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January 13, 2015

22:00
Humans are vulnerable to a number of unique musculoskeletal maladies as a consequence of our evolutionary history. Although walking on our extended hind limbs is the hallmark adaptation characterizing our species it nevertheless makes us vulnerable to a wide range of serious joint and soft tissue problems. When viewed from an evolutionary perspective many of these medical issues become understandable and, indeed, novel methods of diagnosis and treatment can emerge. The proposed collaborative, a working group of paleoanthropologists, comparative anatomists, biomechanical engineers, and physicians will create new analytical approaches and new ways of viewing the disorders that uniquely plague our species. The results of this work include the development and implementation of a model curriculum, the creation of a website, and the publication of an edited volume. The disorders directly related to our way of walking include chronically sprained ankles, hernias, osteoporotic fractures of the hip, spine, and forearm, obstetric problems, knee problems, foot disorders, fatigue fractures, and many others. By understanding how our anatomy changed in order to walk upright, and why these changes occurred, we gain a better understanding of why these adaptations sometimes go awry resulting in disorders and pain.
Source: NESCent

December 17, 2014

22:00
We propose a catalysis meeting to advance theoretically-grounded, empirical study of scientific collaborations designed to achieve synthesis. Synthesis is the integration of diverse theories, methods and data across spatial or temporal scales, scientific phenomena, and forms of expertise to increase the generality, parsimony, applicability, or empirical soundness of scientific explanations. It generates emergent explanations beyond the scope of any one discipline, dataset or method. It counterbalances scientific specialization, capitalizes on existing data, and can be used to address complex problems. Synthesis centers are an increasingly vital component of science policy, rising in number, size, and prominence nationally and globally. Despite this, our understanding of synthesis-group collaborations and their performance are inadequate to advance knowledge, inform policy and guide practice. This meeting will draw together scientists who lead and conduct synthetic research with a diverse group of experts on scientific collaboration and research evaluation. Our aim is to advance understanding of synthesis and develop new approaches for investigating it empirically, longitudinally and comparatively.
Source: NESCent

December 9, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

December 2, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 21, 2014

November 18, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street. Room A103 (1st Floor) For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 17, 2014

22:00
What are the limits of adaptation? What determines long-term evolutionary rates? How predictable is evolution? The field of experimental evolution has grown tremendously over the last decade. This growth reflects both a greater appreciation of the power of experimental evolution for testing evolutionary hypotheses and, especially recently, the new power of genomic methods for analyzing changes in experimentally evolved lineages. But most experiments are fairly short, typically lasting only a few tens or hundreds of generations in plants/animals or microbes, respectively. Long-term evolution experiments are still rare, but are crucial in gaining a better understanding of evolutionary processes and outcomes, and in answering some of the most important basic and applied questions in biology. This catalysis meeting will bring together leading researchers in experimental evolution, population genetics, molecular evolution, theory and many other fields to develop a roadmap for the future of long-term evolution experiments. The meeting’s aims are: (i) To identify the most important biological questions that can be addressed using long-term evolution experiments; (ii) To synthesise information on existing long-term evolution experiments that were both intentional (e.g. lab-based) and unintentional (e.g. disease outbreaks, the pet trade, stock centres, and industrial processes); (iii) To identify opportunities to answer existing questions with existing data and/or experiments; (iv) To plan new long-term evolution experiments in a variety of systems; This meeting will establish an international network of collaborating labs that will result in new research directions, new training opportunities, and a grand vision for the future of long-term evolution experiments.
Source: NESCent

November 12, 2014

22:00
In the last two decades, models from evolutionary biology have made important contributions to demographic research on human fertility change. Within this evolutionary framework, two distinct traditions have focused on different processes of adaptation and time scales of change: (1) behavioral ecological perspectives have focused on how individual fertility decisions are shaped by local ecological circumstances, while (2) cultural evolutionary approaches have emphasized the role of socially transmitted information and changing social norms in shaping fertility behavior. While each tradition has made independent progress, research that integrates these approaches is necessary to improve our understanding of real fertility behavior, which results from a feedback between individual fertility decisions and social change. This approach requires combined attention to immediate ecological determinants of fertility decisions as well as the long-term processes that shape costs and benefits in a given environment. This workshop will bring together an international team of evolutionary behavioral scientists with complementary methodological and theoretical expertise in anthropology, psychology, and demography to develop (a) a synthetic article which proposes how these approaches can be integrated methodologically and theoretically, (b) an empirical article which applies our new synthetic framework to the study of fertility change in a particular fieldsite, demonstrating how the new methodological approach will work in practice and what we can learn through employing it, and (c) a multi-site grant proposal (UK, US, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Bolivia, Poland) aimed at integrating and empirically testing these diverse evolutionary models of human fertility change.
Source: NESCent

November 11, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street. Room A103 (1st Floor) For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 9, 2014

22:00
This catalysis group will plan the implementation of SimBank, a large, openly-available series of population genetic landscape simulations, intended for easy testing and validation of statistical genetics methods and based on realistic scenarios from natural populations across a range of taxa. Genetic and genomic data allow us to estimate numerous biological parameters through statistical genetics techniques. However, these techniques necessarily make many assumptions that do not match biology. As a result, the value of these statistical approaches may depend on the biological details of the evolutionary and demographic history of the populations being studied. Statistical genetics techniques need to be better tested and validated than they currently are, and the best way to do this is by comparisons to genetic simulation of biologically reasonable situations. This catalysis group will plan for the creation of a test bank of simulated genomic data. We will create a core list of biological scenarios that can test a wide variety of statistical methods, over a range of assumptions about evolutionary history, demography, and genetic details. Creating such simulations is non-trivial, because of the necessity of coding a variety of scenarios and the processor time required to do large-scale simulations. However, many types of statistical genetics techniques can be tested on a common set of simulations. In this way, we can share processor time and discuss as a community what issues are most important to cover. The group will mix statisticians and programmers with empirical biologists, with expertise in evolution, landscape ecology, and geospatial pattern analysis.
Source: NESCent

November 4, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street. Room A103 (1st Floor) For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

November 3, 2014

22:00
Odonates are model organisms for testing fundamental evolutionary questions because (1) they are one of the first winged insects); (2) have the most advanced vision and flight among insects; (3) their ecology and behavior is among the best studied for insects; and (4) they are easy to manipulate for field studies. However, a major obstacle to many odonate studies is the lack of odonate genomics resources. This gap in odonate genomics limits research progress but can be overcome by a focused effort that combines, analyzes and synthesizes existing and emerging datasets and knowledge in the field. This is now possible, as several research groups have started odonate genomics projects in the last 5 years, but formal communication between laboratories has yet to begin. The odonate community is geographically dispersed and many researchers are working in disparate fields (such as paleo-entomology, conservation/climate change, single gene evolution and/or comparative genomics), and therefore a Catalysis meeting would provide an ideal opportunity that will (1) foster international collaboration to create an effective network that will (2) focus community efforts towards a cohesive program to (3) generate new knowledge and a legacy of useful resources and novel research directions.
Source: NESCent

November 2, 2014

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent

October 28, 2014

22:00
Wednesday, 12:00 PM at NESCent, Ninth Street and Main Street, Erwin Mill Building, 2024 W. Main Street, Suite A200. For more information, call 919-668-4551
Source: NESCent

October 23, 2014

03:59

Graduate Research Assistantship Evolutionary Ecology of Herbivore Defense in Aspen University of Wisconsin, Madison Funding will be available (2015) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to support graduate research, at the Ph.D. (or Masters-Ph.D.) level, on the ecology and evolution of defense in aspen (Populus tremuloides). Aspen is a foundation species in boreal and montane forests of North America and secondary chemistry plays a key role in its interactions with diverse insect and mammalian herbivores. The graduate research assistant will assume primary responsibility for a collaborative project involving the labs of Rick Lindroth (UW Entomology & Zoology) and Eric Kruger (UW Forest & Wildlife Ecology). The research will evaluate the interplay of intraspecific plant competition and growth-defense tradeoffs with respect to the evolutionary trajectories of mixed-genotype aspen stands. Applicants may pursue admission to UW graduate programs in Entomology, Zoology or Forestry. The University of Wisconsin-Madison is a premier institution for research in ecology and evolution, and has ranked among the top five research universities in the United States for each of the past 20 years. Graduate students have the opportunity to participate in the thriving Ecology (http://bit.ly/GOErNP) and Evolutionary Biology (http://bit.ly/15cJtwk) communities at UW-Madison. Qualifications: Highly motivated individuals with a strong academic background in plant biology and/or ecology, as well as excellent quantitative and communication skills, are encouraged to apply. Candidates must be able to work independently and as part of a collaborative research team. Stipend/benefits: A 50% Graduate Research Assistantship is available beginning in spring, summer or fall semesters of 2014. A 50% RA currently provides a stipend of $20,808 (12 mo.), tuition waiver, and excellent medical/dental health plans at low cost. Applications: Questions about the position may be directed to Rick Lindroth (lindroth@wisc.edu). Interested candidates should e-mail Graduate Student Services Coordinator Sara Rodock (rodock@wisc.edu) a single PDF file containing the following information: - Cover letter outlining research interests, academic and professional backgrounds - Resume - Copies of transcripts (unofficial copies acceptable) - GRE scores (if not available, indicate when exam will be taken) - Names and contact information for three references Applications will be reviewed upon receipt. Promising candidates will be requested to submit a formal application to a UW-Madison graduate program in Entomology, Zoology (Ecology), or Forestry. Note that the application deadline for Zoology is Dec. 31, 2014. Richard L. Lindroth, Ph.D. Professor of Ecology, Associate Dean for Research, and Associate Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 608-262-6792 (Deans office) 608-263-6277 (Lab office) 146 Agriculture Hall 1450 Linden Drive University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, WI 53706 U.S.A. http://bit.ly/GOEp8N lindroth@wisc.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:46
Job in Education and Public engagement with Science at the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science This is a fantastic job opportunity to work at the dynamic, globally operating natural history museum in Germany’s capital Berlin and to develop nationally and internationally recognized education and public engagement with science programs. Salary TVL-13 (annual salary between c. €39,000 – 50,000, depending on qualifications). This is initially a two-year position that can be tenured. Job description: · Design and coordinate projects and programs around science, natural history education and science communication · Develop standards and guidelines for educational work for the natural history / science sector · Develop and lead national and international networks · Develop an externally funded scientific programs on education and scientific literacy · Publish scientific papers · Develop educational courses for teachers, museum guides and others · Operational work at the museum Your qualifications: · Science degree /PhD in Science Education, cultural history, museum studies, science · Several years of experience in (leadership in) science education, science communication · Good knowledge of (national and) international education policy and the museum sector · Demonstrable experience and skills in program, project planning and management · Knowledge and experience in Geo-/ Bio - Sciences · Excellent communication skills and team player · Appropriate English and German language skills to deliver tasks Desirable: · Citizenship of the European Union The usual documentation should be send to recruiting@mfn-berlin.de by 05.11. 2014 The Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin Our Mission: Discovering and describing life and earth – with people, through dialog. The Museum für Naturkunde Berlin is an integrated research museum with strong national and international partnerships and networks. The research is collections based, the collections are developed through the research and the public engagement is science driven. Research areas: Evolutionary biology; evolutionary morphology, biodiversity in time and space; biodiversity dynamics; biodiversity and climate change; meteorites, impact geology & global disasters; collections development; history of science & natural history collections as cultural heritage; biodiversity informatics; public engagement with science: exhibitions; citizen science; education; science policy advice. We are currently undergoing a major renewal / building program (2007-2027). We are a member of the German Science Organisation Leibniz Gemeinschaft (89 organsiations, annual budget €1.3B) and have recently been internationally evaluated as Excellent to very good. To find out more, visit us on: http://bit.ly/1wqGLOL Professor Johannes Vogel, Ph.D. Director General Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity “Vogel, Johannes” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:28

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University is seeking outstanding candidates for at least one and, subject to budgetary approval, up to three Tenure-track faculty positions at the rank of Assistant Professor, with a starting date of July 1, 2015. Candidates from all areas of mathematics and statistics are invited to apply. Candidates must have a PhD or an equivalent degree at the start date of the appointment. The successful candidate(s) will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research leading to peer assessed publications, as well as strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and an ongoing commitment to academic and pedagogical excellence in support of the department’s programs. The successful candidate(s) will be expected to work in areas of study that complement areas already represented in the department (see http://bit.ly/1zlCulb), and to demonstrate evidence of an ability to work in an interdisciplinary, collaborative environment. They will also be expected to make substantive contributions through service to the Department, to the Faculty of Arts & Science, to the University, and/or the broader community. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. All candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents of Canada will be given priority. To comply with Federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information about how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship, however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete. A complete application consists of: a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph), a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications), a statement of research interests, a statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available), and at least four letters of reference (one of which addresses teaching abilities and/or potential). Application materials, with the possible exception of recommendation letters, should be submitted through http://bit.ly/ZIMhBj. Recommendation letters may be uploaded directly on http://bit.ly/ZIMhBj, or sent by e-mail to position@mast.queensu.ca, or mailed to: the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Jeffery Hall, University Ave., Kingston, ON Canada, K7L 3N6. In order to ensure full consideration, complete applications should be received by November 17, 2014. The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact: the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Marge Lambert, at lambertm@mast.queensu.ca, phone number 613- 533-2440.  Additional information about Queen’s University, which may be of interest to prospective faculty members, can be found at http://bit.ly/1zlCsd8. Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA) and the University which is posted at http://bit.ly/1hj4FbB.  troy.day@icloud.com via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:27
*TwoDoctoral Positions in **Plant Evolutionary Ecology *are available at the Plant Ecology Group of the University of Tbingen. Applicants for the Ph.D. position must hold an M.Sc. or equivalent degree in biology, ecology, plant sciences or environmental sciences with a sound knowledge in plant ecology and /or evolutionary ecology of plants and /or molecular ecology. Ideally, the applicants have experience in designing and conducting large ecological experiments in the field and greenhouse and a sound knowledge of statistics and experimental design. Experience in basic lab work can also be advantageous. The projects are part of a DFG priority programme entitled Adaptomics (http://bit.ly/ZIMgNG) which aims at bridging the gap between ecological and molecular approaches to studying phenotypic and genotypic variation in plants. Position #1 (“Biscutella”) is within a cooperative project between the Universities of Tbingen, Vienna and the Max Planck Institute at Tbingen. We aim at studying whether plants can adapt to climate change by utilizing annual plants of the Brassicaceae family in an extensive experimental system in Israel. We use a combined molecular-population genetic-ecological approach to tackling this question. The work includes a several-month field stay in Israel, but the main working place will be Tbingen, a buzzing university town in Southwest Germany. Position #2 (“metals”) will be dedicated to studying plants that are able to hyperaccumulate and — tolerate heavy metals. We use two species from the Brassicaceae family to study heritability of these traits, and the role that plant-plant interactions play in determining variability in this trait within and between species. We use a combination of field and greenhouse experiments and basic lab work to study the positive and negative effects these plants may have on their neighbours. The main working place will be Tbingen, a buzzing university town in Southwest Germany. Both positions are scheduled for 3 years with an anticipated starting date of January 2015, or until the position is filled. Payment is according to the German public tariff (65% TV-L E13). Applications are to be submitted via email and as *a single pdf file* to Katja Tielbrger, University of Tbingen, Plant Ecology Group: katja.tielboerger@uni-tuebingen.de. Deadline is November 15, 2014, or until position is filled. Applications should include a letter of motivation, a CV, transcripts, proof of special qualifications, and prints of publications if applicable. The applicants are also requested to have two letters of reference sent independently to the above Email address. The participating universities want to increase the number of female researchers, and specifically encourage female candidates to apply. Disabled persons will be preferred in case of equal qualification. “"Tielbrger, Katja"” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:11
Do Ravens Modify Their Signals According to Their Audience’s Comprehension? We are looking for a motivated student for a master project at the Humboldt Research Group Comparative Gestural Signalling at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany When people are not fully understood, they persist with attempts to communicate, in order to better convey their meaning. We want to investigate whether captive ravens (Corvus Corax) would use analogous communicative strategies in signaling, and whether they could distinguish different degrees of misunderstanding. Terms of appointment and qualifications: - The project should start in March 2015 and will last for 4-5 months - Experience in behavioural biology would be beneficial - Because of the rather remote location of our institute, a private car would be recommended We seek a highly motivated person with organizational skills, able and willing to work independently. You will learn to interact with eight hand-raised ravens, to set up the observation schedule, film the behaviour and experiments, design and develop a coding scheme and analyze the behavioural interactions. We offer the opportunity to work at one of the leading institutes for bird research in Germany and Europe and to learn methods in comparative research and behavioural biology. Applications should include a CV, a letter of motivation and contact details of one referee. Application deadline: 31.12.2014 For further information please contact: Miriam Sima (Primary contact) msima@orn.mpg.de Group Leader: Dr. Simone Pika spika@orn.mpg.de Webpage: www.orn.mpg.de/cgs “Sima, Miriam” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:11
Assistant Professor of Population Genetics and Computational Biology The Biology program within the Division of Science and Environmental Policy at California State University, Monterey Bay seeks a population geneticist with strong computational biology skills to fill a tenure track assistant professor position. The applicant should be a dedicated teacher capable of successfully involving undergraduates in research. The successful candidate will work with other faculty to develop undergraduate curricula, professional outreach programs, and extramural research or programmatic funding. Additional information on the Division and the Biology program can be found at sep.csumb.edu, the university and its vision at http://bit.ly/1yozMae, and our exceptional undergraduate research program at uroc.csumb.edu. Responsibilities The successful candidate will: (1) teach upper division evolutionary biology & population genetics, (2) develop and teach upper division bioinformatics & systems biology or a new upper division course in genomics or other computationally intensive branch of biology, (3) develop and maintain a research program that provides opportunities for undergraduates, (4) occasionally teach genetics or help with lower division instruction, and (5) contribute to the development of this new university. Qualifications (minimum) Ph.D. in biology or related field at time of hire. Demonstrated excellence in teaching. Expertise in Population Genetics. Expertise in Computational Biology. Qualifications (desired) Research interests that leverage CSU Monterey Bays unique location at the interface between land and sea on the Central California coast. Expertise in a computationally intensive field of study such as transcriptomics that can be applied to projects suitable for the undergraduate research environment. A strong background in evolutionary or conservation biology. Experience mentoring student research and/or internships. Desire and ability to teach and mentor students from diverse cultural, ethnic, educational, and economic backgrounds. A record of writing successful proposals for extramural funding. Experience with course and curriculum development. How to Apply All prospective applicants must apply on-line at http://bit.ly/1yozMah Applicants must submit: 1) Letter of Interest 2) CV 3) Teaching Statement (2 page max) 4) Research Statement (2 page max) 5) Contact information for 3 professional references Please combine your teaching and research statement into a single document for upload. SCREENING BEGINS NOVEMBER 1, 2014 “Cheryl A. Logan” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR