news aggregator

May 21, 2015

22:00
In the last two decades, models from evolutionary biology have made important contributions to demographic research on human fertility change. Within this evolutionary framework, two distinct traditions have focused on different processes of adaptation and time scales of change: (1) behavioral ecological perspectives have focused on how individual fertility decisions are shaped by local ecological circumstances, while (2) cultural evolutionary approaches have emphasized the role of socially transmitted information and changing social norms in shaping fertility behavior. While each tradition has made independent progress, research that integrates these approaches is necessary to improve our understanding of real fertility behavior, which results from a feedback between individual fertility decisions and social change. This approach requires combined attention to immediate ecological determinants of fertility decisions as well as the long-term processes that shape costs and benefits in a given environment. This workshop will bring together an international team of evolutionary behavioral scientists with complementary methodological and theoretical expertise in anthropology, psychology, and demography to develop (a) a synthetic article which proposes how these approaches can be integrated methodologically and theoretically, (b) an empirical article which applies our new synthetic framework to the study of fertility change in a particular fieldsite, demonstrating how the new methodological approach will work in practice and what we can learn through employing it, and (c) a multi-site grant proposal (UK, US, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Bolivia, Poland) aimed at integrating and empirically testing these diverse evolutionary models of human fertility change.
Source: NESCent

May 17, 2015

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent
22:00
Baker’s Law (hereafter BL) states that self-compatible organisms are more likely to be successful colonizers after long-distance dispersal than self-incompatible organisms. This simple prediction draws a link between mating-system evolution and diverse fields of ecology and evolution such as dispersal biology and colonization, the evolution of range size and range limits, demography and Allee effect, and invasion biology. However, after >60 years of experimental research and theory development, the accumulated data yield varying, and often contradictory, support of BL. Our working group brings together a diverse array of researchers to assess predictions and assumptions of BL and elucidate ecological, evolutionary, and demographic parameters likely to determine the relationships between mating system, dispersal, and colonization success. To accomplish these goals we will: 1) Compile the voluminous literature on BL. 2) Link the BL data with two extensive databases gathered by prior NESCent support (seed germination and seed traits data; mating system data) and a NCEAS pollen limitation database. These expanded databases will include dispersal, range size, and life-history traits, thereby creating a powerful tool for testing various aspects of the relationship between mating-system and colonization success. 3) Employ macroevolutionary tools to map mating-system and dispersal traits onto the angiosperm phylogeny to assess evolutionary patterns and phylogenetically-corrected trait correlations. 4) Formalize BL using current population genetic theory and dispersal theory. Synthetic products of our working group should elucidate the links between dispersal and mating-system in colonization success, and will influence multiple fields of research in evolution for the foreseeable future.
Source: NESCent

May 6, 2015

22:00
Primates are highly charismatic and often serve as flagship species in conservation efforts. They are also the closest living relatives of humans, and therefore hold the keys to resolving many questions about human evolution and ecology. However, the slow life histories of primates, combined with their complex social systems, their behavioral plasticity, and the challenging field conditions in which primate researchers must work, have severely limited analyses of mortality and fertility in wild, unprovisioned primate populations. This in turn limits comparative analyses that can shed light on the population dynamics and the social and ecological adaptations that have shaped both human and nonhuman primate evolution. We propose a Primate Life Histories Working Group to compare mortality and fertility schedules across taxa, to evaluate a set of hypotheses about the roles that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior play in shaping primate mortality and fertility patterns, and to examine whether life history theory predicts which vital rates are most variable across species. Using unique, individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years, we will develop age-specific mortality and fertility schedules and create population projection matrices for each species. Our immediate goals are to test current hypotheses about the evolution of life histories in order to advance our understanding of primate evolution. Our longer-term goal is to move toward a collaborative, shared databank allowing analyses of irreplaceable life history data on wild primates.
Source: NESCent

April 28, 2015

22:00
A number of independent efforts have compiled global plant databases on functionally important traits of leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers. These databases are comprised of 1000's to tens of 1000's of species. With a few notable exceptions, they have not been analyzed in an evolutionary or phylogenetic context. However, when synthesized with a modern molecular phylogeny, these data could tell a comprehensive, multivariate story of the evolution of plant functional diversity. In this working group, we will merge multiple databases to explore the rate (tempo, sensu GG Simpson) of evolution of these traits and the best fit evolutionary model(s) (mode) underlying the trait diversification of land plants. We will ask 1. whether important divergences in trait space occurred along similar branches for different traits, 2. whether there were periods of evolution when trait diversification was especially rapid, and 3. whether there were interactions between trait evolution and rates of speciation and extinction. This work will lead to a new community resource of great interest—an internally synced trait matrix—matched with the current state-of-the-art phylogeny. These data can then be synthesized with fossil evidence to explore whether the tempo and mode of trait evolution in extant and extinct taxa provide similar stories. Furthermore, these data will provide a powerful view into the coordinated (or lack thereof) evolution of ecologically important traits across vascular plants—one of the most diverse and important lineages in the world today.
Source: NESCent

April 23, 2015

22:00
The identification and explanation of long-term evolutionary trends in higher taxa and biological communities is an important goal of biological research. Body size is the single most important ecological characteristic of metazoa and the variable most easily applied to analysis of evolutionary trends across distantly related taxa. The proposed working group will bring together paleobiologists studying body size evolution in deep time and across higher taxa with biologists studying the distribution of body sizes in living organisms from the community to global scale. The working group will initiate a community-wide database of body sizes through the Phanerozoic, an effort that requires standardized data on body size across higher taxa. The working group will also catalyze collaborations between paleobiologists and biologists to develop the theory necessary to investigate long-term dynamics in body-size evolution across diverse living and extinct metazoan lineages. The workshop will provide a venue for members to address the relationships between the pattern of body size evolution and the distribution of body sizes in extant organisms. How well can macroevolutionary patterns be inferred from macroecological ones? How well do those patterns reflect evolutionary mechanisms, whether driven or passive? Ultimately, the resulting database will become a broadly applicable and dynamic resource for macroevolutionary research, with real potential to help future workers shed light on the forces that have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of animal life on Earth.
Source: NESCent

April 12, 2015

22:00
Although the Indian and Pacific Oceans (hereafter Indo-Pacific) have long been recognized as containing the majority of marine biodiversity, their vastness poses substantial challenges for empirical research. Syntheses of published data, however, can expand the geographic scope of inference. We plan to examine the recent evolution of Indo-Pacific taxa by drawing upon all available population genetic data. We have two immediate research goals: 1) compile and analyze existing datasets for multiple species using consistent and uniform methods of analysis that represent the best current practice in population genetics to better determine oceanographic and geographic features as well as biological traits correlated with population structure. These results will inform our understanding of evolutionary processes in the region and provide information directly relevant to managers and conservation organizations. We will also: 2) conduct the first large scale multispecies investigation to infer the geography of speciation among Indo-Pacific taxa that incorporates population genetic inferences, thus testing predictions of competing biogeographic hypotheses using a novel approach. These research goals are underpinned by the creation of a database that would become publicly accessible to facilitate future studies. In addition, we plan to develop a virtual collaboration space that will support international collaborations in genetic-based research, training, and education throughout the region.
Source: NESCent

March 15, 2015

February 26, 2015

22:00
Evolutionary biology is a foundational and integrative science for medicine, but few physicians or medical researchers are familiar with its most relevant principles. While undergraduate students have increasing opportunities to learn about the interface of evolution, health, and disease, most premedical students have scant room for electives in their schedules, few premed prerequisite courses incorporate evolutionary thinking, and no medical school develops these competencies. The overarching goal of this Working Group is to lay the groundwork for future endeavors by providing testable models and pathways for infusing premedical and medical education with evolutionary thinking. This Working Group, an interdisciplinary, international, and intergenerational group of physicians, scientists, educators, and students, will 1) define core competencies in evolutionary biology for physicians and other health professionals; 2) investigate the ability of current curricula to prepare health professionals to meet these standards; 3) identify “teachable moments” that provide opportunities to integrate evolutionary principles into premedical and medical curricula; 4) design model curricula and learning experiences that can advance evolutionary education for health professionals; and 5) provide open access to these resources and disseminate them. The Working Group will be supported by an Advisory Committee of senior academic leaders and stakeholders. These efforts will not be sufficient in themselves, but they will establish the intellectual platform from which educational interventions on student learning, and scientific and clinical problem solving, can be developed and tested.
Source: NESCent
22:00
Americans are far less accepting of human evolution than other realms of evolution; yet, human evolution and our common ancestry with other animals are increasingly relevant to medicine and our daily lives. We propose a NESCent working group made up of scientists, educators, and a journalist that will be devoted to enhancing communication of these health-related applications of human evolution to diverse audiences. Planned activities include discussion of methodological approaches designed to best communicate these ideas, design of teacher workshops, writing publications geared to each of these audiences, and discussion regarding collaboration with museums (in particular, the Smithsonian Institution) and zoos. In these activities, we will take a systematic scholarly approach using evidence-based methods to foster communication of principles of human evolution to these diverse audiences.
Source: NESCent

February 22, 2015

22:00
It is easily demonstrable that organisms with rapid, appropriate plastic responses to environmental change will prevail over genotypes with fixed phenotypes. It is also accepted that the general dearth of organisms successful across a wide environmental range indicates fundamental limits to or costs of plasticity. The nature of constraining factors has been broadly discussed (DeWitt et al. 1998), and numerous studies have been done to quantify them. However, a curious pattern has emerged: although hypothesized to be widespread, costs are absent more often than they are detected. The issue of costs of plasticity (CoP) lies at the intersection of a range of evolutionary and ecological questions: What are the limits to plasticity? Are CoP associated with life history tradeoffs? Are CoP expected in all environments? Does plasticity enhance invasiveness? etc. This working group will address two fundamental questions. 1) Are the expectations that costs of plasticity should be universal well-founded (i.e., the “no free lunch” principle)? Several authors have proposed that, in situations where the intensity of selection for adaptive plasticity is strong, there should be corresponding pressure to ameliorate costs. 2) Independently of the answer to the first question, Are analytical and experimental methods for detecting CoP appropriate or sufficiently sensitive? CoP have most often been studied using common garden style plasticity experiments and analyzed via van Tienderen’s (1991) multiple regression approach.
Source: NESCent

February 10, 2015

22:00
Meta-analysis is a statistical technique used for syntheses of results from numerous independent studies. Increasingly, evolutionary biologists need to perform meta-analysis in which the effects of numerous explanatory variables on a response variable of interest are considered, taking into account the evolutionary history of the species in the dataset. However, such analyses require analysis of numerous complex statistical models, and methods for such analyses have not been previously developed. Our working group is developing these methods and applying them to understand local adaptation, context-dependency, and the influence of evolutionary relationships on outcomes of symbiosis between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.
Source: NESCent

February 1, 2015

00:57

2nd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ALGORITHMS FOR COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY AlCoB 2015 Mexico City, Mexico August 4-6, 2015 Organized by: Centre for Complexity Sciences (C3) School of Sciences Institute for Research in Applied Mathematics and Systems (IIMAS) Graduate Program in Computing Science and Engineering National Autonomous University of Mexico Research Group on Mathematical Linguistics (GRLMC) Rovira i Virgili University http://bit.ly/1wQ2oq1 AIMS: AlCoB aims at promoting and displaying excellent research using string and graph algorithms and combinatorial optimization to deal with problems in biological sequence analysis, genome rearrangement, evolutionary trees, and structure prediction. The conference will address several of the current challenges in computational biology by investigating algorithms aimed at: 1) assembling sequence reads into a complete genome, 2) identifying gene structures in the genome, 3) recognizing regulatory motifs, 4) aligning nucleotides and comparing genomes, 5) reconstructing regulatory networks of genes, and 6) inferring the evolutionary phylogeny of species. Particular focus will be put on methodology and significant room will be reserved to young scholars at the beginning of their career. VENUE: AlCoB 2015 will take place in Mexico City, the oldest capital city in the Americas and the largest Spanish-speaking city in the world. The venue will be the main campus of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. SCOPE: Topics of either theoretical or applied interest include, but are not limited to: Exact sequence analysis Approximate sequence analysis Pairwise sequence alignment Multiple sequence alignment Sequence assembly Genome rearrangement Regulatory motif finding Phylogeny reconstruction Phylogeny comparison Structure prediction Compressive genomics Proteomics: molecular pathways, interaction networks … Transcriptomics: splicing variants, isoform inference and quantification, differential analysis Next-generation sequencing: population genomics, metagenomics, metatranscriptomics … Microbiome analysis Systems biology STRUCTURE: AlCoB 2015 will consist of: invited lectures peer-reviewed contributions INVITED SPEAKERS: Julio Collado-Vides (National Autonomous University of Mexico, Cuernavaca), >From Curation of Information to Knowledge Encoding Gaston Gonnet (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich), Human-Dog-Mouse, Probably and Provable Non-trivial Evolution Close to the Root of the Mammalian Clade Peter D. Karp (SRI International, Menlo Park), Algorithms for Metabolic Route Search and Determination of Reaction Atom Mappings PROGRAMME COMMITTEE: Stephen Altschul (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, USA) Yurii Aulchenko (Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia) Pierre Baldi (University of California, Irvine, USA) Daniel G. Brown (University of Waterloo, Canada) Yuehui Chen (University of Jinan, China) Keith A. Crandall (George Washington University, Washington, USA) Joseph Felsenstein (University of Washington, Seattle, USA) Michael Galperin (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, USA) Susumu Goto (Kyoto University, Japan) Igor Grigoriev (DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, USA) Martien Groenen (Wageningen University, The Netherlands) Yike Guo (Imperial College, London, UK) Javier Herrero (University College London, UK) Karsten Hokamp (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland) Hsuan-Cheng Huang (National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan) Ian Korf (University of California, Davis, USA) Nikos Kyrpides (DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, USA) Mingyao Li (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA) Yun Li (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA) Jun Liu (Harvard University, Cambridge, USA) Rodrigo Lpez (European Bioinformatics Institute, Hinxton, UK) Andrei N. Lupas (Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tbingen, Germany) B.S. Manjunath (University of California, Santa Barbara, USA) Carlos Martn-Vide (chair, Rovira i Virgili University, Tarragona, Spain) Tarjei Mikkelsen (Broad Institute, Cambridge, USA) Henrik Nielsen (Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark) Zemin Ning (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK) Christine Orengo (University College London, UK) Modesto Orozco (Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Barcelona, Spain) Christos A. Ouzounis (Centre for Research & Technology Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece) Manuel Peitsch (Philip Morris International R&D, Neuchtel, Switzerland) David A. Rosenblueth (National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico) Julio Rozas (University of Barcelona, Spain) Alessandro Sette (La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, USA) Peter F. Stadler (University of Leipzig, Germany) Guy Theraulaz (Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France) Alfonso Valencia (Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain) Kai Wang (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA) Lusheng Wang (City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) Zidong Wang (Brunel University, Uxbridge, UK) Harel Weinstein (Cornell University, New York, USA) Jennifer Wortman (Broad Institute, Cambridge, USA) Jun Yu (Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China) Mohammed J. Zaki (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, USA) Louxin Zhang (National University of Singapore, Singapore) Hongyu Zhao (Yale University, New Haven, USA) ORGANIZING COMMITTEE: Adrian Horia Dediu (Tarragona) Francisco Hernndez-Quiroz (Mexico City) Carlos Martn-Vide (Tarragona, co-chair) David A. Rosenblueth (Mexico City, co-chair) Florentina Lilica Voicu (Tarragona) SUBMISSIONS: Authors are invited to submit non-anonymized papers in English presenting original and unpublished research. Papers should not exceed 12 single-spaced pages (including eventual appendices, references, proofs, etc.) and should be prepared according to the standard format for Springer Verlag’s LNCS series (see http://bit.ly/1tO5vnk). Submissions have to be uploaded to: http://bit.ly/1wQ2myj PUBLICATIONS: A volume of proceedings published by Springer in the LNCS/LNBI series will be available by the time of the conference. A special issue of a major journal will be later published containing peer-reviewed substantially extended versions of some of the papers contributed to the conference. Submissions to it will be by invitation. REGISTRATION: The registration form can be found at: http://bit.ly/1tO5xf8 DEADLINES: Paper submission: March 2, 2015 (23:59 CET) Notification of paper acceptance or rejection: April 10, 2015 Final version of the paper for the LNCS/LNBI proceedings: April 19, 2015 Early registration: April 19, 2015 Late registration: July 21, 2015 Submission to the journal special issue: November 6, 2015 QUESTIONS AND FURTHER INFORMATION: florentinalilica.voicu@urv.cat POSTAL ADDRESS: AlCoB 2015 Research Group on Mathematical Linguistics (GRLMC) Rovira i Virgili University Av. Catalunya, 35 43002 Tarragona, Spain Phone: +34 977 559 543 Fax: +34 977 558 386 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: National Autonomous University of Mexico Rovira i Virgili University via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:41
Dear All! Please note that I have changed the license agreement of my TREEFINDER software (www.treefinder.de): Starting from 1st February 2015, I do no longer permit the usage of my TREEFINDER software in the USA. For all other countries, the old license agreement remains valid. This is in accordance with the license agreement stated in the TREEFINDER manual since the earliest versions, which reserves me the right to change the license agreement at any time. My reasons: (1) I want to protest against American imperialism, which I regard as the cause of most of all evil in the world: wars, tyranny, poverty, migration. (2) I want to protest against EU tyranny, which is mostly the result of US imperialism. (3) I want to demonstrate my sovereignty, something I would welcome to see much more often in science and politics. In particular, I dislike that the USA and the EU aggressively promote a way of life that conflicts with my own way of life. After so many years of hard work on TREEFINDER, I have still not been paid any reward. I want to stress that this license change is not against my colleagues in the USA, but against a small rich elite there that misuses the country’s power to rule the world. On the TREEFINDER download website I have collected many links to background information, including some in English language. Regards, Gangolf Jobb Gangolf Jobb via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:24

The monthly review of the EvolDir is available from the EvolDir website - http://bit.ly/17VdShI. For more information or for help send mail to Golding@McMaster.CA. Please see the above website for instructions for the EvolDir. This includes ways to limit/reduce the messages you receive from the EvolDir. A reminder: The userid for the web site user list is `evoldir’ and the password is `2EvolBulletins’. [ This was done to limit the access of spammers (e.g. SpeakOut.Com and others). ] Brian Golding via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
00:08
Two motivated PhD student applicants are sought to work on projects related to a recently funded, highly collaborative, NSF Dimensions of Biodiversity project at the University of Nevada Reno. The research is focused on a well-studied, tropical system involving plants in the genus Piper (Piperaceae), associated herbivores, and parasitoid wasps and flies. Research will utilize transformative and innovative approaches to quantifying biodiversity that will allow us to link measures of interaction diversity at an ecologically relevant scale to genetic diversity, population genetic structure, and plant chemical diversity. The research includes work in genomics, physiology, and phytochemistry laboratories, as well as field experiments and sampling in Mexico, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru, Argentina, and Brazil. We are looking for students broadly interested in evolutionary biology and ecology, with specific interests in the evolution of tri-trophic interactions, population genomics, and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of phytochemical variation. We are an interdisciplinary group of ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and chemists; more information about representative research activities can be found at webpages for the various faculty participants (Dyer, Forister, Jeffrey, Parchman, Richards, Smilanich; http://bit.ly/1BIWgCA). UNR has a strong interdisciplinary PhD program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology (http://bit.ly/1fKs0Ax). Graduate students accepted into the EECB program are guaranteed financial support through Teaching Assistantships (TAs) which includes health insurance and an out-of-state tuition waiver. In addition, funds associated with this project are available for summer support, Research Assistantships (RAs), and for field work and data collection associated with specific doctoral dissertation projects. University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) is a Tier I research university located in a spectacular environment at the confluence of the Great Basin and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The faculty and graduate students at UNR are highly interactive and include an internationally known group of evolutionary biologists and ecologists. We are equipped with cutting edge molecular and computational resources for modern genome sequence analysis, and a state of the art facility for phytochemical and metabalomic research. In addition to the tropical research, we are also located in an ideal setting for field-based science in the Great Basin and Sierra Nevada regions, allowing enviable access to spectacular montane and desert ecosystems. Reno is 45 minutes from Lake Tahoe, offers a high quality of living, an excellent climate, and is a large enough city to offer diverse activities and amenities. World class rock climbing, skiing, and mountain biking opportunities are in extremely close proximity. Those interested should contact us via email (tparchman@unr.edu, nolaclimber@gmail.com, mforister@unr.edu, etc.) with a description of your interests, qualifications and preliminary application materials (CV, GRE scores, names and contact information for three references). Thomas L. Parchman Assistant Professor Department of Biology, MS 314 University of Nevada, Reno Max Fleishman Agriculture Building 1664 N. Virginia Street Reno, NV 89557-0314 tparchman@unr.edu Thomas L Parchman via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

January 31, 2015

01:35
SouthAfrica.ResearchAssistant.SocialMolerats Cooperative breeding in Damaraland mole-rats (Fukomys damarensis), South Africa. 2 Positions: 15th of March 2015 to 14th of June 2015. Mid-June 2015 to mid-September 2015. We are looking for two voluntary field research assistants to conduct field research on the completely subterranean, highly social Damaraland mole-rat (Fukomys damarensis). Specifically, this project investigates the group augmentation hypothesis and how benefits of living large groups can generate selection for altruism in animals. We plan a large scale capture-mark and recapture experiment running over one year in which the voluntary research assistant would play an important role. Field work takes place in the southern Kalahari, Northern Cape province of South Africa. Entire groups of mole-rats will be captured and individually marked. Morphological measurements and tissue samples will be obtained before the release of the animals. The work is physically extremely demanding (long hours, heavy digging to capture mole-rats) and weather conditions are very challenging (heat during the day, very cold during the night). Field work will make trapping during the night necessary. The assistant will mostly be working along one more experienced scientist but will need to work independently at times. Applicants should be enthusiastic, willing to work hard and keen to get involved in an ecological research project in the African bush. Research assistants are expected to be willing to work at night when trapping schedules require it and need to be fit as capturing mole-rats requires the capacity to do hard physical work (digging) in a challenging environment. Applicants must be holders of a driving license. A zoology related degree and/or previous field experience will be considered an asset. The successful applicants will work in a small team of 2 persons and hence need to be a team player and generally a person that enjoys collaboration under sometimes challenging and isolated circumstances. Accommodation is provided, and research assistants are paid a monthly allowance to cover their food. Applications received until the 12th of February 2015 are ensured full consideration. Later applications can be considered (particularly for the second time period). Dates for the second period are more flexible and applicants can indicate if they wish to commit for a longer period. Further Information: http://bit.ly/1zG67hJ To apply (CV + cover letter) or enquire further information contact: Dr Markus Zttl Research associate University of Cambridge +441223336673 Mz338@cam.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1Lu9vzh Markus Zoettl via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:43

—_000_D0F160781AD26andrewdoustokstateedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Research focus: We are seeking a highly motivated student to conduct research on evolutionary and quantitative genetics of branching in grasses, as part of an NSF Plant Genome grant focused on tillering in panicoid grasses (in collaboration with researchers at West Virginia University, Brigham Young University, and the University of California at Berkeley). The primary objective of this research is to use three panicoid grasses, maize, sorghum, and Setaria, to identify components of the gene regulatory network controlling branching. Our lab is focused on Setaria, combining traditional QTL mapping with expression QTL studies, mutant analysis, and modeling to understand the genetic components of branching and their responses to environmental stimuli such as shading. There is considerable flexibility for graduate projects within this broad theme. Essential qualifications include successfully completed masters degree in genetics and/or molecular biology, experience in molecular lab techniques including working with RNA, experience in growing plants, and excellent writing skills. Desirable qualifications include experience with quantitative and phylogenetic analysis software, next generation sequence library construction and data analysis, and programming in R and/or Python. Salary: Stipend will be $21,504 per calendar year plus tuition and health benefits. A mixture of TA and RA positions over the course of the Ph.D. will allow you to balance valuable teaching experience with research time. Application deadline: February 13th, 2015; but applications will be reviewed as they arrive. Application materials: Please send a brief cover letter, resume, transcripts, GRE scores, and contact information for two references to andrew.doust@okstate.edu by the deadline to be considered for this position. Andrew Doust Botany Department Oklahoma State University Physical Sciences 301 Stillwater, OK 74078 Phone: 405-744-9559 Email: andrew.doust@okstate.edu Websites: http://bit.ly/1JWiZBH http://bit.ly/1zi2LzF http://bit.ly/1JWiXtl —_000_D0F160781AD26andrewdoustokstateedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=”us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Research focus:  We are seeking a highly motivated student to conduct research on evolutionary and quantitative genetics of branching in grasses, as part of an NSF Plant Genome grant focused on tillering in panicoid grasses (in collaboration with researchers at West Virginia University, Brigham Young University, and the University of California at Berkeley).  The primary objective of this research is to use three panicoid grasses, maize, sorghum, and Setaria, to identify components of the gene regulatory network controlling branching.  Our lab is focused on Setaria, combining traditional QTL mapping with expression QTL studies, mutant analysis, and modeling to understand the genetic components of branching and their responses to environmental stimuli such as shading.  There is considerable flexibility for graduate projects within this broad theme. Essential qualifications include successfully completed masters degree in genetics and/or molecular biology, experience in molecular lab techniques including working with RNA, experience in growing plants, and excellent writing skills.  Desirable qualifications include experience with quantitative and phylogenetic analysis software, next generation sequence library construction and data analysis, and programming in R and/or Python. Salary:  Stipend will be $21,504 per calendar year plus tuition and health benefits.  A mixture of TA and RA positions over the course of the Ph.D. will allow you to balance valuable teaching experience with research time. Application deadline:  February 13th, 2015; but applications will be reviewed as they arrive. Application materials:  Please send a brief cover letter, resume, transcripts, GRE scores, and contact information for two references to andrew.doust@okstate.edu by the deadline to be considered for this position. Andrew Doust Botany Department Oklahoma State University Physical Sciences 301 Stillwater, OK 74078 Phone: 405-744-9559 Email: andrew.doust@okstate.edu Websites:  http://bit.ly/1JWiZBH http://bit.ly/1zi2LzF http://bit.ly/1JWiXtl —_000_D0F160781AD26andrewdoustokstateedu via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:43
A Ph.D. studentship *Butterflies and moths as pollinators along an Afrotropical altitudinal gradient* We are seeking a highly motivated Ph.D. student to join a project assessing studies of plant-pollinator relationships between butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) with selected groups of flowering plants (Rubiaceae and Acanthaceae) on Mt. Cameroon. The student will process already collected material, as well as actively participate on field sampling (at least two times during the study) of data and their subsequent processing in collaboration with international specialists. The length of the study is 4 years. The successful applicant will be supervised by Dr. Robert Tropek and Dr. Stepan Janecek as a part of the multidisciplinary team at the Faculty of Science, Charles University of Prague with a close collaboration with the Institute of Entomology and Institute of Botany, Czech Academy of Sciences. *Offered* - attractive scientific topic in an established international team - standard university scholarship (up to 114,000 CZK annually according to discharging of the study responsibilities) together with the support of the STARS project (120,000 CZK annually; http://bit.ly/1JWiXd3) for four years, it sufficiently covers living expenses in the Czech Republic *Required* - enthusiasm in nature and ecological science - ability to lead a field research in challenging conditions of tropical environments - fluency in English - a MSc degree in biology or related fields Desirable (but not necessary) - previous experience of collaboration in scientific projects evidenced by a (co)authorship of research papers or conference contributions - previous experience with insects and/or plants - basic knowledge of French All applicants will apply for the position online through http://bit.ly/1JWiXd3. The deadline for application is the 28th February 2015, the successful candidate will be selected till early April. The position is available from the beginning of 2015/2016 academic year. All questions should be sent directly to Robert Tropek (robert.tropek@gmail.com). Robert Tropek via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:11
Ranked the number one agricultural institute in Europe and number two in the world, INRA (National Institute for Agricultural Research - France) carries out mission-oriented research for high-quality and healthy foods, competitive and sustainable agriculture and a preserved and valorised environment. Every year, INRA seeks researchers from all disciplines to reinforce laboratory and fieldwork teams. Researchers will be heavily involved in scientific networks and tackle environmental, economic and social issues. They are expected to strive for excellence and come up with useful, concrete applications for the real world. Individual research projects will go hand in hand with group efforts in a bid to further knowledge and innovation, in order to produce sustainably, preserve the environment, and improve human nutrition. INRA is recruiting 30 Research Scientists (PhD or equivalent) through open competitions and offering permanent positions. Positions are open in a wide range of scientific disciplines such as animal quantitative genetics, quantitative genetics and plant development, agrifood sciences and techniques, metabolism and physiology, genetic mechanisms of adaptation, physico-chemistry of interfaces and biological processes for the environment, functional ecology and modelling, evolutionary ecology and modelling, ecology, genetics, pathogens, veterinary and agrifood sciences (microbiology, molecular protozoology and immunology), applied mathematics and informatics, compromise and uncertainty in the evaluation and management of ecosystem services, economics and many more. Applications are available until to March 2, 2015. All useful information to apply is available on: http://bit.ly/1zhVXSr For further details: concours_chercheurs@paris.inra.fr [INRA] Corinne NICOLAS Assistante RH en charge de la mobilité, des études et de la communication de recrutement corinne.nicolas@paris.inra.fr DRH - Service Recrutement et Mobilité Tél. : +33 (0)1 42 75 94 55 Fax : +33 (0)1 42 75 90 39 147 rue de l’Université 75 338 Paris Cedex 07 France wwww.inra.fr Corinne Nicolas via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR