pipelines; - Understanding the dynamics of plant, microbe and pest/pathogen interaction using various omics technologies; - Managing next-generation sequencing (NGS) data and analyses; - Training scientific staff on the use of relevant bioinformatics software and tools; - Working with other non-bioinformatics team member in the CLS group to understand their roles and to serve as backups as needed; - Communicating effectively through listening, documentations and presentations, especially using compelling visualization tools to share analysis and interpretation of data. More specifically related to this position, Bayer seeks an incumbent who possesses the following: - PhD in Computational Biology, Ecology and Evolution, Plant Biology,Bioinformatics, Genomics or related field with 0-1 year of post-graduate experience or a Master????????s with 4+ years, or BSc. with 6+ years of post-graduate experience and currently enrolled in a graduate program. - Proven ability to handle large data sets efficiently using scripts, databases, and other tools; - Familiar with state-of-the-art open source and commercial bioinformatics tools; - In depth familiarity with various public genomic databases, statistical software tools and packages such as R and bioinformatics algorithms, particularly for the analysis of NGS data (Illumina and PacBio); - Should be comfortable enough with some basic statistical concepts and able to converse with other scientists about how to interpret basic statistical analyses such as ANOVA, linear regression, and power analyses. - Experiences in three or more of the following areas: Comparative genomics; Transcriptome sequencing analysis; Phylogenetic analysis; Pathway modeling and analysis; and/or Metagenomics analysis; Preferred Skills/Qualifications: - Familiarity with SQL and relational database, particularly PostgreSQL; - Fluent in Python, Perl, or other scripting languages; - Previous laboratory experience; - Knowledge of fungal, bacterial, insect, or plant genetics; - Working with high performance computing clusters and/or cloud services. Interested applicants should please send a resume and a cover letter to Dilara Ally (Sr Bioinformatics Scientist) : email: dilara.ally@bayer.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
06:00
Background: Genomes of Methanosarcina spp. are among the largest archaeal genomes. One suggested reason for that is massive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria. Genes of bacterial origin may be involved in the central metabolism and solute transport, in particular sugar synthesis, sulfur metabolism, phosphate metabolism, DNA repair, transport of small molecules etc. Horizontally transferred (HT) genes are considered to play the key role in the ability of Methanosarcina spp. to inhabit diverse environments. At the moment, genomes of three Methanosarcina spp. have been sequenced, and while these genomes vary in length and number of protein-coding genes, they all have been shown to accumulate HT genes. However, previous estimates had been made when fewer archaeal genomes were known. Moreover, several Methanosarcinaceae genomes from other genera have been sequenced recently. Here, we revise the census of genes of bacterial origin in Methanosarcinaceae. Results: About 5 % of Methanosarcina genes have been shown to be horizontally transferred from various bacterial groups to the last common ancestor either of Methanosarcinaceae, or Methanosarcina, or later in the evolution. Simulation of the composition of the NCBI protein non-redundant database for different years demonstrates that the estimates of the HGT rate have decreased drastically since 2002, the year of publication of the first Methanosarcina genome.The phylogenetic distribution of HT gene donors is non-uniform. Most HT genes were transferred from Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, while no HGT events from Actinobacteria to the common ancestor of Methanosarcinaceae were found. About 50 % of HT genes are involved in metabolism. Horizontal transfer of transcription factors is not common, while 46 % of horizontally transferred genes have demonstrated differential expression in a variety of conditions. HGT of complete operons is relatively infrequent and half of HT genes do not belong to operons. Conclusions: While genes of bacterial origin are still more frequent in Methanosarcinaceae than in other Archaea, most HGT events described earlier as Methanosarcina-specific seem to have occurred before the divergence of Methanosarcinaceae. Genes horizontally transferred from bacteria to archaea neither tend to be transferred with their regulators, nor in long operons.
02:05

Postdoctoral Position Available in Evolutionary Bioinformatics / Comparative Transcriptomics Description: A 2-year, NSF-funded postdoctoral position in Evolutionary Bioinformatics / Comparative Transcriptomics is available in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at The University of Colorado, Boulder. The successful candidate will be expected to generate, assemble, and annotate transcriptomes from the flowers of a minimum of 48 non-model plant species, in order to investigate the genomic basis (structural, regulatory) of flower color evolution (additional research on the impacts of epigenetic mechanisms of floral color evolution may be possible pending time and funding). Specifically, this research targets evolution of the Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathway. Candidates should have previous experience with large-scale genome or transcriptome sequencing, proficiency in necessary programming languages (e.g., PERL, R), and experience in quantification of gene expression or co-expression networks. The candidate will be expected to contribute to supervision of lab personnel and help coordinate basic activities in the PIs lab including reagent ordering and stocking. The position will remain open until filled. Qualifications: (1) A PhD in bioinformatics, genomics, evolutionary biology, computational biology, molecular biology, or related discipline (2) Strong publication record that includes multiple first-authored publications in the field, and overall high proficiency in scientific writing (3) Familiarity with concepts in evolutionary biology (4) Proficiency in analytical, quantitative, and computational methods with respect to management of next-generation sequence data, including programming abilities (5) Experience in both the generation of and analysis of transcriptome datasets, preferably on non-model organisms (6) Experience preparing graphical visualizations of data Start Date: Fall or Winter 2015, with some flexibility To Apply: Please email your cover letter, curriculum vitae, up to three publications (first author publications preferred) and names and contact information for three references to Heather Stone (heather.blair.stone@gmail.com). Please bundle all items into a single PDF. Specific questions regarding the research project should be directed to Erin Tripp (erin.tripp@colorado.edu) prior to applying. Thanks, Erin Tripp Assistant Professor, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Curator of Botany, Museum of Natural History (COLO Herbarium) University of Colorado, Boulder C105 Ramaley Hall, Campus Box 334 Boulder, CO 80309-0350 phone: 303.492.1862 303.492.4195>303.492.1862>303.492.1862>

Source: EVOLDIR
01:18
Volunteer Research Assistant – Chimpanzee and Gorilla genetic sample collection Hiring Organization: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Date Posted: 2015-04-06 Position Description: We have one research assistant position available in Loango National Park, Gabon. We initiated a project to habituate chimpanzees and western gorillas in Loango in January 2005. In addition, in 2014, we started a project to assess group composition and group dynamics of chimpanzees and gorillas in the study area. For this, genetic samples have to be collected in a systematic manner. We are looking for a person to support the sample collection starting in July 2015, for a one year period. The assistant’s tasks will include: walking recces within grid cells as part of a team and searching for genetic samples (feaces) and signs of apes. This will require long hours in the forest, a lot of walking, a high degree of self-motivation and reliability. Other tasks include handling of samples, data entry, chimpanzee habituation and possible assistance with other projects like phenology, vegetation surveys and camera traps. Loango National Park is located on the coast of Gabon and consists of several ecosystems including coastal forest and swamps. The living conditions at this project are basic. We have two main camps, with only basic amenities (no running water, only minimal solar power for electricity). The typical day consists of approximately 10 hours walking in the forest, often through swamps, an average of 12 km per day, rain or shine. The work is physically demanding. Qualifications/Experience: The applicant must have at least a BSc in biology, zoology, anthropology or a related discipline. Previous field experience with primates or other animals will be viewed as a great asset. Basic laboratory skills (like handling a pipette) are advantageous but not mandatory. The applicant should demonstrate an ability to handle the living conditions at the site. A minimum knowledge of French is required. Interested applicants should send a letter of interest, CV, and names and email addresses of 3 references via email by June 12^th. However, we will be reviewing applications as they arrive; please don’t send repeated letters of inquiry or telephone calls. Salary/funding: 150 euros per month to be paid within Gabon. Support provided for internship/volunteer positions (travel, meals, lodging): One round trip airfare to Gabon and transportation to study site will be provided. Accommodation (a tent) and basic equipment is provided. Basic food is also provided, but if you want anything special you need to purchase it yourself. You will be required to have basic health insurance that also covers emergency repatriation and liability. You also must have vaccinations for measles, yellow fever, TB, hepatitis A and B, polio, and meningitis. Term of Appointment: 1 year Application Deadline: June 12^th, 2015 Comments: Interested applicants should send a letter of interest, CV, and names of 3 references (since the deadline is tight the can be handed in later in exceptional cases) to laura_hagemann@eva.mpg.de. If you do not hear from me by June 20th, please assume that you are not being considered for the position. Laura Hagemann, PhD student Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Department of Primatology Deutscher Platz 6 04103 Leipzig, Germany +49 (0)341 9952 269 Laura Hagemann via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:02

Dear everyone, A conference programme is now available for the 7th European Congress of Mammalogy, and can be directly downloaded using this link: http://bit.ly/1ROcXqs There are only 10 days left to register for the conference (the deadline is on June 15th)! Registration can be done here: http://bit.ly/1BroV1K via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:02
–_000_F34FDFD2CF3242DD9F4F9B68366B4FD0unilch_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF INFORMATION ACQUISITION AND USE IN SOCIAL INTERACTIONS When? 6-9 July 2015 Where? Arolla (Swiss Alps), Switzerland This workshop is organized by Prof. Michal Taborsky and Dr. Leif Engqvist from the University of Bern (CH). Invited speakers: Dr. Sarah Brosnan, Georgia State University (US) Prof. Thomas Bugnyar, University of Vienna (AT) Dr. Sasha Dall, University of Exeter (UK) Dr. Keith Jensen, University of Manchester (UK) Prof. Alex Kacelnik, University of Oxford (UK) Prof. Jens Krause, Leibniz Inst. Berlin (DE) Prof. David Stephens, University of Minnesota (US) The program of the workshop will consist of a combination of plenary talks by invited speakers and work performed in small groups, in which the participants will discuss a particular theme together with one of the invited speakers. The results of these small-group sessions willl be presented to the plenum by student participants, followed by a general discussion. Adaptive decision making depends on the quality of available information. The significance of direct or indirect information involved in social decisions is little understood. Evidence for constraints and substantial costs in the acquisition and processing of information is accumulating. Accordingly, behavioural decisions often seem to be made with imperfect knowledge, following “rules of thumb” rather than applying prudent assessment to make optimal choices. Furthermore, individuals may or may not benefit from sharing information; hence they may transmit only partial or false information. The aim of this workshop is to discuss these issues in an evolutionary framework, both from an empirical and theoretical perspective. Questions discussed in this workshop will include, for instance, how different costs of information acquisition and use will change predictions on adaptive decision making; or, whether seemingly irrational or “wrong” decisions may actually make sense when tak ing costs and constraints on information use into account. These are topics of great interest to students and scientists from different disciplines, such as behavioural ecology, neurobiology, cognitive sciences, and psychology. Interaction between different fields will identify open questions and directions for future interdisciplinary research. For more info and registration: http://bit.ly/1bITzv2 Queries: ecologie-evolution@cuso.ch via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:30

Dear all, We are pleased to announce a four-day workshop Plankton resting stages: ecological, evolutionary and geological perspectives, held at the Tvärminne Zoological Station, Hanko Peninsula, Finland, on Oct 5-8, 2015. The workshop brings together researchers who study phyto- and zooplankton resting stages in the fields of evolutionary biology, genetics, ecology, paleoecology, environmental science, and geology. The workshop will discuss the status of knowledge in the respective research fields, and bring forward joint targets for development and interest. The program involves three thematic components (note that the final workshop sessions will take shape based on the research themes of the registered participants): • Resting stages and geology: Long-term archives and indicators of change • Resting stages and ecology: Environmental cues and ecological significance • Resting stages and evolution: Living archives and evolutionary significance Register by July 31st, 2015. http://bit.ly/1JqwSdZ. Register early, the space is limited. Cheers on behalf of the organizing committee, Maija Heikkilä, Anke Kremp, Sanna Suikkanen and Anu Vehmaa via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:14

Dear All, Two postdoctoral positions are available as part of a collaborative project between the labs of John Burke and Lisa Donovan at the University of Georgia. These positions will involve the genomic and physiological analysis of abiotic stress responses in cultivated sunflower and related wild sunflower species. The ideal candidates will have a strong background in one or more of the following areas: population/quantitative genetics, genomics, bioinformatics, plant ecophysiology, stress physiology. Funds are anticipated to support these positions over multiple years with a preferred start date of January 2015. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the positions are filled. To apply, please send your CV, a brief statement of research interests, and the names and contact information for three references to: jmburke@uga.edu and ldonovan@uga.edu. Informal inquiries are also encouraged. For more information about the UGA Department of Plant Biology, please visit: http://bit.ly/1Qbb9ux. Information on the Burke lab can be found at: http://bit.ly/1QbbbCC. Information on the Donovan lab can be found at: http://bit.ly/1HOUu6d . via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

June 4, 2015

16:45

@jeetsukumaran wrote:

The fourth major version series of the DendroPy Phylogenetic Computing Library has been released!

http://dendropy.org

Get it now with:

$ sudo pip install -U dendropy
  • DendroPy 4 runs under Python 2.7 and Python 3.x
  • Re-architectured and re-engineered from the ground up, yet preserving (as much as possible, though certainly not all) the public API of DendroPy 3.x.
  • MAJOR, MAJOR, MAJOR performance improvements in data file reading and processing! Newick and Nexus tree file parsing crazily optimized, with performance scaling at O(1) rather than O(N) or O(n^2) (i.e., in practical terms, you will see better performance improvements with bigger trees when comparing DendroPy 4 vs. DendroPy 3). A thousand-tip tree can be parsed in 0.1 seconds with DendroPy 4 vs. 0.2 seconds with DendroPy 3, while a one million-tip tree can be parsed in under two minutes with DendroPy 4, vs. over 4 days with DendroPy 3. These performance improvements will percolate down to all applications based on DendroPy, including, for example, SumTrees.
  • Tests, tests, tests, tests, and more tests! The core library has a stupendous amount of new tests added, and with each one the ability to zero in and identify, isolate, and deal with bugs is improved.
  • Related to above: dozens of nasty bugs have been dealt with. No, not killed, because we are not that kind of organization. Rather, they have been taken to the big testing farm in the quarantine zone where they can lead healthy lives munching on mock constructs and helping us test the the library to ensure that it works as advertised so that your code works as advertised.
  • Documentation, documentation, documentation! The goal is to have every public method, function, or class fully-documented.
  • Many, many, many, many new features: e.g., a high-performance TreeArray class, calculation of MCCT topologies, new simulation models, new tree statistics, new tree manipulation routines.
  • SumTrees works faster than ever before thanks to the above improvements, and also allows for many new operations such as rerooting the target tree, using an MCCT tree as the target topology, extensive extra information summarized, auto-detection of number of parallel processors etc.: http://dendropy.org/programs/sumtrees.html .
  • The newly rewritten DendroPy primer is just full of information to get you started: http://dendropy.org/primer/index.html .
  • The "work-in-progress" migration primer will help ease the transition from 3 to 4: http://dendropy.org/migration.html .
  • Comprehensive documentation of all the data formats supported, plus all the keyword arguments you can use to control and customize reading and writing in all these different formats: http://dendropy.org/schemas/index.html .
  • A glossary of terms, to clarify the simultaneously redundant and oversubscribed/conflicting terminological soup that characterizes a lot of phylogenetics: http://dendropy.org/glossary.html .

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02:12

–_000_BF59DA1C6246194E8ACF1BF21457706141095899MBX111dethzch_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL is a part of the ETH domain. Approximately 500 people work on the sustainable use and protection of the environment and on the handling of natural hazards. The Research Unit Biodiversity and Conservation Biology, which deals with all aspects of biodiversity from genes to ecosystems and which has strong links into practical management, is looking, per August 1, 2015, for a PhD student in spatial ecology and habitat network modelling. The interdisciplinary project CHECNET focusses on coupling ecological habitat networks with land-use/transport networks. You will develop a new method for constructing habitat networks that predicts occurrences of animal species resulting from changes in land-use and/or traffic flows on the Swiss Plateau. You work with existing occurrence data from a range of animal groups. You publish your work in international scientific journals and present them at conferences. You have a Master in Biology, Environmental Sciences or Geography, are interested in spatial ecology and have experience with the modelling of habitat connectivity, habitat suitability and/or networks. You also have experience with programming (R, Python, Matlab) and GIS (ArcGIS, QGIS). You enjoy communication and collaboration in an interdisciplinary project and are fluent in English. For more information: http://bit.ly/1Fwnxd2 –_000_BF59DA1C6246194E8ACF1BF21457706141095899MBX111dethzch_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Source: EVOLDIR
01:56

–_000_DC16585125524DD88B9FA98AE743093Dunitnit_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable “Workshop: Rovereto(Italy).Insect_models_of_Behaviour.Sep4” First announcement: We are happy to announce the programme of the Workshop “Insect models of Behaviour: ecology, genetics, evolution, pest management” that will take place in Rovereto (Italy) on 4th September. Beside talks of the invited speakers we will host a poster session with a prize for the best poster presented by a young investigator (up to postdoc level). The meeting is free to attend but a registration is required. We will communicate soon the details of the website for the registration, in the meantime enjoy the programme and for further questions please write to elisabetta.versace@unitn.it : When: 4th September 2015 Where: Fondazione Museo Civico, Borgo Santa Caterina 41, Rovereto (Trento), Italy. Organizing committee: Elisabetta Versace, Anna Eriksson (University of Trento); Gianfranco Anfora (Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige); Gionata Stancher (Fondazione Museo Civico Rovereto) Programme Workshop “Insect Models of Behaviour: Ecology, genetics, evolution, pest management” 9:00-9:15 Opening 9:15-10:15 Benjamin Prud'homme (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Marseille, France) The evolution of egg laying behavior in Drosophila suzukii. 10:15-11:00 Paul Becher (Swedish University of Agricultural sciences, Alnarp, Sweden) Chemical stimuli, basic drives and behavioural responses: understanding some aspects of Drosophila chemical ecology 11:00-11:20 Coffee break 11:20-12:00 Donato Grasso (University of Parma, Italy) Ants as mutualists: from basic to applied science 12:00-12:40 Anna Eriksson, Elisabetta Versace (University of Trento, Italy): Olfactory responses in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila suzukii: studies on ecological specialization 12:45 Final remarks on the morning session 12:45-2:30 Lunch break 2:30-4:30 Poster session. The best poster presented by a young investigator (up to postdoc level), as judged by the Organizing committee and Invited speakers, will be announced at 4 pm. We look forward seeing you in Rovereto. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Elisabetta Versace, PhD Center for Mind/Brain Sciences University of Trento ACN lab - Animal Cognition and Neuroscience Laboratory Piazza della Manifattura 1, 38068 Rovereto (TN), Italy Phone: +39 0464 808658 Mobile: +39 349 8744279 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - @so_evolutionary –_000_DC16585125524DD88B9FA98AE743093Dunitnit_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=“Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

“Workshop: Rovereto(Italy).Insect_models_of_Behaviour.Sep4”

First announcement:

We are happy to announce the programme of the Workshop “Insect models of Behaviour: ecology, genetics, evolution, pest management” that will take place in Rovereto (Italy) on 4th September.

Beside talks of the invited speakers we will host a poster session with a prize for the best poster presented by a young investigator (up to postdoc level).

The meeting is free to attend but a registration is required. We will communicate soon the details of the website for the registration, in the meantime enjoy the programme and for further questions please write to elisabetta.versace@unitn.it :

When: 4th September 2015

Where: Fondazione Museo Civico, Borgo Santa Caterina 41, Rovereto (Trento), Italy.

Organizing committee: Elisabetta Versace, Anna Eriksson (University of Trento); Gianfranco Anfora (Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige); Gionata Stancher (Fondazione Museo Civico Rovereto)

Programme Workshop “Insect Models of Behaviour: Ecology, genetics, evolution, pest management

9:00-9:15 Opening 9:15-10:15 Benjamin Prud'homme (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Marseille, France)The evolution of egg laying behavior in Drosophila suzukii.

10:15-11:00 Paul Becher (Swedish University of Agricultural sciences, Alnarp, Sweden) Chemical stimuli, basic drives and behavioural responses: understanding some aspects of Drosophila chemical ecology 11:00-11:20 Coffee break 11:20-12:00 Donato Grasso (University of Parma, Italy) Ants as mutualists: from basic to applied science

12:00-12:40 Anna Eriksson, Elisabetta Versace (University of Trento, Italy): Olfactory responses in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila suzukii: studies on ecological specialization

12:45 Final remarks on the morning session 12:45-2:30 Lunch break 2:30-4:30 Poster session. The best poster presented by a young investigator (up to postdoc level), as judged by the Organizing committee and Invited speakers, will be announced at 4 pm.We look forward seeing you in Rovereto.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Elisabetta Versace, PhDCenter for Mind/Brain SciencesUniversity of TrentoACN lab - Animal Cognition and Neuroscience LaboratoryPiazza della Manifattura 1, 38068 Rovereto (TN), ItalyPhone: +39 0464 808658Mobile: +39 349 8744279- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -@so_evolutionary

–_000_DC16585125524DD88B9FA98AE743093Dunitnit via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:43
Post-doctoral position in phyloinformatics In 2012 and 2013, NESCent sponsored 2 hackathons to build a prototype “Phylotastic” [1] system with the goal of providing an open, distributed, community-owned system for efficient delivery of “Tree of Life” knowledge, so that scientists, educators, and the public can get online species trees as easily as they currently get online driving directions. NSF recently funded a 3-year collaborative project [2] to develop a production system based on this prototype. As part of this project, a post-doc position is available with Arlin Stoltzfus at the Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research (IBBR), a joint NIST-UMD-UMB institute in Rockville, Maryland, in the midst of a major biotechnology corridor in the greater Washington, DC area. Interested individuals are encouraged to apply for this position, which provides a unique opportunity to build tools with a broad impact in spreading phylogenetic knowledge (in the scientific community and beyond). The successful applicant will become part of a distributed, collaborative team with colleagues from IBBR as well as NMSU (Enrico Pontelli), UTK (Brian O'Meara), Open Tree of Life (Karen Cranston), and Global Names (Dmitry Mozzherin). Applications should include * A cover letter (include skills, suggested start date, and expected PhD date as needed) * A CV * A short research statement * Contact information for two references * Link(s) to repositories with examples of code you have written (or attachments including such code) Salary is from 42000 to 46000 USD depending on experience. The desired applicant is expected to bring a scientific understanding of phylogeny use-cases into the design and testing process, and also to participate in implementation of tools where appropriate. Experience in scientific programming is required. Understanding how and why scientists use phylogenies will be extremely valuable. Knowledge of R or Python (the language of some of the prototype tools), though helpful, is not necessary. If in doubt, ask: please do not self-select yourself out from what might be a mutually beneficial position. The University of Maryland, College Park, actively subscribes to a policy of equal employment opportunity, and will not discriminate against any employee or applicant because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry or national origin, marital status, genetic information, political affiliation, and gender identity or expression. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. Review of applications will begin on June 20th and continue until the position is filled (start dates are flexible). Presubmission inquiries are encouraged. With regards, Arlin Stoltzfus (arlin@umd.edu) Research Biologist (NIST) Fellow (IBBR) Adjunct Associate Professor (UMD) [1] www.phylotastic.org; see also Stoltzfus, et al., 2013, “Phylotastic! Making tree-of-life knowledge accessible, reusable and convenient” (BMC Bioinformatics 2013, 14:158), available at http://bit.ly/1QrNC3c. [2] Arlin Stoltzfus, Enrico Pontelli, and Brian O'Meara. “Collaborative Research: ABI Development: An open infrastructure to disseminate phylogenetic knowledgwww.phylotastic.org; see also Stoltzfus, et al., 2013, "Phylotastic! Making tree-of-life knowledge accessible, reusable and convenient” (BMC Bioinformatics 2013, 14:158), available at http://bit.ly/1QrNC3c. [2] Arlin Stoltzfus, Enrico Pontelli, and Brian O'Meara. “Collaborative Research: ABI Development: An open infrastructure to disseminate phylogenetic knowledge.” Arlin Stoltzfus (arlin@umd.edu) Research Biologist, NIST; Fellow, IBBR; Adj. Assoc. Prof., UMCP IBBR, 9600 Gudelsky Drive, Rockville, MD, 20850 tel: 240 314 6208; web: www.molevol.org Arlin Stoltzfus via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
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–_000_865a05b28c054d9baaa964512e8cdf63pittprodx04univpittedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable REMINDER: Deadline to apply is this Friday, June 5! Join us at ESA 2015 to kick off an online network that will be focused on testing hands-on, data-driven modules in the undergraduate classroom. Funding is available to support participants’ attendance at ESA. Dates & Location: Sunday, August 9 from 9AM-4:30PM at the Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland. Description: DryadLab is seeking faculty to field test classroom modules during the Fall of 2015. DryadLab is an educational extension of the Dryad Digital Repository, which contains freely available research data from thousands of published scientific papers. DryadLab provides open, high-quality, hands-on, data-driven educational modules suitable for use in undergraduate classrooms, developed by the authors of the original publications in collaboration with experienced educators. DryadLab is joining forces with the Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education Synthesis (QUBES) project to provide support for field testers via an online network that will facilitate the sharing of resources and expertise. The network will run from 20 July 2015 to 20 November 2015 and will be hosted online at http://bit.ly/1HLBeWY. Prior to the ESA kick-off meeting, participants will have the opportunity to review materials for four DryadLab modules: 1. Introduction to Extinction and Extinction Bias 2. Survivorship in the Natural World 3. A Walk Through the Woods: Data Analysis of Structural Adaptations in Wood 4. The Beetle Affair Module descriptions are available at: http://bit.ly/1HLBd5E During the one-day kick-off, participants will develop a plan for integrating the DryadLab modules into their existing course curriculum. After the in-person meeting, network participants will continue to interact online to refine the modules for their classroom, discuss various implementation challenges, and define strategies to overcome these challenges. Participants will implement these modules in their classroom during the fall and share their experiences with each other. This mentoring network is most relevant for faculty with an interest in learning how to use real data in the classroom. A total of 14 participants will be selected. To qualify, participants must be willing to incorporate at least 2 modules into their course this fall. Participants must also be able to commit ~1 hour per week to online discussions. Additional time outside of these discussions will also be required for independent work on adapting and reviewing modules. DryadLab is able to provide the following support to participants for the one-day meeting at ESA: Regular ESA member early bird registration, 2 nights hotel, flight costs under $500, and lunch on Saturday. To apply, please go to: http://goo.gl/forms/Fs5KD97X4E. Application deadline is June 5th. Accepted applicants will be notified by June 15th. QUESTIONS? Questions should be directed via email to Samantha Swauger, the DryadLab project manager, at samswauger@gmail.com. –_000_865a05b28c054d9baaa964512e8cdf63pittprodx04univpittedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Source: EVOLDIR
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–_000_0FA06FD7A0F8FD4D8A15470605D26BDA158D59A0EXMB03adwsuedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Postdoc Position: Evolutionary Genomics at Washington State University A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Joanna Kelley, in the School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University in Pullman, WA (kelleylab.wordpress.com). The research goals of the laboratory are to use genomic and computational methods to understand the genomic basis of adaptation to extreme environments. We are interested in understanding how genetic and environmental variation interact to drive population differentiation and adaptive evolution in several fish species. We study mollies, Antarctic eel pouts and mangrove rivulus. The School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University has a strong research presence in evolution and ecology research and there are many opportunities for interaction and collaboration. We welcome applications from candidates with diverse educational backgrounds. Applicants will be expected to develop and lead projects. Candidates are required to have a Ph.D. in Genetics, Genomics, Computational Biology (bioinformatics, systems biology), Statistics, Computer Science, or related disciplines. A computing background is required, especially experience with Unix, and knowledge in one or several programming languages (Perl, Python, C/C++, R/BioConductor, etc). Additional experience with high-throughput sequencing data is highly necessary. Candidates should demonstrate a strong track record of publication; have strong organizational, written, and oral communication skills; and be able to work both independently and as part of a collaborative team. The appointment is for one year with the possibility of renewal based on satisfactory performance. Funding is available for two years. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience, and benefits are included. Applicants should email Joanna Kelley at joanna.l.kelley@wsu.edu and include curriculum vitae, cover letter that includes a statement of research interests that explicitly describes your professional qualifications for the position, and contact information for three references. Start time is flexible, with a desired start in Fall 2015. Applications will be accepted through July 15th. Joanna L. Kelley, PhD Assistant Professor, School of Biological Sciences Member, Center for Reproductive Biology Washington State University joanna.l.kelley@wsu.edu –_000_0FA06FD7A0F8FD4D8A15470605D26BDA158D59A0EXMB03adwsuedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=“iso-8859-1” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}Postdoc Position: Evolutionary Genomics at Washington State University A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Joanna Kelley, in the School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University in Pullman, WA (kelleylab.wordpress.com). The research goals of the laboratory are to use genomic and computational methods to understand the genomic basis of adaptation to extreme environments. We are interested in understanding how genetic and environmental variation interact to drive population differentiation and adaptive evolution in several fish species. We study mollies, Antarctic eel pouts and mangrove rivulus. The School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University has a strong research presence in evolution and ecology research and there are many opportunities for interaction and collaboration. We welcome applications from candidates with diverse educational backgrounds. Applicants will be expected to develop and lead projects. Candidates are required to have a Ph.D. in Genetics, Genomics, Computational Biology (bioinformatics, systems biology), Statistics, Computer Science, or related disciplines. A computing background is required, especially experience with Unix, and knowledge in one or several programming languages (Perl, Python, C/C++, R/BioConductor, etc). Additional experience with high-throughput sequencing data is highly necessary. Candidates should demonstrate a strong track record of publication; have strong organizational, written, and oral communication skills; and be able to work both independently and as part of a collaborative team. The appointment is for one year with the possibility of renewal based on satisfactory performance. Funding is available for two years. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience, and benefits are included. Applicants should email Joanna Kelley at joanna.l.kelley@wsu.edu and include curriculum vitae, cover letter that includes a statement of research interests that explicitly describes your professional qualifications for the position, and contact information for three references. Start time is flexible, with a desired start in Fall 2015. Applications will be accepted through July 15th. Joanna L. Kelley, PhD Assistant Professor, School of Biological Sciences Member, Center for Reproductive Biology Washington State University joanna.l.kelley@wsu.edu –_000_0FA06FD7A0F8FD4D8A15470605D26BDA158D59A0EXMB03adwsuedu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
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Volunteers needed from now onwards as field assistants for the project: Reducing Daily Energy Expenditure as an Adaptive Response to Droughts - Physiology and Behavior Opportunity: This is a great opportunity for anybody who wants to get more experience in field work relating to eco-physiology, animal behavior, evolution, and ecology before starting an MSc or PhD project. Project: We study the evolutionary and ecological reasons as well as physiological mechanisms of group living, paternal care, communal nesting and social flexibility in the striped mouse. One focus is on the adaptation to droughts, combining physiological, behavioral, ecological and evolutionary research. As this species is diurnal and the habitat is open, direct behavioral observations in the field are possible. What kind of people are needed? Biology/zoology/veterinary students are preferred as candidates. Applicants must have an interest in working in the field and with animals. Hard working conditions will await applicants, as the study species gets up with sunrise (between 5 and 6 o` clock), and stops its activity with dusk (19 o` clock). Work in the field will be done for 5 days a week. Applicants must be able to manage extreme temperatures (below 0 at night in winter, sometimes over 40C during summer days). Applicants must both be prepared to live for long periods in the loneliness of the field and to be part of a small social group. Work of volunteer field assistants: Trapping, marking and radio-tracking of striped mice; all-day observations in the field. Volunteers will also see how blood samples are collected for physiological measurements. Volunteers are expected to help with maintenance of the research station (water pump, solar power, etc.). Confirmation letter: Students get a letter of confirmation about their work and can prepare a report of their own small project to get credit points from their university for their bachelor or masters studies. Costs: Students have to arrange their transport to the field site themselves. Per month, an amount of Rand 1350 (around 180 US$, 110 Euro) must be paid for accommodation at the research station. Students must buy their own food etc in Springbok (costs of about R 3000, approx. 360 US$ or 250 Euro/month). Including extras (going out for dinner; shopping), you should expect costs of about 600 US$ / 450 Euros per month. Students get an invitation letter which they can use to apply for funding in their home country. Place: The field site is in the Goegap Nature Reserve near Springbok in the North-West of South Africa. The vegetation consists of Succulent Karoo, which has been recognized as one of 25 hotspots of biodiversity. It is a desert to semi-desert with rain mainly in winter (June to September). When and how long: At the moment we are looking for several volunteers. Volunteers are expected to stay at least three months, but longer periods of up to 6months are preferred. How to apply? Send a short motivation letter stating why and for which period you are interested and your CV via email to rrimbach@gmail.com More information under http://bit.ly/157Nija Contact via e-mail: rrimbach@gmail.com Succulent Karoo Research Station A registered South African non-profit organization Dr. Rebecca Rimbach (Postdoctoral Fellow) South Africa Dr. Rebecca Rimbach School of Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences University of the Witwatersrand South Africa Rebecca Rimbach via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

June 3, 2015

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We are pleased to announce and invite you to the 7th edition of ConGen 7th ConGen- Population Genomic Data Analysis Course: Recent Application of Next Gen Sequence Data to Understand Genetic Population Structure and Detect Natural Selection 31-Aug/ 5-Sept 2015, Flathead Lake Biological Station, Montana, USA Applications for 2015 edition are still open V but space is limited! Objective: To provide training in conceptual and practical aspects of data analysis for the population and evolutionary genomics of natural and managed populations. Emphasis will be on next generation sequence data analysis (RADs, exon capture, and whole genome sequence analyses) and interpretation of output from recent novel statistical approaches and software programs. The course also will allow daily discussions among young researchers (student participants) and >10 leaders in population genomics (instructors) to help develop the next generation of conservation and evolutionary geneticists. We will identify and discuss developments needed to improve data analysis approaches. This course will cover analysis methods including the coalescent, Bayesian, approximate Bayesian, and likelihood-based approaches (see: Andrews and Luikart 2014). Who should apply: Ph.D. students, post-docs, faculty, and population biologists with a background of at least one semester university-level course in population genetics and a course in population ecology. Applicants must have a basic background in population genetic data analysis, including testing for Hardy-Weinberg proportions and gametic disequilibrium. Participation will be limited to 25-30 people allowing efficient instruction with hands-on computer exercises during the course. Priority will be given to persons with their own data to analyze (for example graduate students well into their degree program). Deadline for early bird application is 1 July, 2015 Course/Workshop Format: For each subject, we typically provide 30-45 minutes of background, theory, discussion and introduction to concepts. Immediately following, we will conduct data analyses together for 30-60 minutes using relevant software programs and real data sets. Evening hands-on computer sessions and lodging together of the instructors and students in the same location (the beautiful Flathead Lake field station) will allow for extensive exchange and facilitate learning. For detailed information (on instructors etc.) see http://bit.ly/1OZMGrq Field trip dinner with instructors in Glacier National Park “Luikart, Gordon” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR