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May 17, 2015

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent
22:00
Baker’s Law (hereafter BL) states that self-compatible organisms are more likely to be successful colonizers after long-distance dispersal than self-incompatible organisms. This simple prediction draws a link between mating-system evolution and diverse fields of ecology and evolution such as dispersal biology and colonization, the evolution of range size and range limits, demography and Allee effect, and invasion biology. However, after >60 years of experimental research and theory development, the accumulated data yield varying, and often contradictory, support of BL. Our working group brings together a diverse array of researchers to assess predictions and assumptions of BL and elucidate ecological, evolutionary, and demographic parameters likely to determine the relationships between mating system, dispersal, and colonization success. To accomplish these goals we will: 1) Compile the voluminous literature on BL. 2) Link the BL data with two extensive databases gathered by prior NESCent support (seed germination and seed traits data; mating system data) and a NCEAS pollen limitation database. These expanded databases will include dispersal, range size, and life-history traits, thereby creating a powerful tool for testing various aspects of the relationship between mating-system and colonization success. 3) Employ macroevolutionary tools to map mating-system and dispersal traits onto the angiosperm phylogeny to assess evolutionary patterns and phylogenetically-corrected trait correlations. 4) Formalize BL using current population genetic theory and dispersal theory. Synthetic products of our working group should elucidate the links between dispersal and mating-system in colonization success, and will influence multiple fields of research in evolution for the foreseeable future.
Source: NESCent

May 6, 2015

22:00
Primates are highly charismatic and often serve as flagship species in conservation efforts. They are also the closest living relatives of humans, and therefore hold the keys to resolving many questions about human evolution and ecology. However, the slow life histories of primates, combined with their complex social systems, their behavioral plasticity, and the challenging field conditions in which primate researchers must work, have severely limited analyses of mortality and fertility in wild, unprovisioned primate populations. This in turn limits comparative analyses that can shed light on the population dynamics and the social and ecological adaptations that have shaped both human and nonhuman primate evolution. We propose a Primate Life Histories Working Group to compare mortality and fertility schedules across taxa, to evaluate a set of hypotheses about the roles that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior play in shaping primate mortality and fertility patterns, and to examine whether life history theory predicts which vital rates are most variable across species. Using unique, individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years, we will develop age-specific mortality and fertility schedules and create population projection matrices for each species. Our immediate goals are to test current hypotheses about the evolution of life histories in order to advance our understanding of primate evolution. Our longer-term goal is to move toward a collaborative, shared databank allowing analyses of irreplaceable life history data on wild primates.
Source: NESCent

April 28, 2015

22:00
A number of independent efforts have compiled global plant databases on functionally important traits of leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers. These databases are comprised of 1000's to tens of 1000's of species. With a few notable exceptions, they have not been analyzed in an evolutionary or phylogenetic context. However, when synthesized with a modern molecular phylogeny, these data could tell a comprehensive, multivariate story of the evolution of plant functional diversity. In this working group, we will merge multiple databases to explore the rate (tempo, sensu GG Simpson) of evolution of these traits and the best fit evolutionary model(s) (mode) underlying the trait diversification of land plants. We will ask 1. whether important divergences in trait space occurred along similar branches for different traits, 2. whether there were periods of evolution when trait diversification was especially rapid, and 3. whether there were interactions between trait evolution and rates of speciation and extinction. This work will lead to a new community resource of great interest—an internally synced trait matrix—matched with the current state-of-the-art phylogeny. These data can then be synthesized with fossil evidence to explore whether the tempo and mode of trait evolution in extant and extinct taxa provide similar stories. Furthermore, these data will provide a powerful view into the coordinated (or lack thereof) evolution of ecologically important traits across vascular plants—one of the most diverse and important lineages in the world today.
Source: NESCent

April 23, 2015

22:00
The identification and explanation of long-term evolutionary trends in higher taxa and biological communities is an important goal of biological research. Body size is the single most important ecological characteristic of metazoa and the variable most easily applied to analysis of evolutionary trends across distantly related taxa. The proposed working group will bring together paleobiologists studying body size evolution in deep time and across higher taxa with biologists studying the distribution of body sizes in living organisms from the community to global scale. The working group will initiate a community-wide database of body sizes through the Phanerozoic, an effort that requires standardized data on body size across higher taxa. The working group will also catalyze collaborations between paleobiologists and biologists to develop the theory necessary to investigate long-term dynamics in body-size evolution across diverse living and extinct metazoan lineages. The workshop will provide a venue for members to address the relationships between the pattern of body size evolution and the distribution of body sizes in extant organisms. How well can macroevolutionary patterns be inferred from macroecological ones? How well do those patterns reflect evolutionary mechanisms, whether driven or passive? Ultimately, the resulting database will become a broadly applicable and dynamic resource for macroevolutionary research, with real potential to help future workers shed light on the forces that have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of animal life on Earth.
Source: NESCent

April 12, 2015

22:00
Although the Indian and Pacific Oceans (hereafter Indo-Pacific) have long been recognized as containing the majority of marine biodiversity, their vastness poses substantial challenges for empirical research. Syntheses of published data, however, can expand the geographic scope of inference. We plan to examine the recent evolution of Indo-Pacific taxa by drawing upon all available population genetic data. We have two immediate research goals: 1) compile and analyze existing datasets for multiple species using consistent and uniform methods of analysis that represent the best current practice in population genetics to better determine oceanographic and geographic features as well as biological traits correlated with population structure. These results will inform our understanding of evolutionary processes in the region and provide information directly relevant to managers and conservation organizations. We will also: 2) conduct the first large scale multispecies investigation to infer the geography of speciation among Indo-Pacific taxa that incorporates population genetic inferences, thus testing predictions of competing biogeographic hypotheses using a novel approach. These research goals are underpinned by the creation of a database that would become publicly accessible to facilitate future studies. In addition, we plan to develop a virtual collaboration space that will support international collaborations in genetic-based research, training, and education throughout the region.
Source: NESCent

March 15, 2015

February 26, 2015

22:00
Evolutionary biology is a foundational and integrative science for medicine, but few physicians or medical researchers are familiar with its most relevant principles. While undergraduate students have increasing opportunities to learn about the interface of evolution, health, and disease, most premedical students have scant room for electives in their schedules, few premed prerequisite courses incorporate evolutionary thinking, and no medical school develops these competencies. The overarching goal of this Working Group is to lay the groundwork for future endeavors by providing testable models and pathways for infusing premedical and medical education with evolutionary thinking. This Working Group, an interdisciplinary, international, and intergenerational group of physicians, scientists, educators, and students, will 1) define core competencies in evolutionary biology for physicians and other health professionals; 2) investigate the ability of current curricula to prepare health professionals to meet these standards; 3) identify “teachable moments” that provide opportunities to integrate evolutionary principles into premedical and medical curricula; 4) design model curricula and learning experiences that can advance evolutionary education for health professionals; and 5) provide open access to these resources and disseminate them. The Working Group will be supported by an Advisory Committee of senior academic leaders and stakeholders. These efforts will not be sufficient in themselves, but they will establish the intellectual platform from which educational interventions on student learning, and scientific and clinical problem solving, can be developed and tested.
Source: NESCent
22:00
Americans are far less accepting of human evolution than other realms of evolution; yet, human evolution and our common ancestry with other animals are increasingly relevant to medicine and our daily lives. We propose a NESCent working group made up of scientists, educators, and a journalist that will be devoted to enhancing communication of these health-related applications of human evolution to diverse audiences. Planned activities include discussion of methodological approaches designed to best communicate these ideas, design of teacher workshops, writing publications geared to each of these audiences, and discussion regarding collaboration with museums (in particular, the Smithsonian Institution) and zoos. In these activities, we will take a systematic scholarly approach using evidence-based methods to foster communication of principles of human evolution to these diverse audiences.
Source: NESCent

February 22, 2015

22:00
It is easily demonstrable that organisms with rapid, appropriate plastic responses to environmental change will prevail over genotypes with fixed phenotypes. It is also accepted that the general dearth of organisms successful across a wide environmental range indicates fundamental limits to or costs of plasticity. The nature of constraining factors has been broadly discussed (DeWitt et al. 1998), and numerous studies have been done to quantify them. However, a curious pattern has emerged: although hypothesized to be widespread, costs are absent more often than they are detected. The issue of costs of plasticity (CoP) lies at the intersection of a range of evolutionary and ecological questions: What are the limits to plasticity? Are CoP associated with life history tradeoffs? Are CoP expected in all environments? Does plasticity enhance invasiveness? etc. This working group will address two fundamental questions. 1) Are the expectations that costs of plasticity should be universal well-founded (i.e., the “no free lunch” principle)? Several authors have proposed that, in situations where the intensity of selection for adaptive plasticity is strong, there should be corresponding pressure to ameliorate costs. 2) Independently of the answer to the first question, Are analytical and experimental methods for detecting CoP appropriate or sufficiently sensitive? CoP have most often been studied using common garden style plasticity experiments and analyzed via van Tienderen’s (1991) multiple regression approach.
Source: NESCent

February 10, 2015

22:00
Meta-analysis is a statistical technique used for syntheses of results from numerous independent studies. Increasingly, evolutionary biologists need to perform meta-analysis in which the effects of numerous explanatory variables on a response variable of interest are considered, taking into account the evolutionary history of the species in the dataset. However, such analyses require analysis of numerous complex statistical models, and methods for such analyses have not been previously developed. Our working group is developing these methods and applying them to understand local adaptation, context-dependency, and the influence of evolutionary relationships on outcomes of symbiosis between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.
Source: NESCent

January 14, 2015

22:00
When a seed germinates determines the seasonal environment experienced by a plant throughout its life, and germination phenology is one of the very first phenotypes expressed by plants during ontogeny. As such, germination phenology is subject to extremely strong natural selection, especially during early stages of adaptation. Moreover, germination co-evolves with seed dispersal, mating system, and reproductive strategy to determine plant life cycles and demographic dynamics of plant populations. This working group will test the importance of germination adaptations in delimiting species niche and range limits, both in the past and in response to changed environments. More generally, this topic pertains to the identification of key traits associated with adaptation to environmental change, and the role that early life-stage traits and traits associated with habitat selection contribute to these dynamics. The focus on germination provides a clear and tractable system for addressing general evolutionary and ecological questions concerning the interactions between ontogeny and adaptation, trait coevolution, and the roles of habitat selection and organismal responses to their environment in niche evolution. It also will contribute tangibly to efforts to predict plant responses to environmental change. The group will compile and analyze a comprehensive data set on germination and dormancy, combined with data on niche breadth, geographic range, and life history, in order to test hypotheses concerning trait coevolution and species range limits. The group will also theoretically explore interactions between ontogeny and adaptation, theoretically model trait coevolution via habitat selection and bet hedging, and develop phenological models of integrated life histories that include germination in order to predict plant responses to environmental change.
Source: NESCent

January 13, 2015

22:00
Humans are vulnerable to a number of unique musculoskeletal maladies as a consequence of our evolutionary history. Although walking on our extended hind limbs is the hallmark adaptation characterizing our species it nevertheless makes us vulnerable to a wide range of serious joint and soft tissue problems. When viewed from an evolutionary perspective many of these medical issues become understandable and, indeed, novel methods of diagnosis and treatment can emerge. The proposed collaborative, a working group of paleoanthropologists, comparative anatomists, biomechanical engineers, and physicians will create new analytical approaches and new ways of viewing the disorders that uniquely plague our species. The results of this work include the development and implementation of a model curriculum, the creation of a website, and the publication of an edited volume. The disorders directly related to our way of walking include chronically sprained ankles, hernias, osteoporotic fractures of the hip, spine, and forearm, obstetric problems, knee problems, foot disorders, fatigue fractures, and many others. By understanding how our anatomy changed in order to walk upright, and why these changes occurred, we gain a better understanding of why these adaptations sometimes go awry resulting in disorders and pain.
Source: NESCent

December 20, 2014

05:10
A postdoctoral research fellowship is available in the lab of Dr. Duane McKenna (University of Memphis) to participate in a variety of highly collaborative projects related to the phylogeny and evolution of beetles and beetle genomes. The successful candidate will work with collaborators to establish a bioinformatic pipeline for the NSF-funded 1K Weevils Project (anchored phylogenomics, comparative genomics), analyze beetle data in association with the 1KITE Beetle Subproject (phylogenomics, transcriptomes), and contribute to beetle genome and comparative genomics projects in the McKenna Lab, e.g., in collaboration with the Insect 5000 Genomes Project. These are primarily bioinformatics, phylogenomics, and comparative genomics projects involving extensive analysis of genome- and transcriptome-scale data sets. The position is based at the University of Memphis, but includes opportunities for travel to work with collaborators. The initial appointment is for one year, renewable for one additional year provided the first year review shows satisfactory progress. The position offers a competitive salary plus benefits. Start date is flexible, though interested individuals are encouraged to apply immediately. Review of applications will begin on February 6, 2015; however applicants will be considered until the position is filled. Required Qualifications: • A Ph.D. in computational biology, evolutionary genetics/genomics, phylogenomics, bioinformatics, or a related field. Advanced ABD’s may be considered if degree completion is imminent • Experience with manipulating and analyzing genomic and transcriptomic NGS sequence data • A strong record of prior publication in genome-scale data analysis, including bioinformatics pipeline construction, phylogenomics, and/or genome structure and evolution • Strong communication and interpersonal skills, including a proven ability to work both independently and as part of a team Desired Qualifications: (Ideal applicant; applicants without these skills will be considered) • Proficiency in computer programming • Experience working with arthropods (especially insects) • Experience with standard molecular laboratory techniques • Experience with the analysis of traditional molecular phylogenetic data sets The successful applicant will be expected to work/collaborate with another postdoc and with graduate students in the McKenna Lab. To apply, submit a cover letter stating your research accomplishments and interests, qualifications relevant to the position (especially in reference to the required and desired qualifications listed above), a curriculum vitae, two representative publications, and the names and contact information for three references (submit at: http://bit.ly/1zg4Tsa). Inquiries about the position may be directed to Duane McKenna (dmckenna@memphis.edu). Duane D. McKenna Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Biological Sciences Associate, Program in Bioinformatics Associate, W. Harry Feinstone Center for Genomic Research University of Memphis 3774 Walker Avenue Memphis, TN 38152 phone: (901) 678-1386 email: dmckenna@memphis.edu website: http://bit.ly/1uEP1bS “Duane McKenna (dmckenna)” via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
04:55

Postdoctoral Fellow Bioinformatics/Computational Biology (A402-14JK), Massey University, New Zealand Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, College of Sciences IVABS are seeking a postdoctoral researcher with experience in genomics, computational biology, and bioinformatics to work within a multidisciplinary group on zoonotic diseases. Location: Palmerston North Term: Fixed Term of 3 Years Grade: Postdoctoral Fellow Salary: TBA Applications close: 11:45 p.m. on 30 January 2015 Please go to http://bit.ly/1v4ihZd to apply. Position overview The Institute of Veterinary, Animal, and Biomedical Sciences at Massey University has a three-year fixed-term vacancy for a Bioinformatics Postdoctoral Fellow. As the successful candidate, you will have the opportunity to work with globally renowned researchers in the University’s Infectious Disease Research Centre (IDReC). Ideally, you will have experience in genomics, computational biology, and bioinformatics of infectious diseases, although expertise in other related areas of biology would be considered. You will have the opportunity to work within a multidisciplinary group including other bioinformaticians, statisticians, molecular epidemiologists, microbiologists and veterinarians with expertise in veterinary public health and epidemiology. The position will be based in the Molecular Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory (mEpiLab) of the Hopkirk Research Institute, Palmerston North. Your primary responsibility will be contributing to a range of studies from whole-genome analyses to the molecular epidemiology of zoonotic bacteria, including Salmonella, pathogenic Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter. Epidemiology of zoonotic viruses and protozoa are also studied in the group. As the successful applicant, you will be able to work with minimal supervision, but also work collaboratively, have sound organisational and communication skills, and be attentive to detail. The position would suit someone seeking further research experience while transitioning to become an independent researcher in infectious disease bioinformatics and computational biology. Please direct enquiries to Prof Nigel French: N.P.French@massey.ac.nz or Dr David Hayman: D.T.S.Hayman@massey.ac.nz Job description Purpose statement The primary responsibility will be contributing to a range of studies from whole-genome analyses to the molecular epidemiology of zoonotic bacteria, viruses and protozoa. Responsible to Prof Nigel French via the Head of Institute Key accountabilities 1) Specific project activities - The job requires using bioinformatic and computational biology techniques for a range of different projects within the mEpiLab and in the broader IDReC groups. 2) Other research and affiliated activities - Participate in activities as assigned. Assist in the design of new research projects in related areas and secure finances to conduct the projects. Participate fully in the broader mEpiLab research and teaching community, including assistance with graduate student supervision. 3) Other duties - Other reasonable duties as specified by the Institute Head and through the line management of the Group Leader. University adherence to OSH requirements and animal and human ethics. Person specification Qualifications - Biological, medical, or veterinary degree with training and expertise in bioinformatics and/or computational biology is essential. - Doctoral degree is essential. Experience - Proven ability to write scientific papers is essential. - Appropriate analytical research experience and publications are essential. - Evidence of an ability to work well with students and staff from differing academic and cultural backgrounds and across multiple institutions is essential. Personal attributes and behaviours - Ability to work effectively as a member of a team and independently. - Able to maintain a professional approach with both staff and students while under pressure via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
04:39

Dear Colleagues, The Fifth annual Symbiosis Workshop will take place on May 1-3, 2015 at the Sierra Nevada Research Station, Yosemite National Park. This has become a great venue for a diversity of symbiosis researchers, so we hope to continue to attract a diverse group Keynote speaker 2015: Dr. Ellen L. Simms from the University of California, Berkeley. Information about our meeting: Why: Our goal is to better integrate scientists that focus on symbiosis research. We plan to continue annual workshops at Yosemite as this site is both beautiful and secluded. This will be our 5th annual meeting and we are now attracting scientists from all over the country and overseas. Who: The meeting is small by design (~50 participants) and we seek to focus on scientists interested in both cooperation and symbiosis. In the past we have covered a range of symbiosis topics from ecology and evolution to molecular mechanisms in different model and non-model systems. We would like to make room for a diverse group of people so we will initially accept up to 3 lab members per group (including the PI) on a first come first served basis. When: The talks and formal meeting will be held May 2-3, 2015, though we make accommodation arrangements available for attendees to arrive on Friday the 1st to provide opportunities to enjoy the park. Since time at the conference is limited, we ask attendees to submit an abstract and a preference (talk versus poster). Priority will be given to those presenting. Abstract and early bird registration are due on January 31st, 2015. Where: SNRS has a set of cabins in Wawona and all within a short walk of the conference room. Costs: See details in the registration page. We will only be able to accept credit card payments this year. Link to meeting information: http://bit.ly/1wxWvCl link: http://bit.ly/1AQyqpn direct any questions to the organizers: Joel Sachs joels@ucr.edu A. Carolin Frank cfrank3@ucmerced.edu Becca Fenwick (SNRS Director) bfenwick@ucmerced.edu via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:38

Postdoctoral Fellow in Molecular Epidemiology (A401-14JK), Massey University, New Zealand Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, College of Sciences IVABS are seeking a postdoctoral researcher with experience in molecular epidemiology to work within a multidisciplinary group on zoonotic diseases. Location: Palmerston North Term: Fixed Term of 3 Years Grade: Postdoctoral Fellow Salary: TBA Applications close: 11:45 p.m. on 30 January 2015 Please go to http://bit.ly/1w8iCu4 to apply. Position overview The Institute of Veterinary, Animal, and Biomedical Sciences at Massey University has a three-year fixed-term vacancy for a Molecular Epidemiology Postdoctoral Fellow. As the successful candidate, you will have the opportunity to work with globally renowned researchers in the University’s Infectious Disease Research Centre (IDReC). Ideally, you will have experience in infectious disease molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics of infectious disease, although expertise in other areas of biology would be considered. You will have the opportunity to work within a multidisciplinary group including bioinformaticians, statisticians, microbiologists and veterinarians with expertise in veterinary public health and epidemiology. The position will be based in the Molecular Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory (mEpiLab) of the Hopkirk Research Institute, Palmerston North. Your primary responsibility will be contributing to a range of studies from whole-genome analyses to the molecular epidemiology of zoonotic bacteria, including Salmonella, pathogenic Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter. Epidemiology of zoonotic viruses and protozoa are also studied in the group. As the successful applicant, you will be able to work with minimal supervision, but also work collaboratively, have sound organisational and communication skills, and be attentive to detail. The position would suit someone seeking further research experience while transitioning to become an independent researcher in infectious disease bioinformatics and computational biology. Please direct enquiries to Prof Nigel French: N.P.French@massey.ac.nz or Dr David Hayman: D.T.S.Hayman@massey.ac.nz Job description Purpose statement The primary responsibilities will be contributing to a range of ongoing studies on the molecular epidemiology of zoonotic bacteria, viruses and protozoa.Responsible to Prof Nigel French Key accountabilities 1) Specific project activities - The job requires using molecular epidemiologic techniques for a range of different projects within the mEpiLab and in the broader IDReC groups. 2) Other research and affiliated activities - Participate in activities as assigned. Assist in the design of new research projects in related areas and secure finances to conduct the projects. Participate fully in the broader mEpiLab research and teaching community, including with graduate student supervision. 3) Other duties - Other reasonable duties as specified by the Institute Head and through the line management of the Group Leader. University adherence to OSH requirements and animal and human ethics. Person specification Qualifications - Biological, medical, or veterinary degree with training and expertise in epidemiology and micro-and molecular biology is essential. - Doctoral degree is essential. Experience - Proven ability to write scientific papers is essential. - Appropriate analytical research experience and publications are essential. - Evidence of an ability to work well with students and staff from differing academic and cultural backgrounds and across multiple institutions is essential. Personal attributes and behaviours - Ability to work effectively as a member of a team and independently. - Able to maintain a professional approach with both staff and students while under pressure via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:22

(1) *Postdoctoral Associate to research reproductive ecology and life history transitions in indigenous peoples at Yale Anthropology* Department of Anthropology Yale The Department of Anthropology at Yale University and the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies invite applications for a full-time, two-year Postdoctoral Associate position in biological anthropology during academic years 2015-17. The postdoctoral position will be part of the Chaco Area Reproductive Ecology Program ( http://bit.ly/1Jy8ghv) directed by Dr. Claudia Valeggia. The successful applicant will work on a research project concerning human life history transitions from evolutionary and biocultural perspectives. Further topics of research may include maternal health, child growth and development, evolutionary medicine, the biodemography of aging, and the nutritional and epidemiological transitions in Latin American indigenous peoples. The work will include some laboratory and field project management responsibilities, including trips to the field site in northern Argentina. A Ph.D. degree in anthropology, demography, human biology, public health or related fields is required as are extensive quantitative skills. Experience in qualitative data analysis and knowledge of written and spoken Spanish are highly desirable. Applicants must have a demonstrated record of publication in peer-reviewed journals and/or successful grant writing. The position will remain open until filled, but applicants are advised to submit their applications by February 15, 2015 for primary consideration. Some interviews will take place at the AAPA Meetings (St. Louis, Missouri, March 25-29). Please email the following documents to both of these email addresses: carepostdoc@gmail.com and claudia.valeggia@yale.edu 1. A cover letter indicating your interest in the position. 2. A CV with names and email addresses of three referees. 3. A 1-2 page research experience and future goals statement. 4. pdf samples of publications (submitted, in press, or published). Yale University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. - via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
03:08
PhD/MS opportunities N.Ariz.U.: Evolutionary ecology/Forestry/Global Change Impacts We anticipate making two offers of graduate positions (PhD and MS) working on a NSF Macrosystems Biology project at Northern Arizona University, “Collaborative research: Blending ecology and evolution using emerging technologies to determine species distributions with a non-native pathogen in a rapidly changing climate”. This project will be a multi-university collaboration examining the interacting evolutionary and ecological responses of Southwestern White Pine (SWWP; Pinus strobiformis) to climate change and an invasive pathogen from local to regional scales. The project will be led by Dr. Kristen Waring in the School of Forestry at NAU. The PhD will be based in the Biology department (http://bit.ly/1w8fEFI) with Dr. Amy Whipple and will work on aspects of epigenetic adaptation to climate variation with the opportunity to further develop thesis foci along the lines of the student’s interests. The MS will be based in the School of Forestry (http://bit.ly/1xxwch1) with Dr Kristen Waring and will be closely involved with establishment and early measurement of seedling common garden trials of trees from across the SWWP range planted in three different temperatures. Funding may be comprised of a mix of RA, fellowship and TA support and applicants are encouraged to also consider the Genes-to-Environment Program at NAU (http://bit.ly/1w8fEFK ). Anticipated start date for both positions is June 2015. A brief description of current and previous research projects in SWWP can be found at http://bit.ly/1xxw9Sl. Please contact us any time for more information Amy.Whipple@nau.edu (928)714-0409 and Kristen.Waring@nau.edu (928) 523-4920. Applications received by January 15th , 2015 will receive first consideration and faster evaluation. Amy Vaughn Whipple via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
03:08
Senior Research Programmer or Research Programmer School of Integrative Biology and the School of Molecular and Cellular Biology University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Revised and Extended The School of Integrative Biology and the School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, seek a full-time academic professional, non-tenure track (Senior) Research Programmer in the Office of Information Technology (OIT). The primary function of the position is to engage in the activities of the office to facilitate the use of information technology in education and research in the biological sciences. A Senior Research Programmer is also expected to initiate projects, serve as a resource to assist the Schools? faculty and staff in accomplishing academic and general office goals, and provide a leadership role in the information technology group by training and mentoring Research Programmers in the unit. Research Programmer The responsibilities of the Research Programmer position include: support the information technology needs of faculty, staff and students through consultation, research and hands-on support ; monitor and service network backbone devices to maintain security and high availability; plan hardware refresh of devices; support bioinformatics research, providing administration for faculty sponsored servers, software creation and configuration; provide system administration for UNIX, Windows and Macintosh servers; develop and support IT resources needed to enhance the Schools’ ability to fulfill their mission; respond to potential and actual security breaches; and act as a liaison to campus groups as necessary. Required Qualifications: - Bachelor’s degree required, preferably in Computer Science - A minimum of two years of experience in the computing field - Demonstrated expertise in information technology consulting - Working knowledge of at least 2 of the following: server administration, programming, web design, web application development, data storage practices, backup administration, e-mail system management, authentication and authorization techniques, firewall configuration Preferred Qualifications: - Experience with Unix, Windows and Macintosh environments from a system administration and end-user perspective - Basic knowledge of bioinformatics software and techniques - Working knowledge of wireless and wired networking hardware and protocols; information technology security principles and practices; consumer- and server-grade hardware and software platforms - Familiarity with at least two programming language (e.g. Ruby, Lua, Python, Perl, C++) and common software development practices - Ability to compile and deploy applications from source code - Familiarity with a range of common desktop applications. Senior Research Programmer The responsibilities of the Senior Research Programmer include: support the information technology needs of faculty, staff and students through consultation, research and hands-on support; assist OIT Director with development and execution of long-range planning, through in-depth analyses of the Schools’ IT needs and advanced knowledge and experience with IT platforms; develop and support IT resources needed to enhance the Schools’ ability to fulfill their mission; support bioinformatics research, providing administration for faculty sponsored servers, software creation and configuration; develop and support web applications for research and education; provide system administration for UNIX, Windows and Macintosh servers; respond to potential and actual security breaches; act as liaison to school and campus groups as needed; design web applications to present biological data and assist research; collaborate with faculty and staff to deploy and support educational software; train and mentor Research Programmers, UG students, employees in school units who need assistance with data; work independently and as part of a team; and may supervise undergraduate student workers. Required Qualifications: - Bachelor’s degree required, preferably in Computer Science - At least 4 years of experience in the computing field - A strong record of successfully directing and completing IT projects - In-depth knowledge of at least 2 of the following: server administration, programming, web design, web application development, data storage practices, backup administration, e-mail system management, authentication and authorization techniques, firewall configuration Preferred Qualifications: - Advanced experience with Unix, Windows and Macintosh environments from a system administration and end-user perspective - Demonstrated expertise in information technology consulting - Ability to compile and deploy applications from source code - Ability with a range of common desktop applications - Ability to successfully mentor others - In-depth knowledge of information technology security principles and practices; consumer- and server-grade hardware & software platforms; fluency with at least two programming languages such as Ruby, JavaScript, PHP, SQL, Python, Perl, C++ and common software development practices - Basic knowledge of bioinformatics software and techniques This position is available as soon as possible after the closing date. Salary is commensurate with experience. To ensure full consideration application materials must be received by January 9, 2015. Please create your candidate profile through http://bit.ly/1w8fBKf and upload your application materials: cover letter, resume, and contact information for three professional references. Applicants may be interviewed before the closing date; however, no hiring decision will be made until after that date. For further information contact Research Programmer Search Chair, sib@life.illinois.edu Illinois is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, status as a protected veteran, or status as a qualified individual with a disability. Illinois welcomes individuals with diverse backgrounds, experiences, and ideas who embrace and value diversity and inclusivity. (http://bit.ly/17xpNAL). Becky Fuller via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR