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October 16, 2014

03:11

GRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY The Department of Biology and Biochemistry at the University of Houston (UH) welcomes applications for its graduate program in Evolutionary Biology and Ecology for Fall 2015. The following faculty in the area of Evolutionary Biology and Ecology have opportunities available for their labs: Blaine Cole (bcole@uh.edu) - Evolution and social behavior Dan Graur (dgraur@uh.edu) - Molecular evolutionary bioinformatics Dan Wells (dwells@uh.edu) - Evolution of development and behavior Diane Wiernasz (dwiernasz@uh.edu) - Sexual selection Elizabeth Ostrowski (eaostrowski@uh.edu) - Experimental evolution and social evolution Erin Kelleher (eskelleher@uh.edu) - Evolutionary genetics and genomics George Fox (fox@uh.edu) - Experimental evolution and origin of life Gregg Roman (gwroman@uh.edu) - Evolution of behavior Kerri Crawford (kmcrawford3@uh.edu) - Community ecology Rebecca Zufall (rzufall@uh.edu) - Evolutionary genetics Ricardo Azevedo (razevedo@uh.edu) - Evolutionary genetics Rich Meisel (rpmeisel@uh.edu) - Evolutionary genetics and genomics Steve Pennings (spennings@uh.edu) - Community ecology Tim Cooper (tcooper@central.uh.edu) - Experimental evolution Tony Frankino (frankino@uh.edu) - Evolution of complex traits For more information regarding the Evolutionary Biology and Ecology graduate program at UH see: http://bit.ly/1pfOcE4 http://bit.ly/1txeZ5W The deadline for application of prospective students is February 1st, 2015, but students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. ___________________________ Ricardo B. R. Azevedo, PhD Associate Professor Dept. Biology & Biochemistry University of Houston 369 Science & Research 2 Houston, TX 77204-5001 Tel: 713-743 4149 Fax: 713-743 2636 Email: razevedo@uh.edu Website: wwworm.biology.uh.edu ___________________________ via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
02:39
MS ASSISTANTSHIP in the Biology Department at Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky, USA. The Johnson Lab in the Biology Department at Western Kentucky University is seeking a motivated, qualified individual with prior experience in the fields of genetics and/or population biology to conduct independent research towards the completion of a Master’s of Science Degree while acting as a teaching assistant for an undergraduate Biology course. Appropriate prior experience could include independent undergraduate research in any of a variety of disciplines or undergraduate coursework that utilized molecular genetic lab techniques. Specific areas of research include (but are not limited to) 1) landscape genetics of amphibians using microsatellite loci to evaluate the distribution of genetic variation and identify the interaction between geographic features and gene flow; and 2) analysis of hybrid zones using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to describe genomic patterns of admixture and identify genes of ecological interest. Desirable skills include a familiarity with standard population genetic software (Structure, Fstat, Migrate, etc.) and experience with basic laboratory techniques (PCR, sequencing, etc.). Other areas of research that fall under the broad umbrella of amphibian evolutionary ecology and conservation will also be considered. While enrolled in the Master of Sciences in Biology program at WKU, students are expected to develop, implement, and analyze independent research projects, prepare scientific manuscripts, and present research at regional and/or national meetings. Additionally, the opportunity exists for qualified applicants to apply for a Graduate Research Fellowship that offers an enhanced financial package relative to the standard Department of Biology teaching assistantship (see below for necessary qualifications). Teaching Assistant responsibilities include: instruction of two or three 18-student laboratories once a week, preparation of laboratory materials, grading and evaluation of student performance, and weekly TA meetings with the course instructor. Instruction responsibilities include a brief pre-lab lecture describing concepts and protocols followed by hands-on demonstration of appropriate techniques. Prior teaching experience is not required, but effective communication skills are a must. A B.S. degree in biology, or closely related discipline is required. Additional requirements include: competitive GRE scores and undergraduate GPA, prior independent research experience, demonstrated excellence in course work, excellent written and oral communication skills, and ability to work independently and as a team member. The successful applicant minimally receives two years of TA stipend, a partial tuition waiver, and contributions towards health insurance benefits. Pertinent requirements for Graduate Research Fellowship consideration are as follows: Students must be accepted in a graduate program at WKU. Students must demonstrate outstanding scholarly promise in their selected field (e.g., GPA >3.5, GRE >315, publications, presentations, research awards, etc.). Students must have a clearly identified research topic and proposed research plan that can be completed within the framework of a masters degree program. For further details about this position please contact Dr. Jarrett Johnson: jarrett.johnson@wku.edu. To apply please submit a letter of interest, CV, unofficial transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information for three references to jarrett.johnson@wku.edu. Review of applications will begin immediately (10/15/14) and will continue until a suitable applicant is selected, with a target deadline for selection being February 1, 2015. “Johnson, Jarrett” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:24
Funded Ph.D positions are available for the fall of 2015 in the lab of Carolin Frank (acarolinfrank.com), Life and Environmental Sciences, University of California Merced. Research in the lab focuses on the evolution and ecology of bacterial endophytes in natural ecosystems. The graduate students will work on a large NSF-funded project to study the taxonomic, genetic and functional biodiversity of a novel nitrogen fixing symbiosis in the above-ground tissues of high elevation pines. The research focuses on limber pine, a species with a wide climatic, elevational and geographic range. Limber pine grows in the Rocky Mountains from Alberta to New Mexico; in the Great Basin states of Nevada and Utah; and in the Sierra Nevada in California. To understand how endophyte diversity is shaped by the environment and how it shapes the nitrogen cycle in subalpine forests, we will examine the biodiversity of endophytes in limber pine and co-occurring pine species across the limber pine range. Like most bacteria, the endophytes cannot be cultured in the lab. Therefore, cutting-edge methods including DNA sequencing and genome analysis will be integrated with established and highly sensitive methods for detecting and visualizing nitrogen fixing activity inside limber pine tissue. The project is a collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab and the Joint Genome Institute. Students will actively participate in this team science project while developing their own line of research inquiry, using a variety of sequence-based, single cell genomics- and field-based approaches. For more information about the Life and Environmental Sciences unit at UC Merced, and the Environmental Systems and Quantitative and Systems Biology graduate programs visit: LES http://bit.ly/1vgvZfq QSB http://bit.ly/1rxDMzv ES http://bit.ly/1vgvZfu UC Merced (www.ucmerced.edu) is a public research university located in Merced, California, close to Yosemite National Park and 2 hours from San Francisco. We have a small, close-knit graduate student population, and housing is cheap. The Frank lab shares space with a Microbial Biogeochemistry and a Paleoecology lab. Interested candidates should contact Carolin Frank (cfrank3@ucmerced.edu, acarolinfrank.com). Please include a CV and a brief description of your background and research interests. For a project flyer see here: http://bit.ly/1rxDPeowww.ucmerced.edu) is a public research university located in Merced, California, close to Yosemite National Park and 2 hours from San Francisco. We have a small, close-knit graduate student population, and housing is cheap. The Frank lab shares space with a Microbial Biogeochemistry and a Paleoecology lab. Interested candidates should contact Carolin Frank (cfrank3@ucmerced.edu, acarolinfrank.com). Please include a CV and a brief description of your background and research interests. For a project flyer see here: http://bit.ly/1rxDPeo Carolin Frank via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:37
—_000_D0641278ECA3wmurphycvmtamuedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Faculty Position in Comparative/Biomedical Genomics Texas A&M University The Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences at Texas A&M University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in the area of comparative genomics at the Assistant or Associate Professor level. We seek energetic individuals applying innovative comparative, population-based genomic approaches to better understand the genetic bases and environmental components of complex traits, susceptibility to disease conditions, and other fundamental processes in biology. Applicants with an outstanding record of achievement, a research program using established or emerging vertebrate model organisms, and strong computational skills are of particular interest. The successful candidate must have a doctoral degree and relevant post-doctoral experience, and will be expected to develop and sustain a vigorous extramurally funded research program, train graduate students, and teach within the Biomedical Sciences program. Opportunities exist to interact collaboratively with a large and expanding genomics and life science faculty within the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences and across the broader University community through the Whole Systems Genomics Initiative (genomics.tamu.edu), One Health Initiative (onehealth.tamu.edu), and several interdisciplinary, degree-granting faculties and research programs (e.g., Genetics, Neuroscience, Reproduction, Toxicology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology). Salary and start-up packages will be competitive and commensurate with level of accomplishment. Modern laboratory and office space will be provided within the Veterinary Medical Research Complex, as will access to modern core facil ities for next-generation sequencing (txgen.tamu.edu) and significant computational resources on campus. Review of applications will begin November 1 2014, and continue until the position is filled. Applicants should send a curriculum vitae, statement of research and teaching interests, three relevant reprints, and the names of three potential references to: Genomics Search Committee, Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, VMA Bldg. Rm. 107, College Station, TX 77843-4458 or by email (preferred): dhernandez@cvm.tamu.edu For more information please visit: vetmed.tamu.edu/vibs and genomics.tamu.edu Texas A&M University is an Affirmative Action Employer/Equal Opportunity Employer. Applications from women and individuals from ethnic/racial minority groups are actively encouraged. —_000_D0641278ECA3wmurphycvmtamuedu_ Content-Type: message/external-body; access-type=x-mutt-deleted; expiration=”Wed, 15 Oct 2014 17:23:18 -0400”; length989 Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable —_000_D0641278ECA3wmurphycvmtamuedu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:49
PhD position: A PhD position is available to work on an international project involving laboratories at the University of Toronto and at the Institute of Functional Genomics in Lyon, France (see project description below). The successful candidate will be enrolled into the University of Toronto’s PhD program, and will jointly work in the labs of Locke Rowe, Ashley Bruce, and Abderrahman Khila. Priority will be given to applications from Canadian Citizens. However, applications from international candidates are welcome. http://bit.ly/11qIslC http://bit.ly/1wadOX8 http://bit.ly/11qIslI To apply: Send a CV, a cover letter describing skill relevant to this project, and names and contacts of three referees to: locke.rowe@utoronto.ca The role of ancient developmental genes in trait diversification. Males of the genus Rheumatobates are known to have highly modified appendages that aid in the grasping of resistant females. The transition from the ancestral to the derived states occurs multiple times and in different ways, leading to a diversity of morphological outcomes (presence and location of antagonistic hooks and spines etc). The remarkable diversity in these antagonistic traits may be driven by two processes a direct response to differences in female resistance to mating, and/or spatio-temporal variation in the expression of developmental genes, where a variety of outcomes are similarly effective. We have recently uncovered the role of an ancient developmental gene, dll, in controlling the sexually antagonistic modification of male grasping antennae in Rheumatobates rylei. To determine the relative importance of these two alternative processes in generating sexual diversity, we are combining behavioural studies of antennal function with studies examining the role of dll in the diversification of these structures, in Rhematobates spp. that span the range of modified antennae. For more details see references below. References: Khila, A., Abouheif, E., and L. Rowe. 2014. Comparative functional analyses of Ultrabithorax reveal multiple steps and paths to diversification of legs in the adaptive radiation of semi-aquatic insects. Evolution. doi: 10.1111/evo.12444. Khila, A., E. Abouheif and L. Rowe. 2012. Function, developmental genetics, and fitness consequences of a sexually antagonistic trait. Science 336: 585-589. Rowe, L., Westlake, K. & D.C. Currie. 2006. The functional significance of elaborate secondary sexual traits and their evolution in the water strider Rheumatobates rileyi. Canadian Entomologist 138:568-577. Arnqvist, G., and L. Rowe. 2002. Antagonistic coevolution between the sexes in a group of insects. Nature 415: 787-789. Westlake, K.P., Rowe, L. and Currie, D.C. 2000. Phylogeny of the water strider genus Rheumatobates (Heteroptera: Gerridae). Systematic Entomology 25:125-144. via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:49
Graduate Assistantships in Synthetic Ecology and the Evolution of Symbiosis Graduate assistantships are available to support Masters or PhD students in Erik Homs laboratory at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). The Hom lab is generally interested in understanding how biotic and abiotic factors facilitate the formation, persistence, and evolution of species interactions, notably those that are symbiotic. We are particularly fond of studying the interactions between fungi and algae and use a predominantly synthetic approach to address our questions (see Science 345:94-98). Our lab is seeking bright, highly motivated students with an appetite for learning to join us in pursuing research projects of mutual interest in areas that include (but are not limited to): experimental evolution, synthetic ecology, EcoEvoDevo, eukaryotic metagenomics, bioinformatics, and the ecology of microbial consortia. Stipend support will be a combination of research and teaching assistantships, and includes tuition waivers and health benefits. The University of Mississippi is in an exciting phase of institutional growth and is located in Oxford, a vibrant and idyllic college town in northern Mississippi, about 75 mi south of Memphis, TN. If you are into football, William Faulkner, local music, and/or fine food, Oxford is a fun town! Requirements for graduate admissions can be found here: http://goo.gl/t1CfcR. The desired start date for these positions is August 2015 (although January 2015 may be possible). Women and underrepresented minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. For consideration and/or more information, please contact Dr. Hom (erik@olemiss.edu, +1-662-915-1731, http://bit.ly/1u7oIu8). To apply, please send a single PDF file that includes: 1) a cover letter explaining your specific research interest(s) and qualifications/research experience, 2) your curriculum vitae, 3) a scientific writing sample, 4) school transcript(s), 5) GRE scores (note: quantitative and verbal scores should be >150), and 6) contact information for at least 3 references. Erik Hom Assistant Professor Department of Biology University of Mississippi “erik@olemiss.edu” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:05
GRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES IN EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY AT OTAGO The Department of Zoology at the University of Otago offers a range of research in evolutionary biology. Our faculty also contribute to interdepartmental programs in Ecology and Genetics. We invite applications from high-quality motivated students to join our PhD program in Zoology. Scholarships (competitive), research support, travel/conference support and demonstrating/teaching assistant positions are available for qualified candidates. Applications may be made at any time. Travis Ingram; Evolutionary Ecology http://bit.ly/1b7AE7m Robert Poulin; Evolutionary Parasitology http://bit.ly/1obYeLH Bruce Robertson; Molecular Ecology http://bit.ly/1u7uf3Y Hamish Spencer; Population Genetics http://bit.ly/1obYeLJ Graham Wallis; Evolutionary Genetics http://bit.ly/1u7uf44 Jonathan Waters; Ancient DNA, Genomics, Evolution http://bit.ly/1obYeLL Possible projects include: Adaptive evolution of a zona-pellucida domain gene in galaxiid fishes Conservation genetics of the endangered black-billed gull Evolutionary consequences of freshwater fish introductions Genetics of hybridisation in NZ galaxiid fishes Host-parasite coevolution in complex aquatic ecosystems Mate choice and personality gene variation in the New Zealand sea lion Population-genetic models of epigenetic systems (including genomic imprinting) Population-genetic models for the maintenance of genetic variation More information on the application process can be found at: http://bit.ly/1u7ufkq Graham Wallis office +64 3 479 7984 Department of Zoology fax +64 3 479 7584 University of Otago home +64 3 476 1314 PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054 courier 340 Great King St Aotearoa-New Zealand email g.wallis@otago.ac.nz Professor in Genetics http://bit.ly/1u7uf44 Graham Wallis via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

October 15, 2014

23:44

Curator of Invertebrates and Assistant Professor in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology The University of Colorado Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EBIO), University of Colorado Boulder, invite applications for a joint, tenure-track appointment as Curator of Invertebrates and Assistant Professor. Primary responsibilities will be to develop an active research program on any group of non-insect invertebrates using molecular systematic approaches preferably including bioinformatics tools, to curate and develop the Museum’s invertebrate collections, and to teach in the Museum and Field Studies and EBIO programs. The successful candidate will be expected to take a leadership position in advancing the role of the collections, particularly in digital and molecular assets. The Invertebrate collection houses approximately 870,000 specimens of molluscs, other non-entomological marine, freshwater, and terrestrial invertebrates. Most holdings are from Colorado and the southern Rocky Mountain region, and enhanced by wider US and international collections. The successful candidate will contribute to research, curation, mentoring, and teaching at graduate and undergraduate levels and will be expected to develop an externally funded research program. We offer a collaborative, intellectually stimulating, and supportive environment in which a new professor can thrive. Additional information about EBIO and the CU Museum can be found on the web at: http://bit.ly/1u7oH9v and http://bit.ly/1zcxdMI. Applicants must have a doctoral degree and strong research, curatorial, and teaching and mentoring credentials. Application materials must be submitted electronically at http://bit.ly/1sY0zcq, Posting #89649, beginning October 13. The application package should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, three representative publications, statements of research, teaching, and curatorial experience and vision, along with names and addresses of four references. Review of applications begins December 1, 2014. Contact search committee chair: Christy.McCain@colorado.edu. The University of Colorado is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. erin.tripp@colorado.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
23:44

—_000_985C53F720B76B45B656624AB29D078007878033exchange1adolem_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Graduate Assistantships in Synthetic Ecology and the Evolution of Symbiosis Graduate assistantships are available to support Masters or PhD students in Erik Hom’s laboratory at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). The Hom lab is generally interested in understanding how biotic and abiotic factors facilitate the formation, persistence, and evolution of species interactions, notably those that are symbiotic. We are particularly fond of studying the interactions between fungi and algae and use a predominantly synthetic approach to address our questions (see Science 345:94-98). Our lab is seeking bright, highly motivated students with an appetite for learning to join us in pursuing research projects of mutual interest in areas that include (but are not limited to): experimental evolution, synthetic ecology, EcoEvoDevo, eukaryotic metagenomics, bioinformatics, and the ecology of microbial consortia. Stipend support will be a combination of research and teaching assistantships, and includes tuition waivers and health benefits. The University of M ississippi is in an exciting phase of institutional growth and is located in Oxford, a vibrant and idyllic college town in northern Mississippi, about 75 mi south of Memphis, TN. If you are into football, William Faulkner, local music, and/or fine food, Oxford is a fun town! Requirements for graduate admissions can be found here: http://goo.gl/t1CfcR. The desired start date for these positions is August 2015 (although January 2015 may be possible). Women and underrepresented minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. For consideration and/or more information, please contact Dr. Hom (erik@olemiss.edu, +1-662-915-1731, http://bit.ly/1u7oIu8). To apply, please send a single PDF file that includes: 1) a cover letter explaining your specific research interest(s) and qualifications/research experience, 2) your curriculum vitae, 3) a scientific writing sample, 4) school transcript(s), 5) GRE scores (note: quantitative and verbal scores should be >150), and 6) contact information for at least 3 references. —_000_985C53F720B76B45B656624AB29D078007878033exchange1adolem_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”Windows-1252” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Graduate Assistantships in Synthetic Ecology and the Evolution of Symbiosis Graduate assistantships are available to support Masters or PhD students in Erik Hom’s laboratory at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss).  The Hom lab is generally interested in understanding how biotic and abiotic factors facilitate the formation, persistence, and evolution of species interactions, notably those that are symbiotic.  We are particularly fond of studying the interactions between fungi and algae and use a predominantly synthetic approach to address our questions (see Science 345:94-98).  Our lab is seeking bright, highly motivated students with an appetite for learning to join us in pursuing research projects of mutual interest in areas that include (but are not limited to): experimental evolution, synthetic ecology, EcoEvoDevo, eukaryotic metagenomics, bioinformatics, and the ecology of microbial consortia.  Stipend support will be a combination of research and teaching assistantships, and includes tuition waivers and health benefits.  The University of Mississippi is in an exciting phase of institutional growth and is located in Oxford, a vibrant and idyllic college town in northern Mississippi, about 75 mi south of Memphis, TN.  If you are into football, William Faulkner, local music, and/or fine food, Oxford is a fun town!  Requirements for graduate admissions can be found here: http://goo.gl/t1CfcR.  The desired start date for these positions is August 2015 (although January 2015 may be possible).  Women and underrepresented minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. For consideration and/or more information, please contact Dr. Hom (erik@olemiss.edu, +1-662-915-1731, http://bit.ly/1u7oIu8).  To apply, please send a single PDF file that includes: 1) a cover letter explaining your specific research interest(s) and qualifications/research experience, 2) your curriculum vitae, 3) a scientific writing sample, 4) school transcript(s), 5) GRE scores (note: quantitative and verbal scores should be >150), and 6) contact information for at least 3 references. —_000_985C53F720B76B45B656624AB29D078007878033exchange1adolem via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
22:00
The theory of evolution by natural selection has had a profound impact not only on the biological sciences but also on the social sciences, revolutionizing our understanding of perception, cognition, language, social behavior, and cultural practices. Despite the centrality of evolutionary theory to the social sciences, many students struggle to understand how natural selection works, imagine greater scientific controversy than actually exists, and show little appreciation for evolution as an overarching theoretical framework. One factor contributing to this divide between scholars and students may be how evolution is (and is not) taught in the social sciences. Our goal is to provide a new perspective on best practices for teaching evolution in the social sciences that is informed by our understanding of how people accommodate and reconcile scientific and non-scientific explanations, an understudied area of evolution education. We seek to synthesize what is and is not known about varieties of teaching evolution in the social sciences, assessing student's understanding and misunderstanding of evolution in this context, and diagnosing potential causes of student misconceptions. This synthesis is expected to result in two major outcomes. The first outcome will be a review paper outlining what scientists view as the primary challenges to students' understanding of evolution in the social sciences and the strategies they have adopted to meet these challenges. The second outcome will be a grant proposal outlining studies that will test alternative teaching strategies, using a variety of outcome measures devised by the participants of the catalysis meeting. The catalysis meeting will thus serve two purposes: to chart the landscape of evolutionary misconceptions specific to the social sciences and to identify empirically testable strategies for countering those misconceptions.
Source: NESCent
22:00
Underlying the adaptive behavior of animals is a process by which individuals must make decisions based on functionally relevant categories: who is a suitable mate, social partner, host, or prey item? Who is a competitor or a predator? Despite the ubiquitous need for animals to find a suitable mate, sort out enemies from collaborators, and correctly identify food, we lack a unifying framework of evolutionary decision theory. Here, we propose a cross-disciplinary team to establish an integrative conceptual framework with testable hypotheses for studying decision-making in an evolutionary context. Leveraging expertise from research programs in evolution, neurobiology, behavioral ecology, and comparative psychology, we aim to address questions of whether and how available information is processed by similar or different algorithms to generate decisions across individuals, species, sensory modalities, and functional contexts. We identify directions for immediate analyses within a new framework, including the role of learning and memory in shaping animal decisions, and hypotheses related to the evolution of categorical-like perception in a complex environment. We propose to systematically synthesize the primary literature incorporating data from behavioral “choice” and “recognition” trials (e.g., mate choice, host choice, kin recognition, parasite rejection), in order to generate a large, multi-taxon, publicly available database that will provide a rich source of data for future analyses of comparative patterns in decision making algorithms. Ultimately, our aim is to bring together a diversity of perspectives spanning multiple levels of analysis in order to transform our understanding of decision-making in an evolutionary context.
Source: NESCent
18:00
Background: Gene flow is traditionally considered a limitation to speciation because selection is required to counter the homogenising effect of allele exchange. Here we report on two sympatric short-horned grasshoppers species in the South Island of New Zealand; one (Sigaus australis) widespread and the other (Sigaus childi) a narrow endemic. Results: Of the 79 putatively neutral markers (mtDNA, microsatellite loci, ITS sequences and RAD-seq SNPs) all but one marker we examined showed extensive allele sharing, and similar or identical allele frequencies in the two species where they co-occur. We found no genetic evidence of deviation from random mating in the region of sympatry. However, analysis of morphological and geometric traits revealed no evidence of morphological introgression. Conclusions: Based on phenotype the two species are clearly distinct, but their genotypes thus far reveal no divergence. The best explanation for this is that some loci associated with the distinguishing morphological characters are under strong selection, but exchange of neutral loci is occurring freely between the two species. Although it is easier to define species as requiring a barrier between them, a dynamic model that accommodates gene flow is a biologically more reasonable explanation for these grasshoppers.
17:39

Erick Matsen wrote:

New from @alexei_drummond and his postdoc:

The space of ultrametric phylogenetic trees by Alex Gavruskin, Alexei J. Drummond

We introduce two metric spaces on ultrametric phylogenetic trees and compare them with existing models of tree space. We formulate several formal requirements that a metric space on phylogenetic trees must possess in order to be a satisfactory space for statistical analysis, and justify them. We show that only a few known constructions of the space of phylogenetic trees satisfy these requirements. However, our results suggest that these basic requirements are not enough to distinguish between the two metric spaces we introduce and that the choice between metric spaces requires additional properties to be considered.

http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.3544

I haven't read it in detail, but it seems that the most version of the space that is most natural for time-trees (their t-space) has properties that make it mathematically difficult to analyze. The combinatorial machinery that helped out with the BHV space doesn't help here.

Theorem 8. The problem of computing geodesics in t-space is NP-hard. We will reduce the problem of computing NNI-distance to the problem of computing geodesics in t-space, but before going on to the proof of this result, we would like to develop some intuition of why t-space is so different from both BHV and τ -space. The key property for this difference is that the cone-path is rarely a geodesic in t-space. Indeed, in both BHV and τ - space the position of two cubes can result in a cone-path being the geodesic between any pair of trees from these cubes. Particularly, the measure of the set of pairs of trees between which the cone-path is a geodesic is positive. For example, if two trees T and R have topologies with no compatible splits, then the geodesic between T and R is a cone-path [3]. A property such as this does not present in t-space. It will follow from the observations below that the measure of the set of pairs of trees between which the geodesic is a cone-path in t-space has measure 0.

I know @cwhidden has been reading it so perhaps he'll post some observations.

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03:37
Harley Jones Van Cleave Professor Host-Parasite Interactions Department of Animal Biology and School of Integrative Biology University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign The Department of Animal Biology and the School of Integrative Biology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign seek a highly qualified candidate for the Harley Jones Van Cleave Professor of Host-Parasite Interactions. This Professorship was made possible by the generous gift of David R. and Margaret Stirewalt Lincicome. This is a full-time faculty position at the rank of Associate or Full Professor with credentials warranting tenure at the University of Illinois. We seek a broadly trained biologist who has a well-established, internationally renowned, externally funded research program in any aspect of host-parasite interactions, including but not limited to coevolutionary interactions, the molecular, physiological, developmental, or immunological bases of such interactions, molecular parasites and genome evolution, effects of parasites on host behavior, life histories, population dynamics, conservation biology, or alterations in such interactions caused by global change. We welcome empirical and theoretical approaches. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to be part of dynamic and well-established communities of integrative biologists with interests spanning a wide range of taxa in the School of Integrative Biology, as well as in a number of interdisciplinary programs across the campus. Responsibilities also include teaching and participation in both undergraduate and graduate training. The successful candidate must have a Ph.D. in biology or related discipline. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. Target start date is August 16, 2015 but is negotiable. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is a public land-grant university with more than 40,000 students and provides a highly collaborative and supportive academic environment. There are opportunities for interactions with the Institute of Genomic Biology, the Program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology, the National Center for Supercomputer Applications, Roy J. Carver Biotechnology Center, the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and the Illinois State Natural History Survey and the Illinois State Geological Survey. To ensure full consideration, please create your candidate profile through http://bit.ly/1vcfAsD and upload your application letter, curriculum vitae, summary of research and plans, teaching philosophy and experience, and contact information for three professional references by December 9, 2014. After a review of the research record, the search committee may then contact the applicant about soliciting letters of reference. Applicants may be interviewed before the closing date; however, no hiring decision will be made until after that date. For further information contact Host-Parasite Interactions Search Chair, sib@life.illinois.edu. Illinois is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, status as a protected veteran, or status as a qualified individual with a disability. Illinois is an Affirmative Action /Equal Opportunity Employer and welcomes individuals with diverse backgrounds, experiences, and ideas who embrace and value diversity and inclusivity. (http://bit.ly/17xpNAL). Alison M. Bell Associate Professor Integrative Biology University of Illinois, Urbana 439 Morrill Hall 505 S. Goodwin Avenue Urbana, IL 61801 217-265-5469 (phone) 217-244-4565 (fax) alisonmb@life.illinois.edu http://bit.ly/1r8Du25 Alison Bell via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:05
FACULTY POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Schlinger Endowed Chair in Insect Systematics University of California, Davis Title: Associate Professor or Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Associate Entomologist or Entomologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station. This is an academic year (9 mo.) tenured position. Responsibilities: The appointee will be required to organize and present undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of systematics and phylogenetics, as well as contribute to other courses in the departmental teaching program. Supervision of graduate students, involvement in curricular development, participation in outreach programs, and performance of University service are expected. The appointee to the Endowed Chair is expected to maintain an innovative research program on the systematics of insects or other terrestrial arthropods, and to interact collaboratively with the diverse community of systematists and evolutionary biologists on campus. The appointee will also be designated as a curator in the Bohart Museum of Entomology, and will be expected to contribute towards the development of this internationally recognized systematics resource. Qualifications: Ph.D. in the biological sciences, demonstrated leadership in insect or terrestrial arthropod systematics, with training and experience commensurate with a comprehensive and cutting-edge research program. Examples of fields considered appropriate include species delimitation and description, phylogenetics, revisionary taxonomy, biogeography, character evolution, and comparative biology. Demonstrated competence in molecular systematics and field-based research are required. Familiarity with natural history collections and their development is also highly desirable. Salary: Commensurate with experience within the Associate Professor or Professorial ranks at the University of California. Appointment Date: July 1, 2015 Applications: Applications should be submitted on-line at http://bit.ly/1vc8KmQ and inquiries should be directed to Dr. Philip Ward, Search Committee Chair, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, telephone (530) 752-0486, e-mail: psward@ucdavis.edu. UC Davis is an affirmative action/equal employment opportunity employer and is dedicated to recruiting a diverse faculty community. We welcome all qualified applicants to apply, including women, minorities, veterans, and individuals with disabilities. Thank you, Amanda Amanda Isaac Executive Academic Assistant The Phoenix Cluster (Plant Pathology, Entomology and Nematology) 367 Briggs Hall 530-752-0492 alisaac@ucdavis.edu Amanda Lee Isaac via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:50
PhD Fellowship in Paleobiology/Paleontology at the University of Pennsylvania A PhD fellowship in Paleobiology is available in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at the University of Pennsylvania, starting in Fall 2015. Prof. Lauren Sallan seeks a graduate student to address major paleobiological questions, such as how global change has affected life over time, how life evolves at high levels (macroevolution), and the origins of living biodiversity. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the drivers and ecological consequences of mass extinction (e.g. the end-Devonian Hangenberg event), the role of predation and competition in setting marine biodiversity, the characteristics of adaptive radiations and $B!H(Bliving fossils,$B!I(B the effects of long-term environmental events (e.g. the Late Paleozoic Ice Age) on biodiversity trends, and transitions in early vertebrate evolution (e.g. origin of jaws, invasion of land). The student can also develop a novel project that address similar questions using quantitative, phylogenetic and descriptive methods. While research in the lab has focused on fishes, any suitable group of fossil animals may be used. Applicants are encouraged to contact Prof. Sallan (lsallan@sas.upenn.edu) for more details. Additional information on the fellowship is available on the departmental website: http://bit.ly/11muDER. Applications for entry in Fall 2015 are due December 15, 2014. Applications to graduate school at Penn must be submitted online at http://bit.ly/1w6z9AK Lauren Sallan Assistant Professor Earth and Environmental Science & Evolution Cluster University of Pennsylvania Office: 154B Hayden Hall Phone: (215) 898-5650 Website: www.LaurenSallan.com E-mail: lsallan@sas.upenn.edu Lauren Sallan via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:34
*MS position*: A graduate research assistantship position (TA funded) is available in the lab of Dr. Matt Hale in the Biology Department at Texas Christian University starting in August 2015. The student will develop a MS project on the genetic basis of complex phenotypic traits. Some possible research projects include questions relating to the genetic basis of migration in salmonid fishes, and the presence and identity of genes showing patterns of sex-bias in expression, also in the salmonid fishes. The applicant should have some previous lab experience, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and DNA sequencing. Ideally, the candidate will also have experience with RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and bioinformatics, although training in these areas will be provided. Interested applicants should send a CV, a cover letter describing their research interests and reasons for applying, and the names and contact details of two potential referees. Review of applications will begin on December 1st 2014. Please send inquires and applications to Matt Hale (m.c.hale@tcu.edu) Interested students are encouraged to view the Biology Department website (http://bit.ly/1qrsWeV) for more information on the graduate program. Matt C. Hale, PhD Assistant Professor, Biology Department Texas Christian University 2800 S University Drive Fort Worth, Texas 817-257-8707 “Hale, Matthew” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
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PhD student position in Ethology at the Department of Zoology. Reference number SU FV-2909-14. Deadline for applications: November 20, 2014. Project description We are seeking a highly motivated PhD student with an interest in evolutionary biology and behavioral ecology to take part in the research project “Life-history variation, behavior and methylation patterns”, funded by the Swedish Research Council. The aim of the project is to investigate the association between methylation patterns and variation in life-history traits and behavior across species. Methylation is one of several epigenetic inheritance mechanisms, which may play an important role in phenotypic plasticity and genetic accommodation. Understanding epigenetic effects has implications for core evolutionary processes such as heritability, maintenance of genetic variation and speciation. Still, we have only a rudimentary understanding of how evolutionary processes are affected by these epigenetic effects. The project involves a combination of modern phylogenetic comparative methods and experimental approaches to analyze the association between methylation and inter-specific variation in life-history and behavior using killifish (Cyprinodontiformes) as a model system. The selected candidate will gain experience in modern phylogenetic comparative methods, experimental design, molecular analyses and statistics. This is an ambitious project which will be demanding and require excellent organization and analytical skills. However, we think it will also be very rewarding and exciting. The candidate will be based in Stockholm, the capital of Sweden and a beautiful and vibrant Scandinavian city. Since one of the PIs of the project has a joint affiliation between Stockholm University and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, research visits to the later, in Mexico City, another vibrant and diverse city with plenty of cultural offer, are also highly likely. The proposed project combines the different areas of expertise of the two principal investigators, who will jointly supervise the candidate. Alejandro Gonzalez Voyer is interested in phenotypic evolution and speciation, topics that are mainly addressed using modern phylogenetic comparative methods. Björn Rogell has a broad interested in environmental stress, local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity. Qualifications To be qualified for research studies in ethology the applicant must have completed a research degree (e.g. Master’s), or have passed at least 120 hp (2 years) of biological studies, including an approved independent project of at least 30 hp at advanced level (“examensarbete”) within ethology, evolutionary biology or related subjects. Applicants who have in principle acquired the corresponding competence in Sweden or abroad are also qualified. Criteria for selection Among qualified applicants, selection is made according to the ability to benefit from the studies. The criteria to be used are properly documented competence within the described research area, capabilities with regards to speaking and writing in English (note that English is the working language in the groups), analytical thinking, organizational skills, creativity, initiative, independence, and team work performance. Experience with statistical analysis and molecular data is an advantage. The applicant’s earlier experience within the field of research can be of relevance especially when further documented by university courses, independent research works, personal references, interview and an application indicating the applicant’s motivations in written form. Terms of employment The PhD studies include 48 months of full-time studies with employment as PhD student. The salary currently starts at 23.700 SEK/month. Stockholm University aims to be a workplace free from discrimination and with equal opportunities for everyone. Information For further details, please contact Dr. Alejandro Gonzalez Voyer, a.gonzalezvoyer@zoologi.su.se, or Dr. Bjorn Rogell, bjorn.rogell@zoologi.su.se, at the Department of Zoology. Union representatives Anqi Lindblom-Ahlm (Saco-S) and Lisbeth Häggberg (Fackförbundet ST), telephone: +46 8 16 20 00 (switchboard), and Gunnar Stenberg (SEKO), telephone: +46 70 316 43 41. Application The application should contain: personal presentation and letter of intent/motivation: maximum one A4-page CV (including methodological skills) copy of independent project thesis copies of degree certificates and transcripts of academic records (attested) two reference letters and contact details for these academic referees. Please send your application, marked with the reference number SU FV-2909-14, no later than November 20, 2014, by e-mail to: registrator@su.se. Documents sent by e-mail should be in Word or PDF format. NOTE! State the reference number SU FV-2909-14 also in the subject line of your e-mail. via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
01:48
The Department of Biology at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY seeks outstanding candidates for a tenure-track ASSISTANT PROFESSOR in the area of MICROBIAL ECOLOGY. This includes but is not limited to the study of human and non-human animal microbiomes and the ecology and evolution of disease, symbiont-host interactions, and extremophile communities. The successful candidate will be expected to develop an independent, extramurally funded research program that complements growing research strengths within the Department and across a highly interactive life science community at the university, as well as participate in undergraduate and graduate education in microbiology. The startup package will include a competitive salary in an affordable community, a generous startup budget, modern laboratory facilities and an outstanding collegial environment. A Ph.D. (or equivalent) and postdoctoral research experience are required. Send cover letter, *curriculum vitae*, statements of research and teaching philosophy and three letters of recommendation to http://bit.ly/1ru3dlq Questions regarding this position may be directed to Dr. Vincent Cassone: 859-257-6766 / vincent.cassone@uky.edu The University of Kentucky is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity University that values diversity and is located in an increasingly diverse geographic region. It is committed to becoming one of the top public institutions in the country. Women, persons with disabilities, and members of other underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. Catherine Linnen via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
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The conference *Mathematical Models in Ecology and Evolution Paris 2015 ** **http://bit.ly/1ru3dlk will host 6 selected mini-symposia, with 6 speakers each: 2 invited speakers (approx. 25’ talk) and 4 contributed speakers (approx. 15’ talk). If you consider participating in the conference, we invite you to propose a mini-symposium devoted to your favourite subject. We ask you to provide a title of your symposium, along with a short introduction to the subject and a list of (2+2 spare) invited speakers. You can propose 1 or 2 (related) mini-symposia by email to info-mmee2015@list01.biologie.ens.fr Deadline Dec 12, 2014. Decision mid-January 2015. Mini-symposia close to the following themes are especially appreciated: epigenetics and information transfer, evolution of cooperation, modelling of speciation, adaptive dynamics, individual-based models of phylogenies, microbial ecology, and adaptation in a changing environment. Once the list of 6 mini-symposia is established, a call for contributions of 3 kinds will be sent: oral contributions within a mini-symposium (6*4 = 24 slots), free oral contributions, posters (deadline April 2015). Please feel free to share this call with interested colleagues and relevant emailing lists. The organisers, Amaury Lambert (UPMC, Collge de France) Guillaume Achaz (UPMC, Collge de France) Minus van Baalen (CNRS, ENS) Silvia De Monte (CNRS, ENS) Todd Parsons (UPMC, CNRS, Collge de France) Emmanuel Schertzer (UPMC, Collge de France) PS. If you are not yet part of the MMEE list, you can check http://bit.ly/1sKt92I to find out how to receive regular information about the conference (no more than approx. 5 emails per year). You can also follow us on twitter using @MMEE2015Paris. Amaury Lambert, professeur UPMC http://bit.ly/1sKt92L SMILE group http://bit.ly/1ru3dlo Stochastics & Biology group http://bit.ly/1sKt7Ih amaury.lambert@ens.fr via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR