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May 21, 2015

22:00
In the last two decades, models from evolutionary biology have made important contributions to demographic research on human fertility change. Within this evolutionary framework, two distinct traditions have focused on different processes of adaptation and time scales of change: (1) behavioral ecological perspectives have focused on how individual fertility decisions are shaped by local ecological circumstances, while (2) cultural evolutionary approaches have emphasized the role of socially transmitted information and changing social norms in shaping fertility behavior. While each tradition has made independent progress, research that integrates these approaches is necessary to improve our understanding of real fertility behavior, which results from a feedback between individual fertility decisions and social change. This approach requires combined attention to immediate ecological determinants of fertility decisions as well as the long-term processes that shape costs and benefits in a given environment. This workshop will bring together an international team of evolutionary behavioral scientists with complementary methodological and theoretical expertise in anthropology, psychology, and demography to develop (a) a synthetic article which proposes how these approaches can be integrated methodologically and theoretically, (b) an empirical article which applies our new synthetic framework to the study of fertility change in a particular fieldsite, demonstrating how the new methodological approach will work in practice and what we can learn through employing it, and (c) a multi-site grant proposal (UK, US, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Bolivia, Poland) aimed at integrating and empirically testing these diverse evolutionary models of human fertility change.
Source: NESCent

May 17, 2015

22:00
Human cultural diversity is expressed in myriad ways (from social and marital norms to languages and religious practices), but what factors shape this diversity? Dating back to Darwin, multiple disciplines have debated the degree to which cultural diversity patterns are influenced by different factors, including history, demographics, and ecology. Over recent years an emerging set of studies have showcased how phylogenetic comparative methods from evolutionary biology can help resolve these long-held debates and revolutionize the field of cultural evolution. Now the major barrier to advances lies in the location of necessary data, which are spread across multiple disparate sources in linguistics, biogeography and anthropology. To overcome this challenge we will create D-PLACE (a Database of Phylogenies of Languages for the study of Cultural Evolution), a publicly available and expandable web-portal that will map over 100 cultural features onto language phylogenies and link these to ecological and environmental variables, empowering a whole new line of investigation into the drivers of cultural change and patterns of cultural diversity. We will produce a paper to introduce D-PLACE and outline the many types of questions in comparative anthropology the database can answer. Finally, we will demonstrate the power of this new resource by using D-PLACE to examine two long-standing and fundamental questions from comparative anthropology: (i) What drives the diversity of incest taboos (i.e. how human societies regulate who can mate and marry)? (ii) Can we characterize recurrent “human niches”, or are societies just arbitrary bundles of cultural features?
Source: NESCent
22:00
Baker’s Law (hereafter BL) states that self-compatible organisms are more likely to be successful colonizers after long-distance dispersal than self-incompatible organisms. This simple prediction draws a link between mating-system evolution and diverse fields of ecology and evolution such as dispersal biology and colonization, the evolution of range size and range limits, demography and Allee effect, and invasion biology. However, after >60 years of experimental research and theory development, the accumulated data yield varying, and often contradictory, support of BL. Our working group brings together a diverse array of researchers to assess predictions and assumptions of BL and elucidate ecological, evolutionary, and demographic parameters likely to determine the relationships between mating system, dispersal, and colonization success. To accomplish these goals we will: 1) Compile the voluminous literature on BL. 2) Link the BL data with two extensive databases gathered by prior NESCent support (seed germination and seed traits data; mating system data) and a NCEAS pollen limitation database. These expanded databases will include dispersal, range size, and life-history traits, thereby creating a powerful tool for testing various aspects of the relationship between mating-system and colonization success. 3) Employ macroevolutionary tools to map mating-system and dispersal traits onto the angiosperm phylogeny to assess evolutionary patterns and phylogenetically-corrected trait correlations. 4) Formalize BL using current population genetic theory and dispersal theory. Synthetic products of our working group should elucidate the links between dispersal and mating-system in colonization success, and will influence multiple fields of research in evolution for the foreseeable future.
Source: NESCent

May 10, 2015

22:00
Building non-model species genome curation communities
Source: NESCent

May 6, 2015

22:00
Primates are highly charismatic and often serve as flagship species in conservation efforts. They are also the closest living relatives of humans, and therefore hold the keys to resolving many questions about human evolution and ecology. However, the slow life histories of primates, combined with their complex social systems, their behavioral plasticity, and the challenging field conditions in which primate researchers must work, have severely limited analyses of mortality and fertility in wild, unprovisioned primate populations. This in turn limits comparative analyses that can shed light on the population dynamics and the social and ecological adaptations that have shaped both human and nonhuman primate evolution. We propose a Primate Life Histories Working Group to compare mortality and fertility schedules across taxa, to evaluate a set of hypotheses about the roles that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior play in shaping primate mortality and fertility patterns, and to examine whether life history theory predicts which vital rates are most variable across species. Using unique, individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years, we will develop age-specific mortality and fertility schedules and create population projection matrices for each species. Our immediate goals are to test current hypotheses about the evolution of life histories in order to advance our understanding of primate evolution. Our longer-term goal is to move toward a collaborative, shared databank allowing analyses of irreplaceable life history data on wild primates.
Source: NESCent

May 3, 2015

April 28, 2015

22:00
A number of independent efforts have compiled global plant databases on functionally important traits of leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers. These databases are comprised of 1000's to tens of 1000's of species. With a few notable exceptions, they have not been analyzed in an evolutionary or phylogenetic context. However, when synthesized with a modern molecular phylogeny, these data could tell a comprehensive, multivariate story of the evolution of plant functional diversity. In this working group, we will merge multiple databases to explore the rate (tempo, sensu GG Simpson) of evolution of these traits and the best fit evolutionary model(s) (mode) underlying the trait diversification of land plants. We will ask 1. whether important divergences in trait space occurred along similar branches for different traits, 2. whether there were periods of evolution when trait diversification was especially rapid, and 3. whether there were interactions between trait evolution and rates of speciation and extinction. This work will lead to a new community resource of great interest—an internally synced trait matrix—matched with the current state-of-the-art phylogeny. These data can then be synthesized with fossil evidence to explore whether the tempo and mode of trait evolution in extant and extinct taxa provide similar stories. Furthermore, these data will provide a powerful view into the coordinated (or lack thereof) evolution of ecologically important traits across vascular plants—one of the most diverse and important lineages in the world today.
Source: NESCent

April 23, 2015

22:00
The identification and explanation of long-term evolutionary trends in higher taxa and biological communities is an important goal of biological research. Body size is the single most important ecological characteristic of metazoa and the variable most easily applied to analysis of evolutionary trends across distantly related taxa. The proposed working group will bring together paleobiologists studying body size evolution in deep time and across higher taxa with biologists studying the distribution of body sizes in living organisms from the community to global scale. The working group will initiate a community-wide database of body sizes through the Phanerozoic, an effort that requires standardized data on body size across higher taxa. The working group will also catalyze collaborations between paleobiologists and biologists to develop the theory necessary to investigate long-term dynamics in body-size evolution across diverse living and extinct metazoan lineages. The workshop will provide a venue for members to address the relationships between the pattern of body size evolution and the distribution of body sizes in extant organisms. How well can macroevolutionary patterns be inferred from macroecological ones? How well do those patterns reflect evolutionary mechanisms, whether driven or passive? Ultimately, the resulting database will become a broadly applicable and dynamic resource for macroevolutionary research, with real potential to help future workers shed light on the forces that have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of animal life on Earth.
Source: NESCent

April 17, 2015

03:45
The adverts for our pending academic positions at the CEC http://bit.ly/1aetX5b are now live: For Professor in Biosciences (Ref: P48365) and For (3 positions) Lecturer/Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor in Biosciences (Ref: P48364) Applicants should be broadly aligned with one or more of our key areas (ecology, conservation, evolution, behaviour). However we are particularly interested in strengthening our activities in disease, population and community ecology as well as ecological and evolutionary genomics. Interest from independent research fellows are also welcomed. Interested applicants should contact either Brendan Godley (B.J.Godley@exeter.ac.uk) or Nina Wedell (N.Wedell@exeter.ac.uk). See: http://bit.ly/1Dqkoh8 http://bit.ly/1DqkqFO Prof DJ Hosken University of Exeter, Cornwall Tremough, Penryn TR10 9FE UK 01326 371843 D.J.Hosken@exeter.ac.uk http://bit.ly/1bMLIqH DJ Hosken via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
00:58

–089e0158c78a5a1ad00513d42624 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Research Officer Bangor University - School of Biological Sciences Fixed Term Contract, Salary Range: £31,342 - £37,394 p.a. Applications are invited for the above 21-month fulltime BBSRC/NERC-funded post working in the School of Biological Sciences at Bangor University, as part of a collaborative project including Bristol University and The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), Norwich. Duties will include bioinformatic, molecular and morphological studies of hybridisation between native and introduced tilapia fish populations from Tanzania, including analysis of full genome sequences. The post-holder will join a thriving research group at Bangor University working in the area of genetics, morphology, behaviour and conservation of African cichlid fish in implementation of this exciting collaborative project. We aim (1) to assess the extent and predictability of introgressive hybridization following introduction of exotic Oreochromis (mainly Nile tilapia) species into the range of native species in Tanzania, using genomic data; 2) to estimate the nature and basis of genomic introgression, including the types of genes most likely to introgress into native and exotic phenotypes and to estimate whether introgression of certain regions is predictable; 3) to develop a quick economical diagnostic test of the extent of introgression, using a SNP-chip based on 100 polymorphisms selected using the full genome sequences and chosen as diagnostic of the pure strains to allocate a ‘hybrid score’ to each individual and then to use this to calibrate phenotypic methods to diagnose hybrids; 4) to estimate the relative growth and ecological niche of pure native and exotic genotypes, as well as a range of hybrids and relate to phenotype to allow us to predict the likely outcome of the introduction 5) to enhance the genomic resources for Tilapia strain improvement through bioinformatics (sequences of a range of native species), tissue/ sperm cryopreservation in collaboration with WorldFish and advising the Tanzanian Government agencies on the identification of candidate stocks for in-situ conservation. The post holder will be responsible for conducting, analysing and publishing a series of genomic studies based on tissue samples obtained from Tanzania in a parallel project funded by the Leverhulme Trust. This will involve basic molecular and morphological laboratory studies and advanced bioinformatic analyses. Candidates should be educated to PhD standard (or equivalent) and have previous experience of molecular laboratory work and quantitative analysis of biological data, preferably including genome sequences. The successful candidate will be expected to commence on or before 1st July 2015. Applications will only be accepted via the on-line recruitment website, jobs.bangor.ac.uk. However, in cases of access issues due to disability, paper application forms are available by telephoning 01248 383865. Closing date for applications: Monday, 18th May 2015. For further details and specific enquiries contact Prof. George Turner ( george.turner@bangor.ac.uk). – via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR

April 16, 2015

18:00
Background: Bayesian relaxed-clock dating has significantly influenced our understanding of the timeline of plant evolution. This approach requires the use of priors on the branching process, yet little is known about their impact on divergence time estimates. We investigated the effect of branching priors using the iconic cycads. We conducted phylogenetic estimations for 237 cycad species using three genes and two calibration strategies incorporating up to six fossil constraints to (i) test the impact of two different branching process priors on age estimates, (ii) assess which branching prior better fits the data, (iii) investigate branching prior impacts on diversification analyses, and (iv) provide insights into the diversification history of cycads. Results: Using Bayes factors, we compared divergence time estimates and the inferred dynamics of diversification when using Yule versus birth-death priors. Bayes factors were calculated with marginal likelihood estimated with stepping-stone sampling. We found striking differences in age estimates and diversification dynamics depending on prior choice. Dating with the Yule prior suggested that extant cycad genera diversified in the Paleogene and with two diversification rate shifts. In contrast, dating with the birth-death prior yielded Neogene diversifications, and four rate shifts, one for each of the four richest genera. Nonetheless, dating with the two priors provided similar age estimates for the divergence of cycads from Ginkgo (Carboniferous) and their crown age (Permian). Of these, Bayes factors clearly supported the birth-death prior. Conclusions: These results suggest the choice of the branching process prior can have a drastic influence on our understanding of evolutionary radiations. Therefore, all dating analyses must involve a model selection process using Bayes factors to select between a Yule or birth-death prior, in particular on ancient clades with a potential pattern of high extinction. We also provide new insights into the history of cycad diversification because we found (i) periods of extinction along the long branches of the genera consistent with fossil data, and (ii) high diversification rates within the Miocene genus radiations.
17:43

@rob_lanfear wrote:

Hi All,

I am putting together a collection of alignments with metadata (https://github.com/roblanf/PartitionedAlignments), and I'm looking for advice on file formats. The point of the collection is to make it simpler to test software and compare methods, by providing a well-annotated, tested set of published alignments that are all CC0.

The problem is formats. Each dataset has an alignment, various definitions of sites (i.e. which locus and genome each site comes from), taxon sets (e.g. outgroups), and other metadata (e.g. DOIs for the original study and data set, estimate of the age of the root of the tree, etc). Alignment formats are notoriously varied, so I'd like to stick with one of the standard formats (Nexus, phylip, FASTA), plus at most one more file for metadata (e.g. YAML, CSV).

I'd be happy to hear anyone's thoughts on the various pros and cons of any options.

Cheers,

Rob

Posts: 3

Participants: 3

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17:24
A phylogenetic analysis of the early branching lineages of the monocotyledons is performed using data from two plastid genes (rbcL and matK), five mitochondrial genes (atp1, ccmB, cob, mttB and nad5) and morphology. The complete matrix includes 93 terminals representing Acorus, the 14 families currently recognized within Alismatales, and numerous lineages of monocotyledons and other angiosperms. Total evidence analysis results in an almost completely resolved strict consensus tree, but all data partitions, genomic as well as morphological, are incongruent. The effects of RNA editing and potentially processed paralogous sequences are explored and discussed. Despite a decrease in incongruence length differences after exclusion of edited sites, the major data partitions remain significantly incongruent. The 14 families of Alismatales are all found to be monophyletic, but Acorus is found to be included in Alismatales rather than being the sister group to all other monocotyledons. The placement is strongly supported by the mitochondrial data, atp1 in particular, but it cannot be explained as an artifact caused by patterns of editing or by sampling of processed paralogues.
Source: Cladistics

April 15, 2015

23:25

ARC Postdoctoral Research Associate Human Evolutionary Genetics Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD), The University of Adelaide Salary: 1.0 FTE, Level A, AU$76,283-81,836 per annum plus up to 17 % Superannuation applies. Project: Biomedical population genetics of ancient human DNA A 3 year post-doctoral position is available on a project using bioinformatics techniques to analyse ancient human biomedical and genomic information, with a focus on the origins and spread of diseases. The position will head an internationally competitive research team working closely with Harvard, Max Planck Institutes, Sanger Centre and UCSD, to develop and apply field leading population genetics approaches. The aim of the program is to trace the evolution and spread of biomedically relevant markers through ancient populations and genomes, using existing and newly generated data. The position will work closely with the new ACAD-Australian National Data Service Online Ancient Genome Repository (OAGR) for ancient human genome and microbiome data, as well as population genetics specialists, archaeologists, and ancient DNA researchers from around the world. The project is situated within the ACAD and will combine state state-of-the-art genetics, bioinformatics, and genomics tools, and is funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) for a period of 3 years with immediate start. The project is embedded in an ARC Laureate FL140100260 Using ancient genomes and microbiomes to reconstruct human history to Prof. Alan Cooper. The successful applicant will head a team that utilises anthropological and archaeological collections to generate paleogenomics data. While the position focuses on bioinformatics and population genetics analyses, there is scope for the generation of new ancient human data using the large collections of material available at ACAD and collaborators. S/he will develop and integrate analytical methods and pipelines for the analysis of large ancient genomic datasets, and co-supervise a group of postgraduate students in collaboration with overseas colleagues and the Universitys School of Mathematical Sciences. Applicants should have completed a PhD in biomedical genetics, population genetics, bioinformatics, biostatistics, ancient DNA or any relevant discipline, and preferentially have a keen interest in human evolution, disease, and archaeology. The successful appointee will have evidence of strong oral and written communication and organisation skills, demonstrated abilities to publish in scientific journals, present research at international conferences/committees, but also to present research in a meaningful and appealing format to the public. The applicant is expected to be passionate about research, capable of working both independently and as part of a larger team, and have demonstrated leadership skills. Experience with postgraduate student supervision is desirable. Enquires about the job specifications should be directed to Dr Laura Weyrich (laura.weyrich@adelaide.edu.au) or Prof Alan Cooper (alan.cooper@adelaide.edu.au). Interested applicants are encouraged to send a CV including a cover letter detailing, background experience and motivation, and addressing the key selection criteria of the job aspects above. Note applicants are invited to formally apply through the University of Adelaides job listing page at http://bit.ly/1CQmByA. For more information about ACAD, check out (http://bit.ly/1wjI463) for links to Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, our blog, recent publications and our official website. Prof. Alan Cooper, ARC Laureate Fellow Darling Blg (DP 418), Rm 209b University of Adelaide North Terrace Campus South Australia 5005 Australia Email: alan.cooper@adelaide.edu.au Ph: 61-8-8313-5950/3952 Fax: 61-8-8313-4364 http://bit.ly/1wjI463 - blogs, YouTube, Twitter http://bit.ly/1cxzV5T - Official Website CRICOS Provider Number 00123M alan.cooper@adelaide.edu.au via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR
10:20

The six finalists for the GBIF Ebbe Nielsen Challenge have been announced by GBIF: “The creativity and ambition displayed by the finalists is inspiring’, said Roderic Page, chair of the Challenge jury and the GBIF Science Committee, who introduced the Challenge at GBIF’s 2014 Science Symposium in October.

“My biggest hope for the Challenge was that the biodiversity community would respond with innovative—even unexpected—entries,” Page said. “My expectations have been exceeded, and the Jury is eager to see what the finalists can achieve between now and the final round of judging.”The finalists all receive a €1,000 prize, and now have the possibility to refine their work and compete for the grand prize of €20,000 (€5000 for second place). As the rather cheesy quote above suggests, I think the challenge has been a success in terms of the interest generated, and the quality of the entrants. While the finalists bask in glory, it's worth thinking about the future of the challenge. If it is regarded as a success, should it be run in the same way next year? The first challenge was very open in terms of scope (pretty much anything that used GBIF data), would it be better to target the challenge on a more focussed area? If so, which area needs the nost attention. Food for thought.

Source: iPhylo
10:02

I've put together a working demo of some code I've been working on to discover GBIF records that correspond to museum specimen codes. The live demo is at http://bionames.org/~rpage/material-examined/ and code is on GitHub.

To use the demo, simply paste in a specimen code (e.g., "MCZ 24351") and click Find and it will do it's best to parse the code, then go off to GBIF and see what it can find. Some examples that are fun include MCZ 24351, KU:IT:00312, MNHN 2003-1054, and AMS I33708-051

It's proof of concept at this stage, and the search is "live", I'm not (yet) storing any results. For now I simply want to explore how well if can find matches in GBIF.

By itself this isn't terribly exciting, but it's a key step towards some of the things I want to do. For example, the NCBI is interested in flagging sequences from type specimens (see http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gku1127 ), so we could imagine taking lists of type specimens from GBIF and trying to match those to voucher codes in GenBank. I've played a little with this, unfortunately there seem to be lots of cases where GBIF doesn’t know that a specimen is, in fact, a type.

Another thing I’m interested in is cases where GBIF has a georeferenced specimen but GenBank doesn’t (or visa versa), as a stepping stone towards creating geophylogenies. For example, in order to create a geophylogeny for Agnotecous crickets in New Caledonia (see GeoJSON and geophylogenies ) I needed to combine sequence data from NCBI with locality data from GBIF.

It’s becoming increasingly clear to me that the data supplied to GBIF is often horribly out of date compared to what is in the literature. Often all GBIF gets is what has been scribbled in a collection catalogue. By linking GBIF records to specimen codes cited that are cited in the literature we could imagine giving GBIF users enhanced information on a given occurrence (and at the same time get citation counts for specimens The impact of museum collections: one collection ≈ one Nobel Prize).

Lastly, if we can link specimens to sequences and the literature, then we can populate more of the biodiversity knowledge graph

Source: iPhylo
02:07
Practical DNA Training Program Summer Special: A two-week (9 business days) intensive laboratory-based training program designed to teach participants the fundamentals of molecular techniques including DNA extraction, amplification (using PCR), sequencing and interpretation. This training program is offered at various times throughout the year and we will work with you to find a suitable time for training. The cost of the training program is now $2500.00. The next scheduled times for the Practical DNA Training Program are: May 5 - 15, 2015, May 25 - June 4, 2015, June 15 - 25, 2015 For more information please contact us at 807-343-8877 or email paleodna@lakeheadu.ca or visit our website at www.ancientdna.com and click on ‘Training Programs’. Thank you. Karen. Karen Maa Administrative Assistant Paleo-DNA Laboratory 1294 Balmoral Street, 3rd Floor Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5Z5 Telephone: 1-866-DNA-LABS or 1-807-343-8616 Karen Maa via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
02:07
Call for applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship Provisioning and stability of multiple ecosystem services in agroecosystems A postdoctoral fellowship is proposed at CNRS Moulis and INRA Agroecology in collaboration with CNRS CEBC to develop theory on the magnitude and stability of multiple ecosystem services, such as crop production, pollination and conservation, and their synergies and trade-offs depending on the spatial arrangement of agricultural landscapes. Application deadline: 9 May 2015 Eligibility deadline by Agreenskills (see below): 26 April 2015 Date of recruitment: from 1st August 2015 Open to: Young researchers holding a PhD with less than 7 years of postdoctoral research experience Fellowship: €3500 / €5000 per month Eligibility Applicants must: - Hold a PhD (or PhD will have been awarded by the date of recruitment); - Have less than 7 years of research experience after their PhD; - Have spent no more than 12 months in France during the 3 years prior to the date of recruitment; - Be able to write and speak English or French fluently; - Have at least 1 publication in a peer-reviewed journal; Application Candidates interested in the postdoctoral research position should contact Sabrina Gaba (sabrina.gaba@dijon.inra.fr). The postdoctoral project is part of Agreenskills (http://bit.ly/1FJ9Sjq), hence candidates are evaluated and selected through two selection rounds per year for both programs: - Before April 26th 2015: Candidates interested in the research project will have to fulfil the eligibility criteria (described below) and to complete an online application through the secure area of the AgreenSkills web portal. Applicants will have to provide a detailed CV. - Before May 9th 2015: Once declared eligible, candidates will be able to apply by proposing a research project that is relevant to the fields of interest of the research teams. INRA *SabrinaGaba* *Chargée de recherches * sabrina.gaba@dijon.inra.fr *Centre INRA de Dijon* Tèl. : +33 (0)3 80 69 31 87 Fax : +33 (0)3 80 69 32 62 17, rue de Sully, BP 86510 21065 Dijon Cedex France http://bit.ly/1DGzsZm Sur twitter: @sabrina_gaba Sur twitter: @ZA_PVS Sabrina Gaba via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR
01:51
*FINAL DAY FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION! * *15 April* *Secure your spot now at the EvoDevo Event of the Year! * *1) **Become a member of PanAm EvoDevo.* *2) **Register and submit an abstract - NOW.* *3) **Attend the meeting – August 5th in Berkeley, CA.* Abstract Submission for the inaugural meeting of the Pan American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology ends Tomorrow! Register and Submit your Abstract to secure your spot at the meeting - registration is limited to 350 members. There are only a few spaces left to attend, and a few days left to submit your abstract!!! *Click **here* * to join, register and submit your abstract.* Follow us: @EvoDevoPanAm Join Us: #EvoDevo15 A few meeting highlights: - *Award winning speakers: *Natalia Pabón-Mora (Early Career Award Recipient), Rudy Raff (Pioneers Award recipient). - *Selected abstracts* chosen for presentations and posters by members; faculty, postdocs and students encouraged to apply. - *Poster prizes* for PhD students and postdocs All details about registration, accommodation options, childcare services, and the conference program are available at the following website: http://bit.ly/1D23EcV Support the Society and Become a Member, and enjoy the benefits of being part of the fast-growing and intellectually invigorating EvoDevo community!! To learn more about PASEDB, visit the following website: http://bit.ly/1ElPbx4 The Organizing Committee and the PanAm SEDB Executive Council look forward to welcoming you to Berkeley in August! registration@panamevodevo membership@panamevodevo Chelsea Specht via Gmail
Source: EVOLDIR

April 14, 2015

23:44

OUTREACH (formal posting to follow) Washington Office Forest Management Lab Manager (Geneticist/Biological Scientist) GS-0440/0401-09 (Permanent, Full-time) National Forest Genetics Laboratory (NFGEL) Location/Duty Station: Placerville, CA About the Position: The USDA Forest Service Forest Management Staff is filling a permanent, full-time Lab Manager (Geneticist/Biological Scientist) position with the National Forest Genetics Laboratory (NFGEL). The NFGEL mission is to link science to management in the area of genetics. The lab uses molecular genetic markers (protein and DNA) in plant material to provide baseline genetic information, determine the effect of management on the genetic resource, support genetic improvement programs, and contribute information in the support of conservation and restoration programs, especially those involving native and TES (threatened, endangered, and sensitive) species. The primary duties of the position are to (1) conduct molecular genetic analyses of plants, (2) maintain a safe and functioning molecular genetic laboratory, (3) maintain the identity and proper processing of all samples received, and (4) provide technical guidance and instruction to laboratory staff. The position will be located in Placerville, California (El Dorado County) at the Institute of Forest Genetics in the Apple Hill area. It is being advertised at the GS-9 level and will be filled based on qualifications and experience of the individual selected. Placerville is located on Highway 50 about 30 miles east of Sacramento. Highway 50 is a major trans-Sierra route between the State Capitol at Sacramento and scenic Lake Tahoe. The community is located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevadas at an approximate elevation of 2500 feet. Placerville is a full service community. Vacancy Announcement : The vacancy announcement for this position will be posted on the U.S. Government’s official website for employment opportunities at www.usajobs.gov . Outreach Response: Interested applicants, or those desiring further information, should complete an outreach form. Please contact Valerie Hipkins (NFGEL Director) at 530-622-1609 or email at vhipkins@fs.fed.us for instructions. Many thanks, Jenn Jennifer DeWoody, PhD Geneticist Forest Service National Forest Genetics Lab p: 530-621-6883 jadewoody@fs.fed.us 2480 Carson Road Placerville, CA 95667 www.fs.fed.us Caring for the land and serving people jadewoody@fs.fed.us via Gmail

Source: EVOLDIR